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MINNtbUIA 



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A 



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THIEF RIVER FALLS 



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JUL 



JUN 



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Tlcle: Thief River Falls FORqtf 



Inclusive 
Dates: 



THIEF RIVER FALLS F01 



3:13 - 4:12 



Jul 5 



Jun 27 



1934 



1935 



RUM" 



' 283-12-1989 


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Originals held by::MHS _X_ Other ( | 


Prepared by: s /"~"\ 
N. Q. Cristobal fl~W 


Date: 
Dec 15, 1989 


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VOLUME THREE NUMBER 



THIEF RTVER FALLS, PENNINGTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA. 



COUNTY TO HAVE 
EXPERT CANNING 
DEMONSTRATIONS 

Leaders Trained at a One-cay 

School to Instruct at 

Other Points 



Did? you know?- 
That in preparing 



asparagus 



THURSDAY JULY 5, 1934 



for; 



can -be 
greens 



canning, the dirt imbedded under 
the scales can be easily released if 
the stalks are plunged tip down into 
hot water? 

That old jar rubbers are not safe 
for this year's canning ? 

That blanching and jcold-dfaipipg 
belong to the war days of 1918 and 
that the correct method is to pre-co'ok 
and pack the vegetables hot? 

That many neglected leaves can |bi 
canned for greens — such wild gn 
as lambs -quarter and mustard ~ 

That soft water is better than haird 
water for canning peas? I . 

These are just a few of the hun- 
dreds of hints on canning methods 
and discoveries to be given at ttii 
canning, demonstrations to be held ill 
over the county during the next f^w 
days. 

The demonstrations will be 
tended the canning school recently 
held under the auspices of the county, 
emergency relief committee and cofn- 
. d'ucted by Miss Irene Netz, nutri- 
tionist and canning expert of the 
state ERA's social service divisiojn. 
The demonstrations will take up 
all phases of the canning and pro- 
per ^reservation of vegetables, fruits 
and 'meats, and will deal particula^y 
with new methods that prevent tljie 
\>aste of spoilage and eliminate th" 
c!-ngers of poisonous bacteria. * 

A part of the state emergency ru 
lief administrations garden an<5 self- 
help program, these canning demon- 
stiations will bring, to all interested 
housewives the best informatic 
available on the subject of food pr< 
servation, the local committee points 
out. ' f 

The demonstrations are not only for 
benefit of relief clients but for the 
housewife in the county, according ;o 
the committee. 

The canning program is directed 
by Miss Inez Hobart, nutritionist of - 
the Farm. School and now attached 
to the social service division of the 
state ERA, and is designed to mal:e 
possibe the best use of garden pro- 
duce raised by relief clients. 

"Although vegetables fresh from 
the garden will be used liberally 
throughout the summer, the majority 
will be canned for fall and winter 
use to supply the diet with more gen- 
erous amounts of valuable minerals 
and vitamins than can be obtained 
on a restricted relief -budget," said 1 
Miss Hobart. | 

Estimates of the value of a gar- 
den-canning program come to ap- 
proximately five dollars a month far 
each person participating, accord- 
ing to the results of last year's ex- 
periment. 

"Every housewife in the county, 
whether she has a garden or not, ca l 
save many dollars by attending her 
local canning demonstration," say i 
the local committee. 

The time and place of these dem- 
onstrations for Thief River Falls ar > 
as follows: 

Place, Civic and Commerce Room i 
in Auditorium ; Time, Fricay, July 
6, 1 P. M.; Leaders, Miss A- 
and Mrs. A. C. Matheson.' 

Place, Civic and Commerce Rooms 
in Auditorium; Time, ^Monday, Jul£ 

9, 1 P. M.; Leaders, Mias Rosin'j 
Dahlen snd Miss Lois Oden. 

Place, Civic and Commerce Room 3 
in Auditorium; Time, Tuesday, July 

10, 1 P. M.; Leaders, Miss Roam's 
Dahlen and Miss Lois Oden. 

A demonstration will be held' in 
Lutheran church in St. Hilaire 



Four File as Candidates for 
School Board; District 18 



Four citizens have filed as can- 
didates for positions on the local 
school board. E. M. Bennea and* A. 
E. Mathson, incumbents have filed for 
re-election and Ralph Woolhouse and 
W. J. Douville entered thejr filings 
today. 

Mr. Woolhouse is superintendent of 
the Osbortie-MacMillan Elevator 
-company's plant here and !Mr .Dou- 
ville is a Soo Line engineer. Mr. 
Bennes hos been a member of the 
board eleven years and Mr. Math son 
has served seven years. 

Filings closed' this evening. 



THREE CARS ARE i 
WRECKED; INJURE 
SIX PEOPLE; 4TH 



Pat Tailor, Crookston Man is 

Severely Injured. Others 

Cut and Bruised 



NATIONAL FARM BUREAU | 
HEAD jTO ADDRESS MEETING 



Business at Local Post- 
Office Shows Highest 
Record in All History 



The Thief River Falls postoffice 
reached the highest figure i'a its his- 
tory during the last fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, totaling the sun of $28,- 
735.46. There is an increase of ?635,- 
29 over last year's receipts of $28,- 
100.17. The lowest during the las* 
ten years occured for the fiscal year 
ending June, 1928 being $25,612.47. 
Following are the receipts by quar- 
ters for 1932-33, 1933-34: 

1932-3 
$*8,'772.73 

6,458.22 

6,583.77 

6,185.35 



December 
September 
March . . 
June .... 



1933-4 

$9,133.34 

6,059.35 

6,619.59 

6,923.17 



8,100.17 $28,735.46 



th. 



Safety Council is Formed 



It has beeri announced by Chief of 
Police A. B. ' Stenberg, that a Pen- 
nigton county safety council was or- 
ganized last Thursday at the Civic 
and Commerce Association luncheon, 
its purpose being to work to decrease 
the number of traflic accidents in the 
community. The officers of the or- 
ganization elected' were: W. E. Dahl- 
quist, chairman; A. B. Stenberg, 
vice-chairman; and Alex Campbell 
secretary-treasurer. 

District Personnel of the 
NRS Holds Meeting Sat. 

The personnel of District No. 1 of 
the National Reemployment Service 
had a meeting at the local NHS office 
on Saturday, June 30. The county' 
offices represented were Kittson, 
Roseau, Pennington, Red Lake, Polk 
Mahnomen, and Normen. Instruc- 
tions in the employment office opera- 
tion and functioning was discussed. 
Howard Davidson, county manager of 
the local NES office announced' that 
the local district No. 1 was third in 
the number of .persons placed in pri- 
vate industry last week. 



Six - persons were injured when 
three automobiles collided in a ser- 
ious mishap Wednesday evening 
about four-miles south of Thief River 
Falls on State Highway No. 32. Pat 
Taylor, Miss Adele j Werninger and 
Miss Mildred .Borsvbld all of Crook- 
ston were traveling jnorth when their 
car collided with a ! car occupied by 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Ci Matheson, Miss 
Majorie Matheson and Mrs. Minnie 
Shetler, and overturned the Mathe'- 
son car; then hitting a car following 
the Mathesons, and ^overturned'. Tay- 
lor suffered concussion of the brain. 
Miss Werninger received cuts and 
bruises and a lacerated hip, and Miss 
Borsvold escaped with cuts and 
bruises ^on the arms and ankles. 
Those riding in the Matheson car re- 
ceived bruises. 



Assessors Complete 
Work. Valuation has 
Dropped $130,000 

Assessors A. Mi Senstad and 
George Werstlein submitted figures 
to the board of equalization on Mon- 




Hail and Wind Causes Havoc 
To Crops Over a Wide Area 



Men are Wanted for Haying 
Local N.R.S. Manager States 



Howard Davidson, county man- 
ager of the NRS announces that 
there is an active demand for- men 
to work in haying. Anyone inter- 
ested' should telephone of call at 
the local NRS office. The phone 
number is 107. 



WORK 
WALK 



STARTED ON NEW SIDE 
AROUND AUDITORIUM 



E. A. 



O'NEAL 



The removing of the old siidewalk 
on the north and east side of the 
new auditorium was started Monday. 
The work is being done by Olson and 
Kolden who entered a contract with 
the city council at the regular meeting 
on Tuesday of the preceeding week. 



O'Neal, President of American*? arm 



day and Tuesday that revealed thatjdiown oustanding ability. From these 
thejissessed^yaluation of real estate \ stars county teams will be made up, 

and they in turn will compete for 
Valley honors at the Farm Bureau 
picnic. TJie_ elimination -will start 



Bureau to Speak at Crook ston Picnic July 12 

All-star kittenball teams of Red reaus, will be terminated with a eer*. 
River valley counties >vill compete niony in which the Farm Bureau flag 
*.or the yalley championship at the will be dedicated ' 

district Farm Bureau picnic ■ io be j Many farmers will participate in 
5. . a ' Cranston on July 12, when the horse shoe pitching tourney, to be 
"'- A - O'Neal president of the Ameri- held during the fbrenoon. 
can Farm Bureau, speaks at the ~" 
largest farm assemblage ever to be 
arranged in Northwestern Minnesota.. 

In games held' to date between lo- 
cal teams certain ' players . have 



Drum Corps to Appear 
At N. D. State Legion 
Convention July 9-10 



in the city this yearj when compared 
to the 1932 assessment shows a drop 
of about $130,000, wbich is cue to the 
operation of the new Minnesota home- 
stead law. I 

The new law provides that home- 
steads occupied by the owner shall 
be appraised at 25% jof the full value 
up to a maximum of $4,000 while 
real estate is assessed on the basis of 
40% of the full value. 

The. full value of l the real estate 
for the current year is $3,196,179, 
with an assessed value of $1,100,921. 
In 1932 the full value was $3,081,495 
with the assessed valuation of $1,230,- 
459. The assessed value of personal 
property was listed -as $273,935 as 
compared to $236,809 in 1933. The 
total for the assessment of money's 
and' credits for 1934: was $414,000 as 
compared to $227,000 in 1933. 

It has been indicated that an in- v 
crease of one mill in the fx rate 
will be required to raise the same 
amount of money as :was raised last 
year. 



at 10 A. IM., and the final will be 
played following the! afternoon pro- 
gram. R. J. Christgau, of the North- 
west School faculty, will be in charge 
of the sports program. 

The program, including musical 
numbers or other entertainment fea- 
tures furnished by County Farm Bu- 



Barns are Wrecked by Tornado 

Like Wind Near Village 

Of Plummer 

OTHER NORTHWEST ^ 

TOWNS REPORT DAMAGE 

Neon Signs and Greenhouses 

In the City are Badly 

Wrecked 

A severe hau storm caused exten- 
sive damage to crops, gardens and 
other property here Sunday after- 
noon. The storm which struck this 
city at about 4:10 P. M., lasted about 
half an hour during which time hail, 
some of which were the size of heas 
eggs, fell. Gardens and orchards in 
the city were badly dsaiaged and the 
electric signs in the city were all 
damaged to a great extent. 

Severe damage to crops in 'the 
neighboring farming sections also re- 
sulted. Some nearest the city report- 
ing almost complete loss of the crop, 
while others farther removed report 
damage of from ten per cent to 
seventy-five per cent of the. cropl 

Garage roofs in all parts of the 
city were Laclj damaged' and- hun- 
dreds of cars had the tops riddled with 
The skylights of the Thief 



Three, of four beeves are to be bar- 
becued-, and meat and coffee will be holes. = m rai _ iu 

furnished free, to augment the lunch- River Falls Green Houses were com- 
es the farmers and their families P'etely smashed, the hail taking a- 
bring from home. | toll of 1420 lights. The garden waa 

As preparations neared completion destroyed also there. Another gar- 
l or the picnic it was indicated that ' den operated by the same firm, near 
kittenball teams from East and West 'he sanatorium, south of the city 
~ " Pennington, Kittson, Wilkin, suffered no damage. The .Riverside 



Polk, .._...., „ ( 

Roseau, Norman, Marshall and Clear- 
water counties would participate in 
the tourney. 

Efforts are being made locally to 
assemble a large escort of rooters, to 
accompany each team to the picnic. 

All farmers pre urged to attend, 
whether or not they are Farm Bu- 
reau members. 



Work on Angle Road Cut- 
Off is completed Saturday 

Work was completed on the Ane-lc 
road cut-off Saturday after providing 
work for 40 men for • the past month 

The new road will shorten the road 
to Plummer and points south and 
makes it possible for motorists to 
avoid the hairpin curve where the 
Angle Road joins the. St. Hilaire- 
Highlanc'Sng road' ten:and a half miles 
south-east of the city. 



'TheWrecker' Starring Jack 



The local Auxiliary drum corps ap- 
peared at the 8th annual celebration 
of the Mod'ern Woodmen of America „ - , _ , .. „ „ „- , 

• • ., t , ? , Ph ? mmer Iast Satu rfay, and on Holt at S of N Hall Sunday 

vis Akr£ July 4tf was featured in the parade ' 
and activitits a't Red Lake Falls. 
The corps has been invited to play at 
the North Dakota State American 
Legion convention at Fargo next 
Monday, July 9. All the Minnesota 
corps will appear in a drum 
corps contest which will be sponsor- 
ed by the North Dakota American 
Legion. 



"The Wrecker," a stirring drama 
starring Jack Holt 'and Genevieve 
Tobin will be presented at the Sons of 
Norway hall on Sunday and Monday. 
July 8th and 9th. 

Short subjects make up the balance 
of the program. A matinee will be 
presented on Sunday; afternoon at 
2:30 o'clock. 



ANNUAL 
TOURNEY TO BE 
LAUNCHED SOON 

Marvin Benson, Chsmpion Last 

Year, Will Defend His 

Laurels 



A medal is to be present- 
winner. If this tourna- 



The men's singles i tennis tourna- 
ment is expected to; be under way 
within the next ten Idays, according 
to Arthur Johnson, manager, and will 
be completed in two weeks time. The 
tournament is limited to the first 32 
entrants, so anyone interested should 
immediately get in touch with Mr. 
Johnson, 
ed to the 

ment is successful it is probable that 
a doubles tournament for men, and 
women's singles, with the possibility 
of mixed doubles may be arranged. 

One of the entrants is Marvin 
Benson, wfio will defend his title of 
men's singles champion in the city 
tournament won last! year, and who 
won first place in singleSTh the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota campus tourna- 
ment. 



ne ?£ Wednesday, July 11, at 1 o'clock 
with Mrs. Earl Jensbn and Mrs. W 
A. Corbet as leaders. Similar demT 
onstrations will be held in everV 
township in the county according to 
the announcement. Other dates will 
be made public -next week. 



Radio Entertainers Will 
Appear on Avalon Stage 

"Murder at 



'Our Community Builders' and Series of 

Hawthorne Poems Will Start Next Week 



^zx^sfc^.ius*x ^ssj- --* ** 



*""-"*- " poems by Lawrence '. . , " „ 

■--'--- 'A copy of the Forum 



twenty-seven _ _ _ __ 

Hawthorne, most beloved of Ameri- L, A c ? py of the Fo ™m containing 
ca's contemporary poets. The other tlie3e biographies will be filed each 
I will be a series of biographies of pio- 1 w ? ek in a fire P r °°f place and they 
, neer men and women of this ' com- ". De turned ov er to a historical 
munity.. . ^. " j society when such °n organization is 

- - superb musical" nirt I -Hawthorne's work glows with hu- organized., 
ture with a very good mysterv nlnT man ** interest and are fra- These biographies and the series j>f 

ano features Earl Carroll'* 't^HLtl K rant '"'th sentiment. Here is a poet Hawthorne poems will begin simul- 

beauties. Others In a very snlendlfi ™°1 lik t ?"F ene Field and '" 

cast are Carl Brisson .lSi, o f"wj 1 ■ Wh'tcomb Riley translates the 

nd 



«,„ -:* the Vanities", will b 

the screen attraction at the Avalon' 
theatre Sunday and Monday, July B 
and 9. It is a ««— i. —.-!_.*. Pi 



Kitty Carlisle and Victor McLaS • 

On Wednesday and Thursd-t ^Eft in?P>™tjon 



James 
Httli 



J M„T.. a ,ii' things of daiily life into songs of 

... Jown the 
11-12, the_weiI-known " radIo~*ente£ f™"?wwi h iL 0f ™ e ^ .T' and , bac , k 



teneously in next week's issue of the 
Forum. 



hope, Down the 



ay and Thursday, July £?££ 

. — ..-[-known radio enteit I t-Vi, - , . ---■ 

tamers, "Doc" Schneider and' Texas ^° chll , dhood J°Vs, he guides us, leal 
Yodeling Cowboys will appear in a ing al ' va y s to a finer appreciation 
stage show, which will consist of things that are beautiful and 

comedy, singing, sharp shooting: ■ "'^ i.- ' v.- 

yodeing and novelty and string band -7, ? biographies of our pioneers 
music. The additiorfl.l picture will J?. 11 be written! by our city editor, 
Pripate Scandal" with Mary ■ a Bermce Berge, and will tell the 



be "A 

Brian, Zasu Pitts and Phiiip~HoTmes 

in the cast. 



Silverton Luther League to 
Meet at Hanson Home Sun 

The Silverton Luther League will 
meet at the Syvert Hanson home; 4 
™\ e l = ast and' 1 mile north frpm 
■ Thief River Falls on. Elwell road, on 
bunday* July 8. Miss Inanda Han- 
son and Mrs. Syvert Hanson will bfe 
hostesses. ..There will be a special 
program given by the pupils of th i 
Parachial School under the direction 
of Miss Estelle Hanson, tieacheik 
Everyone is cordially invited. 



CWA Group Calls 
Mass Meeting For 
Next Tuesday Night 



K. 



The CWA Workmen's Protective 
story of the people who settled this association meeting on Tuesday eve- 
community, who cleared the wilder-' ning passed a resolution calling a 
ness and built our city. Those who 'mass meeting at the city auditorium 



have played an important part ... 
making it one of the best communi- 
ties in the northwest. ~This feature 
will be run under the head "Our 
Community Builder.i" and will ap- 
pear on the editorial page each week. 
The Hawthorne poems will also be 
found on this page. 

The Forum has on several occas- 
ions voiced the need of and urged the 
organization of a Pennington County 
Historical Society, and we again urge 
the people of the community to get 
busy on this most desirable civic en- 
terprise. However we know there is 
a wealth of historical material which 



next Tuesday July 10. At- that 
time they will present to the council 
the petitions which .they have been 
cirrulating and which demands that 
the council dispenses with the. ser- 
vices of the city engineer and rein- 
state the two men who were dis- 
charged from city employment at^the 
light department some, time ago; Over 
200 citizens have put their signatures 
on this petition. 

In- a general call for the meeting 
they ask all citizens who feel that an 
injustice was done when the two men 
were discharged, to be present at the 
meeting. 



Governor Olson Asks 
Criminal Prosecution 
In Banco Stock Sales 

Criminal prosecution of "certain 
individuals ' connected' with the 
Northwest Bancorporation was urged 
Saturday by Gov. Olson. 

His recommendation followed his 
examination of transcripts and ex- 
hibits in the investigation of the 
Banco stock sales activities by the 
state commerce commission. 

In a letjter. to Paul Sk hen, state 
commissioner of securities, and mem- 
ber of the! commerce commission in- 
vestigating; the sales,; the governor 
said: "There is sufficient evidence 
available to justify criminal pro- 
ceedings." j i . 

He urged that Mr.; Skahen turn 
over the ejviderice and transcripts to 
various county attorneys and the 
United States district attorney for 
criminal action. 

It is understood that Ed. J. Goff, 
Hennepin county attorney, already 



Pennington County Men 
Enroll in CCC on Tuesday 

Nine young men from Pennington 
county took examinations at prook- 
ston Tuesday preparatory to going to 
Fort Snelling to take further examin- 
ations qualifying them for enrollment 
in the civilian conservation -cOrps.. 

An enrollment of iGQfiQCfitfevr men 
to camps in the drouth area began 
Monday in every state in the Union. 
They will replace the 70,000 men^dis- 
charged from the corps Saturday 
complying with the regulation limit- 
ing membership to one complete year, 
and another 40,000 who accepted out- 
side employment during the last 3 
months. 

173 new camps are to be set up, 
among whijeh there will be r ' 
Minnesota, 16 in North Dakota 
in South Dakota, 10 in Wisconsin. 12 
m Iowa, and 27 in Illinois. 

Quotas of additions to be mad-e in 

? Ugh : t , area states delude: Minne- 
sota, 5,167; North- Dakota, 3,561; 
Wisconsin, 4,149; and Iowa, 3,402 

WCTU Will Hold a Picnic 
At Tourist Parki Wednesday 

The Women's Christian Temper- 
ance Union wil have its midsummer 
picnic in the Tourist Park Wednesday 
July 11 at 2:30 in the aftenoon, in- 
stead of Frid-ay, July 6 as previous 
'y announced. Each member is 
t ?.,, brin ? a friend, and the 
children of the members are also to 

luclf U »ff "•■ Th % Iunch wU1 be » POt- 
luek affair, and members are re- 
quested to bring their individual 
dishes anc silverware. Anyone de- 
5M nS transportation should phone 



Greenhouses report 27 broken : lighta 
and only slight damage to the Har- 
dens. ; !■ 

The storm which struck from the 
northwest covered a swath from about 
six- miles west of town, about the 
same distance north and several miles' 
east. Partial damage was reported 
as far south as six miles from- the 
city. • No wind accompanied the hail 
here. 

Severe wind damage is reported 
from Plummer where two' 1 barns were 
demolished. On the "Ed Johnson" 
farm just north of Plummer the barn 
was torn down and several trees were 
uprooted and on the Peter Morria- 
sette farm, west of Plummer the 
barn is reported to have been destroy- " 
ed. No hail is reported from that 
.vicinity. ' _: 

Hail showers fell in other widely 
"seperated area according to reports. 
Stephen and Argyle report heavy 
hail and wind damage and hail show- 
ers without wind are reported from 
town of Hickory, in the east end of 
the county. 

Three seperate showers fell in the 

city, the second hitting about six 

_ o'clock or shortly after. This lasted 

be 14 in|- only, a few minutes and" the hail 



t as large as the first shower. A 
ball hour later a third and heavier 
shower fell at which time the ground 
became completely covered with the 
hail which this time was about the 
size of hazelnuts. A heavy down- 
pour of rain accompanying the hail 
taxed the storm sewers to capacity. 

LARGECROWDS 

ATTEND ANNUAL 
ASSEMBLY SUN. 

Dr. Boe, President of St. 0}af 

Delivers Two Stirring 

Addresses 



Community Clubs Hold 
Successful Picnic at A. 
Lendobeja's Farm Sun. 

Approximately 400 persons attend- 
ed the joint community club picnic 
uie Adam Lendobeja farm last 
kunday. Oscar Wiseth and his 
Moonbeam Serenaders" supplied mu- 
sical selections during the dinner 
hour. In the league game which 
was played, Kratka defeated Silver- 

i°5L y th S!, c , ore of 19 - 14 > and " same 6 -"■=. m,.,,^, ut. coe snoka 

rested 1 ?'" 3 ,if„ S . h °S - d i^leyicf the_future of tS' chur«h2 



resulted in a victory of 7-6 for the 



The annual meeting of the North- 
west Lutheran Assembly at Squaw 
Point Sunday was reported by Bev. 
E. M. Fjelstad', president of the as- 
sembly, as the best meeting ever 
held. 

■ Dr. L. W. fioe, president of the St. 
Olaf college at Northfleld, spoke 
both in the morning and afternoon 
sessions. In his morning address, 
Ut. Boe drew a comparison between 
the people at Israel in tEe Promised 
.Land and the settlements of America 
pointing out that justas God warned 
people then that turning aside and 
worshiping strange Gods works ruin- 
ation, so are similar warnings 
necessary if America is to enjoy hap- 
piness and prosperity. 
Among other things, Dr. Boe spoke 



. ,. ■■-- — •; , ' . : ■". ™'r,~- — *." ? vu^m-jr m ( -o ior tne ■"-wuuuun auoress. Me s 

has asked. I for legal help from Mr. former, it being called to a close 'system of government or 
Skahen and Harry H. Peterson, ft- at the end of the 6th inning due to " " 



torney general. 



MR. AND MRS. ERNEST YONKE 
HAVE SILVER WEDDING SUN. 



Approximately fifty-five friends 
and relatives gathered at the farm 
home of Mr. and Mrs. 1 Ernest Yonke 
in Sanders ] Township Sunday evening 
in celebration of their I silver wedding 
anniversary. The evening waa 



tured by a 



supper wad served by the self-invited and Kocksbury has ost 2 and won 



guests, the 
a large we 



centerpiece of which was 
Iding cake ornamented by 



lovely and 



mock wedding. An 



ram. Ram also prevented the game 
scheduled between the Silxerton and 
Rocksbury girls from being played. 
No games are to be played next Sun- 
day, July 8, but Smiley will play 
Silverton at Rocksbury on July 15 
and on July 22, Kratka and Rocks- 
bury will clash at Rorksbury field. 
In the community clubs kittenball 
_ t league to date, Kratka has won 1 
f ea- . and -lost 2; Silverton has won 1 and 
8:30 | lost 2; Smiley has won 1 and lost 1- 



a miniature brid« and \ groom. Many 



useful gifts; were present- 



ed to Mr. and Mrs. Yonke in remem- 



the occasion. 



berance of 



Mrs. Igartin Myskowski and 
daughter j^nonette of Strandquist 
were Thursday visitors in the city. 



SILVERTON KITTENBALL TEAM 
TO HOLD DANCE JULY ith 



-There will be a dance at the Silver- 
ton Town Hall Saturday, July 7,! to 
help raise funds for sweaters for the 
Silverton Community kittenball team. 



afternoon address. He said that no 
any change 



of the present system is established 
on a basic quality, and reverence for 
Uod is the sure guarantee to correct 
the evils of the present day. The 
only effective remedy is the will to 
d0 n el>t on the part of the people. 

Musical selections were presemted 
K? .t e „ HoIt community bandv the 
North Star college quartette of bar- 
ren, and the men's ohorus ef the • 
Trinity Lutheran church. 

The following were re-eleeUd to 
succeed themselves as officers of the : 
organization: Rev. R. M. Fjelstad. 
President; M. N. Peterson of Greeir- 
bush, Vice-President; John Wold. 
Secretary; a n d ' N. A. Neleon 
Treasurer 



Miss Theresa Soderberg left PrI- 
day for Duluth where she will spend 
a week visiting with friends. 

Miss Florence Mellem of Rosewood 
spent Thursday shopping here. 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



~) 



i'"' 




K 



c 



COUNTY TOHAVE 
EXPERT CANNING 
DEMONSTRATIONS 

Leaders Trained at a Onen 
School to Instruct at 
Other Points 



Did* you know? — — ] 

That in preparing asparagus for 
canning, the dirt imbedded under 
the scales can be easily released [if 
the stalks are plunged tip down into 
hot water? | 

That old jar rubbers are not safe 
for this year's canning? ■ j 

That blanching and fcold-dfoping 
belong to the war days of 1918 and 
that the correct method is to pre-cojok 
and pack the vegetables hot? 

That many neglected leaves can be 
canned for greens — such wild greens 
as lambs-quarter and mustard ? 

That soft water is better than hard 
water for canning peas ? . ■ j 

These are just a' few of the hun- 
dreds of hints on canning methods 
and discoveries to be given at the 
canning demonstrations to be held all 
over the county during the next few 
days. 

The demonstrations will be in 
tended the canning school recently 
held under the auspices of the county 
emergency relief committee "arid con- 
ducted by Miss Irene Netz, nutri- 
tionist and canning expert of the 
state ERA's social service division. 
The demonstrations "will take up 
all phases of the canning and pro- 
per ^reservation of vegetables, fruits 
and' meats, and will deal particulary 
with new methods that prevent the 
Vraste of spoilage and eliminate the 
d-ngers of poisonous bacteria. j 

A part of the state emergency re- 
lief administrations garden andr self- 
help program, these canning demon- 
stxations will bring to all interested 
housewives the - best information 
available on the subject of food pre- 
servation, the local committee -points 
out. . i 

The demonstrations are not only for 
benefit of relief clients but for the 
housewife in the county, according to 
the committee. j 

The canning program is directed 
by Miss Inez Hobart, nutritionist of 
the Farm - School and now attached 
to the social service division of tb.e 
state ERA, and is d'asigned to make 
possibe the best use of garden pro- 
duce raised by relief clients. 

"Although vegetables fresh from 
the garden will be "used liberally 
throughout the summer, the majority 
will, be canned for fall and winter 
use to supply the diet with more gen- 
erous amounts of valuable minerals 
and vitamins than can be obtained 
on a restricted relief budget," said' 
Miss Hobart. ■ 

Estimates of the value of a gar- 
den-canning program come to ap- 
proximately five dollars a month for 
each person participating, accord- 
ing to the results of last year's ex- 
periment. ! 
. "Every housewife in the county, 
.whether she has a garden or not, can 
save many dollars by attending, her. 
local canning demonstration," says 
the local committee. j 
The time and place of these dem- 
onstrations for Thief River Falls are 
as follows: j 
Place, Civic and Commerce Rooms 
in Auditorium; Time, Friday, 
6,1 1 P. M.; Leaders, Miss Avis Akre 
and Mrs. A. C. Matheson. - I 
- Place, Civic and -Commerce Rooms 
in. Auditorium; Time, Monday, July 

9, 1 P. "M.; Leaders, Miss- Rosine 
Dahlen and Miss Lois Oden. j 

. _ Place, Civic and Commerce Rooms 
m Auditorium; Time, Tuesday, July 

10, 1 P. M.; Leaders, Miss Rosine 
Dahlen and Miss Lois Oden. I 

A demonstration will be held in 
the Lutheran church in St. Hilaire £ 
S Wednesday, July 11, at 1 o'clock 
with Mrs. Earl Jenson and Mrs. W 
Corbet as leaders. • Similar dem- 



Fotur File ]as Candidates for 
School JB^ard; District 18 

Four citizens have Sled as can- 
didates for positions on the local 
school board; E. M. Bennes and "A. 
E. Mathson, incumbents have filed for 
re-election and Ralph Woolhouse and 
W.- J. Douvtile- entered their filings 
today. ; 

Mr. Woolhouse is superintendent of 
the j Osboribje-MacMulan Elevator 
company's plant here and Mr .Dou- 
ville is a Sdo Line engineer. Mr. 
Bennes hos been a member of the 
board -eleven lyears- and Mr. Mathson 
has served seven years. 

Filings closed this evening.- 



Business at Local Post- 
Office Shows Highest 
Record in All History 



The Thief ! River Falls postoffice 
reached the highest figure in its his- 
tory during tJie last fiscal year eld- 
ing June 30, totaling the sum of ¥28,- 
735.46. There |is an increase of $635,- 
29 over last, year's receipts of $28,- 
100.17. The lowest during the last 
ten years occured for the fiscal year 
ending June, 1928 being $25,612.47. 

Following ar* the receipts by quar- 
ters for 1932-33, " 



TfiRFr w A R\ A R F r n atonal fabm bub 

llllaLlLl VriTlUJ rilllJ J HEAD |TO ADDRESS MEETTN 

WRECKED; INJURE 

SEC PEOgpHTH 

Pat Tailor, Crookston Man is 

Severely Injured. Others 

Gut and Bruised i 



December . 
September 
March ° ... 
June ....; 



1933-34: 
1932-3 
$ 8,772.73 
6,468.22 
6,583.77 
6,185.35 

?2#,100.17 $28,735.46 



1933-4 

$9,133.34 

6,059.35 

6,619.59 

6,923.17" 



Safety Council is Formed 



It has been: announced by Chief of 
Police A. B. Stenberg, that a Pen- 
nigton county; safety council was or- 
ganized last IThursday at the Civic 
and Commerce Association luncheon, 
its purpose being to work to decrease 
the number of; traffic accidents in the 
community. The officers of the or- 
ganization elected- were: W. E. Dahl- 
quist, chairman; A. B. Stenberg: 
vice-chairman; and Alex Campbell, 
secretary-treasurer. 



Six' persons ;were ' injured when 
three automobiles collided in a ser- 
ious mishap : Wednesday . , evening 
about .four- miles south of- Thief River 
■Falls on State Highway No. j 82. Pat 
Taylor, Miss -Adele - Weminger and 
Miss Mildred Borsvold all ..of Crook- 
ston .were .traveling north when their 
car collided with a : car -occupied by 
Mr. and Mrs. A. C; Matheson, Miss 
Majorie Matheson.. and Mrs. ! Minnie 
Shetler, and overturned the [ Mathe- 
son car; then hitting a car following 
the Mathesons, and overturned Tay- 
lor suffered concussion of the brain. 
Miss Weminger received cuts ■ and 
bruises and a- lacerated hip, and Miss 
Borsvold escaped with cuts and 
bruises on the arms and ankles. 
Those riding in the Matheson: car re- 
ceived bruises. ! . . " 



District Personnel of the 
NRS Holds Meeting Sat. 

,,- The . Personnel of District No. 1 of 

the National Reemployment Service 

had a meeting at the local NRS offict, „ .«,» uera maicatea tirnt An in - 

on Saturday, jJune 30. . The county | crease- of one muTnTtbrt-x rate 

offices represented were Kittson, ~ ! " «• = ■* ■ "*. u,e .. ,: i x race 

Roseau, Pennington, Red like, Polk 
Mahnomen, and Normen. Instruc- 
tions in the employment office opera- 
tion and functioning was discussed. 
Howard Davidson, county manager of 
the local NRS office announced! that 
the local district No. 1 was third in 
the number of persons placed in pri- 
vate industry last week. 



Drum Corps to Appear 
At N. D. State Legion 
Convention July 9-10 

The local Auxiliary drum corps ap- 
peared at the -8th annual celebration 

of the Modern' Woodmen of America 

July at Plummer last Saturday, and on 
»'-- July 4t]f was featured in the parade 
and activitits at Red Lake Falls. 
The corps has been invited to play at 
the North Dakota State AnTerican 
Legion convention _at Fargo next 
Monday, July 9. All the Minnesota 
corps will appear in a drum 
corps contest which will be sponsor- 
ed by the North Dakota American 
Legion.' t . 



Complete 
Work. Valuation has 
Dropped $130,000 

Assessors A. M. Senstad and 
George Werstlein submitted figures 
to the board of equalization on Mon- 
day and Tuesday that revealed that 
the assessed valuation of real estate 
in the city this year* when compared 
to the 1932 assessment shows- a drop 
of about $130,000, which is d-ae to the 
operation of the new Minnesota home- 
stead law. " 

The new law provides that home- 
steads occupied by the owner shall 
be appraised at 25% ; of the full value 
up to a maximum of $4,000 while 
real estate is assessed on the basis of 
40% of the full value. 

The full value of the real estate 
for the current year is $3,196,179, 
with an assessed value of $1,100,921. 
In 1932 the full value was $3,081,495 
with the assessed valuation of $1,280,-' 
459. The assessed value of personal 
property was listed as $273,935 as 
compared to $236,809 in. 1933. The 
total for the assessment of money's 
,and> credits for 1934 was $414,000 as 
compared to $227,000 in. 1933. . :■ 

It has been indicated that an in' 

ease- of one mill in the *f 
will be required to raise thef same 
amount- of money as was raised last 
year. 



Work on Angle Road Cut- 
Off is co mplete d Saturday 

Work was completed oh the Ane-lc 
road cut-off Saturday after providing 
work for 40 men for the past :month 

The new; road will shorten the road 
to '■Plummer and points south and 
makes it possible for motorists to 
avoid the hairpin curve where the 
Angle Road joins the. St. Hilaire- 
HighlancJng road' ten and a half miles 
south-east of the city. w -' 

'The Wrecker' Starring Jack 
Holt at S of N Hall Sunday 

"The Wrecker," a stirring drama 
starring Jack Holt and Genevieve 
Tobin will be presented at the Sons of 
Norway hall on Sunday and Monday 
July 8th and 9th. 

Short subjects make up the balance 
of the program. A matinee will be 

S r on en , t 1 d '. on Sunda y afternoon at 
*i:30 o clock. 




2T 



E.A. 



girfAVir^d Causes Havoc 
>s Over a Wide Area 



Men are Wanted for; Haying 
Local N.K.S. Manager States 

'"--./..-.- ■ -s 

Howard Davidson, county majn-- 
ager of the NRS announces that 
there/is an active demand for mien 
to work in haying. Anyone inter- . 
estefc should telephone of call 'at 
the 7 local NRS office. The phone 
number is 107. j 

WpRK STARTED ON NEW SIDE 
WALK AROUND AUDITORIUM 



The removing of the- old siidewalk 
on the north and east side of ' the 
new auditorium was started Monday. 
The work is being done by Olson i and 
Kolden who entered a contract with 
the city council at the regular meeting 
on Tuesday of the preceeding week. 



O'Neal, President of American Farm 



Bureau to Speak at Crookston Picnic Julyl2 

All-star ! Mttenbanjteama of Red reaus, will be terminated with a cere- 
River valley counties will compete mony in which the Farm Bureau 1 flag 
xor the valley championship at the will be dedicated. i 

hS? 10 * ^«™ bureau T piaric to be) .Many farmers will participate in 
£ a a t c T TO okston on July 12 when the horse shoe pitching tourneyTto be 
*•-.. A. O'Neal president of the Amerl- held daring the forenoon, 
can Farm Bureau, speaks at the "™ - - - 

largest farm assemblage ever to be 
arranged in Northwestern Minnesota. 

In games held' to date between lo- 
cal teams certain j players .have 
thown oustariding ability. From these 
stars county teams will be made up, 
and they | in turn will compete for 
Valley honors at the Farm Bureau 
picnic. The elimination' will start 
at 10 A. | M, and the. final will be 
played following the! afternoon pro- 
gram. R. ; J. Christgau, of the North- 
west School faculty, win" be fn charge 
of the sports prograia. 
* The program, including musical 
numbers or other entertainment fea- 
tures furnished by County Farm Bu- 



Barns are Wrecked by tornado 

Like Wind Near Village 

Of Plummer 

OTHER NORTHWEST ^ 

TOWNS REPORT DAMAGE 

Neon Signs and Greenhouses 

In the City are Badly 

Wrecked 

A severe Hail etorm caused exten- 
sive damage to crops, gardens and 
other property here Sunday after- 
noon. The storm which struck this 
city at about 4:10 P. M., lasted abokt 
half an hour during which time hail, 
some of which were the size of hew 
eggs, fell. Gardens and orchards is 
the city were badly damaged and the/ 
electric signs in the city were all 
damaged to a great extent 

Severe damage to crops in the 
neighboring farming sectioni also re- 
sulted. Some nearest the city report- 
ing almost complete loss of the crop, 
while others farther removed report 
damage of from ten per cent to 
seventy-five per cent of the crop! ■ 
Garage roofs in all parts of the 

„ » — - -; "W were badlj damaged and- hun- 

-Ihree.pf four beeves are to be bar- drt-ds of cars had the tops riddled with 
becued, and meat and coffee will lie holes. The skylights of the Thief 
furnished free, to augment the lunch- River Falls Green Houses were com- 
es the farmers and their families P'etely smashed, the hail taking a 
bring from home. < | toll of 1420 lights. The garden waa 

As preparations neared completion destroyed also there. Another gar- 
for the picnic it was indicated that "Jen operate! by the safre firm, near- 
kittenball teams from East and West tlfe sanatorium, south of the city 



Polk, Pennington, Kittson, Wilkin, 
Roseau, Norman, Marshall and Clear- 
water counties' would participate in 
the tourney. 

Efforts are being made locally to 
assemble a|large escort of rooters to 
accompany each team to the picnic 

All farmers ere urged to attend, 
whether or not they are Farm ' Bu- 
reau members. 



ANNUAL TENNIS / 
TODRNEYXOBE 
LAUNCHED SOON 

Marvin Benson; Chsmpiotr Last- 
Year, Will Defend" His; 
Laurels 



every 



onstrations will be held 

township in .the county according" to 

the^ announcement. Other dates will 



Ue made public next week. 

Radio Entertainers Will 
Appear on Avalon Stag] 



Our Community Builders' and Series of \ 
H awthorne Poems Will Start Next Week 

Two new features which we- believe 



The men's singles jtennis tourna- 
ment is expected toi be under way 
within the next ten -jdays, according 
to Arthur- Johnson, manager, and will 
be completed in two weeks time. The 
tournament is limited] to the first -32 
entrants, ko anyone interested should 
immediately get in touch with Mr. 
Johnson. JA medal is to.be present- 
ed to the] winner. 1^ this tourna- 
ment is successful it' is probable that 
a doubles ! tournament for men,', and 
women's singles, with the possibility 
of mixed ! doubles may be arranged. 

One of I the entrants - is Marvin 
Benson, who will defend his title of 
men's singles champion in the 'city, 
tournament won last year, and who 
won_ first place in singles in the Uni- 
versity of i MinnesotarCampus tourna- 
ment. , ~ 



suffered no damage. The Riverside 
Greenhouses report 27 broken lights 
and only slight damage to the Har- 
dens. i ~ 

The storm which struck from tha 
northwest covered a swath from about 
six' miles west of town, about the 
same distance north and several miles' 
east. Partial damage was reported 

a? ^ far xT Soutn ** six "^e 3 fro 'n tne 
city. No wind accompanied the hall 
here. . ^^ 

Severe wind damage is reported 
from Plummer where two barns wei» 
demolished. On the "Ed Johnson.'' 
farm just north of Hummer the barn 
was torn down and several trees war* 
uprooted and on the Peter. Mdrxis- 
sette farm, 1 we3t of Plummer tha 
barn is reported to have been destroy- - 
ed. No hail is reported from that 
^viciniiy. - ■ . _j 

Hail showers fell in otter widely 
-seperated area according to reports 
Stephen and Argyle report heavy 
had and wind damage and hail show- 
ers without wind are reported from 
town of Hickory, in the east «nd of 
the county. 

Three seperate- showers fell in the 

city, the second' hitting about six 

_ , . , - — - — — -«•, o'clock or shortly after-. This lasted 

ELIZ^r th Z e JZ iU T, ? e 14 i" only, a few minutes and the hauWai 

Minnesota, 16 in North Dakota, 14 not as large as the first shower A 

in South Dakota, 10_in Wisconsin, 12 half hour later a third and lljearfer' 

shower fell at which time the ground 



Pennington County Men 
Enroll in CCC on Tuesday 

Nine young men from Pennington 
county took examinations at Crook- 
ston Tuesday preparatory to going to 
Fort Snelling to take further examin- 
ations qualifying them for enrollment 
in tb.e civilian conservation -corps. 
'■ An enrollment 'of ±60#00 new men 
to camps in the drouth area began 
Monday in every state in the Union. 
They will replace the 70,000 men i dis- 
charged from the corps Saturday 
complying with the regulation limit- 
ing membership to one complete year, 
and another 40,000 who accepted out- 
side employment during the last 3 
months. 

_J73 new camps are to be set! up, 



Governor Olson Asks 
Criminal Prosecution 
In Banco Stock Sales 



will be much enjoyed by Foram reaS' IL? 6 "™? '"k* eVei ?- week *"! . this 

twenty-seven poems by Lawrence! f vos V b }^ „ 

Hawthorne, most beloved of Ameri- L, A c ? py of the Fo ™ni contammg 

, ca's contemporary poets. The other tne se biographies will be filed each 

"Murder at the Vanities"' will i,L' wU1 be a aeriea of biographies of pio-l^f* ™ a fireproof place and they 
the screen attraction at tL Ti,Tn^' neer men and < women of this ' com- ' wlU . Jf tu ™ ed °\ e ' *° a historical 
theatre Sund.iv and MimJfS t i 2 niunity.. | society when such «n organization is 

and 9. !t U Ts y a Tuperb m^sica^ ni/i Hawt horne's < work glows with hu- organized, 
ture with' a very good mysterv nlof ,man heart interest and are fra- 1 These biographies and the series ,pf 

and' features Earl Carroll's "famlS Krant W1 ™ sentiment. Here is a poet Hawthorne poems will begin aimul- 
beauties.' Others in a verv snlerSirt ™°' lke ^S^e Field and James 'teneously in next week's issue of the 



ucau "ea. utners in a verv RnlpWrtin "" ' ""bw^ £iem ana jamE3,wiieuuB 

cast are Carl Brisson Jack OalT;li ■ >Wmtcomb RUe y translates the . little For^m. 
Kitty, Carlisle and Victor McLaalen! ? hm ?3 of daiUy life into songs of, 



On Wednesday and ThursdaiTTrrt£ in?Piratiori 
U : 12, the well-known radio 7 \J& .?^^? ■"- r^**' ? 
temers, "Doc" Schneider and Texas *? cn ", ahood ^ ova ' h ? Sflides 



and hope. Down~ the 
iy' paths iof memory, and back 

. „„„ „ llu . ±exaa . ildhood joys, he guides us, leaJ- 

Yodeling Cowboys will appear in a "J E ^ al,va y s to a finer appreciation 
stage show, which will consist of the : things that are beautiful and 
comedy, singing, sharp shooting ■ "^ . . J. . 

yodeing and novelty and strine band -S ? D10 B ra P'ues of our pioneers 
music. The addition! picture will ??*"*£ written: by onr city editor, 
"A Pripate Scandal" with MarV Mia3 B ermce Berge, and will tell the 
Zasu Pitts and Philip Holmoi. stor y of the people who settled this 



CWA Group Calls 
Mass Meeting For 
Next Tuesday Night 



Bnan,. Zasu Pitts and Philip Holmes 
in the cast. 



Silver ton Luther League to; 
Meet at Hanson Home Sun. 

The Silverton Luther League will 
meet at the Syvert Hanson borne, 4 
JS^i S? st "»<* 1 mile north from 
Thief RivCr Falls on. Jilwell road, oh 
Sunday; July 8. Miss Inanda Han- 
son and Mrs. Syvert Hanson will be 
hostesses. ./Share will be a special 
program given by the pupils of the 
Parachial School under the direction 
of Miss Estelle Hanson, teacher. 
Everyone is cordially invited. 



The CWA Workmen's Protective 
_ l _ _ association meeting on Tuesday eve- 
community, who cleared the wilder- 'ning passed a resolution calling a 
ness and built: our city. Those who ' mass meeting at the city auditorium 
have played aij [important part in ' on next Tuesday July 10. At that 
>making it ohe;of the best communi- 



ties in, the northwest. This feature 
will be' run under the head "Our 
Community Builder.*" and will ap- 
pear on the editorial page each week. 
The Hawthorne poems will also be 
found on. this 'page.' 
^.The Forum has on several occas- 
ions voiced the Ineed of and urged the 
organization of, a Pennington County 
Historical Society, and we again urge 
the people of the community to get 
busy o.n thi» most desirable civic en- 
terprise. Howeyer we know there is 
a wealth of historical material which 



time they will present to the council 
the petitions which they have been 
drrulating and which demands that 
the council dispenses with-thei ser- 
vices of the city, engineer and rein- 
state the two men who were; dis- 
charged from city employment at the 
light department some time agoi Over 
200 citizens have put their signatures 
on this* petition. 

In : a general call for the meeting 
they, ask all citizens who feel that an 
injustice was done when the two men 
were discharged, to be present -at the 
meeting. 



Criminal; prosecution of ."certain 
individuals;" connected with the 
Northwest Bancorpdration was urged 
Saturday by Gov. Olson. 

His recommendation -followed^ his 
examination of transcripts and ex- 
hibits in the investigation of the 
Banco stock :sales activities by the 
state commerce commission. 

In a letter to Paul Sk hen, state 
commissioner of securities, and mem- 
ber of the! commerce commission in- 
vestigating, the sales, -the governor 
said: "Thpre is sufficient evidence 
available to justify criminal pro- 
ceedings." j ^ 

He" urged that' Mr. Skahen turn 
over' the evidence and transcripts to 
various county attorneys and .the 
United States district r attorney for 
criminal action. ! 

It is understood that Ed. J. Goff, 
Hennepin county '/attorney, already 
has askedi|for legal help from Mr. 
Skahen and Harry H. ■ Peterson, rt- 
torney general. ■•-,•■:■■ 



in Iowa, and 27 in Illinois. 

Quotas of additions to be made m 
drought area states include: Minne- 
sota, 5,167; North Dakota, 3,66lJ 
Wisconsin, 4,149; and I owa, 3,402 . 

WCTU Will Hold a Picnic 
At Tourist Park Wednesday 

The Women's Christian Temper- 
ance Union wil have its midsummer 
picnuv in the Tourist Park Wednesday 
S 7 * 1 **^ 2130 m the aftenoon,: in- 
stead of Friday, July 6 as previous- 
ly announced. Each member is 
to : . bring a friend, and the 
children of the members are also to 

wif" 6 ^ 8 -- The lunch wiU be a pol> 
luck affair, and members are ?re- 

auh^ to •J >rins their dividual 
dishes anc silverware. Anyone de- 
siring transportation should phone 



665. 



Community Clubs Hold 
Successful Picnic at A. 
Lendobeja's Farm Sun. 

Approximately 400 persons attend- 
ed the joint community club picnic 
_ cne Adam: Lendobeja farm last 
S? ?• 0sca r Wiseth and bis 
Moonbeam Serenaders" supplied mu- 
sical selections during the dinner 
hour. In the .league game which 
was played, Kratka defeated Silver- 
tonjiy the score of 19-14, and a rame 
oetween Billys Eat Shop and'Snuley 



became completely covered with the 
hail which this time was about the 
size of hazelnuts. A heavy down- 
pour of rain accompanying the hall 
taxed the storm sewers to capacity. 

LARGECROWDS 
ATTEND ANNUAL 
ASSEMBLY SUN. 

Dr. Boe, President of &. Olaf 

Delivers Two Stirring 

Addresses 

The annual meeting of the North- 
west Lutheran Assembly at Squaw 
Point Sunday was reported by Rev. 
R. M. Fjelstad-, president of the as- 
sembly,- as the best meeting ever 
held. - .- 

Dr. L. W. Boe, president of the St 
01af t college at Northfield, ~ spoke 
both in the mornings and afternoon 
sessions. In his morning address. 
Dr. Boe drew a comparison between 
the people of Israel in tEe Promised 
Land and the settlements of America, 
pointing out that just as God warned 
people then that turning aside and 
worshiping strange Gods works. ruin- 
ation, so are similar warnings 
nedessary if America is to enjoy hap- 
piness and prosperity. ., 

Among. other things, Dr: Boe spoke 
of the future of the church in til 



resulted in a victory of 7-6 for the I afternoon "addreTs," He said "that m 
former, »* Ko;«« ..h^j i_ _ _r. U n ^.« ..* . . o»*w uwv no 



»? r S» r ' j b f^ < ?P ed to a ^o 86 s ? s *?. m of government or any change 
■™- b'- °^ th ?_ 6 °i ">°ing due to of the present system is IstabUahed 

on a b lasic quality , and reverence for 



MR. AND MRS. ERNEST. YONKE 
HAVE SILVER WEDDING SUN. 



I " n \ Kam also prevented the game 
scheduled between the Silxerton and 
Kocksbury girls from being played. 
No games are to bel played next SunV 
day, July 8, but Smiley will plaj* 
Silverton at Rocksbury on July 15, 
and on July 22, ,Kratka and Rocks- 
bury will dash _at Rorksbury field. 
In the community clubs kittenball 
league to date; Kratka has won 1 



Approximately fifty-five friends 
and relatives gathered: at the farm 
home of Mr. and Mrs. ' Ernest Yonke 
in Sanders : Township, Sunday evening 

in celebration of their- jnlver. wedding iir 

anniversary. The evening was fea- J and -lost 2; Silverton has won 1" and 
tared by a! mock wedding. An 8:30 | lost 2; Smiley has won 1 and lost 1- 
supper was served by the self-invited and Rocksbury has ost 2 and won 
guests, the centerpiece! of which was 
a large wedding cake ornamented by 
a miniature bride and groom. Many 
lovely and useful gifts] were present- 
ed to Mr. and Mrs. Yonke in remem- 
berance of : "the occasion.- • -•.; 



Mrs. SJartin .Myskowski; and 
daughter Anenette '.of . Strandquist 
.were Thursdaj; visitors' in the ci^r. . 



SILVERTON KITTENBALL TEAM 
TO HOLD DANCE JULY 7th 



'•"-There-will-be'a dance at the Silver- 
ton. Tpwn : -Hall- Saturday, July 7, to 
help raise funds for sweaters for the 
SUyerton Community .'kittenball team. 



t»od is the sure guarantee to correct 
the evils of the present day. The 
only effective remedy is the will to 
do right on the part of the peosle. 

Musical selections were presented 
by the Holt community band\ the 
North Star college quartette of bar- 
ren, and the men's ehorus ef tke 
Tnmty Lutheran church. 

The following were re-eleeted to 
succeed themselves as officers of the 
organization: Rev. R. M. FjelstaS. 
President, M. N. Peterson of Green- ': 
bush, Vice-Pr.esident; John Wold. 
Secretary; and N. A. Nehon. 
Treasurer _ .^NMiaB 

Miss Theresa Soderberg left Prl-- 
day for Dulnth where she will spend 
a week visiting- with friends. 

Miss Florence Mellem of Rosewood 
spent Thursday shopping here. 



;as-'i.?iiai 



^fiffitfe-'^g^rt^.frVa^g;'^ 





INTENTIONAL. DUPLICATE EXPOSURp" 



r 



/ 



t:7' 




nTirrjg 



TOfEF jjfVE6 FALLS PofeftM, ¥SlfiF RrVfiR FALLS, MINNESOTA. THURSDAY JULY S, 1934 !"" 



imaim 



GOVERNOR LANGER 
ilTS PRISON TERM 

Penalty is Imposed the Day ; After 

He Wins Nomination for 1 
\ Another Term. 



Fargo, N. D» — Governor William 
\ Langer -was sentenced to 18 month! 
in prison and fined $10,000 by Fei- 
eral Judge Andrew Miller In Unite* 
States District Court. Langer Waa 
convicted of conspiracy to defrtMA 
the United States government. 

Nominated as republican candidate 
for governor the day before, Langoff 
faced federal court aa a convicted <$» 
fendent In a criminal case. L&ngafr 
was convicted with foun other ' dfr 
fendants two weeks ago qf sollcltlnff 
funds from federal relief workers tot 
maintenance of "The Leader," an «&• 
miniaftatlon newspaper. Lanser wea 
renontp riled for governor in a primary 
.election that gave him the call by 
_ lanisljitte proportions. Still receiving 
congratulations from all parts of tfes 
■tate, Lan£«r walked into federal 
court in Fargo to. hear himself! op> 
dered to a federa prison for 18 moritka. 
The •conviction and sentence creates 
a situation absolutely unprecedeEfr 
ed In northwest 'history. Still goTefr 
nor of the state and renominated ttr 
that office, Langer faces confinement 
in a penal institution unless a hlgftof 
court intervenes and reverses the «S> 
vlctlon. | 

Sentences of 13 months and flneb ef 
S3.000 each were imposed on 03 ear 
Chaput, business manager of 1th* 
Leader;. Frank Vogel, state highway 
commissioner and R. A. Klnzer, Sp, 
former executive secretary of the fed- 
eral emergency relief committee j for 
North Dakota. Harold McDonald, also 
a co-defendunt, was given four months 
in the Bismarck jail, Judge MUler| re- 
marked in passing sentence, that 'the 
lighter penclty was Imposed because 
of the defendant's ^outb. and the fact 
that he was merely a hired agent. 



Bandits Loot Kellogg, Minnesota 

Kellogg, Minn.^Two armed bandits 

leisurely looted business places here 

after binding and gagging the town 

. marshal, Tom Gilchrist, 65, and two 
women. Gilchrist was making his 
rounds when a car stopped beside him.' 
Two men leaped .from the car and 
seized ^Gilchrist's gnn. They forced 

, him to accompany them to a restaur- 
ant, where Miss Grace .La Salle find 
her grandmotrer, Mrs. Anna Guder, 
were aroused and compelled to open 
the restaurant. Then they gagged 
and bound the three victims. 1 



,1 



A. A. A. To Last Two More Years 
Brookings, S. D.— A further develop- 
ment and expansion of the general 
plan of controlled production of farm 
crops and livestock, with continued 
and possibly Increasing processing 
taxes to pay the expense, is the pro- 
gram to which .the administration is 
going to pin Its faith and stake its 
reputation for farm, relief leadersiln 
In 1935 and 1936, B^ford G. Tugwell", 
undersecretary of agriculture, told 
South Dakota farmers here. 



Roosevelt- Signs Farm Moratorium 
Washington — More" than a billion 
and a - quarter of farm mortgage debt 
In the" four spring wheat states, 
eluding $530,025,000 la the state 
Minnesota, became subject to a five- 
year motarorium when President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt approved the 
Frazler-Lemke act, which provides 
machinery for scaling down all farm 
debts, personal and real, and lowering 
the Interest to 1 per cent. 



Army Orders 81 Bombers, 230 Engines 
Washington— The "United States 
made another move toward increasing 
Its airplane power to a level with that 
of any other nation. A $3,195,450 con- 
tract was awarded the Glenn L. Mar- 
tin company of Baltimore for 81 bomb- 
ing planes and a $1,705,733 contract 
was given the Wright Aeronautical 
Corporation of Patarson, N. J., for 280 
airplane engines. i . 



Boy Slays Mother Making Him Study 
/Coral Gables, Fla. — Because 15-year- 
/old Harry Allen Shay's mother in- 
' slated he study English, a subject ha 
failed in at the last' school semester, 
the boy, police said, shot and killed 
her. The mother, Mrs. Nina D. Shay, 
40, was fatally wounded when struck 
in the back by a shotgun charge, j 



Two Salesmen Killed In Plane Crash 
Center, Texas— Ned Allen, 30 years 
old, automobile Salesman, and Roy 
Heiman, airplane salesman, both [of 
Longview, Texas, were burned to 
death when their airplane crashed 
Immediately 'after taking off here. 



' capac- 



Stae! Industry's Activity Declln 
i New York — The steel industry 
■ operating at only 23 per cent of 
, lty, compared with 44.7 per cent _ 
1 week ago, a drop of 48^ per ce it, 
: the American Iron and Steel institute 

reported. 



: U. 3.. Ship's 70,000 Cattle from S. D, 
' Pierre, S. D. — Approximately 70,000 
cattle have been sliipped from Sontb 
' Dakota under the government pur- 
chasing program, the state relief ad- 
ministration reported at Its office 
Iters. 



Rum Thieves Face Death by Shoot! ig 
JJobcow — Death by shooting was 
the sent en ae imposed by the Mosct w 
city court here on-tv'o men convicted 
ef the theft of $100";fl00 worth of iron 
Syom. a subway warehouse. ■ 
forum Advertising is bargain i 



FACTORS IN HOG MARKETING 

FAVOR AJSE IN PRICES 

Underlying- factors in influencing 
prices of hogs and the probable trend 
of the hog market are gradually be- 
coming more favorable, says the 
weekly market bulletin issued by the 
Central Co-Operative Association at 
South St. Paul. Hoj* prices have 
scored a. big gain during the past 
week and the top at §4.80 last Thurs- 
day was r $1.60 above the June 1 top. 
The market is well above the_ corres- 
ponding level a year ago. 

Among the factors favorably influ- 
encing prices are: 

1. Reduction in supply of pork due 
to government slaughter of pigs and 
piggy sows last year. 

2. A reduction of S% in spring far- 
rowing and 3 c /c reduction last tall. 

3. Distribution of hundreds of thou- 
sands of hogs, bought by the. govern- 
ment,, to relief agencies (this pork 
went to people who would have con- 
sumed no pqrk thuk keeping it^out of 
storage.) 

4. Reduction of pork poundage due 
to liquidation of light weight and un- 
fattened hogs because of drouth and 
high prices for feeds (-this indicates 
prospective smaller supplies this sum- 
mer.) 

5. Average weight qf hogs marketed 



MILLWAUKEE MAYOR SENDS 

STINGING REBUKE TO WAY, 
PUBLIC UTILITY MAGNATE 

t 

Mayor Daniel W. Hoan has replied 
in stinging terms to a letter sent to 
him and to officials of Milwaukee's 
suburbs and to the Wisconsin . public 
service commission by S. 13. Way, 
president of the Electric Co., in 
which Way announced that he holds 
the municipalities liable for injuries 
to employees and damage to property 
incurrec? in the present strike. . 

Mayor Hoan, in his letter to Way, 
expressed doubt that the taxpayers 
of Milwaukee can be held liable for 
property damage, and scored Way 
ior his entire attitude. 

Following is Mayor Hoan's reply 
in full: 

Real Cause of Disturbance 



EFFORTS ARE MADE TO MAKE 
THIS; AN ACCIDENTLESS 4TH 

"Death Takes No, Holiday!" 

This is the thought of the Safety 
Division) of the State Emergency 
Relief Administration, under the di- 
rection of Q. H. Zealand, is making 
the keynote of the state-wide effort 
for the j prevention of traffic acci- 
dents on the Fourth of July. 

"Cut the accident to zero, as far.as 
the state uf Minnesota is concerned," 
is the urge of the Safety Division of 
the SERA to motor vehicle drivers 
and pedestrians of the state. 
- Disobeying traffic regulations is 
the greatest cause of accidents, the 
Safety Division points out. 

Among the unsafe driving prac- 
tices which are listed by the Safety 
Division! of the SERA are improper 
passing,) operation of 'cars on the 



Let the Foruni advertisements be 
your mail-ordjer catalogue. 



. Shop in your easy-chair by reading 
the message of Forum advertisers. 



• wrong side of the road, lack of wr 

"Up to this moment, I have had no Uu " " a ^ UiVt -' ;i » ""**• * li ^ oiuer places 
- - - -- where v^im is obscured; disregard of 

traiiic signals; entering upon or 
Crossing] arterial highways without 
stopping, as commanded by highway 
STOP signs; driving cars with faulty 
mechanism, and all reckless driving 
practices. 



occasion to talk to anyone connects 
with the labor controversy at your 
plant. Your communication, just re- 
ceived, necessitates that I now speak 
forth plamly. 

"You notified me that your com- 
pany will hdld the city of Milwaukee 
iiabie pursuant to law, for any and 
all injury to its property and its em- 
ployes caused by mobs and riot. 



- . t -_~ , Xi_ "While I am not so certain of your 

is running about o% less than a year abmty to hoW 0Uf cifey , s toxpa * ers 

similar . r(1 c nnnc ;Ki a «r,ri Q Y. «-*.*, „;w„™„<- 



ago. This is equivalent to 

reduction in a number of hogs. I 

6. Exports of pork from the U. 
S. for the first half of the marketing 
year (October l'to April 1) were 35 
per cent larger than last year (to 
offset part of this lard exports for the 
same period' were 14 per cent smaller. 

7. Wholesale prices of pork art 
higher — pork lows being quoted 60 
per cent above a year ago. 

8. Smaller storage stocks of pork. 
The latter factor is a big one in 

which all hog producers should be 
vitally interested. Storage holdings ir. 
the U. S. on June 1 were G42 million 
pounds this year compared to 650 mil 
lion pounds on May 1, and 670 mil- 
lion pounds a year ago. The June 1 
five-year 'average was 768 raillioi 
pounds. Except for 1926 the June 1 
storage of pork was smaller than for 
many years. 

Lard stocks are quite different. On 
June 1 this year, total lard in stor- 
age amounted to 182 million pounds 
on May 1 the total 179 million pounds 
and a year ago 111 million pounds 
The five-year average for June 1 was 
128 million pounds t 

If the statistical position of lard 
were as favorable as that of pork 
the hog outlook would be regarded 
as highly favorable. 

STATE TOURIST PLANS TO 

ATTRACT YJSMMRAFIED 

The Come-toMinesota c.ub an- 
nounced its program today to center 
nation-wide attention to the land of 
10,000 lakes through an intensive acV 
vertising campaign to attract tour- 
ists, business men, permanent resi- 
dents and industry on an all-year- 
basis. 

The program has won acclaim as 



responsible under the circumstances, 
I write this in the hope of fixing and 
exposing the real cause of the dis- 
tuuance so as to prevent further de- 
predations. 

Denounces Company Arrogance 

I now notify you and through you, 
the • most powerful trust the world, 
has ever known, which you represent, 
that you alone are solely responsible 
lor the riots that have so far blotch- 
ed the good name of this city. Dur- 
ing my entire tenure as mayor, it has 
been a source of pride and joy that 
we were virtually without violence 
in time of strike. Now our fair city 
is besmirched* with a record of vio- 
lent disorder. 

"Your attitude toward your, em- 
ployes, cur people, our city, our fed- 
eral government, is more arrogant 
than that of any ruler in the world. 
Not, since the days of George III of 
England has any ruler successfully 
deiied our nation. But you have im- 
pudently refused to comply. with the 
reasonable request of the representa- 
tives of the United' States govern- 
ment until Uncle Sam himself has 
been compelled to rebuke the insol- 
ence by removing your Blue Eagles. 
You are now witnessing the harvest 
uf pent up public indignation you 
yourself have aroused. 

Operators Refuse Arbitration 

"It wr.s your company that spon- 
sored th2 company _union called the 
hi. M. B. A. Now In the face of aj 
i scleral government request to 
gotiate 



COACHES ENTERED IN GUILD 
COMPETITION TO BE JUDGED 
AH fcENIURHF PROGRESS 

Model I Napoleonic coaches submit- 
ted by American youths in the 1934 
Fisher Body Craftsman's Guild com- 
petition will be judged in the Gen- 
eral Motors Building at A Century 
of Progress Exposition, Chicago, be- 
ginning late next month, it is an- 
nounced in the JurTe issue of "The 
Guildsman," official magazine of the 
educational foundation. 

"The 'Windy City" will be the 
Mecca of literally millions of per- 
sons in | the next few months," the 
publication says. "Since tWe judging 
of the miniature Napoleonic coaches 
always has been of widespread in- 
terest, it! finally was decided that in 
fairness | to the public it should be 
held at the world's fair, where many 
more would be able ±o witness it than 
would be posible otfiprwise." 

"This jdecision do&s not affect the 
closing d'ate. All models, to be con- 
sidered for honors, must be shipped 
by their | builders not later than mid- 
night of Saturday, July 21, and we 
should like to caution entrants once 
again to; determine the closing hour 
of their! local express agencies." ^ 

Preliminary judging of models sub-? 
mitted by Canadian boys will be held 
simultaneously et the Royal York 
hotel in Toronto, according to the 
magazine. 



"Arrangements have been conclud.- 

,. ___, .„ „„ ( e d with the management of the hotel 

settlement of the strike, an' to throw open one of the rooms on 

alleged contract with this company j tne mezzanine floor so the public may 
union is paraded as an obstacle you 'have an j opportunity of inspecting 
cannot break. Is it possible that you* the handicraft of boys from all parts 



really think the people of Milwaukee 
are" so dumb as to belive you cannot 
now induce this organization to com 



ply with an honest arid* sincere re-i - Pff ty-q'ne thousand dollars in' 



quest of the president's representa- 
the greatest in the state's history and tive in the face of the crisis you have 

brought on? . 

"Mr. "Way, in the name of our 
city, and all that is fair and decent, 
in the interest of preserving peace 
and order, I urge you to temporarily 
set aside your pride and arrogance 
and cooperate with the fed-eral gov- 
ernment in bringing this strike to a 
speedy end,';. I further notify you 
that the caging of your street cars 
with fence wire is in fact acting as 
"an open- invitation to violence and 
their operation is provocative of un- 
lawful assemblage and should cease 
forthwith." 
"Signed, Daniel W. Hoan, Mayor." 

EAR INFECTIONS FLOURISH 
INJWIMMING TIME 

Care of the ears should* be an im- 
portant part of everybody's precau- 
tions for a pleasant summer, in the 
opinion of the Public Health Educa- 
tion Committe of the Minnesota State 
Medical Association. 

Several serious 'ear infections flour- 
ish especially during the swimming 
months, acording to the bulletin. 

One is boils in the outer ear canal 
generally caused" by irritation and 
injury. It may happen as a result of 
digging into the ear with an 



is widely sponsored and indorsed by 
advertising, merchandising and pub 
Hcity experts, hotel and' resort own- 
ers and operators, civic groups, news- 
paper men, manufacturers, whole- 
sa T ers, professional men, theater 
owners, public utility executives, the 
clergy, state and city officials, bank- 
ers, oil men and other representative 
business executives. 

More than $100,000,000 annually 
was estimated as formerly derived 
through .tourist trade alone. Com- 
petition from other states together 
with the withdrawal by the state 
legislature of the $50,000 annual ad- 
vertising fund formerly granted the 
10,000 Lake association, with the un- 
derstanding that an equal amount 
be raised through business channels, 
has had its effect. 

Come-to-Minnesotp. club program 
will replace this loss, it was said. 
Business interests are supporting this 
movement. The tourist's dollar is 
valued more than ever before as a 
definite community asset. 

32 CITIES ARE ORGANIZED 
IN PUBLICITY PROGRAM 

With nearly 100 per cent organiza- 
of 32 cities in the state, in the'Pub- 



of the Dominon during the last 10 
days of IJuIy, the period which the 
judges will be at works," it state; 



versity scholarships-are being offer- 
ed by the Guild- this year to the 
youths submitting the best coach 
models. There are six $5,000, six 
§1,000 and six $500 awards. Six- 
teen of them will go to the winners 
in the United States, and the re- 
maider to those in Canada. 



Man doesn't have to look pretty, 
though he ought to .do his best to look 
healthy. 

If you ever lived In n log cabin you 
know it is next to Impossible to keep 
It clean. ! 

The best government fosters the 
business of the business man; Thus 
be can pay more taxes. 

A whole generation of men grow up 
and pass away without knowing what 
their beards look like. 

Malice may be something cherished 
by the just toward those who practice 
evil and deserve malice. 

Can one tell the story of his life 
without suppressing some of It7 But 
who pray, has a righ't to know all? 



lie Safety Educational Program of spoSn ha^inT loop matched „ 
Z e J^ & r Era ,f S ? n 7 ^"f A f dmin ;i s ° me such instrument; « Tt may ra 
istration C. ft Zealand, director of S ult from irritation caused by water 
the Safety Division, is optimistic of —ocean lake or <«ri™iZ ™„i 

»l" V ^v that ""'-J? dil ' e S ed hy , ' '"rl-ter'TIie^pelrancTTTnV s'uch 
ft Itlf^-ri- com ™ U % es t throughout irritation is the sign for the svrimmei 

"Nn »^M»£» V ?' t0 re ?l' Ze the . t0 keeD "is head out of the wate 
No-accident' objective on the cur- until it is healed . 

"in ™^ , „ th ) e 4 ' h of . f Ju 'y- , „ Another is blocking the external 

In response to the city and county ear with wax. The water swells the 

her? of i^ me h-r bl "5 °>, ffldaIS ' T" 1 - wax antil the eardram fa entoe y cut 
o? rMn ^hl T f S ' ™ mb "=:off. The only safe treatment in this 

of civic clubs, and representatives of case is proper douching of the ear 

teresTin Sc'^fT h .T" g - t an in : !T ^ in e to remove the wax by instru 
terest in public safety, into city and ments n the hands of an amateur is 



the increasing traffic fatalities in the 
state, not only have the cities rallied 
to the support of the project but the 
counties are nearly two-thirls or- 
ganized'. 

RAIL PROFITS INCREASE 
THREE TIMESREPORT SHOWS 

WASHINGTON (FP)_ Railroad 
profits in the first four months of 
1934 increased more than 168% over 
the similar period of 1933, the Bureau 
of Railway Economics reported June 

Net operating income of Class 1 
lauVoad's of '.Yc Dmted States was 
$144,546,047 in the first four months 
of this year, according to the Bureau 
as compared with $53,875,770 in those 
months last year. Total operating 
revenues increased only 20.8% from 
$881,670,502 to $1,065,010,217, but net 
income increased 168.3%. 



even rupture of the eardrum. 

Rupture of the eardrum with sub- 
sequent serious middle ear infection 
may happen as a result of diving or 
jumping from great heights into the 
water, too, but middle ear infection 
and rupture much more frequently 
comes through the Eustachian tube 
from an infected' nasal sinus or in- 
fected tonsils or adenoids, or from an 
acute cold. 

Everybody should be careful not to 
'snuffle" water up through the nose 
into the postnasal passages and in 
to the ears where, it can and does/ 
start unpleasant infections. And peo-( 
pie who are already suffering from 
colds or any infection should never 
get their heads under water. Water 
is - almost sure to make the trouble 
worse. 



-Saving money is a matter of being 
informed. Read the Foxum advertise- 
ments and' know where the best bar- 1 
gains are. ■<•... j 



Free Soap 

from your 

Watkins Dealer 

2 Bars of Green Palm 
Soap FREE with 1 lb. 
Double Action Baking 
* Powder. 

That's just like cutting the 
price of Baking Powder in half 
I give 2 or 3 bars of soap FREE 
with other necessities like spi- 
ces, Extracts, daily used Toi- 
let Articles, needed Medicines, 
etc. which means a savings to 
you of 15c to 25c on an article. 

Wait for Watkins— It Pays 

I will start working in this 
locality with the J well known 
Watkins line of Pspices, ex- 
tracts food products; 1 soaps, toi- 
let articles and stock and 
poultry preparations. My stock 
is new; and fresh. You'll enjoy 
using ■ these highest quality 
yproducts, which I will bring to 
your door at a savings to you. 

GEQ. BERKHOLZ 

Central Hotel 
Thief River Falls. 




Another carload of UNCLAIMED FURNI- 
TURE will be sold at the 

SEVERT ANDERSON STORE 
GOODRIDGE, MINNESOTA 

Monday, July 9th, '34 

1:00 o'clock P. M., This sale cousists of / 
beds, springs, mattresses, dining room sets, 
living room sets, buffets, chairs, rockers, 
rugs and a lot of other items. 

G. M. Thoreson, Owner" A. Diamond, Auct. 



THEATRE 



Sons of Norway Hall 

ABSOLUTELY SAFE FOR KIDDIES 



Sunday and Monday 

July 8 @L 9 

THE 






aying Tim e 
is Here! 



and we have a complete 
stock of 

Mower 
irs 

Hay Rake Teeth and re- 
pairs, and Binder re- 
pairs of all kinds. 

SAVING ON OIL IS POOR 
ECONOMY. Use lots of good oil 
and save your horses and machin- 
ery. We have the best quality ma- 
chine oil and lots of it. 



OEN'S 

Hardware Department 



ECKER 



starring ' 

JACK HOLT & GENEVIEVE T©BIN 

Swaying above ten thousand frightened faces — hov- 
ering over life and death — Could he save the man 
and woman who wrecked his life or send them dash- 
ing to their doom. Also selected short subjects. 



Arlmtseirkn* Mat. Sun. 2:30, 5, 15, 20 c 
iiiimS&blOn. Eve. 7:30 &. 9:00: 10.15 



Eve. 7:30 & 9:00; 10,15, 25 c 




~^ 



fBjgjjjgyjjgHj, 







THlEF felVfiB FALLS FOftttM, fjftlfiF, RrtfiS FALLS' MmMEg6fA: THURSDAY JtJLY S, 1S84 Tg 



GOVERNOR LANGER 

BtTSPWTERM 

Penalty is Imposed the Day Aijter 

He Wins Nomination for 
i Another Term. 



te« 



Fargo, N. D, — Governor William 
\ Langer was sentenced to 18 moi tbl 
In prison and fined $10,000 by !*•*■ 
era! Judge Andrew Miller In Tin 
States District Court. Langer 
convicted of conspiracy to del 
the United States government. 

Nominated as republican candidate 
for governor the day before, Lai g* 
faced federal court as a convicted 
fendent In a criminal case. Lax gaff 
was convicted with four other de- 
fendants two weeks ago of- solicit inff 



funds from federal relief workers 
maintenance of "The Leader," an 
miniatjfcfttian newspaper. Langer wea 
renotapated for governor In a primary 
election that gave him the call | bf 
lanisljhe proportions. StlU receiving 
congTAtulatlons from ejl parts of jtfc* 
itate, Langar wklked Into federal 
court In Fargo to hear himself | op* 
dered to a ftdera prison for 18 months. 
The conviction and sentence creatM 
a situation absolutely unprecedSfit* 
ed In northwest history. Still gover- 
nor of the state and renominated Iter 
that office, Langer faces conflneniest 
In a penal Institution unless a higher 
court Intervenes and reverses the Mff> 
viction. ( J 

Sentences of 13 months and fines flf 
W.OOO.each were imposed on Osesr 
Chaput, business manager of itha 
Leader; Frank Vogel, state highway 
commissioner' and R. A. Kinzer, Br., 
former executive secretary of the fed- 
era! emergency relief committee jflor 
North Dakota. Harold McDonald, also 
a co-defendant, was given four months 
Itt the Bismarck jail, Jijdge Miller] re- 
marked In passing sentence, that the 
lighter pentlty was' imposed because 
of the defendant's youth and the fact 
that he was merely, a nlred agent.' 



Bandits Loot Kelloga, Minnesota 
Kellogg, Minn.— Two armed bandits 
leisurely looted business places hera 
after bindlng v and gagging-the town 
marshal, Tom Gilchrist, 65, and two 
women. Gilchrist was making jhla 
rounds when a car stopped beside him.' 
Two men leaped from the car and 
seized Gilchrist's, gun. They forced 
him to accompany them to a\restaur» 
ant, 'Where Miss Grace La SaSfcyimd 
her grandmotrer, Mrs. Anna ^Rai 
were aroused and compelled to open 
the restaurant. Then they gagged 
* and bound the three victims. 



A. A. A. To Last Two More Years 
Brookings, S. D.— A further develop- 
ment and expansion of the general 
plan of controlled production of farm 
crops and livestock, with continued 
and possibly Increasing processing 
taxes to pay the e^frense. Is the pro- 



gram to which the administration 
going to pin Its faith and stake 
reputation for farm relief leadership 
in 1935 and 1936, afford G. Tugwell, 
undersecretary of agriculture, told 
South Dakota farmers here. 



Roosevelt- Signs Farm Moratorium 
Washington — More than a billion 
and a' quarter of farm mortgage debt 
in the four spring wheat states, in- 
cluding $530,025,000 In the state of 
Minnesota,, became .subject to a five- 
year motarorium when President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt approved the 
Frazier-Lemke act, which provides 
machinery for scaling down all farm 
debts, personal and real, and lowering 
the Interest to 1 per cent. I 



Army Orders 81 Bombers, 280 Engines 
Washington— The United States 
made another move toward Increasing 
its airplane power to a level with that 
of any other nation. A $3,195,450 con- 
tract was awarded the Glenn L. Mar- 
tin company of Baltimore for 81 bomb- 
ing planea and a ?L705,733 contract 
was given the Wright Aeronautical 
Corporation of Paterson, N. J., for 280 
alyplane engines. 



FAGTORS IN HOG MARKETING 
FAVOR A_RI§E IN PRICES 

. Underlying factors in ~ influencing 
prices of hogs and the 'probable trend 
of the hog; market are gradually be- 
coming more favorable, says th,e 
weekly- market bulletin issued by the 
Central Co~Operative Association at 
South St. Paul. Hog prices have 
scored a big gain during the past 
week and the top at $4.80 last Thurs- 
day was $1:60 above the June 1 top. 
The market- is well Above the_ corres- 
ponding level a year ago. 

Among the factors favorably influ- 
encing prices are: 

1. Reduction in supply of pork due 
to government slaughter of pigs and 
piggy sows last year. 

2. A reduction of 8% in spring far- 
rowing and- 3% reduction last fall. 

3. Distribution of hundreds of thou- 
sands of hogs, bought by the govern- 
ment,, to relief agencies (this pork 
went to people who would have con- 
sumed no pork thus keeping it out of 
storage.) 

4. Retraction of pork poundage due 
to liquidation of light weight and un- 
fattened hogs, because of drouth and 
high prices for feeds (this indicates 
prospective smaller supplies this sum- 
mer.) 

5. Average weight of hogs marketed 



KILLWAUKEE MAYOR SENDS 
STINGING REBUKE TO WAY, 

PUBUCH MAGNATE 

Mayor Daniel W. Hoan has replied 
in stinging terma -ttf a letter sent . to 
him and to officials of ^Milwaukee's 
suburbs and to the Wisconsin public 
service commission by S. B. Way, 
president of the Electric Co., in 
which Way announced that he holds 
the municipalities liable, for injuries 
to employees and damage to property 
incurred* in the present strike. 

Mayor Hoan, in his letter to Way, 
.expressed doubt . that the taxpayers 
of Milwaukee can be held liable for 
property damage, and scored Way 
for his entire attitude. 

Following is Mayor Hoan's reply 
in full: 

, Real Cause of Disturbance 

"Up to this moment, I have had no 
occasion to talk to anyone connects,, 
with the labor controversy at your 
plant. Your communication, just re- 
ceived, necessitates -that I now speak 
forth plainly. , . 

"You notified me that your com- 
pany will' hold the city of Milwaukee 
liable pursuant to law, for any and 
all injury to its property and its em- 
ployes caused by mobs and riot. 



. , ■-« ,. ■., While I am not so certain of your 

* running about 6% less than a year ability to hoW our cfty , s ^^ 

mil iar , rpemfmcih?*! HTlHoi* tTie. niniiim«fn nnAn 



ago. This" is equivalent to a 
reduction in a number of hogs. 

6. Exports of pork from the U. 
S. for the first half of the marketing 
year (October 1 to April 1) were .35 
per cent larger than last year (to 
offset part of this lard exports for the 
same period* were 14 per cent smaller. 

7. Wholesale prices of pork arc 
higher — pork lows being quoted 60 
per cent above a year ago. 

8. Smaller storage stocks of pork. 
The latter factor is a big one in 

which all hog producers should be 
vitally interested. Storage holdings ir 
the U. S. on June 1 were 6'42 million 
pounds this year compared to 656 mil 
lion- pounds on May 1, and 670 mil- 
lion, pounds a year ago. The June 1 
five-year average was 768 miilioi 
pounds. Except for 1926 the June 1 
storage of pork was smaller than for 
many years. 

Lard stocks are quite different. On 
June 1' this year, total lard in stor- 
age amounted to 182 million pounds 
oh May 1 the total 179 million pounds 
and a year ago 111 million pounds. 
The five-year average for June 1 was 
128 million pounds. 

If the statistical position of lard 
were as favorable as that of pork 
the hog outlook would be regarded 
as highly favorable. 

STATETOURSSTPLANSTO 

ATTRACT VISITORS DRAFTED 

The Come-toMinesota club an- 
nounced its program today to center 
nation-wide attention to the land of 
10,000 lakes through an intensive ad«- 
vertising campaign to attract tour- 
ists, business men, permanent resi- 
dents and" industry on an all-year 
basis. 

The program has won acclaim as 



i responsible under the circumstances, 
I write this in the hope of fixing and 
exposing the real cause of the dis- 
tuuance so as to prevent further de- 
predations. 

Denounces Company Arrogance 

I now notify you and through you t 
the most powerful trust the world, 
has ever known, which you represent, 
that you alone are solely responsible 
lor the riots that have so far blotch- 
ed the good name of this city. Dur- 
ing my entire tenure as mayor, it has 
been a source of pride and joy that 
we were virtually without violence 
in time of strike. Now our fair city 
is besmirched* with a record of vio- 
lent disorder." 

"Your attitude toward your em- 
ployes, our people, our city, our fed- 
eral government, is more arrogant 
than that of any ruler in the world. 
Not, since the days of George III of 
England has any ruler successfully 
deiied our nation. But you have im- 
pudently refused to conr81y.with the 
reasonable request of the representa- 
tives' of the United 1 Spates govern- 
ment until Uncle Sam himself has 
been compelled to rebuke " the insol- 
ence by removing your Blue Eagles. 
You are now witnessing the harvest 
of pent up public indignation" you 
yourself have aroused. 

Operators Refuse Arbitration ' 

"It wr.s your company that spon- 
sored, ths company _union called the 
U. M. B. A. Now in the face of a 



EFFORTS ARE MADE TO MAKE 

THIS; AN ACCipTLESS 4TH 

"Death Takes No; .Holiday!" 

This is the thought of the Safety 
Division i of the State Emergency 
Relief Administration, under the di- 
rection of G. H.. Zealand, is making 
the keynote of the! state-wide effort 
for the .prevention j of traffic accl> 
dents ' on the Fourth of July. 

"Cut the accident! to zero, as far^as 
the state of Minnesota is concerned," 
is the urge of the Safety Division of 
the SERA to motor vehicle drivers 
«nd pedestrians of the state. 

Disobeying traffic regulations is 
the greatest cause] of accidents, the 
Safety Division points out. 

Among the unsafe driving* prac- 
tices which are listed by the Safety 
Division j of the SERA are improper 
passing, i operation jof cars on the 
wrong side of the road, lack of eao- 

Uuit uil liurtfud, UUiS- U11U Ut,uur jJlUCca 

where vJsii-n is obscured; disregard of 
traiiic signals; entering upon or 
crossing ; arterial 'highways without 
stopping: as commaii<5ed by highway 
STOP signs; driving cars with faulty 
mechanism, and all reckless driving 
practices. - j 

COACHES ENTERED IN GUILD 
COMPETITION TO BE JUDGED 
AH CENTIMJF PROGRESS 

Model | Napoleonic' coaches submit-. 
ted by American youths in the 1934 
Fisher Body Craftsman's Guild com- 
petition will be judged in the Gen- 
eral Motors Building at A Century 
of Progress Exposition, Chicago, be- 
ginning late next month, it is an- 
nounced ;in the June issue of "The 
Guildsmah," official i magazine of the 
educational foundation. 

"The 'Windy City", will be the 
Mecca of literally i millions of per- 
sons in the next few months," the 
publication says. "Since tlfe judging 
of the miniature Napoleonic coaches 
always has been of widespread in- 
terest, it! finally was. decided that in 
fairness ito the public; it should be 
held at the world's fair, where many 
more would be-able to witness it than 
would be posible otherwise." 

"This decision does not affect the 
closing date. All models, to be con- 
sidered for honors, 'must be. shipped 
by their builders no't later than mid- 
night of ; Saturday, ! July 21, and we 
should like to caution entrants once 
again to > determine j the closing hour 
of their j local express agencies." 

Preliminary judging of models sub- 
mitted by Canadian 'boys will be held 
simultaneously et the Royal York 
hotel in Torqnto, according to the 
magazine. 

"Arrangements have been conclud- 
ed .with the management of the hotel 



Let the." Forum advertisements be 
your mail^orc&er catalogue. 



vShop in your- easy-chair by reading 
the message of : Forum advertisers. 



Inderal government request to ***.-, ~ ... 

gotiate settlement of the strike, an to throw^ open one jof the rooms on 
.alleged contract with this company \ the mezzanine floor so the public may 
'union is. paraded as an obstacle you ' na . ve .an ! opportunity of- inspecting 
cannot break. Is it possible that you* tne handicraft of boys from all parts 



really think the people of Milwaukee 
are* so dumb as to belive you cannot 
now induce this organization to com- 
ply with an honest an<5 sincere re- 
quest of the president's, representa- 
tive greatest in the state's history and tive in the face of the crisis you have 



Boy Slays Mother Making Him Study 
Coral Gables, Fla.— Because 15-year- 
old Harry Allen Shay's mother Jln- 
slsted he study English, a subject fha 
failad In at the last- Bchool semester, 
th» boy, police said, shot and killed 
her. The mother, Mrs. Nina D. Shay, 
40, was fatally wounded when struck 
In the back by a Bhotgun charge, j 



Two Salesman Killed In Plane Crash 
Center,- Texas— Ned Allen, 30 years 
old, automobile salesman-, and EJov 
Helm^n, airplane 'salesman, both of 
Longvlew, Texas, were burned to 
death when their airplane crashed 
immediately after taking off here. 



Staal Industry's Activity Declines 

j New York— The steel industry 
: operating at only 23 per cent of capke- 
, ity, compared wtth 44.7 per cent 
■ week ago, a drop of 48% per ce it, 
I the American Iron and Steel Institute 
: reported. 



■ U. 8. Ships 70,000 Cattle from S. 

1 Pierre, S. D.— Approximately 70,(JOO 
cattle have been snipped Irom Sol th 
Dakota under- the' government p ir- 
ch&aing program, the state relief ufl- 
mlnistratlon reported at its of^ce 
here. 



Rum Thieves Face Death by Shooting 
itofcow— Death by shooting was 
the aentenae Imposed by the Moscow 
city court here on -two men convicted' 
«f the theft of $10pp0 worth of iron 
from a subway warehouse^ 
JForum Advertising. is bargain. ne^ra. 



is widely sponsored and indorsed by 
advertising, merchandising and pub 
licity experts, hotel and' resort own- 
ers and operators, civic groups, news- 
paper men, manufacturers, . whole- 
saTers, professional men, theater 
owners, publijy utility ' executives, the 
clergy, state/and city officials, bank- 
ers,- oil menjand other representative 
business e«fButives. 

:"Mbre than^ $100,000,000 annually 
was estimated as formerly derived 
through tourist trade alone. Com- 
petition from other states together 
with the withdrawal by the state 
legislature of the $50,000 annual ad- 
vertising fund formerly granted the 
10,000 Lake association, with the un- 
derstanding that an equal amount 
be raised through business channels, 
has had its effect. 

Come-to-Minnesotp. club program 
will replace this loss, it was said. 
Business interests are supporting this 
movement. The tourist's dollar is 
valued more than ever before as a 
definite community asset. 

32 CITIES ARE ORGANIZED 
IN PUBLIC WETY PROGRAM 

With nearly 100 per cent organiz*a- 
of 32 cities in the state, in the Pub- 
lic . Safety _Ed*acati6nal Program of 



brought on ? 

"Mr. Way, in the name of our 
city, and all that is fair and decent, 
in the interest of preserving peace 
and order, I urge you to temporarily 
set aside your pride and arrogance 
and cooperate with the fed-eral gov- 
ernment in bringing this strike to a 
speedy end. I further notify you 
that the caging of ; your street cars 
with fence wire- is hv fact acting as 
'an open - invitation to violence and 
their operation is provocative of un- 
lawful assemblage and should eease 
forthwith." 
"Signed, Daniel W. Hoan, Mayor." 

EAR INFECTIONS FLOURISH 
1NJWIMMING TIME 

Care of the ears should* be an im- 
portant part of everybody's precau- 
tions for a pleasant summer, in- the 
opinion of the Public Health Educa- 
tion Committe of the Minnesota State 
Medical Association. 

Several serious 'ear infections flour- 
ish especially during the swimming 
months, acording to the bulletin. 

One is boils in the outer ear canal 
generally caused* by irritation and 
injury. It may happen as avresult of 
digging into the ear with an ear 
spoon, hairpin, loop, matchead 



of the Dominon during the- last 10 
days of [July, the period which the 
judges will be at works," it states. 
Fifty-one thousand dollars in uni- 
versity scholarships; are being offer- 
ed by the Guild- this year to the 
youths submitting the best coach 
models. |There are jsix $5,000, six 
$1,000 and six $500 awards. Six- 
teen of them will go to the winners 
in the United States, and the re- 
maider to^those in Canada. 



Man doesn't have to look pretty, 
though he ought to -do his best to look 
healthy, j . I 

If you lever lived in a log cabin you 
know It Is next to Impossible to keep 
it clean, i 

I _j 

The best government fosters the 
business jof the business man. Thus 
he can pay more taxes. 

A whole generation of men grow up 
and pass; away without knowing what 
their beards look like. 

Malice j may be something cherished 
by the just toward those who practice 
evil and deserve malice. 

I . : 

Can one tell the story of his life 
without suppressing some of It? But 
rWho pray, has a right to know all? 



activities that will be dlrfeted by lo- 1 ^r'The^pp^rane^r^y JTh 

cal safety committees throughout irritation is the si^ for the swhmSer 

5,25 'W^' to re ?' ize the ,to keep his head out of the wX 

No-acadent" objective on the cur- until it is healed. 

In ^ y ; th , e4 fl h ° f -. July -, . Another is blocking the external 

In response to the city and county ea r with wax. The water swells the 

f™ nf ^Z le h-? UMl ^ "v.®" 313 ' T m " wax untU th = <** d ™™ ™ entire £ ™t 
„1^i,£ ^,K t ° Iubs ' ™? mber ?:<>ff. The only safe treatment in this 
of cmc clubs, and representatives of case is proper douching of the ea? 
business organizations having an in-! Trying to remove the wax by instaf ' 
terest m public safety, into city and ments in'the nandi of™ aSa^urls 



county committees, to put a stop to 
the increasing traffic fatalities in the 
state, not, only have the cities rallied 
to the support of the project but the 
counties are nearly two-thirls or- 
ganized'. 

RAIL PROFITS INCREASE 
THREE TjMEWORT SHOWS 

WASHINGTON (PP)_ Railroad 
profits in the first four months' of 
1934 increased more than 168% oyer 
the similar period of 1933, the Bureau 
of Railway Economics reported June 

Net operating income of Class 1 

l? , £°/.£- 3 „. of • '"" 1: " :to " Stateawas 
?144 J 546,047 !in the first four months 
of this year,; according to the Bureau 
as compared i with $63,876,770 in those 
months last I year. Total operating 
revenues increased only 20.8% from 
$881,670,602 to $1,066,010,217, but net 
income increased 168.3%. 



all to likely to cause ferunculus oi 
even rupture of the eardrum. 

Rupture of the eardrum with sub- 
sequent serious middle ear infection 
may happen as a result of diving or 
jumping from great heights into the 
water, too, but middle ear infection 
and rupture much more frequently 
comes through the Eustachian tube 
from an ' infected'-nasal sinus or in- 
fected tonsils or adenoids, or from an 
acute cold. 

' Everybody should be careful not to 
snuffle" water up through the hose 
into the postnasal passages, and in 
to the ears where, it can and does 
start unpleasant infections. And peo- 
ple who are already suffering from 
colds or any infection should never 
get their heads -under water. Water 
is ^almost sure to make :the trouble 
worse. . u . ;. . 



■_'-Savmg money is a matter of being 
informed. Read the -Earam advertise- 
ments and know- where the ; best bar- 

gains-arei-;\:: ;...-:3 ;..U- _'.•;- ■. ,;V. ; :,. 



Free Soap 

from your 

Watkins Dealer 

2 Bars of Green Palm 
Soap; FREE with 1 lb. 
Double Action Baking 
| Powder. 

/That's just like! cutting the 
price of Baking Powder in half 
I give 2 or 3 bars of soap FREE 
with ojther necessities like spi- 
ces. Extracts, daily, used Toi- 
let Articles, needed Medicines, 
etc/which means /a. savings to 
yon of 1 15c to 25c 9n an article. 

Wait for Watkins-It Pays 

I will start working in this 
locality with the well known 
Watkins line of ! spices, ex- 
tracts food products, soaps, toi- 
let articles and; {stock and ' 
poultry preparations. My stock 
is new and freBh.jYou'll enjoy 
using ; these highest quality 
products, which I jwill bring to 
your door at a savings to you. 

GEO. BE^KHOLZ 

Central Hotel 
Thief Rivelr Falls; 




Another carload of UNCLAIMED FURNI- 
TURE will be sold at the 

SEVERT ANDERSON STORE 
GOODRIDGE, MINNESOTA 

Monday, July 9th, '34 

1:00 o'clock P. M., This sale cousists^ of 

beds, springs, mattresses, dining room sets, 

living room sets, buffets, chairs,' rockers, 

rugs and a lot of other items. 

G. M. Thoreson, Owner" A. Diamond, Auct 



THEATRE 



Sons of Norway Hall 

ABSOLUTELY SAFE FOR KIDDIES 



Sunday and Monday 

July S /a 9 

THE 

WRECKER 

starring 

JACK HOLT & GENEVIEVE TOBIN 

Swaying above ten thousand frightened faces—hov- 
ering over life and death — Gould he save the man 
and woman who wrecked his life or send them dash- 
ing to their doom. Also selected short subjects. 



Arttniecinvi* Mat - Sun - 2:30 ' 5 > 15 - 2 °c 
/\aiillSblOIl. Eve. 7:30 & 9:00; 10,15, 25 c 



H aying Time 
is Here! 

and we have a complete 
stock of 

Mower 
irs 

Hay Rake Teeth and ire- 
pairs, and Binder re- 
pairs of all kinds. 

SAVING ON OIL IS POOR 
ECONOMY. Use lots of good oil 
and save your horses and machin- 
ery. We have the best quality ma- 
chine oil and lots of it. 





Hardware Department 




DEFECTIVE PAGE I liNTENTTONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



i 
i . 




door, 
think 



Watch Forum 
bargain iie^s. 



Advertisements lot 



MINNESOTA NEWS 

| St. Cloud — A new generating plant 
; to cost $1,229,000' will., be built with a 
; PWA grant. 

; Warren— A 12-inch public wel will 
'be drilled here to supply the :ieeda 
| of villagers. 

Thief River Falls — Road construc- 
tion work worth- more than $5,00) will 
be undertaken in Pennington ccunty/ 
Ruth ton— Fifty-four sheep were killM 
ed by lightning when they huddled 
next to a wire fence during a storm. 
They were owned .by E. E. Beede and' 
Vernon Dillman. 

Hopkins — Boys set off a wholj fire- 
works stand here and bolted the 
causing two war veterans .to 
they were in a new war until the ex- 
plosions ceased, 

Stillwater— After nearly two years 
of legal subterfuge^ former Sta'te 1 Sen- 
ator Edwin L. McLean was taken to 
Stillwater prison to start serving a 
two-year term for forgery. | : , 

- Stillwater — One hundred barrels of 
creosote are" being distributed by 
government agencies In Washington 
county to stop the spread of chinch 
fcngs, reported in the northern coun- 
ty- 
Detroit Lakes — Before 5,000 specta- 
tors, the Pelican Rapids Legion drum 
corps, captured first prize In tha 
Ninth district American Legion con- 
test held in conjunction with ths an- 
nual ' district convention here. 

Letrolt Lakes — Leaving Canada for 
the first time since 1914. the famomi 
Princess Patricia Canadian Light In- 
%ntry Band will visit Detroit Lakes 
July 1 and 2 under the direction of 
Captain James, Canada's "Sousa." 

St. Paul — The threat that St. Paul's 
franchise in the American Assocla- 
ton would be removed to Peoria, 111., 
was averted when President R.^T. 
Connery and the local business -iften 
got together on a plan to boost at- 
tendance. 

Jackson— Children "In the Stanley 
Breed family escaped through a win- 
dow when flames, caused by an explo- 
sion of gasoline used to start a fire In 
a stove, destroyed their home anir all 
its contents. Mr. and "Mrs. Breed 
were absent. 

Savage — Some 800 transient relief 
workers are busily engaged In con- 
struction of permanent*camps In the 
. Minnesota river bottoms. *"500 transi- 
ent, workers are housed In a tent city 
and engaged in construction of a 
camp a half mile west of here. 

St. Paul— The MInneapolis-St. Paul 
sanitary district budget for 1935 was 
filed with the city clerk by Allen Wag- 
ner, executive secretary. Of the to- 
tal needs, of $3,980,660.67, Minneap- 
olis' share will be §2,650,453.05, with, 
•the balance being charged against St. 
Paul. 

Mankato — Badly bruised and scar- 
red, Robert West, 12 years old, lay In 
a hospital here claiming his father, 
William West,' and stepmother had 
- locked him in his room, starved and 
beaten him. The elder Wests, who 
declare Robert fell from a haymow, are 
under arrest. 

St. Paul — Minnesota will receive 
'$519,000 during July for the aid of 
needy families in the drouth area, ac- 
cording to announcement from Federal 
Relief Administrator Harry L. Hop- 
kins who said his agency will spend 
approximately $70,000,000 in 41 states 
and three territories this month. 

St. Cloud — Adding to the burdens of 
the farmer, a new enemy has been 
discovered. The wild mustard and 
the Russian thistle have been report- 
ed seen in many sections of central 
Minnesota, crowding out stands of 
wheat and establishing themselves in 
places where grain has refused to 
grow. 

Minneapolis — Veterans now enroll- 
ed in CCC camps may continue with 
the CCC after June 30, when the new 
enrollment period starts* Senator 
Henrlk Shipstead wired Paul Nordeen, 
adjutant of the fourth district, Amer- 
. lean Legion. Before the regulations 
were changed, veterans engaged in 
•emergency conservation work could 
not continue after June 30. 

Owatonna — Construction of a pro- 
posed road on the Dodge-Steele coun- 
ty line has been ordered by Judge 
F. W. Senn in a^distrlct court man- 
date filed with Cferk of Court S. C. 
Goff here. The order demands that 
the two county boards act jointly in 
: the project, which calls for a half- 
\ mile construction to link roads which 
: now exist, using emergency r^ief ad- 
t ministration funds. 
! -St. Paul — The canvassing board 
cleared up the muddle in the close 
congressional races. There was some 
Question in the second, seventh, 
eighth and ninth district on who was 
nominated. They were: Second — 
Henry Arens, F.-L.; L. P. Johnson, R., 
Elmer T. Ryan, D.; Seventh— Paul J. 
Kvale, .F.-L., Richard T. Daley, D.; 
Eighth— A T. Winterquist, F.-L., Wil- 
liam A. Pittenger, R., Jerry A. Harris, 
D.; Ninth— R. T. Buckler, F.-L., Ole 
O. Sageng, R., Martin O. Brandon, D. 
Maynard M. Bartley, D., was returned 
. the victor over E. G. Quamme for 
state, treasurer. 

■ St. Paul — There is good grazing for 
at least 80,000 head of cattle in seven 
northern Minnesota counties, F. A. 
Wildes, director of the division of 
lands and minerals, state department 
of conservation, says that a survey 
just completed reveals, 
i Bemldjl — Failure of bidding contrac- 
tors to Include with' their bids certl- 
j fled checks In the proper amounts 
,' drawn on Bemldjl banks made It 
-necessary for the city council to re- 
ject all bids offered for construction 
dj the sewage disposal plant. New 
bids will be opened July 9. 



,„ raiEF RIVfig FAttS FOStrat THJEP fctVfeR frAltg, MlKKfifiOf A 1 »Htftg&A» Jt JLY 6^ ldkt 




Semi-Annual Political Review Shows 

Some Progress is Being Made but 

Williams Sees Fascist Tendencies 

"A political review by a progres- Allen of Ohio, and the. nomination of 
sive of the first half of the year 1934 1 another able women, Josephine 
indicates that progress has been Roche, as Democratic candidate for 
made in, plugging up the holes of I governor of Coloiauo. 



the sinking ship, 'Capitalism/ but it 
is not clear that a long range pro 
gram has been entered upon that 
will insure a new ship, 'Permanent 
and Genuine Prosperity'," declares 

.Howard Y. Williams of at. Paul, 

tional director of the League for In 
dependent Folotical Action,- in his 
semi annual review released from the 
national offices of the League at 209 
Baltimore Building, St. Paul. 

"In these six months the govern- 
ment has pouted out in emergency 
expediture alone "over three hiliion 
dollars at the rate of ?470,000,000 a 
month. Only this priming of the 
pump has kept the ship atioat. She 
muse otherwise have sunk. The C. 
W*. A., the Home Owners Loan Act, 
the restoration of 10% of the Feder- 
al pay cut, the liberalized regula- 
tions governing veteran's pensions, 
the retirement act for the railroad 
employees and relief for farmers and 
the unemployed have been the meth- 
ods used. 

"Also, on the favourable side of the 
political ledger for the first half of 
1934 are stock exchange regulation, 
the opening up of air-mail contracts, 
the National Housing Act, the special 
commission for Federal regulation 
of the telephone, telegraph and 
ladio, the '"Arms. Embargo Act, the 
Senate investigation o f munition 
makers, the plan for reciprocal tariff 
agreements, the splendid development 
of the Tennesee Valley Authority, 
and* the Supreme Court decision up- 
holding the Minnesota moratorium 
law. 

,. "Other advances worthy of notice 
are the launching of the Progressive 
Party in Wisconsin, the adoption by 
the Minnesota Farmer- La bur par«.y 
of a platform offering an adequate 
solution of the present depression, 
the act of the University of Minne- 
sota regents making roilitary drill 
optional and not compulsory, the first 
apofh^ment of a'woman to a Federal 
judgeship in the person of Florence 



"On ' the Cark side of the ledger 
was the passage of the Vinson Bill 
which will result in naval rivalry, 
the disintegration of our educational 
system, the ema * filiation of the Tug- 
well Bill regulating the advertising 
and sale of medicines and food, the 
lack of any well-coordinated and ade- 
quate system for administering re- 
lief ana the flaunting by big busi 
ness of the section 7a of N. R. A. 
covering collective bargaining re- 
sulting^ in repression of workers and 
chiselling by employers. 

"In international affairs one is en- 
couraged by the act offering indepen- 
dence to tne .Philippines; the exit of 
American imperialism in Cuba, Haiti 
and San Domingo, the crumbling of 
Nazi prestige in Germany, and the 
capturing of the London County 
Council with a majority of 14 seats 
by the British Labor party." One re- 
grets that in these six months Fas- 
cism has captured Austria, Latvia ■£ 
and Bulgaria. Mussolini and Hitlei 



GROUP ENJOY PICNIC 

A group of girls enjoyed a picnic 
supper near the golf links on Friday 
evening. Those in , the group were 
Misses; Verna Brandon, Adeline Lind- 
berg Helen and Ruth Wasgren, Ber- 
nice Eerge, Martha Ristau and Grace 
Sanduin. j 



DISTRICT N.R.S1 OFFICE STAFF 
HAS STEAK FRY 

The staff of the N.R.S. offices of 
District No. 1 had; a steak fry at the 
Old Dam on Saturday following a 
meeting at the ' local N.R.S. office. 
Those; participating were Roy Berg 
Miss Janet Newberry, and Miss Eliza- 
beth Dostert of the Crookston office ; 
Mr. arid Mrs. Fred Richards} and Miss 
Ruth Harris of Red Lake Fajls, Elmer 
(Stanghelle of Warren, Mr. andf Mrs 
Arthur Wold of .Roseau, Donald L. 
Snyder, Miss Irma Fredericks, and 
Howard Davidson of the local office. 

FOR VISITOR 

MrsJ M. O. Stenberg entertained 
severa: ladies at her home Monday 
afternoon in honor' of Mrs. J. B. Con- 
ner of Minneapolis who has visited 
*or the past .several wjseks in the city. 



«, f f« ci^*,,,^* * • «. . i*i The afternoon was spent informally, 

met to strengthen fascist plans. Wai | at the ; dose of whi( £ * delightful 



still goes on -between Bolivia 
Faraguay. , ; 

"These six months indicate that 
the tendencies toward Fascism in 
this country and- throughout the 
world are very strong. The next half 
of 1934 ought to indicate whether 
President Roosevelt has a long-time 
program that i^, adequate to meet the 
present crisis or whether America is 
drifting toward chaos anc? fascism. 
•These next six months ought also to 
tell whether other democratic coun- 
tries like Great Britain and France- 
can rise to the emergency in the pre- 
sence of an outworn economic sys- 
tem and offer the people a through- 
going solution, or whether these 
strongly democratic nations will fol- 
low the rest of Europe into the next 
stage of capitalism, state capitalism, 
fascism. Forces are at work in all 
these democratic countries that i£\ 
properly suported by the voters will 
prevent fascism and make possible 
a cooperative democracy." 




Mr. J and Mrs. Olaf Neset and fami-, 
ly and Miss Carrie Aakhns -motored 
to Itaska State Park on Sunday and 
spent the day. \ ; 

Mr. and* Mrs. Allen Ulrich and son 
Arnold left Tuesday for a two weeks 
vacation at Stillwater, where they 
will visit with friends and relatives. 

Miss Ethel Richards who is a stu- 
dent nurse at the Ashbury hospital 
in Minneapolis, arrived Monday morn- 
ing arid will spend a three weeks 
vacation with her parents, Mr. anc 
Mrs. E. J. Richards. ; 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Khmgness and 
son Jimmy arrived Sunaay trom their 
home at iron Mountain, Michigan, 
and will spend a week visiting re- 
latives. } 

Miss iElla Holden, who is employed- 
in this | city spent last week' enc* at 
her parent's home at Viking. , 

Miss [Gladys Norby returned Sun- 
day after spending a weeks vacation 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J^ 
Norby at Plummer. 

Mrs. Mary Bakke returned Friday 
evening [after spending a month visit- 
ing .with frienus anu relatives at 
Northwaod, N. Dak. 

Miss Delia Daugherty, who is em- 
ployed in the city, spent the week 
enc with, her parents at Grygia. 

Mrs. J. A. Yotter, Mrs. Sophie 
Storholrrj, Mrs. T. J. Welch, Mrs. J. 
A. Erickson and Mrs. C. H. Jung mo- 
tored to Detroit Lakes on Friday and 
attended i a lecture there in the eve- 
ning. 

Curtis and Willard Anderson and 
Harry Prugh were in Duluth Satur- 
day attending to business matters. 

Jtilra and Kenneth Porter were on 
a fishing trip last week end at Rainy 
River. 

Miss Charlotte MacAnnany, Miss 
Marie Dablow, and Charles Dablow, 
spent the week end at Grand Forks 
where they visited with Richard 
Dablow, who is employed in Grand 
Forks, arid also attended the North 
Dakota State Fair. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Cosgrove, 
daughter Veronica, and son Bobby 
visited at the John Dahlsing home at 
Radium on Sunday. 
. Mr. and- Mrs. H. A. Pratt spent last 
Friday pt Detroit Lakes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Simons and son 
Fred of Langdon, N. Dak., and Mrs. 
Jim Doyle and daughter Celia of 
Walhalla, N. Dak., visited at the R 
M. Aalbu home on. -.Friday, leaving 
the same day for Baudette, and vari- 
ous points in Canada. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Aasl nd and 
family spent Sunday at Buxton, N. 
Dak visiting Mr. Aasland's parents. 

Mr. and* Mrs. Frank Erickson and 
son left last week end for their home 
at Minr eapolis after spending two 
weeks with relatives. Mr, Erickson 
was formerly employed with the 
Land O'JLakes plant in Minneapolis, 
city, and is now connected with the 
Land O' Lakes plant in Mineapolis. 

Ed. Mattson and daughters Adeline 
and Evelyn and Miss Ruth Walle of 
Grygla spent Friday in the city at- 
tending to matters of business. 

Guests at the Albert Swanspn Home 
during the summer months will be 
Mrs. Swanson's mother, Mrs. Charles 
Sampson of Trail and her sisitei 
Mrs. Elmer Lundstrom of Portland', 
Oregon,; who arrived Wednesday. Mrs 
Lundstrom spent several weeka with 
relatives at Trail before coming here. 
' Mr. and Mrs. "Kip" La Bree of 
Minneapolis are spending a few days 
at the W. J. La Bree-home. 

Mrs. | Edw. Hermanson of Los 
Angles, ;Calif., arrived' Wednesday and 
is spending some" time with the Her- 



mansons and Ole Granum families. 

Mrs. Lela McCrystal and son Floyd 
Kelly of Minneapolis visited last 
weeK at the M. <j. Stenberg home. 

Mr. and Mrs. -John Altin and son 
Emmett of Minneapolis are guests at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. V. King- 
strand. 

Mrs. J. B. Conner left Tuesday for 
Minneapolis alter spending six weeks 
visiting her son and daugnter-in-iaw, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Conner. 

Miss Mildred Erickson of Minnea- 
polis arrived Sunday and will spend 
ihe summer months visiting with re- 
latives in .this city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Stenberg of In- 
ternational Falls were the Sunday 
guests of Mrs. Mary Shaw. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meiford LaBree and 
two children of Minneapolis arrived 
Sunday and are spending the week 
visiting at the W. J. .LaBree ' : and 
Charles Conner homes. 

Mrs. J . A. Erickson and Miss 
Minnie Stonehouse spent last Wed- 
nesday at Ada attending the foil' 
there. 

Mrs. R.'D. Munt visited last week 
in Duluth with Mr. ; and Mrs. P. J. 
Keating and Mr. and Mrs. George 
Tweed. , 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Stitt, and Mr. 
and Mrs.-y. S. Steen and family mo- 
tored to Crookston on Sunday and 
enjoyed a picnic at the tourist park. 

Mrs. Carl E. Carlson, daughter 
Emma, and Miss Margaret Munt left 
Tuesday for a trip druing which they 
will visit at Spokane, Washington, 
Couer d' Alene, Idaho, Portland and 
Reeds Port, Oregon. 1 

Air. and Mrs. ill H. Arhart . ancf 
family spent last Sunday at Crook- 
ston. 

Mr. and Mrs. August' Johnson and 
daughters Hilver and Vandla left on 
Wednesday for a trip to Marvin, Sum- 
mit, and other points in South Da- 
kota, where they will visit relatives. 

Walter Jung returned Sunday from 
a weeks trip during which time he 
made stops at New Rockford, III., 
Chicago, III., Fon-du-lac and Lady- 
smifch, Wise, and Minneapolis. 

Why chase your "dogs" all over 
town looking for the best bargains 
when you can find them in the Forum 
advertisements ? 



anc 'j lunch .was served j by the hostess. 
Those I present were Mrs. J. B. Con- 
ner, Mrs. E. F. Cheney, Mrs. Howard 
Cheney, Mrs. George Erickson, and 
Mrs. Charles Conner. 

[PICNIC FOR GUESTS 

In compliment to Charlotte and' 
Ardis 1 Dale who are guests -&tkj&»- 
home [of Dr. and Mrs. J. N. Nesae, 
several girls enjoyed a picriic outing 
at the! Tourist park Friday. TkOM 
participating were: Charlotte and 
Ardis JDale, Eileen Rhodegaard, Nor- 
ma Ystesund, Edria Lee, Barbara 
Reep, j Marion Green, Ruth Knauff, 
Joan Neset, and Stello Stadum. 

FOR MINNEAPOLIS VISITOR 

Honoring Mrs. John Altin of Min- 
neapolis who is a guest at the Vigor 
Ringstrand home, Mrs. M. O. Sten- 
berg entertained at her home on 
Tuesday afternoon. The guests were 
Mrs. John Altin, Mrs. V. Ringstrand, 
Mrs. Norman Johnson, Mrs. George 
Erickson, and Miss Mildred Erickson 
of Minneapolis. 



To the Voters: 

Please accept my thanks for 
the splendid vote given me in 
the recent Primary Election. 
Your confidence and support is 
very much appreciated. I trust 
that you feel that I merit your 
continued good; will. 

Paul At Harris 



PAST NOBLE GRANDS ENTER- 
TAINED AT LANCASTER 

Thej members of' the local past 
noble grand club motored to Lancas- 
ter Friday and were entertained at 
the home of Mrs.' f Gust Schilbred, 
formerly of this city who now makes 
her home" at Lancaster. ThoBe in- 
cluded! in the group were: Mrs. Abbie 
Wa'ssgren, Mrs. Jack Robinson, Mrs 
Arthur Johnson, Mrs. M: O. Sten- 
berg, iMrs. R. W. Belcher, and Mrs. 
Carl Whiting. 

HAS BIRTHDAY 

In compliment to, Mrs. Charles Con- 
ner, the Birthday club met Thursday 
afternoon at Mrs. Conner's home, the 
occasion- being her birthday. Tfea 
afternoon was spent socially, and 
lunch jwas served ;-foy the members. 
Those present were" Mrs. Charles Con- 
ner. Mrs. George Erickson, ■Mrs. M. 
O. Stenberg,Mrs. S. Salveson, and 
Mrs. Leonard Hanson. 



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MlNNEAR;qU5-^QtlN£P0WER IMPLEMINT COMPAwV 




Let Us Show You The Minneapolis Separator 

BORCHERT-HILL MOTOR CO. 

DODGE PLYMOUTH 

Minneapolis-Moline Farm Machinery 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINN. 



« H ii :m i H ii ; iiiiii i:i i mi ii ii i i i iimmuuuuuMH i » : i i i »iimii uiu: 



rct«ni : nm i »n 



TRADE 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 





Quality 



Economy 



Lemons 



Sunkist 
300 size 
Per dozen 



Crackers 

19c 



Sodas 
2 lb. 
box 




THIS MOUTH WASH 
GIVES YOU TWICC 
AS MUCH FOR 
YOUR MONEY 

OR rude breath — or to kill 
dangerous nose and throat 
germs get Mi31 F [ ition. I't NEW 
reinforced forn : -nves you the 
equivalent of t : pints of anti- 
septic for the price of one — for it 
kills, germs even when it is diluted 
halfjstrength. Same, pleasant taste 
too, | Try it today. 



131 SOLUTION 

full pint ™*C 

Thief River Pharmacy 

O. H. EKEREN & SONS 




h 



A special stockholders' meeting ; of the 
Thief River Falls Cooperative Creamery 
association will be held in j the Civic and 
Commerce room in New Auditorium, Fri., 
July^th^ at 2 o'clock P. Ml 
Be sure to be present. ! 

By order of j the Board. 
J.IM. THEIGE 



Corn Flakes 



Large 
. package 
3 for 



25c 



Fig Bars 



Fresh 
2 lbs. 



23c 



es 



.Strikalite 
6 boxes 



c 



Macaroni 
box* Vv/L/ 



ZCy Spread pt.IDtqt.^3 



Coffee 

Vaccuum pkd. 
1 lb. glass jars 



25c 



Navy Beans , 

21c 



Hand picked 
■ 5 lbs. 



Rice 

JFancy Blue Roseffj -• 
4 pounds ^AC. 



Brown Sugar 
20C 



Medium 
4 lbs. 



Cigarettes, all leading brands 2 f Or 25c 



Vanilla 



Imitation, 8 oz. bottle "19c 



Mackerel, 1 lb. tall can, 3 for 25c 
Corn, Crosby, 3 No. 2 cans 25c 



Prunes 



med. size 
3 pounds 



Super- Suds 

16c 



Per 
Package* 



Cleanser 
3 cans 



Sunbrite 

14c 



Gold Ditstl 



Large 
Package 



L. B„ Hartz Stores 



- Phone 93 



(Incorporated) 

•Thief River Falls; Minnesota 




- 














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MINNESOTA NEWS 

j St. Cloud — A new*generatlng plant 
; to cost Jl.229,000 will.be built with a 
; PWA grant 

j W»rren— A 12-lnch public well will 
■ be- drilled here to supply "the 'needs 
j of villagers. 

i Thief River Falls-fRoad construe- 
; tlon work worth more than J5.000 will 
_ be undertaken in- Pennington county. 
Ruthtorr— Pitty-tonr sheep-were Sill- 
ed by lightning when .they huddled 
next to a wire fence during a storm. 
They were owned by E. E. Beede and 
Vernon Dlllman. 

Hopkins— Boys set off a whole fjre- 
works stand here and bolted the door, 
causing two war veterans to think 
they were in a new war nntil the ex- 
plosions ceased.- 

Stillwater — After nearly two years 
of legal subterfuge, former State Sen- 
ator Edwin L. McLean was taken to 
Stillwater prison to start- serving a 
two-year term for forgery. 

Stillwater — One hundred barrels of 
creosote are. being distributed by 
government" agencies in Washington 
county to stop the spread of chinch 
.bugs, reported in the northern coun- 
ty. 

Detroit Lakes — Before' *5,000 specta- 
tors, the Pelican Rapids Legion drum 
corps, captured- first \ prize in the 
Ninth district Americans. Legion' con- 
test held in conjunction with the an- 
t nual district convention here. 

Letrolt Lakes — Leaving Canada for 
the first time since 1914, the famous 
Princess Patricia Canadian Light In- 
fcntry Band will visit Detroit Lakes 
July 1 and 2 under the direction of 
Captain James, Canada's "Sonsa." 

St Paul— The threat that St. Paul's 
franchise In the American Associa- 
ton would be removed to Peoria, 111., 
■was averted when President R. T. 
Connery and the Jocal business men 
got together on a plan to boost at- 
tendance, j 

Jackson— Children "In the Stanley 
Breed family escaped through a win- 
dow when flames, caused by an explo- 
sion of gasoline used to start a fire in 
a stove, destroyed their home and all 
Its contents. Mr. and Mrs. Breed 
were absent. 

Savage — Some 800 transient rellet 
workers are busily engaged In .con- 
struction of permanent camps In \the- 
Minnesota river bottoms. 600 transi- 
ent workers are housed in a tent city 
and engaged in construction* of a 
camp a half mile w^st of here. 

St. Paul— The Minneapolls-St. Paul 
sanitary district budget for 1935 was 
filed with the city clerk by Allen Wag- 
ner, executive secretary. Of the to- 
tal needs of $3,980,660.67, Minneap- 
olis" share will be $2,650,453.05, wltJl 
the balance being charged against St 
Paul. 1: 

Mankato— Badly bruised and scar- 
red, Robert West, 12 years old, lay fn 
a hospital here claiming his father, 
William West, arid stepmother had 
locked him in his room, starved and 
beaten him. The elder Wests, who 
declare Robert fell from a haymow, are 
nnder arrest ~ , 

St. Paul — Minnesota w4H receive 
$519,000 during July for the aid of 
needy families in the drouth area, ac- 
cording to announcement from Federal 
Relief Administrator Harry L. Hop- 
kins who said, his agency will spend 
approximately 570,000,000 in 41 states 
and three territories this month. 

St Cloud — Adding to the burdens of 
the farmer, a new enemy -has been 
discovered. The wild mustard and 
the Russian thistle have been report- 
ed, seen in many sections of central 
Minnesota, crowding out stands of 
wheat and establishing themselves in 
places where grain has refused to 
grow. 

Minneapolis — Veterans now enroll- 
ed In CCC camps may continue with 
the CCC after June 30, when the new 
enrollment period starts, Senator 
Henrlk Shlpstead wired Paul Nordeeh, 
adjutant of the fourth district Amer- 
ican Legion. Before the regulations- 
were changed, veterans engaged in 
! emergency conservation .work could 
not continue after June 30. 

Owatonna — Construction of a- pro- 
; posed road on the Dodge-Steele' coun- 
; ty • line has been ordered by Judge 
P. W. Senn in a district court man- 
; date filed with Clerk of Court S. C. 
; GofC here. The order demands that 
the two county boards act Jointly in 
: the project which calls for a half- 
\ mile construction to link roads which 

■ now exist using emergency relet ad- 
I ministration funds. 

j •St Paul — The canvassing board 
' cleared up the muddle in the close 

■ congressional races. There was some 
-question in the second, Beventh, 

' eighth and ninth district on who was 
nominated. They were: Second — 
Henry Arens, P.-L.; L. P. Johnson, R., 
Elmer T. Ryan, D.; Seventh— Paul J. 

' Kvalef-iP.-L., Richard T. Daley, D.; 
Eighth— A. T. Winterquist P.-L, Wil- 
liam A. Pittenger, R.,' Jerry A Harris, 
D.; Ninth— -R. T. Buckler, P.-L., Ole 
O. Sageng, H.,- Martin O. Brandon, D. 
Maynard M. Bartley, D, was returned 

. the victor over B. Q. Quamme for 
state treasurer. 

St Paul — There Is good grazing for 
at least 80,000 head of cattle in seven 
northern Minnesota counties, P. A, 
Wildes, director of the division of 
lands and minerals, state department 
of conservation, says that a 'survey 
Just completed reveals. 

; GemldjI — Failure of bidding contrac- , 
tors to include with' their bids certl- 

■ fled checks in the- proper amounts - 
; drawn on - Bemldjl banks made It 

-necessary for the city council to re- 
ject all bids offered' for construction 
fit the sewage disposal plant} New 
Bids will be opened July 9. 



mxfif smis pails totm fattEg ttvfeft MiAkiijtote^Ai 



Semi-Annual Political Review Shows 

Some Progress is Being Made but 

Williams Sees Fascist Tendencies 



"A- political review by a progres- 
sive of the first half of the year 1934 
indicates j that progress has been 
made, in j plugging up the tholea of 
the sinking- ship. 'Capitalism,* but it 
is ;. not clear that a long range pro- 
gram has been entered, upon that 
will insure a new ship, 'Permanent 
and Genpine Prosperity'," declares 
iioward Y. Williams of Sfc. Paul, na- 
tional director of the League for In 
dependent _Folotical Action, v in his 
semi annual review released from the 
national offices of the League at 209 
Baltimore Building, St. Paul. 
- "In these, six months the govern^ 
ment has poured out in emergency 
expediture alone over three billion 
dollars at the rate of $470,000,000 a 
month. ; Only, this priming of the 
pump- has kept the ship afloat. Sne 
must otherwise have sunk. The C. 
W. A., the Home Owners Loan Act, 
the restoration of. 10% of the- Feder- 
al pay; cut, the liberalized regula- 
tions governing veteran's pensions, 
the retirement act for the . railroad 
employees and relief for farmers and 
tbe unemployed have been the meth- 
ods used. ; ' • . , 
, "Also, on the favorable side of the 
political ledger for the. first half :of 
1934 are ; stock exchange regulation, 
the opening up of air-mail contracts, 
the National Housing Act, the special 
commission for Federal regulation 
of the - telephone, telegraph and 
radio, the^Arms Embargo Act, "the 
Senate ■ investigation o f .munition 
makers,: the plan for reciprocal tariff 
agreements, the splendid development 
of the Tenriesee Valley Authority, 
and? the Supreme Court decision up- 
holding the Minnesota moratorium 
law- | 

"Other advances worthy of notice 
are the : launching of the Progressive 
Party in Wisconsin, the adoption by 
the Minnesota Farmer-Labor party 
of a "platform offering an adequate 
solution of the present depression, 
the act of the University of Minne- 
sota regents making military drill 
optional and not compulsory, the first 
apointment of a woman to a Federal 
judgeship ; in the person of Florence 



Allen of Ohio, and the nomination of 
another able women, Josephine 
Roche, as 'Democratic candidate for 
governor of Colotaoo. 

"On the dark side of the ledger 
was the passage pf the Vinson Bill 
which will result in naval rivalry, 
the 'disintegration of our educational 
system, the ema filiation of the Tug- 
well Bill regulating the advertising 
and sale pf medicines and food, the 
lack of any well-coordinated and ade- 
quate system foi* administering re- 
lief ana the flaunting by big busi 
ness *oX.the section 7a of N. E. A. 
covering collective bargaining re- 
sulting in repression of workers and 
chiselling by employers. 
- "In international affairs one is en- 
couraged by the act -offering indepen- 
dence^ to tne Philippines, the exit of 
American imperialism in Cuba, Haiti 
and San Domingo, the .crumbling of 
Nazi prestige in Germany, and the 
capturing of the London ' County 
Council with a majority of 14 seats 
by the British Labor party. One re- 
grets that in these six months Fas- 
cism has captured Austria, Latvia 
and Bulgaria. Mussolini and Hitlei 
met to strengthen fascist plans. War 
still goes on between Bolivia ami 
Faraguay. 

"These 'six months indicate that 
the tendencies toward Fascism 
this country and- throughout the 
world are very strong. The next half 
of 1934 ought to indicate whether 
President Roosevelt has a long-time 
program that & adequate to meet the 
present crisis or whether America is 
drifting toward chaos and* fascism. 
These next six months ought also to 
tell whether other democratic coun- 
tries like Great Britain and France 
can rise to the emergency in the pre- 
sence of an outworn economic sys- 
tem and. offer the people a through, 
going solution,' or whether these 
strongly democratic nations will fol- 
low the rest of Europe into the next 
stage of capitalism, state capitalism, 
fascism. Forces are at work in all 
these democratic countries '■ that if 
properly suported by the voters will 
prevent fascism and make possible 
a cooperative democracy." 





Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Neset and fami- 
ly and Miss Carrie Aakhas motored 
to Itaska State Park jon Sunday and 
spent the : day. J 

Mr. and 1 ' Mrs. Allen jUlrich and son 
Arnold left .Tuesday for a two weeks 
vacation; at Stillwater, where they 
will visit with friends and relatives. 

Miss Ethel Richards who is a stu- 
dent nurse at the Ashbury hospital 
in Minnedpolis,;arrived Monday morn- 
ing and will spend a three weeks 
vacation; with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs.- E. 1 J. Richards. 

Mr.' and Mrs. A. J. Klungness and 
son Jimmy arrived Sunaay ±rom their 
home at; iron Mountain, Michigan, 
and will spend a week visiting re- 
latives. 

Miss Ella Holden, who is employed 
in this city spent last week enc at 
her parent;s home at Viking. 

Miss Gladys Norby returned Sun- 
day after spending a weeks vacation 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J^ 
Norby at Plummer. 

Mrs. .Mary .Bakke returned Friday 
evening after spending a month visit- 
ing ..with frie"nas ana relatives at 
Northwood, N. Dak. 

Miss Delia Daugherty, who is em- 
ployed in the ci€y, spent the week will visit* "a^Spokahe, 
enc? with her parents at Grygla. - Couer d' Alene, Idaho 

Mrs. J. A. Yotter, Mrs; Sophie! Reeds Port, Oregon. ' 
Storholm, Mrs.- T. J. Welch, Mrs. J. Mr. and Mrs. H. H. 
A. Erickspn and Mrs. C H. Jung mo- 
tored to, Detroit Lakes on Friday and 
attended a. lecture there in the eve 



mansons and Ole Granumfamijies. 

Mrs. Lela McCrystal and son Floyd 
Kelly of .Minneapolis visited last 
weeK at the M. u. Stenberg home. 

Mr. .and Mrs. John Altai and son 
Emmett of Minneapolis are guests at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs, V. Ring- 
strand. 

Mrs. J. B. Conner left Tuesday for 
Minneapolis after spending six weeks 
visiting her son and daugnter-in-Jaw, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Conner. 

Miss Mildred Erickson of Minnea- 
polis arrived Sunday and will spend 
the summer months visiting with re- 
latives, in .this city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Stenberg of In- 
ternational Falls were "the Sunday 
guests of -Mrs. -Mary Shaw. - 

Mr. and Mrs." Meiford LaBree and 
two children of Minneapolis arrived 
Sunday and are spending the week 
visiting at the W. J. i^aBree and 
Charles Conner homes. 

Mrs. J. A. Erickson and Miss 
Minnie Stonehouse spent last Wed- 
nesday at Ada attending the fair 
there. 

Mrs. R.'D. Munt visited last week 
in Duluth with Mr. and' Mrs. P. J. 
Keating and Mr. and Mrs. George 
Tweed. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Stitt, and Mr. 
and Mrs. J. S. Steen and family mo- 
tored to Crookston on Sunday and 
enjoyed a picnic at the tourist park, 

Mrs—Carl . E. Carlson, daughter 

Emma, and Miss Margaret Munt left 

Tuesday for a trip druing which they 

•"■-•- Washington, 

Portland and 



_. ' Gkouf enjcTy picnic 

, A group of girls \ enjoyed a> picnic 
supper near the golf links on Friday' 
evening. Those in| the group were 
Misses Verna Brandon, Adeline Lind- 
berg Helen and RJuth Wasgren, Bex- 
nice Berge, Martha Ristau and Grace 
SanduinV 

DISTRICT N.R.SI OFFICE STAFF 
I HAS STEAK FRY 
. The' staff of the N.R.S. offices of 
District No. 1 had; a steak fry at the 
Old Dam on Saturday following a 
meeting at the ' -local N.R.S, "~ 
Those 'participating were Roy Berg 
Miss Janet Newberry, and Miss Eliza- 
beth Dostert of the : Crookston office, 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred^ Richards, and Mi> q 
Ruth Harris of Red.Lake Falls, Elmer 
Stanghelle of Warren, Mr. ami Mrs. 
Arthur Wold- of Roseau, Donald L. 
Snyder, Miss Irma Fredericks, and 
Howard Davidson of; the local office. 

J FOR VISITOR 

Mrs.; M. O. Stenberg entertained 
severa | ladies at her home Monday 
afternoon in honor of Mrs. J* B. Con- 
ner of: Minneapolis who has visited 
for the past several v^eeks in the city. 
The afternoon was spent informally, 
at the i close of which a delightful 
lunch was served by the hostess. 
Those 'present wei;e Mrs. J. B. Con- 
ner, Mrs. E. F r Cheney, Mrs. Howard 
.Cheney, Mrs. George Erickson, and 
Mrs. Charles Conner. 

■PICNIC FOR GUESTS 
In compliment ito Charlotte and 
Aixlis ; Dale who are guests at the 
home pf Dr. and j Mrs. J. N. Nesse, 
several girls enjoyed a picnic outing 
at the Tourist park Friday. ZhON 
participating were: Charlotte and 
Ardis Dale, Eileen Rhodegaard, Nor- 
ma Ystesund, Edna Lee, Barbara 
Reep, Marion Green, Ruth Knauff, 
Joan Neset, and Stello Stadum. '' 

FOR MINNEAPOLIS VISITOR 

Honoring Mrs. John Altin of Min- 
neapolis who is a 'guest at the Vigor 
Riiigstrand home, 'Mrs. M. O. Sten- 
berg entertained at her home on 
Tuesday afternoon. The guests were 
Mrs. John Altin, Mrs. V. Ringstrand, 
Mrs. Norman Johnson, Mrs. George 
Erickson,. and Miss Mildred Erickson 
of Minneapolis. t 

PAST I NOBLE GRANDS ENTER- 
TAINED AT| LANCASTER 

The j members of . the local past 
noble grand Club motored to Lancas- 
ter Friday and were entertained at 
the home of Mrs.- Gust .. Schilbred, 
formerly of this city who now makes 
her home at Lancaster. Those in- 
cluded! in the group were: Mrs; Abbie 
Wa'ssgren, Mrs. Jack Robinson, Mrs. 
Arthur Johnson/ - Mrs. M. O. Sten- 
berg, Mrs. -R. W.j Belcher, and Mrs. 
Carl Whiting, r \ ■ . 

HAS BIRTHDAY j 

In compliment to Mrs. Charles Con- 
ner, the Birthday club met Thursday 
afternoon at Mrs. Conner's home, the j 
occasion* being her birthday. Tba 
afternoon was spent socially, and j 
lunch was served by the members, 
Those present were Mrs. Charles Con- 
ner. Mrs. George JEricksbn, <Mrs. U. 
O. Stenberg,Mrs. IS. Salveson, and 
Mrs. Leonard Hanson. 



Let Us Show You The Minneapolis Separator 
BORCHERT-HILL MOTOR CO. 

DODGE PLYMOUTH 

Minneapolis-Moline' Farm Machinery 
THIEF RIVER PALLS, MINN. . 



n ii ii i ii n i Mi a 



iiiiii i i ii im ii iii i i i i iiii i ii iii i iii iiii ii iii n i ii i nii ! 



(:i i iii : i i itn: ;iii ni ii it 



fRADE IN 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 






Quality 



Ecooaomy 






Lemons 

29c 



Sunkist 
SOO size- 
Per dozen 



Crackers 

19c 



Sodas 
2 lb. 
box 



Watch Forum Advertisements for 
barfeaih news. , ., 1 ^ 



ning. • 

Curtis and Willard Anderson and 
Harry Prugh were in Duluth Satur- 
day attending 'to business matters. 

Elra and Kenneth Porter were on 
a fishing - trip last week end at Rainy 
River; ' • 

Miss Charlotte MacAnnany, Miss 
Marie Dablow, and Charles Dablow, 
spent the Sveek end at Grand Forks 
where they visited with Richard 
Dablbw; who is employed in Grand 
Forks, and also attended the NorBh 
Dakota State Fair. 

Mr. and ' Mrs. James Cosgrove, 
daughter : Veronica, and son Bobby 
visited at the John Dahlsing home at 
Radium on Sunday. 
< Mr. and' Mrs. H^ A. Pratt spent last 
Friday pt j Detroit Lakes. -' - 

iMr. and /Mrs. Bill Simons and son 
Fred of Langdon, N. Dak., and Mrs,. 
Jim Doyle, and daughter Celia of 
Walhalla, N. Dak., visited at the R 
M. Aalbu home on Friday, '. leaving 
the same: day for Baudette, and vari- 
ous points an Canada. 

Mr. and \ Mrs. Ralph Aasl nd and 
family spent Sunday at Buxton, N 
Dak visiting Mr.- Aasland's parents. 
• Mr. andrjMrs. Frank Erickson and 
son left last week end for their home 
at Minneapolis after spending two 
weeks with- relatives. - Mr. Erickson 
was formerly employed with the 
Land O' Lakes plant in Minneapolis 
city, and- is now connected with the 
Land O' Lakes plant in Mineapolis. * 

Ed. Mattson and daughters Adeline 
and Evelyn and Miss Ruth Walle.of 
Grygla spent Friday in the city at- 
tending to j matters of business. 

Guests ;at the Albert Swanson home 
during the' summer months will be 
Mrs. Swanson's mother, Mrs. Charles 
Sampson i of Trail and . her sisiter 
Mrs. Elmer Lundstrom of Portland, 
Oregon, who arrived Wednesday. Mrs 
Lundstrom: spent several weeks with 
relatives alj; Trail before coming here. 

Mr. and -Mrs. "Kip" La Bree of 
Minneapolis are spending a few days 
at the W. J. La Bree-nome. [ 

Mrs. Ed w. Hermanson of Los 
Angles, Calif., arrived Wednesday and 
is spending} some' 'time iwjth the Heir- 



Arhart . and 
family spent last Sunday at Crook r 
ston. -- ■ t 

Mr. and Mrs. August' Johnson and 
daughters Hilver and Vandla left on 
Wednesday for a trip to Marvin, Sum- 
mit, and other points in South Da- 
l«>ta, where they will visit relatives. 
\Walter.Jung returned Sunday from 
a [weeks trip 'during which time he 
made stops at New Rockford, HI., 
Chicago, HI., Fon-du-lac and Lady- 
smith, Wise, and Minneapolis. 

Why chase your "dogs" all over 
town looking for the best bargains 
when you can find them in the Forum 
advertisements ? 



To the Voters: 

Please accept my thanks for 
the splendid vote given 'me in 
the recent Primary Election. 
Your confidence ariid support' is 
very much appreciated; I trust 
that you feel that I merit your 
continued good will. 



Paul Ai Harris 





THIS MOUTH WASH 
GIVES YOU TWIGCJ 
: AS MUCH FOR 
: YOUR MONEY '. 

"POR rude breath— or to kill 
•*- dangerous nose and throat 
gemis get Mi31 r j" ition. I's NEW 
reinforced forn j -^ives you the 
equivalent of t. .. pints of anti- 
septic for the price of one — for It 
kills germs even ^rhen it is diluted 
half strength. Same, pleasant taste 
too, .-Try it today^ 

iSlsOLUTIflN 

fuii pint IVe 



Thief Rivet Pharmacy 

O. H."teKEBBN & SONS 



Corn Flakes 



Large 

package 

3 for 



25c 



Fig Bars 



Fresh 
2 lbs. 



23c 



Matches 
23c 



Strikalite 
6 boxes 



Macaroni 

10 lb. 
box 



69c 



T,j- ATr Sandwich 1 Z r *% C< 
z vy Spread pt.iOtqt.^3 



Coffee 



A special stockholders' meeting of the 

Thief River Falls Cooperative Creamery 

k association will be held in jthe Civic and 

Commerce room in New Auditorium, FrL, 

July 6th(at 2 o'clock P. MJ ! 

Be suire to be present, j 

I By order of jthe Bocfe 

limthMge 



Vaccuum pkd. 
1 lb. glas"s jars. 



25c 



Navy Beans 

21c 



Hand picked 
• 5 lbs. 



Rice 

Fancy Blue RpseQ -| — 
4 pounds «1C 



Brown Sugar 
20C 



Medium 
4 lbs, 



Cigarettes, an leading brands 2 for 25c 



Vanilla 



Imitation, 8 oz. bottle "19c 



Mackerel, 1 lb. tall can, 3 for 25c 



Corn, Crosby, 3 No. 2 cans 



Prunes 



med. size 
3 pounds 



Super Suds 

Package luC 



25c 

- - - v 



Cleanser 
3 cans 



Sunbrite 

14c 



Gold Dust 



Large 
Package 



L. B. Hartz Stores 



f 




-tiii^s-iSeii'.^k; 




INTENT IQNAL DUPLICATE EXPOfillft'lr 



*r g i :*3 sw *j: '- . •■ & &- 



Thief River Falls Forum 

* Official Pager of Pennington County 1 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



Published Thursday of each week by the 
Forum Publishing Company 

R. M. Aalbu and H. L. Schuster, .Proprietors 
R. M. Aalbu, Editor. Bernice Berge, City Edito 



Citizens State Bank Building. Thief River Falls, Minn 



Subscription $1.00 per year in the United I States. 



"Entered as second-class matter, April 27, 1932, at 
the post office at Thief River Falls, Minnesota, under 

Ac t of M arch 3, 1879." 

r . 

ROOSEVELT SIGNS THE FRAZIER-LE^IKE BILL 

After a week of 'conflicting reports out of Washing- 
ton, we are finally assured that Roosevelt has signed 
• tne r'razier-LemKe Barm Moratorium bill, it- seems 
that the banks and insurance companies put a lot of- 
pressure on the president to get him to Yeto this bill. 
j.t is also very evident that his personal inclination was 
to kill it. This is quite in line with the president's ac- 
tions all thru the year and a halt of his aaministration. 

v Ke has apparently at all times shown a great respect for 

the wishes of the banking crowd. His opposition to in- 
flation and his policy of issuing Ijpnds for every con- 
ceivable purpose proves that. , 

This time it seems that he has taken the advice of 
Secretary Morgenthau of the treasury and signed this 
bill. No doubt it is a good political move and will be 
of some assistance to democratic candidates in the forth- 
coming campaign. A purpose which probably was in 
his mind when he yielded to the demand from the farm- 
ing sections of the country and signed the measure. 
However the farmers of the country will not forget that 
the Frazier bill for refinancing of farm debts was de- 
finitely side-tracked thru the president's use of his in- 
' fluence with members of congress. 

Just how much good the measure will do the farmers 
can not as yet be estimated. It would appear that foi 
those who avail themselves of its provisions it. will be 
as good as inflation. It would seem that whether the 
debts are scaled down or the dollar is scaled up would 
amount to the same thing so far as the top-heavy debt 
structure is concerned. Possibly this bill will serve the 
purpose better than inflation and will save the country 
some of the evils which would be bound to follow in- 
flation. 

It should be a source of a great deal of satisfaction 
to the North Dakota progressives and the Minnesota 
farmer-labor members of congress that they were able 
to crowd this measure thru. Senator Shipstead did 
Yoeman service on the floor of the senate in behalf of 
-this bill and turned back the attacks made upon it by 
the representatives of eastern capital with a fine mastery 
of the art of debate. Altho it was reluctantly signea 
by a democratic president the farmers should bear in 
mind that any benefits which may acrue to them from 
this law is as a result of the Non-Partisan League- 
Farmer-Labor- forces in the national congress. 

We have not yet been able to procure a copy of this 
law but just as soon as one is available we shall publish 
a review 'of the measure and its provisions. 

o 

FUNDS THAT ARE SACRED AND FUNDS THAT 
ARE NOT 



i - ".. i ■ 
TOlBfl feMft ffAttS PORtjtf, gfl jfeg ftlVBft frAitS, MhTN^gOTA I THURSbA? WLY 5, 1934 




««art:»b«^i^&33E3^Si^533 



Editorial Comment 

Frotai Our Exchanges 

SO-CALLED 'PAINLESS TAX* 
(Park Region Echo) 



Some publicotions denies that a sales tax will make 
the little fellow pay as much tax as he does now, arguing 
that in states having the tax, the levy on groceries and 
household goods is insignificant. 

No doubt it is on a single item, but with a cent or 
two added to the cost of everything a family buys, at 
the end of the year if will amount to a large sum. 
Twenty-five' cents a day' added to the cost of what a 
family buys, makes ?100 in a year. The thing that puts 
the sales tax over, is that a person can pay ?100 a year 
taxes without feeling it as much as if he pays only 
two-bits a day instead' of a big round $100 all at once. 

The fact remains, however, that the poor man with 
a large family, carries a far heavier load under a sales 
tax in proportion to his income than the well-to-do per- 
son with a small family. The tax on expensive furniture 
is the favorite argument of the sales tax booster. But 
rich people do not refurnish the whole house every year, 
and they do not spend anywhere near as big a propor- 
tion of their income for food and clothing as the poor 
man with a big family c«oes. 

It isn't only the daughters of the rich man who 
wear silk stockings. 



We heard a man state the other day, that he thought 
the federal government rattier inconsistent when it 
would railroad Governor Langer of 



PUMP OUT THE WATER 
(The Austin American) 

( While the President is busy injecting a hypodermic 
into: the industrial system, the railroads gomerrily on, 
rate schedules practically unchanged since the depres- 
sion hit and profits of several roads at least, swelling 
as business spurts. 

The road's have done a lot of weeping about the 
competition offered by trucks. When rates are mentioned 
they throw up their hands and blame the interstate com- 
merce commission. But — they refuse to wring the water 
from their bloated stocks. 

And this refusal results in the continued high t»tes 
If these same exorbitant rates were not working a hard- 
ship on human beings the issue would not be so con- 
cerning. 

However, there are case3 on record which prove the 
rates are keeping food, from the needy. A farmer in 
Idaho last fall had 300 acres of potatoes. After deduct- 
ing the cost of digging n„d of shipping to eastern mar- 
kets he found he would owe money on the crop. 

So the potatoes rotted in the ground'. And families 
went hungry. The farmer received nothing- -for his crop— 
the hungry humans had no potatoes— and the empty 
freights of the railroads rolled on. 

Similar instances of such an economy may be cited 
at random. 

Rio- iVT'? I- T U J°J Pre3ifen t' Roosevelt to use that 
Big Stick of his to deflate the stuffed valuations of the 
railroads. Only by pumping out the water can any rea- 

contf 'l r f a ?'° n . m /'I'" be made ' so ]on S as t^ roads 
continue to be privately operated. 



] W. C. T. U. NOTES I 

*_ ; ; i * 

ALCHOL DEALERS BITTERLY 

ASSAIL 'LAWLESS TRAFFIC 

By Gilbert O. Nations 

Editor of the Fellowship Forum 

Bootleg liquor traffic now handles 
two-thirds of the alcolholic beverages 
_sold to the American nafcnle. Repeal 
of the Prehibition ;AiJ8ftdment is a 
bonanza! to the lawless traffic. That 
step has given bootlegging the great- 
est impetus in its history. 

Such is the situation as portrayed 
June 19; by the wholesale liquor deal- 
ers of the United. States. Representa- 
tives ' of the Alcoholic Beverages 
Wholesale Industry were then in a na- 
tional conference at the Mayflower 
Hotel inithe the National Capitol City. 
They had* come to Washington pri- 
marily to discuss amendment to the 
wholesalers and rectifiers codes. 

It was stated that 10,000 firms and 
corporatfons engaged in the wholesale 
beer liquor industries were repre- 
sented, i The meeting protested tht 
Government's policy of reselling" seiz^ 
ed bottled liquors. Complaint was 
expressed that the Federpl authori- 
ties were selling at auction by the 
bottle at Boston large quantities of 
stuff taken in raids on illict- joints. 
. A New York liquor broker, who 
declared that -he has $250,000 in- 
vested in the business, alleged that 
18,000.000 gallons of bootleg stuff 
is now available, and that he was 
constantly being urged to help mar- 
ket it. He also stated that statistics 
show a drop in liquor consumption 
from more than a gallon to one quart 
per capita from 1917 to the present 
year when repeal threw open the 
floodgates. 

One delegate showed how present 
Administration plans simplify the 
problem of the bootlegger. He dis- 
played a photostatic copy of a sales 



list of corks, ribbons, labels, wrappers ' 
and packages, whereby any author- 
ized brands of wu£, whiskey, rum or 
brandy could* be imitated. ' 

What a mess has the wet gang and 
the Administration elected by them 
made of the booze trade! How wan- 
tonly false were their promises as to 
bootlegging! How shameless were 
their falsehoods as to promoting 
"real temperance-" How absurd theii 
estimates of liquor revenue. 

A few weeks ago it was stated 
on high official authority that 
more than half of the traffic was 
handled by bootleggers. Now the 
wholesalers lament that two- 
thirds of the business has passed 
into such hands. Of course sales 
so handled 'pay no revenue. Tax 
receipts from the remaining third 
are pitiably insignificant. 



cMe. FIRESIDE 
PHILOSOPHER." 

By ALFRED BIGGS 



Nobody loves an egotist.' 

• • * 
Wisdom Is better than wealth. 

• * • 
Waste no tears over yesterday. 

• • * 

It is often harder to live than to die. 

• • • 

We are all slaves to habit and custom. 

• • * 

Ignore misfortune and it will lgnor» 
you. 

• * • 

A mind perennially young Is a fountain 
of youth. 

• * • 

Aged war-makers demand young t!o- 
tims. 




MR. ROOSEVELT'S FAILURES 
(Union Advocate) 



Now that congress has adjourned until the first n.m,^^ +v 

Preside" t%o U os^^ 5 faUu iS T^ '° TJ™ * ™ ' * h ^^ ■»«& ™Se ' auS^ 
the laboring class * *° ^^ P ' edge8 made t0 " y "J. I™ c0,ltrol »*■ the northern 



The following is the conclusion 
of the Dnrrow report criticizine 
the NRA. 

BITUMINOUS COAL 

Monopolistic practices arc marked' 
in this industry .because the code 
was made and its operation direct 
ed by agencies connected with the 
larger coal companies to their advan- 
tage and to the disadvantage of the 
small . enterprises. 

Testimony was presented to show 
that the same price had been fixed 
for coal that contained a large per- 
centage of sulphur and for co 1 that 
contained but a small percentage of 
this same substance; . whereas the 
practical value of the. coal was dimin- 
ished in proportion to the presence of 
sulphur. ; 

We urge that no time be lost in 
CAsmissing for malfeasance in office 



wjien re ., , , — .-;.-. ^. 

North Dakota for the labormj class. 

The President's absolute failure to use the big whin 
on his party to put teeth into the WagnerLabor Disputes 
thi % " ustan!]in 8- example of his lack of interest in 
the forgo. ten mann" he immortalized diirine; his cam 
pa.gn for election. The National' Industrial Recovery 
Act, supposed to be his greatest contribution to the pro- 
gram of recovery, merely legalized slave wages by in- 
dustrial codes which gave Labor nothing, fortified capi« 
tal, set aside the. Sherman anti-trust law, gloried rugged, 
mdiv.^al.sm and added a few more repairs to the bro- 
mnVt J u. C ^ ,ta 1,stlc f ystem - Mr - Roosevelt surrendered 
most of his clajm on the affections of organized Labor by 
™IT his blessing to company unionism in the settle- 
ment of tlie automobile strike, and refusing to - make 
would e, hT ed If ? r rt the ° ri8inal *•«"« "11 which 
sorec! f unions. fraudulent company-spon- 

„„,-. N °„ 0n | I?" ?, ay . that con ere*» was not ? t the bee* 
bod'v „ ,-°k I B Presitent - Itis « democratic .controlled 
body quick to su ,„der its legislative: authority to th- 
chief executive. But it failed to put a curb ont the powers 

tion Lw r" C ' H "' tS tQ :r^"- e ** N > Tis -"ti-injunc! 
J°" la f • Corgress 7.-ou!d hove acted had the President 

when S f he Si "™ qUick and speedy aeti °" "e ordered 
and n sen\2"™ S ™ ! ^^ *■ « eU to ™ k = 
And when President Roosevelt suspended the pre- 
vailing wage law a week or two ago,; he demonstrated 
once more his lack of. sympathy for the very ones who 
championed .the new deal. This one act sets asidl a 
regulation which compelled, contractors on federal pro 
The ° Pay r the P™""^ wage on all construct^ work 
The^ prevailing wage in most cities is| the union wage 

Labor has been patient to a fault. It has given the 
President 100% i ovaItv . It has surrendered iS rights 
on scores of occasions. It has . withheld strike* action 
countless times when under the law it: was justified °n 



— .. uu ,. &w ui AxuiLu uuKuca lor 

o-uil misappropriation of ¥±.10 of federal funds and 
jv.-: railed to even ask for an indictment of the Morgans 
:-.r.U the Mellons who by their own admission stole 
liiiiiions due the government in income taxes. The 
gentleman was promptly informed by a "New Dealer" 
standing by, that "this is different, this money was in- 
tended for the relief of the jobless, the destitute and 
ihe hungry." 

This raises the question in our mind, if it~is _ rnore 
heinous, to steal "two bits" out of the collection plate 
uian to pilfer a five-spot, twenty-five cents of which was 
intended for the collection, from a person's pocket. 

We met Langer back in 1917, when he was attorney 
general of North Dakota and he impressed us as a hard 
headed man; proud, and a lover of power andJfolitical 
prestige. But it would be hard to convince us that he 
would stoop to grafting a petty $140. As governor of 
tne state of Norch DaKota, he could certainly make it 
worth more than that if he was inclined to 'be crooked. 
Evidently the voters of North Dakota feel the same 
way about it, if their vote last Tuesday is any criterion. 

However there, is nothing inconsistent about the 
actions of the administration in this instance. It is the 
history of the. old parties and their elected officials that 

v hX 1 , t0 .i." gh Places those wh0 steaI ™lUons 
while they clap the min who steals a loaf of bread in 
the jug. Many farmers found it was "bad medicine" 
to try to circumvent the barley bread diet by laying 
a a stock of white flour during the war, but we are 
still waiting to hear of an indictment for the graft 
wmd, resulted in selling. the government two million 
horses'" 5 lr ° nS W ' th WhiCh '° br " nd anundred thousand 

- The voters of Minnesota and of North Dakota have 
been fooled by the old parties' smoke screens a good 
many times in Hue past, but we are inclined to believe 
mat it was about . the last time in 1932, when these 

spates went so overwhelmingly into the Roosevelt • ~:~Y: — " ""'" ,v "°" un uer tne law it was iustifie^ ;„ 
I nee"; D Th ? AA , Aa " d ^RA fizzles coupled wiftthe I = t » k d '"/- " has been tolerant, sympathetic and willing o 
I.unger Deal wdl probably make it necessary to use ! y " d *° the w,shes of - the President, all to the end that 

m ' crosc °P/ ."> Snd Roosevelt Vo.os in North Dakota i permanen t recovery miht be achieved. 

in WJ6, and if the democrats want to see a man with! U ma y be the popular thini? to lav nil tv, m „ 

ve^H oId Scandinavian name "Olson" succeed Ro" e ^congress for whatever failures ^L been rSori3"ta t 

thel i„! , ? H0US , e V 937 ' they on l y need t0 ca rry Political honesty demands that the blame be laHoA th„ 
their .nv«.,..,.™ .,„ ._, .. . . __ d te ,^ t „ . Roosevelt ^^ £ ^ h ^ 

-he got it. The record does not show a single incident 
wherein he failed to get all that he asked ffr? 

mn«t nf ?l WCre a l0 V f thi " gS he failed t0 dema n°, and 
most of them we re of vit al importance to Labor. 

FROM SOCIETY'S STANDPOINT 
(St. Paul Dailey News) 

Htn„ C i l i! a i d0 ' S 1 ew deal for condemned murderers' is 8 
little lethal gas house at Canon City, similar to Nevada's 
at Carson City. Last Friday Colorado gave its new exe- 
cution chamber its first test. - 
A 30 ; -year-old rancji hand named William .Cody Kellev 

w aS ,l e ^ P J ayi T n , g J in ' t0 the cnamto! r, hound to a chair ana 
blindfolded. Under his chair was a bucket of sulphuric 
acio, above this a trough of potassium cyanide "eggs." 
The guards withdrew and sealed the chamber door. Wit- 
nesses peered into a window as guards pulled a lever 
letting the eggs drop into the bucket. Gray fumes envel- 
oped the man, whose hear almost instantly dropped- for- 
ward. Later doctors held an autopsy. 
_ "They .Pronounced the lethpl chambel a success" 
read the Dispatch. Was it ? - '** 

It may have given the young murderer a quick and 
painless death. But from society's view point it will 
prove no more successful as a crime deterrent than have 
the garrote, the guillotine, the gallows, the electric chair 
or any of the other instruments of death by which men 
vainly have tried to scare bad men into becoming good. 



their investigation and indictment "hor'seplay^into Min- 
nesota. It would, be one excellent way of getting their 
hngers into a buzzsaw. B B tneir 



BY ALL MEANS LET US HAVE THAT FUSION. 

Somehow we can't get excited over this talk about 
fusion The olfc parties' ballyhoos are deploring tear- 
fully the fact that their candidates refuse to fuse, now 
after the election is over, and some of the farmer-labor 
papers are apparently doing a little worrying over the 
possibility that they may fuse after all. We note that 
the same farmer-labor papers that fear fusion of the 
old parties, are the same ones that worried over "that 
'radical' platform." 

. j We didn't fear the platform; we gloried in it. We 
would still like it if we went down to defeat with it. 
; We don't fear a fusion of the old parties either. 
. We, would like to see it. We enjoy a good fight and we 
can see plainly that we will not have any such pleasure 
rf the old scallawags fail to get together on one can- 
didate. And boyl How we would enjoy getting them 
in the same corner so we could clout them both with 
the same club. 



WITH APOLOGIES TO TED COOK 

Prof. Pitkin says there is sufficient energy in n 
peanut to run a finst-class mind for two hours. 

iAnd there is sufficient energy in a peanut politician 
to run a first-class "municipality ragged. 



*,; i. V,- ! ■ .--"""* «* "IW uuiLiiurr 
West Virginia and western Pennsyl- 
vania regions, and replacing of them 
with persons that. have a higher con- 
ception of social obligations than an 
impulse to seize every opportunity 
ior personal agrandizement. 

We further recommend that the 
code . be amended so : that cue al- 
lowance . shall be made in determin- 
ing prices for difference in quality of 
coal and for the cost of processing it. 
Also, that the code be amended' as to 
prevent price changes without at 
least three days notice and that if a 
member protests a price change to the 
divisional! authority, it shall be held 
in abeyance pending ithe determina- 
tion of the .appeal. 

In conclusion it is| evident that 
when monopoly utilizes its power to 
increase prices, it is the consumei 
alone who must pay for the increases. 
While iinu-jr tne codes the cost of 
living increases, wages have not risen 
accordingly. The prices charged for 
some articles the poor should have, 
as much as the rich, have been in some 
instances (prohibitory. 

According to the bulletins of the 
department of labor, t iJMng the. aver- 
age cost of all foods it 1U13 as 100, 
their cost in April 1933, was 90 and 
in April 1934, it was 107. Forty-one 
cities showed in this. year an advance 
in food prices of from 10 to 27 per 
cent. i 

Rent, fuel light, house furnish- 
ings and- ; other items showed at the 
end of the year, after the codes had 
begun to j operate, a marked upward 
tendency, j 

The fact is generally overlooked or 
obscured, < but the small business en- 
terprise has often a social importance 
out of proportion to its size, since it 
is often the consumer's sole barier 
against complete, grasping, ind ir- 
responsible monopoly. 

"CHISELEK" NOT ALWAYS 
iPUBLIC ENEMY 
What is called a "chiseler" likewise 
may not always be the public enemy 
he has been represented. Instances 
arise where he is seen to be strugling 
to prevent the total absorption of an 
industry or interest into a monopol- 
istic orgainization or chain againsi 
which the; public has no other protec 
tion. > 

What the powerful producer calls 
fair, his weaker rival fiercely de- 
nounces as most unfair; and there ii. 
do way to reconcile the difference. All 
competition is savage,- wolfish, and 
relentless, iand can be nothing.else. One 
may as well cVream of making war 
lady-like as of making competition 
fair. I 

Big business begins by making it 
impossible for the small man to sur- 
vive, and,- after he is eliminated, it 
turns upon the weakest of the com- 
mon aggessors. 

We are reminded of some remarks 
made by: Senator Vnnce of North 
Carolina,, many years ago, who said 
that: . 

"At one time the question was up 
in the state legislature as to what 
sort of fish should stock their streams. 
One enthusiastic member -suggested 
the carp, j for the reason that they 
drove out all other fish, and' ended' up 
be eating leach other." 



The following is the conclusion 
of a summary of NRAVrepIy 
to the charges of the Darrow 
committee, and was prepared by 
Donald Richberg, general coun- 
sel to NRA. 

The review board criticizes a re- 
duced price of coal for railroads with- 
out the slightest knowledge of the 
basis upon which this reduced price 
was reached at . a joint meeting be- 
tween representatives of the rail- 
roads, the coal producers and the 
government. 

The board is evidently also igno- 
rant of the fact that the federal co- 
ordinator of railroads has urged every 
possible effort to protect the railroads, 
against price increases, necessary foi 
the payment of decent wages, but 
difficult for the railroads to bear in 
a time when all railroads are suffer- 
ing from a heavily reduced traffic re- 
sulting in the insolvency of a' large 
number of railroad systems. 

Under regulated hours and wages 
in the coal industry and "savage 
wolfish" competition, the result would 
be the survival only of higly mechan- 
ized, low-cost-proc'iiction mines, throw- 
ing out of employment thousands of 
miners. 

If the review board had pursued 
diligently the f cts freely available 
for its consideration, it would- have 
been forced to find that in every ma- 
jor industry protections had extended 
to small enterprises, and- monopolistic 
practices had been curbed to a degre 
nitherto unknown. 

The board made no adequate in- 
vestigation of facts, but delioerately 
encouraged' the presentation of in- 
competent,' misleading, onesided testi- 
mony by those who joined the board 
in its preconceived hostility. 

The board concluded its labors ap- 
propriately with a defense of the 
"chiseler," satisfied by the pretense 
that the sweatshop operator, the 
exploitei of child ■ labor, the ci-c- 
throat competitor, was often a man- 
'struggling t.) prevent the total 
absoi-prion of an industry or int t- 
est into a monopontistic organiza- 
tion or chain against which the 
public has no other protection. 

Disregarding the high purposes 
of the President and the intensive, 
tap.."f ul efforts cf the m i >n,.l re- 
covery administration to carry for- 
-rd his program, abusing shame- 
fully the confidence reposed in its 
membership, the board has made 
itself on agency to furnish ammu- 
nition for the malicious sniping of 
political partisans, for the covert 
scheming of monopolists and for the 
mean attacks of chislers - who seek 
private profit out of continuing that 
"sav ge, wolfish" competition which 



Minute Sermons 

By Dr. Crawford Grays 

! The day will come when doc- 
tors will not give medicine, to 
some patients, but talk like a 
revival preacher. ' 

No one is poorer by sharing 
with the church from out of 
what they receive, and no one 
gains who refuses to give. 

It is said: "Poverty drives 
love out of the window" but 
since, "depression," divorces 
have decreased. 

On a "check-up" for the 
cause of the failure of a church 
it was discovered the fault was 
not the minister's. 

Beer in its best day never 
paid the government more than 
$75,000,000, gross. Ded-uct cost 
of "set-up" to collect and cost 
to enforce and what have you 
left in the net?. 



AN ESSAHN WHEAT 

Wheat is a seed that is planted 
and grown in the West to keep the 
producer broke and the buyer crazy. 

The protein varies in content and 

the man who can guess nearest the 

strength of the protein is called 

'Wheat Grader" by the public and 

fool" by the farmer. 

The price of wheat is determined 
at primary markets, and goes up 
when you have, sold, and down when 
you have bought. 

A group of farmers sent a man 
to Edmonton to watch the wheat 
market and after a few days' delib- 
eration he wired them to this effect: 
"Some think it will go down, and 
some think it will go up. I do too 
Whatever you do will be wrong, act 
at once." 

Wheat is planted in the spring, 
mortgaged in the summer ahd lost 
; " the fall. 

"You can and- you can't; you will 
and you won't; be damned if you do 
and damned if you don't." — Prince 
Albert, Saskatchewan, Farmer-Labor 
News. 



Monde sua. he* 
■tteihare -false* 



■caliil, I titiith. 
shfij veny 

1UCC 




"A good word for a bad one it svrti midl- 
and costs Hide.'* 

.JULY 1 

2 — Assassin Guiteau shoot* 
President Garfield, 1S81. 



3 — First street cars in<U. S. ■ 
v run in Brooklyn, 1854. 




Jirst trans-Pacific cablt 
ice starts, 1903. 



PI 

owmr 



5 — P. T. Bamum, "sucker-a* 
minute,'* born 1810. 



6— Jdhn Paul JoneSj first U. 
S. naval hero, bom 1747. 

7 — Four are hanged for as- 
sassination of Lincoln, 
1865. 

8— The Liberty Bell is 
cracked while tolling; 
1835. 



Something for Weak 

Sisters to Ponder 

When a Farmer-Lab orite turns his 
back on the "cause" he never gets 
near the throne again, no ftiatter , 
howmuch he bends his back in the/ 
service of his party or how deep are 
his devotions to its principles. — 
Blooming Prairie Times. 



frt-fr'fr'fr tg"»»» »»^» & *» M"M" t " M 



Cry of the Dead 



Hardest Wood 

The yate, one of Australia's numer- 
ous hardwoods, seems to be the strong- 
est known timber, with an averaga 
tensile strength of 24,000 pounds to 
the square Inch and a maximum as 
high as 85,000— about equal to cast 
and wrought Iron. 

the review board would' perpetuate 
in its contempt or pessimistic despair- 
of the processes of civilization. 

Ji ill iTi i T, ■* ■* * * * * *AJ..%* ■ ■ 

* ■ ■* l 1' '1' V V 'V V "l 1 1'TT V tr^r^ 



SILENCE the hateful mortar's lying mutter; 

Silence the drums loud perjury; the quick 
Falsehood of bullets; the machine-gun's stutter; 

And all the bellowing cannon's rhetoric! 
Silence them all: the rifle's rapid lies; 

Silence the bugle's treacherous evasion; 
Silence the shrapnel's shrill and ghaulish cries; 

The bayonet's abrupt and false persuation! 
Out of the forum of our hush, we dead 

Cry out above the cannon and the drum: 
Never from any slaying, any dread 

Will spring to flower the millennium ! 

Begin rebuilding Eden once more: start 

Healing all broken, parted peoples whole; 

There iano other nation but the hearty. 
There is no ether country but the sdul. 



♦»»» $ »»♦'»»«♦»< 



»«.»*♦♦ » »»! 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



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' 



Thief River Falls For 



Official Paper of Pennington County ii 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota if 







Published Thursday of each week by the j . '• ' 
Forum Publishing Company 1 

E. M. Aalbu and H. L. Schuster, Proprietora 
B.' ii. Aalbu, Editor. Bernice Berge, (Sty:JEdito 



Citizens State Bank Building. Thief Biver Falls; Minn 



Subscription $1.00 per year in the United States. 



"Entered as second-class matter, April 27, 1932, a| 
the post olBce at Thief Biver Falls, Minnesota] ! undet 
Act of March 3, 1879." ; 



EOOSEVELT SIGNS THE FRAZIEB-LEMKE BILL 



■i 



After a week of -conflicting reports out of Washing- 
ton, we are finally assured ttutt Koosevelt has j [signed 
tne Frazier-Lemke Farm Moratorium* bill. It J ; seems 
that the banks and insurance companies put a;|lot.of 
pressure on the president to get him to veto this bill, 
.it lis also very evident that his personal inclination was 
to: kill it. This is quite in line with the president's ac- 
tions all thru the year and a half of his administration 
He has apparently at all times shown a great respect for 
the wishes of tbe banking crowd. His opposition; to in- 
flation and his policy of issuing femds for every con- 
ceivable purpose prdyes that. . 

. This time it seems that he has taken the advice, of 
Secretary Morgenthau of the treasury and signed this 
bill. No doubt it is a good political move and | will be 
of .some assistance to democratic cancndates in thklforth- 
coming campaign. A purpose -which probably was* in 
his mind when he yielded to the demand from the; farm- 
ing sections of the country and signed the measure. 
However the farmers of the country will not f ojrget .that 
the Frazier bill for" refinancing of farm debts was de- 
finitely side-tracked thru the president's use of \ his in- 
fluence with members of congress. \\ 

I Just how much good the measure will do the farmers 
can not as yet be estimated. It would appear that fox 
those who avail themselves of its provisions it I will be 
as good as inflation. It would seem that whether the 
debts are scaled down or the dollar is scaled up would 
amjount to the same thing so far as the top-heavy debt 
structure is concerned. Possibly this bill will serve the 
purpose better -than inflation and will- save the country 
some of the evils which would be bound to follow in- 
flation. : • ■ 

It should be a source of a great deal of satisfaction 
to the North Dakota progressives and the Minnesota 
farmer-labor members of congress that they were able 
to crowd this measure thru. Senator Shipstead did 
Yoeman service on the floor of the senate;' in behalf of 
this hill and turned back the attacks made upon'; it by 
the representatives of eastern capital with a fine mastery 
of the -art of debate. Altho it was reluctantly . signea 
by a democratic president the farmers should bear in 
mind that any benefits which may acme to them from 
this law is as a result . of the Non-Partisan League- 
Farmer-Labor forces in the national congress. : ■ / 

We have not yet been able to. procure a copy of this 
law but just as soon as one is available we shall publish 
a review of the measure and its provisions. 



FUNDS THAT ARE SACRED AND FUNDS THAT 
ARE NOT 



We heard a man state the other day, that he thought 
the federal government rather inconsistent when it 
would railroad Governor Langer of North Dakota for 
alleged misappropriation of $140 of federal funds, and 
yci,; iailed to even ask for an indictment of the Morgans 
and the Mellons who by their own admission! stole 
lniiiions due the government in ; ; income taxes: The 

, gentleman was promptly informed by a "New Dealer" 
btanding by, that "this is different, this money was in- 

; tended for the relief of the jobless, the destitute and 
the - hungry." i 

i < -m ■ .- * i-,'£^Ellk. 

'/ * ins raises the question in our mind, if it is more 

heinous to steai^'two bits" out of the collectioir plate 
tnan to pilfer a five-spot, twenty-five cents of which was 
intended for the collection, from a person's pocket. 

We met Langer back in 1917, when he was attorney 
general of North Dakota and he impressed us as: a hard 
headed man; proud, and a lover of power and political 
prestige. But it would be hard tio convince us that he 
would stoop to grafting a petty ?140. As governor of 
tne state of North DaKota, he could certainly make it 
worth more than that if he was jndined to be crooked 
Evidently the voters, of North Dakota feel the i same 
way about it, if theft vote last Tuesday, is any criterion. 
However there is nothing - i iconsistent about the 
actions of the administration in this instance. It is the 
history of the old parties and their elected officials that 
they elevate to high places those who steal millions 
while they clap the mSn who steils a loaf of bread ii 
the "jug." Many farmers found t was "bad medicine' 
to (try to circumvent the barley bread diet by! laying 
in ia stock of white flour during the war, but i-we are 
still waiting to hear of an indictment for the: gVaft 
wmdh resulted in selling the government two -i million 
Drandmg irons with which to braid a hundred thousand 
horses. 



BY ALL MEANS LET US HAVE THAT FUSION. 



Editorial Comment 

v From Our E^h^^s: " ; ■ 



SO-CALLED "PAINLESS- TAX' 
(Park Region Echo); 



. Some, publications' denies that a. sales tajc will make 
the little fellow pay, as /much tax as he does now, arguing 
that in states having the tax, the. levy \on groceries and 
household goods is insignificant. 

No doubt it is on a single item, but with a cent or 
two added to .the cost of everything a. family] buys, at 
the end of the year it will amount to a large sum. 
Twenty-five" cents a day added to the cost of what a 
family buys, makes $100 in ayea'r. The thing that puts 
the sales tax over, is that a person can pay $100 a .year 
taxes without feeling it as much as if he pays only 
two-bits a day instead' of a, big round $100 all at opce. 

The fact remains, however, that the poor man with 
a large family, carries a far heavier load undtjr a sales 
tax in proportion to his income than the well-to-do per- 
son with a small family. The tax oh expensive furniture 
is the favorite argument of. the sales tax booster. But 
rich people do not refurnish the whole house every year, 
and they do not spend anywhere neai as big a propor- 
tion of their income for food and clothing as 'the poor 
man. with a big family does. 

It isn't only the daughters (of- the rich man who 
wear silk stockings. , I) - 

■ r o— — r- 

PUMP OUT THEiWATEB 
(The Austin American) 



J 



While the President is busy injecting a- hypodermic 
into the industrial 'system, the railroads gpmerrily on, 
rate schedules practically .unchanged since the .depres- 
sion hit and profits of several roads at least, swelling 
as business spurts. 

v The roads have done a lot of weeping about the 
competition offered by trucks. When rates are mentioned 
they throw up their hands and blame the interstate com- 
merce commission. But — they refuse to wring the water 
from their bloated stocks.. 

And this refusal results in the continued high K>tes. 
If these same exorbitant rates were not working a hard- 
ship on human beings the issue would not be so con- 
cerning. 

However, there are cases on record which prove the 
rates are keeping food' from the needy,- A farmer in 
Idaho last fall had 300 acres of potatoes. After deduct- 
ing the cost of digging «nd of shipping to eastern mar- 
kets he found he would owe money on the crppj 

So the potatoes rotted in the ground-. And families 
went hungry. The farmer received nothing- ior his crop— 
the hungry humans had no potatoes— and tlie empty 
freights of the railroads rolled on: i ■ . 

Similar instances of such an economy may be cited 
at random. 

D . £ . would be well for President' Roosevelt toi use that 
Big Stick of his to deflate the stuffed valuations of the 
railroads. Only by pumping out the water caniany rea- 
sonable reduction in rates be made, so long as the roads 
continue to be privately operated. '•■'', i '■ 

— ■— « — ■ 

MR. ROOSEyELT'S FAILURES i- 

(Union Advocate) .'.' . 



Now that congress has adjourned until the first 
week m January, 1935 it is possible to review some of 



; ^a : tlOTp*B^ 



:l 



- ALCHOL DEALERS BITTERLY 
ASSAIL 'LAWLESS TRAFFIC 

.• By Gilbert Oi Nations . J 

.'■; Editor of the Fellowship .-Forum).-;' 

Bootleg liquor . trance-- now handles 
two-thirds of the tdcblhqlic beverages 
,sold to the American o*ple. Repeal 
"of "the Prohibition." AiaKdment is a 
bonanza I to the lawless r traffic. That 
step has| given bootlegging ^ie great- 
est- impetus in its history.- 

Such is the situation as portrayed 
June 19 by the wholesale liquor deal- 
ers of the United , States . Representa- 
tives of the Alcoholic Beverages 
Wholesale Industry vJere then in a na- 
tional conference at the Mayflower 
Hotel in the the National Capitol City. 
They hsd come to Washington pri- 
marily to discuss aiiendment to the 
wholesalers and rectifiers codes. 

It was stated that 10,000 firms and 
corporat 6ns engaged in the wholesale 
beer iliqiior inaustries were repre- 
sented. The- meeting • protested the 
Government's policy pf reselling seizy 
edbottljd liquors, i Complaint was 
expressed that the Federpl authori- 
ties weie selling at! auction by the 
bottle a "> Boston, large quantities of 
stuff taken in raids on illict joints. 

A New York liquor broker, who 
declared that he has; $250,000 in- 
vested in the business, alleged that 
18,000.00'0 gallons, of v- bootleg - stuff 
ia now [available, and that he was 
constantly being urged to help mar- 
ket it. He also stated that statistics 
show a [drop in liquor consumption' 
from more than a gallon to one quart 
per capita from 1917 t° the present 
year when repeal threw open the 
iloodgaUs. j 

One delegate showed how present 
Administration plans' simplify the 
problem of the bootlegger. He dis- 
played a photostatic j copy of a sale's 



list .of corks/ ribbons, labels, wrappers 
and.j packages, "thor- 

izedj brands "of ^wuifc, whiskey, nun or 
brandy could be. imitated- • 

-What a mess has the wet gang and 
the jAcJministration elected by them 
made of the booze trade I How wan- 
tonly false were their promises as to 
bootlegging I How shameless . were 
their falsehoods as to promoting 
"real temperance-"** How absurd thejx 
estimates of liquor revenue; 

A few weeks ago it was stated 
on high official authority that 
more than half of the traffic was 
handled by bootleggers. Now the 
-.. wholesalers lament that two- 
"■ thirds of the business has passed 
into Buch Viands. Of course sales 
so handled^pay no revenue. Tax 
receipts from 'the remaining third 
are pitiably insignificant. 



g^ FIRESIDE 

philosopher" 

By ALFRED BIGGS 



Nobody loves an egotist.* : 

■•.••- 
Wisdom is better than wealth. 

Waste no tears over, yesterday. 

• ■• • 

It Is often harder to live than to die. 

• • • "--' 
We are all slaves to habit and custom. 

• « * 

Ignore misfortune and it will Ignore 

you. 

: ~ * * •" 
A mind perennially young Is.a fountala 

of youths ? ■ 

• * • 

Aged war-makera demand young vic- 
tims. 




.The 
of the 



the NRA. 



following is !the conclusion 
Darrow report criticizing 



tage anc 
small en 
Testim 
that the 
for coal 



K^S^ 3 «- * ^-W= - S ^SKW S?£3SL 



BITUMINOUS COAL 

. Monopolistic practices' are marked 1 
in this industry 'because the code 
was made and its operation direct 
ed by agencies connected with tbe 
larger coal companies to their advan 
to tlie. disadvantage _of the 
erprises. 

ony was presented to show 
same price! had heen fixed 
that contained a large per- 
centage of sulphur and for co 1 that 
contained but a small percentage of 
this same "substance! whereas the 
practical value of the. coal was dimin- 
ished in proportion to the presence of 
sulphur. 

We urgethat.no time be lost in 
o.smissinjg for malfeasance in office 
the entire subdivisional code author- 



the laboring class. 

The President's absolute failure to use the big whip 
on his party to put teeth into the WagnerLabor 'Disputes 
bill is the oustanding example of his lack of interest ii 
the forgotten mann" he immortalized curing his cam- 
paign for election. The National Industrial Recovery 
Act, supposed to be his greatest contribution to I the pro- 
gram of recovery, merely legalized slave wage's by in- 
dustrial codes which gave Labor nothing, fortified capi' 
tal, set aside the Sherman anti-trust law, gloried rugge<3 
individualism and added a few more repairs to 'the bro- 
ken-oown capitalistic system. Mr. Roosevelt snrrend-ered 
most of his claim on the affections of organized Labor by 
giving his blessing to company unionism in the settle- 
ment of the automobile strike, and refusing to* make 
a determined fight for the original Wagner bill which 
Would have outlawed these fraudulent company-spon- 
sored unions. , .; : ~. 

No one can say that congress was not i>t the bee* 
ana call of the President. Itis a democratic ^ontrollej 
body, quick to su .nder.its legislative authority to th» 
chief executive, But it failed to put a curb ont the powers 
of the federal courts to hi validate- th* Norris anti-injuno- 
tion law Corgress would have acted had the President 
demanded the same quick and speedy action he ordered 
^"ell^fr ™" " emandirS *e ri^t jtomak, 

And when President Roosevelt suspended the pre- 
vailing wage law a week or two ago, he demonstrated 
once more his lack of. sympathy for the very ones who 
championed the new deal. This one act sets (aside 
regulation which compelled contractors on federal nro- 
j«ts to pay the prevailing wage on all construction work 
The prevailing wage in most cities is the union wage 



The voters of Minnesota and lof North Dakota have 
been fooled by the old parties' i moke screens ia 1 good 
many times in the past, but we ire inclined to Believe 
that it was about, the last time in 1932, when! these 
states went so overwhelmingly into the Roosevelt 
column. The AAA and NRA fizzles couplel with the 

Lunger Deal will probably mato it necessary! to use „„„. ,. 

a microscope to find Roosevelt vp'-v-s in North i Dakota I permanent recovery miht be achieved, 
m 1936, and if the democrats watt to see a man with 
the, plain old. Scandinavian name 'Olson" succeed Roose- 
velf in tlie White House in 1937, tiey only need to! carry 
their investigation and indictmen; horseplay into! Min- 
nesota. It would be one excellent way of getting' their 
nngers into a buzzsaw. 



Somehow we cant get excited over this talk: about 
fusion. The old parties' ballyhocs are deploring' tear- 
fully the fact that their candidates refuse to fuse, now 
after the election is over, and soiAe of the farmeij-labor 
papers are apparently doing a little worrying over the 
possibility, that they may fuse afier all.' We npti that 
the same farmer-labor papers th it fear fusion of the 
old parties, are the same ones tbkt worried over! "that 
'radical' platform." ! 1 . 

We didn't fear the platform; we gloried in! it; We 
would still like it if we went doim to defeat with it. : 

We don't fear a fusion of ttie old parties iither. 
We would like to see it We enjokr a good fight and we 
can see plainly that we will not bkve any such pleasure 
if the old scallawags fail to get together on one can- 
didate. And boy! How. we woull enjoy' getting j them 



in the same corner so we could 
the same club. 



clout them both; with 



TED COOK 



WITH APOLOGIES TO 

Prof. Pitkin sjlys there is £ ufficlent energy \ in 
peanut to run -a first-class mind or. two hours, i 

And there is sufficient energy ■' '— ' — '•- -->'"-• 

to run a first-class~municipnlity 



t 



in a, peanut- politician 
rajrgei 



Labor has been patient to a fault. It has given the 
Pres,dent 100% loyalty. ': It has surrendered ite righte 
on scores of occasions. It has . withheld strikd action 
couptless times when under the law it was justified in 
v5m "t 8 *^ ■ l een * olerant ' sympathetic and willing to 
,yeild to the wishes of the President, all to the end that 
-—nanent recovery miht be achieved. I 

It may be the popular thing to lay all the biame on 
congress for whatever failures have been recorded, bnt 
political honesty demands that the blame be laid on the 
doorstep of Mr. Roosevelt. Whenever he wanted anything 
—he got it. The record does not show a single incident 
wherein he failed to get all that he asked for. 

There- were a lot of -things he failed to demand, and 
most of them were of vital. importance to Labor. " 

FROM SOCIETY'S STANDPOINT 
(St. Paul Dailey Ncwb) 

i«> C , 0l0 v a ?°' s new deal for condemned murderers is I 
little lethal gas house at Canon City, similar to Nevada', 
at Carson City. Last Friday Colorado gave its new exe 
cution chamber its first test. . 

A 30-year-old ranch hand named'William Cody Kelley 
was led' praying into the chamber, bound to a chair and 
blindfolded. Under his chair was a bucket of sulphuric 
acid-, ahove this a trough of potassium cyanide "eggs " 
The guards withdrew and sealed the chamber door. Wit- 
nesses peered into a window as guards pulled a lever 
Jetting the eggs drop into the bucket. Gray fames envel- 
oped the man, whose hear almost instantly dropped for- 
ward. Later doctors held an autopsy. j 

"They pronounced the lethfl chambel a success " 
read the Dispatch. Was it?- ^T* 

It may have given the young murderer a quick and 
painless death. But .from society's view point! it win 
prove no "ihore successful as a crime deterrent than ha vO 
the garrote, the guillotine, the gallows, the electric chair 
or any of the other instruments of death by which men 
vainly have tried to scare bad men mto becoming good. 



West Virginia and western Pennsyl- 
vania regions, and replacing of them 
with persons that have a higher con- 
ception of social obligations than an 
impulse io seize every -opportunity 
loi* personal agrandizement. 

We further . recommend that- the 
code be amended so r that cue al- 
lowance shall 'be made in determin- 
ing prices for diiferehce in quality of 
coal and for the cost'of processing it. 
Also, that the code he amended* as to 
prevent price changes" without at 
least three days notice and that if a 
member protests a price change to the 
divisions^ authority it - shall be held 
in abeya ice pending ; the determina- 
tion of t te appeal, j ' " 

In conclusion it is evident that 
when; monopoly utilizes its power to 
increase prices, it is; the "' consumei 
alone who must pay -for the increases. 

"While pneur the codes the cost of 
living increases, wages have not risen 
accordingly.. The . prices charged for 
some articles the poor- should have, 
as much as the rich, have been in some 
instances prohibitory.; 

Accord ng to the bulletins of the 
department of labor, ti&ing the aver- 
age- cost of all foods: ii 1913 as 100. 
then; cost in April 1933, was 90 and 
in April 1934, .it was 107. Forty-one 
cities showed in this year" an advance 
in food prices of from 10 to 27 per 
xent. 1 -. - . 

Rent, fuel light, house furnish- 
ings and' other items showed at~the 
end of the year, after, the -codes had 
begun to operate, a (marked upward 
tendency. . j . 

The fact is generally overlooked or 
obscured, but . the small business en- 
terprise has often a social importance 
.out: of proportion to: jits size, since it- 
is ofteh : | the consumer's, sole barier 
against complete,- grasping, ' ind ir- 
responsible monopoly." 

••CHISELER" NOT, ALWAYS 
| PUBLIC; ENEMY 
"What is called a "chiseler" likewise 
may. not [always .be the public enemy 
he has been . represented. ^Instances 
arise where he is. seen ;tb be struglin'g 
to preverit the. total absorption of an 
industry jor interest Snto: a monopol- 
istic organization. ; or K chain - againsl 
which thi public has ino other protec 
tion.. j . ; ; 

What the powerful ' producer calls 
fair, his |weaker rival fiercely de- 
nounces as most unfair; and there ic 
no way to reconcile the difference. All 
competition is savage, wolfish, and 
relentless^ and can be nothing else. One 
may as well dream -of making war 
lady-like as of makuig ■ competition 
fair. I ; . 

Big business begins by making it 
impossible for the small man to sur- 
vive, -and, after he is eliminated, it 
turns upon the weakest of the com- 
mon.-aggessors. . 

We art reminded of some remarks 
made by. Senator 'yiance of North 
Carolina, many years ago, who said 
that:".-.. | .. j ; 

"At one time the Question was up 
in the state legislature' as to what 
sort of fish should stock their streams. 
One- enthusiastic"niembe'r . _ suggested 
the carpj-for. the reason' that Hiey. 
drove :duo all other' fish,\ aid' ;ehded tip 
be 'eating* eachjolhfer/ , " r "' ' - >v 



The following is the conclusion 
of a summary of NRA's reply 
to the charges of the Darrow 
committee, and was prepared by 
Donald Richberg, general coun- 
sel to NRA. _ 

The review board criticizes a re- 
duced price of coal'for railroads with- 
out the slightest knowledge of the 
basis upon whicn this reduced ' price 
was reached at a joint meeting be- 
tween representatives of the rail- 
roads, the coal producers and the 
government. - . 

The board is evidently also igno- 
rant of the fact that the federal co- 
ordinator of railroads has urged every 
possible effort to protect the railroau- 
against price increases, necessary foi 
the payment of decent wages, but 
dinlcult for the -railroads to bear in 
[a time when all railroads are suffer- 
ing from a heavily reduced traffic re- 
sulting in the insolvency of a large 
number of railroad systems. 

Under regulated hours and wages 
in the coal industry and "savage 
wolfish" competition, the result would 
be the .survival' only of higly mechan- 
ized, iow-cost-prod'dction mines, throw- 
ing out of employment thousands of 
miners. 

If the review board had . pursued 
diligently the f cts freely available 
for its consideration, itwould' have 
been forced to find that in every ma- 
jor industry protections had extended 
to small enterprises, and* monopolistic 
practices had been curbed to a degree 
-nitherto unknown. 

The board made no adequate in- 
vestigation of facts, but delioerately 
encouraged* the .presentation of in- 
.competent, misleading, onesided testi- 
mony by those who joined the board 
in its preconceived " hostility. 

The board conclud'ed its labors ap- 
propriately with a -defense of the 
"chiseler," satisfied by- the pretense 
: that .the .sweatshop operator, the 
exploiter of child labor, the ci-c- 
throat competitor, was often a man- 
struggling tj present the total 
absorption of an industry or inter- 
est into a. monopontistic organiza- 
tion or chain against which the 
public has no other protection. 

Disregarding the high purposes 
of the President and the intensive, 
lai-j'fiil efforts cf the hiUn.il re- 
covery administratibn to carry for- 
ward his program, abusing shame- 
fully the confidence reposed in -its 
membership, the board has .made 
itself on agency to furnish ammu- 
nition for the- malicious sniping of 
political partisans, -for the covert 
scheming of monopolists- and for the 
mean' attacks of chislers- who seek 
private profit out of continuing that 
"saj ge, wolfish" competition which 



■ 



te Sermons 

By Dr. Crawford Grays 

The day will come when doc- 
tors will, not; give medicine, to 
some patients, but talk -like a 
:reviyal preacher.- 

- No one is:poorer by sharing 
with the church from out of 
what they receive, and no one 
gains who .refuses to Tgive. 

It is said: "Pdverty drives 
love out of the window" but 
since "depression," ? divorces 
have decreased. 

.On a "check-up" for the 
cause of the failure of a church 
it was discovered the fault was 
not the minister's. 

Beer in its best day never 
paid the government more than 
?75,000,000, gross. Deduct cost 
of "set-up" to 'collect and cost 
to enforce and what have you 
left in the net?. 



AN ESSAirm WHEAT 

Wheat is a seed that ia planted 
and grown in the West to keep the 
producer broke and the buyer crazy. 

The protein varies in content and 
the man who can gness. nearest the. 
strength of the protein is called 
"Wheat Grader" by the public and ' 
"fool" by the farmer. -.-.;. 

The price of whest-'is- determined 
at primary markets, and goes up 
when you have sold, and do)wn when 
you have bought. 

A group of farmers sent a man- 
to Edmonton to watch the wheat 
market and after a few days' delib-- 
eration he wired them to this effect: 
"Some think it will go down, and 
some think it will go up. I do too; 
Whatever- you do will be wrong, act 
at once." 

Wheat is planted in the spring, 
mortgaged in the summer and lost 
in the fall. 

"You can and* you can't;- you will 
and you won't; be damned if you do 
and damned if you don't."-4-Prince 
Albert, Saskatchewan, Farmer-Labor 
News. 



SieSddV«^st0J , « 
Monde ana he* 
^teethsit -false/ 



•urhii* I t&fhJt 
Sfcefc verv 




t JULY 

^2— Assassin Guiteau shoot* 

President Garfield, 1881. . 

3 — First street cars in U. S. 
run. ia Brooklyn, 1854. 



•ft(6i-*-o.-e;4— First trans-Pacific cabl* 
^•jyKPAftg service starts, 1903. 



& 



[ycKE* 



5— P. T. Bamum, "sucker-** 
minute," bom 1810. 



n 



6— John Paul Jonesi first U. 
S. naval hero, born 1747. 

7— Pour are hanged for as- 
sassination of Lincoln, 
1865. 

fcV-Tbe Liberty Bell is 
cracked while tolEne; 
2835. 



Something for Weak 

Sisters to Ponder 

When a Farmer-Labbrite turns hi3 
back' on the "cause'' he never gets - 
near the- throne again, no (batter 
how much . he bendB his back in the 
service of his party or how deep are 
his devotions to its principles.—. 
Blooming -Prairie Times. 



HarcUst Wood 

. The yate, one of Australia's numer- 
ous hardwoods, seems to be the strong- - 
est known timber, with an average 
tensile strength of 24.000 pounds to 
the square Inch and a maximum a* 
high as 85,000— about equal to cast 
and wrought Iron. 



the review board would* perpetuate 
in its contempt or pessimistic despair^, 
of the processes; of civilization. 



Cry of the Dead ; 

SILENCE the hateful mortar's lying matter; 
■■.'■' Silence the drums loud perjury; the quick 
-Falsehood-of bullets^the machine-gun's stutter; 

And all the bellowing cannon's rhetoric! 
Silence them all: the rifle's rapid lies; 

Silence the bugle's peacherous evasion; 
Silence the shrapnerVsnrill and ghaulish cries; 

The bayonet's abrupt and false persuation! 

Out of the forum of our hush, we dead 

Cry out above the cannon and the drum: 

Never from any slaying, any dread 

Will spring to flower the millennium! 

Begin rebuilding Eden once more: start ' 

Healing, all broken, parted peoples whole; 
There is^nt), other nation but the heart;^; 
j;-Thereisno'©therc^ '\ 



;"•£ 




J 







K^HOUt^tikmi 



TfitBf BIVEE fJ&JS FORtiM, TBIEP RlVfeR: gAtt3;_ttiitiJg36*A:. ?HtiBSDAY- Jtrilf g. IflM 




HftaaiBBiBliiaEia 



I HIGHLANDING 

• ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Sigurdson and 
daughter Dolores and Mr. and Mrs. 
C. Nelson and family, of Goodridge 
visited at the GTDenny home 'Sunday. 

Sheriff and' Mrs. O. L. Ihle of Thief 
River Falls and Miss Dorothy Kor- 
stad were supper guests at the Anton; 
Johnson home Sunday. 

Harold, Leo and Walter Johnson, 
Ted Thoreson, Albert Haglund, Vivian 
Johnson and Dorothy Korstad motor- 
ed to St. Hilaire Sunday to attend the 
ball game. It resulted in a victory 
'for Goodridge by the score of 12 to 6 

Mr. and Mrs. • S. Sigurdson and 
daughter Dolores motored to Middle 
River one day last week. 

Harold Johnson motored to Middle 
River Tuesday. 

Ed. Korstad motored to Thief Riv- 
er Falls Saturday. 

Miss Ruth Bergquist visited at the 
A. Johnson home Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday of last week". 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Engen called 
at the Palmer Wold home Tuesday 
night. 

County Engineer and Mrs. J. A. 
Eriekson were callers in Highlanding 
Tuesday. 

}~ GOODRIDGE ~*| 

Adeline Stephenson left ^Monday 
for Grygla where she will be employ- 
ed. 

Ms. Olaf Solheim and daughter 
Darleen of Thief River. Falls, Mrs* 
Halmer Nelson 01 St. Clair, Minn, and! 
Mrs. Theo. Gilbertson visited friends' 
here Wendnesday afternoon. 

(Mr. anc? Mrs. A. B. Mandt and! 
daughter Hazel left Monday for a trip 
to Minneapolis where they visit rela- 
tives and friends. 

TillieHegtnedt who has been em- 
ployed' at the telephone office is en- 
joying a three weeks vacation at her 
home. 

Myrtle Stephenson arrived Mon- 
day from Minneapolis to visit foi 
some time at the home of her mother 
Mrs. Gena Stephenson. 

The baseball game played at St 
Hilaire Sunday resulted in a victory 
for the Good'ridge team the score be 
ing 7 and 12. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Peterson and. 
family, John Gonnering, and Guy] 
McEnelly attended the baseball game 
at Grygla Sunday. 



KRATKA 



Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Strand and son. 
of Minneapolis are guests of Mr. ana 
Mrs. Olaf Brovik. Mrs. Strand is a 
sister to Mr. Brovik. 

Mrs. John Graige and son Vernon 
spent' Tuesday afternoon with her 
brother and sister-in-law Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Johnson. 

Mrs. S. Peterson and infant daugh- 
ter of Grand Forks, have been spend- 
ing the past week at the home of her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Torgua Lar- 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Trunes of 
Shevlin,, motored up here on Tuesday 
and visited at the Henry Runnestrand 
home. They returned on Wednesday. 

Julius Hanson and Joseph Johnson 
were business callers in Goodridge 
Thorsday evening. ^ 

John Graige of Grand Rapids, Minn, 
motored here on Thursday, returning 
| the same day, with Mrs. Graige and 
sons Vernon and David who have 
been visiting here the past three 
weeks. 

Tom Belland of Goodridge was- a 
business, caller at the Anton Jenson 
home on Wednesday. - 

Carl Hoven was a visitor in Thief 
River Falls on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ole Hofdahl spent the 
week end visiting with relatives and 
friends at Beltrami. 
'A large crowd attended the Smiley 
and Kratka community club picnic 
which was held* at the Adam Lendo- 



| EAST ROCKSBURY 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Arne and* aon 1 
Irvin returned home on Tuesday from 
Fargo where they visited at the Hj 
Hanson home. They were accompanU 
ed home by. Mrs.. Hanson and four) 
sons who will visit at the Arne and 
M. Hanson homes here. I 

Kenneth Finstad came on Tuesday 
to the Martin Finstad home where 
he will be emplyed. 
^ C. E. Oien, Ruth and' Marie Oien 
and Elida' Engehretson were Fridfiy 
evening supper guests at the M. Fin- 
stad home. 

Miss Eida Engebrefson came on 
Thursday for a visit at the C. 'E. 
Oien home. . 

Mrs. Ole Lian, Mrs. Axel | Engel- 
stad, Mrs. Calvin Toomey, Mfs. Mar- 
tin Finstad and Marie Oien Mtended 
the canning demonstration in ThieJ 
River Falls on Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Hanson one 
children were Sunday dinner guests 
at the Andrew Aine home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Housket Jpan 
and Rawlins ,Houske, Mr. ana Mrs 
Ed. Houske and' Alfred Arne visiter 
at the M. Finstad home Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Seeland anc 
Elida Engehretson visited at the Car! 
Finstad home on Saturday evening. 

Members of the Rocksbury Com- 
munity club motored 1 to Crookston or 
Saturday to pttend the reunion oJ' 
the Northwest School of Agriculture 
and present a 3-act play. 

Foxes Eat Snow 
Foxes do not require water during 
the months when there is snow on the 
ground. They prefer to eat the snow 
rather than drink water. 



~~BRA¥^ 



Mrs. Annie Lindbloom ancTlbasille 
visited with- Mrs. Lawrence Best 
Tuesday. 

Mrs. A. E. Anderson returned t« 
St. Hilaire after visiting some tim« 
at the John Scholin home. 

Mrs. Herbert Grinde and family 
spent Saturday afternoon at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. J. 0. Swanson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lund Fevig and 
family of Ulen spent Sunday visit- 
ing at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
P. - Hegstrom. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Johnson of 
St. Cloud arrived -Sunday for a 'visit 
at the home of his father, Gust John- 
son. 

'Misses Lillian Larson and Hazel 
Person returned home Sunday after 
serving as delegates at the Luther 
League convention at Grand Forks. 

Olaf Larson and Nels Stannes fwere 
business callers at the John Swan- 
son home Monday. j 

Mrs. Annie Lindblom left Monday 
for Thief River Falls to spend a few 
days visiting friends and -relatives. 

Theodore Anderson and ssn Ver- 
non and Stanley and daughter Nor- 
ma and Miss Inga Olson were Sun- 
day visitors at the O. K. Sevre home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rux came re- 
cently to spend a couple days visit- 
ing relatives. 

Mrs. Lawrence Best and daughter 
visited at John O. Swanson's Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hohisel and 



beja home on Sunday. The ball game family were Friday evening visitors 
between "the Kratka and Silvertonjat the home of Mr. and Mrs. Emil 



BLACK RIVER 



boys turned out 12 to 9 in favor of 
Kratka. 

The Telemarken Luther League will 
meet at the R. M. Johnson home Sun- 
day the 8th. 

Mrs. H. Waale and Mrs. R. M. 
Johnson are entertaining. There will 
be a ball game there also. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Lorrent visit- 
ed relatives and friends in Grand 
Forks last week and* also attended 
the State Fair there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Johnson, and 
sons were social callers at the Jul- 
ius Hanson home Saturday evening. 

Miss Hazel Runnestrand left on 
Wednesday for Shevlin where she 
will be employed. 



NORDEN 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Harris vis- 
ited at the Gordon Olson home Tues- 
day evening. 

Mrs. P. A. Harris, Miss Lilas Ol- 
son and Mrs. Johnson" attended the. 
ladies' aid at Rev. Dahle's in St. Hil- 
ainre Friday afternoon. 

Soren Sorenson, Gorden Olson and C. 
T. Slinger, school board of District 
135 met at the Gordon Olson home 
Friday to hire a teacher for the com- 
ing year. Mrs. Chas. Sorenson was 
selected'. _^"\ 

The Lockrem. girls attended a" pic- 
nic at the Kindal church Sunday. . 

The hail storm <\did qonsiderab|e 
considerable damage in this vicinity. 

Gardens fields and orchards were 
damaged ps well as telephone lines 
and windows. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Johnson are 
moving to Thief River Falls on Mon- 
day. 

Mrs. D. W. Ayres, sons Dake and 
Eldred and d-aughter Iris visited at the 
Gordon Olson home Sunday. 

Anna Anderson - visited with her 
brother Ed, and Albert Johnson Sun- 
day. 

Oline Skaar visited with friends in 
Thief River Falls Saturday. 

Melvin Gabrielson called at John 
Sjolsvold- Friday. 

Ethel Sorensnn called on friends 
and relatives in Thief River Falls 
Monday. 



Eriekson and Lund 
FUNERAL HOME 

M. P. ERIGKSON 

Funeral Director 

Prompt Ambulance Service 

-321 N. Main 

Day and Night Phone 404-W 




by VIVAUDOU 

25** 

sty* 




-f Ofl course, Mavis Talcum is as 
indispensable as a razor to well 
grooming after shaving. Men prove 
that everyday. But don't stop there... 
To really enjoy the benefits of Mavis 
Talcum, as millions of both men and 
womei now do, sprinkle or lightly 
massage the same incomparable 
Mavis I Talcum over the entire body. 
That's comfort — and protection! 
Cools- — absorbs perspiration-r- de- 
odorizes. 



s 



TALCUM 
POWDER 



Larson. 

Mrs. A. P. Hegstrom and Lulu 
were Friday visitors at the home of 
Mrs. Lena Hallstrom of St. Hilaire. 

Miss Esther Johnson returned home 



Felix Anderson called at the Albert 
Anderson home Monday evening. 

Henning Eriekson of Ogden 
Iowa"came home Monday to visft with 
his motKfetJ Mrs. Andrew Eriekson 
and also otfrw^ relatives and friends 
for some time. 

Raymond Anderson called at the 
Alfred Halstrom and Clause Adolph- 
son homes, Monday evening. 

Ferdie Anderson called at the Oscar 
Mosbeck home Monday evening. 

Hilding * Adolphson and Raymond 
Anderson are working i on a road in 
Polk Center this week: ""' 

Rev. Henning' Eriekson visited at 
the Milcher 1 Eriekson home M/onday 
evening. ' t 

Misses Hadel and Edna Adolphson 
visited at t^ie Felix Anderson home, 
Tuesday afternoon. j 

Business iallers in j Thief River 
Falls on Tuesday were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert Anderson and daughter Mer- 
riam, Mr. Alfred Dahlstrom" and son 
Alvin, Rev. I Henning lErickson and 
Axel Eriekson, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Hallstrom. j j 

Esther and Joe Larson of Thief 
River Falls called at the Alfred Dahl- 
strom homej Tuesday, j 

-Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anderson and 
daughter Merrian called at the Felix 
Anderson home Tuesday evening. . 

Rev. Hen ling Eriekson and Axel 
Eriekson visited' at the Alfred Dahl- 
strom home. Tuesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Axel Swanson, Doris 
Lorraine an i Kenneth jvisited at the 
Felix Anderson home Tuesday even- 
ing. | 

Gladys and Ferdie Anderson cal- 
led at the Albert Anderson home 
Wednesday evening. I 

Quite a large number of people 



daughter Merriam visited at the Alf . 
Dahlstrom home Friday evening. 
Rev. Henning Eriekson of Oj. 
Iowa, Alfred Dahlstrom, Hattie 
Alvin and Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. 
Peterson visited at Thief River Falls 
Sunday evening. 

Clara Olson-feafi^been employed at 
th^JBiH-TKruse home for some time. 
Albert .Anderson and Gust Naplin 
were business callers^at "Wylie Mon- 
day- 
John Scholin, Martin Eriekson and 
Alfred Sorvig called at the John 
Kruse home Monday afternoon. 

Rev. G. H. Eriekson, Axel Eriekson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anderscon, Mer- 
riam and Raymond were dinner 
guests at the, Alf red Dahlstrom home 
Sunday. 

(Mr. and Mrs. John Naplin, Helen 
and Rose motored to ^Crookston, Sat- 
urday. 

Alfred Dahlstrom, Hattie and Al- 
vin and Mr. and Mrs. M, J. Peterson 
visited at the J. A. Anderson home on 
Saturday evening. 

Grandpa Naplin visited at the' Al- 
fred Sorvig home Friday. 

Felix Anderson and daughter 
Gladys, Mr. and Mrs. Chris Kruse 
and daughters, Shirley Mae and Dar- 
leen, Mr. and Mrs. Axel Swanson, 
Doris, Lorraine and Kenneth and Mr. 
and Mrs. Gust Peterson and daughter 
Muriel returned hjme Sun Jay evening 
after spending a couple days at the 
Red Lake Narrows. . 

Helen Naplin visited at the Alfred 
Sorvig home Sunday. 

Axel Eriekson arid Rev. G. "H. Eriek- 
son called at the John Stiger home 
Tuesday evening. 

Mr. ■ and Mrs; Charley Ness and 
family were dinner guests at the, 
Henry Sorenson home Sunday: 



from Grand Forks Friday where she ! from this vicinity attended the ball 



had visited 
home. 



at the. Victor Peterson 



Read Forum advertisements and 
know where the best -bargains in the 
city are to be found. 



Saturday 

JulyZ 



at the 



S of N Hall 

The Well Known 




COMPANY 
Arney -Wick 

famous 

Accordionist and 
Comedian 

and his 

Vaudeville 
Troupe 

Presenting 

Singing, Dancing 

and Musical 

Novelties 




ARNIE WICK 

A Guaranteed Attraction. 
We work clean, so bring the family. 

Fun For Young and Old. 

You'll laugh 'till you cry, when you 

see and hear, Arney, "The Funny 

Norwegian." 

SHOW STARTS AT 

8:30 

\ SHARP - 

ADMISSION 

15c, 25c 

Free Dance to All Show 
Patrons, 



game at St. Hilaire, Sunday after- 
noon. ■ ; 

Clara Olson, Lorreta Kruse, .Mrs. 
Enock Sundholm and Bill Kruse mo- 
tored to Red Lake Fals Sunday even- 
ing- I . 

Mr. and -Mrs. Albert ■ Anderson and 
daughter Merriam called at tne 
Dahlstrom home, Tuesday afternoon. 

Rev. Henning Eriekson and Axel 
Eriekson visited at the Albert Ander- 
son home Thursday evening. 

Felix Anderson, Gladys, Marie, 
and Ferdie yisited at the Chris Erase 
home Thursday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Sorvig, Evelyn 
and Robert returned home Sunday 
evening after spending a few days 
visiting with friends and relatives at 
Winger and also at other places. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Oson and daugh- 
ter Alvina visited at the Harvey 
Be rgards home at Thief River FalB 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Wallbeck passed away at her 
home Sunday evening jfrom a heart 
attack. , \ | 

Miss Alice Naplin and Charles Du- 

is of Grand Forks N. D. arrived 
here Monday to visit the former's par- 
ents, Mr. arid Mrs. John Naplin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert j Anderson and 



Legal Notices 

ORDER LIMITING TIME TO VILE, 
CLAIMS WITHIN THREE 

th } erIJn ANDF0R HEABmG 

State of Minnesota, 
County of Pennington- 

IN PROBATE ;COURT 
- In the matter of the Estate of 
Bertha M. Jacobson, Decedent. 
; Letters Testamentary this day hav- 
ing been granted to Ruth Ida Hoium 
and it appearing by the affidavit of 
said representative that there are no 
debts of said decedent: 

IT IS ORDERED, That the time 
within which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against her estate in this Court, be 
and the same hereby (is, limited to 
three.months from andl after the date 
heredf; and that Saturday the 29th 
day of September, 1934,-, at 10 o'clock 
A M., in the Probate 1 tSrart Rooms 
at the Court House at Thief River 
Falls, in said County, be, and the 
same hereby is, fixed land appointed 
as the time and place for hearing up- 
on the examination, adjustment and 
allowance of such claims as shall be 
presented within the time aforesaid. 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in The Thief 
River, Falls Forum as provided by 
law. * 

Dated June 18, 1984. 

Andrew Bottelson 

(COURT SEALf ° f Probate C ° u * 
H. 0. Berve 

Attorney for Representative 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 

June 21-28 — July 6 



CI SAS°? r F0R HEARING ( 

wnx FOR PE0BATE ' 

STATE OP' MINNESOTA, 
County or Pennlneton, !bs. 

ix 'probate court 

oi N rhJT5 MATTER OF THE ESTATE 
?F Christopher H. Porter, also known 
as C. H. Porter, or Chris H. Porter, 
ue.ceuent. 

THE. STATE OP MINNESOTA TO 
?irS S -?, ort . er ' Kenneth !H. Porter, Ken- 
neth H. Porter, Jr., Nettle Ove, and Ida 
pve, and all persons Interested in the al- 
lowance and probate of ithe will of said 
decedent: The petition of Elra C. Por- 
ter being: duly filed in this court, repres- 
enting: that Christopher ! H. Porter, also 
known as C. H. Porter, then a resident of 
the County of Pennington State of Min- 
nesota, died .on the 19th day of June 1934. 
leavlna: a last will and testament which 
Is presented to this court with said peti- 
tion, and pray In that said Instrument 
be allowed as the last will and testament 
of said decedent, and that letters of Ad- 
ministration with the will annexed bt 
Issued thereon to Elra C. Porter, NOW 
THEREFORE, you, and each of you, are 
hereby cited and required to show cause, 
if °-hy you have,- before this -jourt, at 
the Probate Court Rooms in the Court 
House, in Thief River Pallsrcounty of 
Pennlnstoa State of Minnesota, on the 
21st day of July 1934, at 10:00 o'clock A. 
ST., why the prayer of said petition 
should not be granted. 

WITNESS THE HONORABLE, An- 
drew Bottelson, Judge of said court, 
and the seal of said court, this 25tii 
day of June 1934. t 

Andrew Bottelson 
Judge. 
COURT SEAL 
H. o. Berve, ; 

Attorney for, Petitioner ' 
Thief River Palls, Minn. 

- June 28 July *-U 



atent to a Woman 

e first American invention ,.- 
was patented by a man, the records 
further state, that the process was 
"found out by Sybille his wife." For 
19 years after the enactment of the . 
patent law in 1790 not a single one of 
the 10,000 patents issued was granted 
to a woman. The first successful ap- J 
plication from a woman was recorded <* 
In 1809 by Mary Kies and was granted _ 
for a method of weaving straw with 
silk or thread. 



-L- 



Dr.H.J.Rice 
DENTIST 

X-RAY LABORATORY 

Phone — Office, 207 Resident*, 249 

First NatieniJ Bank 'Building 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 



, l M S M {"5"5***<-"i"5' *♦ * •> *> # * •;-** •:• * •: 



Auction 







A carload of broken snd^ 
unbroke high grade 



nev. and Mrs. Dahie"and y 'dau B h- % Percheron and Belgian 



ters Grace and Margarete, Mrs. 
Forde and Mrs. Haimey and daugh- 
ter Arleen visited Monday at the 
at the Gunnnard Lindquist home. 

Verna and Arthur Almquist /spent 
the weekend visiting friends at Fer- 
tile, i 

Lyda Muzzy visited with her sister, 
Mrs. Henry Sorenson on Monday. 

Arleen McKercher returned home 
Friday after spending her vacation 
at different points in Illinois. 

Would Be Pleated " 
"What would your father say If he 

heard the awful words you use?" 
"He would be pleased — he is as deaf 

as a post."— Gazzettlno niustrato, 

Venice. 



Silly Queltion 

"Every time 1 raise my hand my 
husband gives me a good beating." 
"Why don't you tell the police?' 
"What do they know about brldgel" 
—Pathfinder Magazine. 



Larson Funeral Home 

CARL B. LARSON 

Licensed Funeral Director 

Ambulance Service — Calls Answered 

Day or Night 

Day Phone 61 - Night Phone 148W 

118 La Bree Ave. N. 

Thief River, Falls, Minnesota. 



Mares & Colts 

Will be sold, to the 
highest bidder 

SATURDAY 

July 

1:30 P.M. . | 

Goodridge % 

L Terms will be given on % 
f bankable paper. Buyers * 
I make arrangements with g 
| clerk before s&le, other- % 
t wise bidder will be con- * 



* sMered a cash buyer. 



r— 



FISKE& YEN ABLE 

A. Diamond, Auctioneer 



£*»1h$<3m>2m2»«Sm&<2* •>•>•?-! 






All 



Dr. P. L. Vistaunet's Clink 

Besides Medical and Surgical, also Electronical Dip sail «f 

Diseases. 

Fundamental Treatments Consisting of: Medicines, Beetranies, 

Baths, Massage, Manipulations, Diets, etc. are adntiaistered. 

And,— if reqateai, Htgmi. 

Room 6. Dobner-Meehan Bldg. Phones: Office 383 Residence 280. 

Thief River Fals, 1 



NORTHERN CLINIC 

A. W. Swedenburg, M. D. 

O. G. I.ynde M. D. C. AI. Adkins, M. D'. 

Physicians and Surgeons . 

Swedenburg Building Telephone 850 

Thief River Falls. Minnesota 



We Will Be BUYING 

Sweet Clover 
SEED 

for the next few days. / 

This~will be a good time to clean-up 
the odds and ends. 

Market Broilers Now! 

"COOPERATION PAYS" 



LAND O' LAKES 
CREAMERIES, Inc 




• / 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



lt*SPp7; 



m 



' \ THIfif 




Tflffig ftlVER fAjJi TOSm, TBIEF RrVfeft gASJff/.jiB^&fe^ 



HIGHLANDING | 

• : • 

Mr. land Mrs. S. Sigurdson and 
daughter Dolores and Mr. and Mrs. 
C. Nelson and family" of Goodridge 
visited at the C. Denny home Sunday^ 

Sheriff and Mrs. O. L. Ihle of Thief 
Eiver | Falls and Miss Dorothy Kor-i 
stad were supper gue'sts at the Anton 
Johnson home Sunday. . I 

Harold, Leo and Walter Johnson, 
Ted T^oreson, Albert Haglund, Vivian 
Johnson and Dorothy Korstad motor-] 
ed to pt. Hilaire Sunday to attend the 
ball game. ; It resulted in a victory 
for Goodridge by the score of 12 to 6 

Mr. | and Mrs. S. Sigurdson and 
daughter Dolores motored "to Middle 
River [.one day last -week. I 

Harold Johnson motored to Middle. 
Eiver Tuesday. 

. Ed.) Korstad motored to Thief Riv- 
er Falls Saturday. 
f Miss Ruth" Bergquist visited at the 
A. Johnson hocie Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday of last week. 

Mr. land Mrs. Martin Engen called 

at the Palmer Wold home Tuesday 

■ night J ■ j 

County Engineer and Mrs. J. AJ 
Erickson were callers in Highlanding 
Tuesday. { 



KRATKA 



i 

Mr. and Mrs] Jacob Strand and son. 
of Minneapolis jare guests of Mr. ana 
Mrs. Olaf BroVik. Mrs. Strand is a 
sister to Mr. Brovik. 

Mrs. John Graige and son Vernon 
spent Tuesday | afternoon with- her 
brother and saster-in-law Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Johnson. • 

Mrs. S. Peterson and infant daugh- 
ter of Grand Forks, have been spend- 
ing the past week at the home of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Torgoa Lar- 
son. ■ ! ■ 

Mr. and Mrq. Elmer' Trunes of 
Shevlin, motored up here on Tuesday 
and visited at the Henry Ronnestrand 
home. They returned on Wednesday. 

Julius Hanson and Joseph Johnson 
were business J callers in Goodridge 
Thorsday evenirg. 

John Graige of Grand Rapids, Minn. 
motored here pn~Thursday f returning 
the same day, jwilh Mrs. ^Graige and 
sons Vernon : and David - 1 who 



GOODRIDGE 



* j ; *[ 

Adeline Stephenson left Monday 
for Grygla where she will be employ-- 
ed. -I j 

MsJ Olaf Solheim and daughter; 
Darleen of Thief River Falls, Mrs; 
Halmkr Nelson of St. Glair, Minn, and 
Mrs. [Theo. Gilbertson visited friends 
here Wendnesday afternoon. 

(Mr I and* Mrs. A. B. Mandt and 
daughter Hazel left Monday for a trip 
to Minneapolis where they visit rela- 
tives and friends. * i 

TillieHegtnedt who has been em; 
ployed at the telephone office is en? 
"joying a three weeks vacation at her 
homei 

Myrtle Stephenson arrived Mon> 
day from Minneapolis to visit foi 
some time at the home of her mother 
Mrs. G<fna Stephenson. 

The baseball game played at St. 
Hilaire Sunday resulted in a victory 
for the Goodridge team the score be- 
■ ing 7 and 12. '-.;"■ 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Peterson and 
family, John Gonnering, and Guy 
McEnelly attended the baseball. game 
at Grygla Sunday. 



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L/'.: \y \ 





I EAST ROCKSBURY J 

Mrj and Mrs. Andrew Arne and son 
Irvin returned home on Tuesday from 
Fargo where they visited at the H, 
Hanson home. They . were accompani- 
ed home by. Mrs. Hanson and four 
sons jwho" will visit at the Arne and 
M. Hanson. homes here. 

Kenneth Finstad came oh Tuesday 
to the Martin Finstad home where 
he will be emplyed. ■,■■""" 

C. E. Oien, Ruth anc? Marie Oien 
and Elida Engebretson were Friday 
evening supper guests at the M. Fuir 
stad home. ;-'-,: 

Miss Eida Engebretson came on 
Thursday- f6r a visit at the C. "E. 
*Oien home.: ; 

Mrs. OleiLian, Mrs. Axel Engel- 
stad, Mrs. Calvin Toomey, MrsV Mar- 
tin Finstad and Marie Oien attended 
the canning demonstration in Thief 
River Falls on Thursday. 

Mr. ; and Mrs. Manuel Hanson and 
children were Sunday dinner guests 
at the Andrew Arne home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Houske, Joan 
and Rawlins Houske, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed. Houske: and Alfred Arne visited 
at the M. Finstad home Sunday. 

Mr. and. : Mrs. Oscar Seeland and" 
Elida Engebretson visited at the Carl 
Finstad home on Saturday, evening.' 

Members of the Rocksbury Com- 
munity club motored to Crookston oh 
Saturday to pttend- the reunion of 
the Northwest School of . Agriculture 
and present a 3-act play." j 

Foxes Eat Snow j 

Foxes do not require water during 
the months when there Is snow on the 
ground. They prefer to eat 'the snow 
rather than drink water. 



have 
three 



been visiting here the past 
weeks. : i / 

Tom Belland of Goodridge was. 
business caller; at the Anton Jenson 
home on Wednesday. | 

Carl Hoven was a visitor in Thief 
River Falls on ; Sunday, j 

Mr. and Mrs. Ole Hofdahl spent the 
week-end visiting with relatives and 
friends at Beltrami. \ 

A large crowd attended the Smiley 
and Kratka community) club picnic 
which was held* at the Adam Lendo- 
beja home on \ Sunday, The ball game 
between the Karatka and Silverton 
boys turned out 12 to 9/ in favor of 
Kratka. " f 

TheTelemarken Luther League will 
meet at the R. M. Johnson home Sun- 
day the 8th. ! 

Mrs. H. Waale and Mrs. R. M. 
Johnson are entertaining. There will 
be a ball game there also. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Lorrent visit- 
ed relatives and friends in Grand 
Forks last week and* also attended 
the State Fair there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Johnson, and 
sons were social callers at the Jul- 
ius Hanson home Saturday evening. 

Miss Hazel iRunnestrand left on 
Wednesday for Shjevlin where she 
will be employed. 



BRAY 



Mrs. Annie Lindbloom and Lucille 
visited with Mrs. Lawrence Best on 
Tuesday. 

Mrs. A. E. Anderson returned U 
St. Hilaire after visiting some time 
at the John Scholin home. 

Mrs. Herbert Grinde and family 
spent Saturday afternoon at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs; J. 0. Swanson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lund Fevig and 
family of- Ulen spent Sunday visit- 
ing at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
P. Hegstrom.' 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Johnson of 
St. Cloud arrived Sunday for a visit 
at the home of bis father, Gust John- 
son.. 

'Misses Lillian . Larson and Hazel 
Person returned home; Sunday after 
serving as delegates at the Luther 
League convention' at ; Grand . Forks. 
, Olaf Larson and Nels Stannes were 
'business callers at the John Swan- 
son home Monday. 

Mrs. Annie Lindblom left Monday 
for Thief River Falls to spend a few 
days visiting friends and -relatives. 
ft Theodore Anderson and ssn Ver- 
non and Stanley and daughter Nor- 
ma and Miss Inga Olson wcr<3 Sun- 
day visitors at the O. K. Sevre home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rux came re T 
cently to spend a 'couple days visit- 
ing relatives. 

Mrs. Lawrence Best' and daughter 
visited at John O. Swanson's Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hohisel and 



BLACK RIVER 



. Felix Anderson called at! the Albert 
Anderson Home Monday- evening. 

Rev. Henning Erickson of Ogden 
Iowa came home Monday, to visit with 
his mother; Mrs. Andrew Erickson 
and also other relatives and friends 
for some .time...:.-- .,_ I 

Raymond Anderson called at the 
Alfreff Halsjtrom and Clause Adolph- 
son homes; Monday evening;. - 

Ferdie Anderson called at the Oscar 
Mosbeck honie Monday evening. 

Hilding> Adolphsoh and ! Raymond 
Anderson^, are. working on : a road_ih 
Polk Center this week.! ' ?.| ■ " 

Rev. Henhingr Erickson jvisited at 
the Milcher! Erickson home Monday 
evening; .]■-, . I ■ 

Misses Hadel and Edna Adolphson 
visitedJ&Vthe Felix Anderson home, 
Tuesday, afternoon. 

Business callers in Thief River 
Falls on Tuesday were jMri and Mrs. 
Albert Anderson and daughter Mer- 
riam, Mr. Alfred Dahlgtrom and son 
Alvin, Rev. 1 Henning Erickson and 
Axel Erickson, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Hallstrom. ! . 

Esther and Joe Larson: of Thief 
River Falls called at the Alfred Dahl- 
strom home Tuesday. ' ' 

Mr. and Mrs. . Albert Anderson and 
daughter Merrfan -called at thePelix 
Anderson home Tuesday evening. 

Rev. Henning Erickson and Axel 
Erickson visited- at the Alfred Dahl- 
strom home, Tuesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Axel Swanson, Doris 



NORDEN 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Harris vis- 
ited at the Gordon Olson home Tues- 
day evening 

Mrs. P. A. Harris, Miss Lilas Ol- 
son and Mrs. .Johnson attended the 
ladies' aid at Rev. Dahle's in St. Hil- 
ainre Friday afternoon. 

Soren Sorenson, Gorden Olson and C. 
T. Slinger, scnool board of District 
135 mec at .the Gordon Olson home 
Friday to hire a teacher for the com- 
ing year. Mrs. Chas. Sorenson was 
selected'. ; „ 

The Lockreni girls attended a pic- 
nic at the Rindal church Sunday. 

The hail storm qd|d qonsiderabfe 
considerable damaTge in this vicinity. 

Gardens fields and orchards were 
damaged ps well as telephone lines. 
and windows. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Johnson are 
moving to Thief River Falls on Mon- 
day. 

Mrs. D. W. Ayres, sons Dake and 
Eldred and daughter Iris visited at the 
Gordon Olson home Sunday. 

Anna Anderson - visited with her 
brother Ed, and Albert Johnson Sun- 
day. 

Oline ■Skaarivisited with friends in 
-Thief River Falls Saturday. 

■Melvin Gabrielson called at John 
Sjolsvold* Friday. 

Ethel Sorenson called on friends 
and relatives ; in Thief River Falls 
-Monday. ' 



Erickson and Lund 
FIJNERAL HQME 

M. P. ERICKSON 
. Funeral Director 
Prompt Ambulance Service 
321 N. Main- 
Day and Night Phone 404-W 




family were Friday evening visitors ; Lorraine arid Kenneth visited at the 



at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Emil 
Larson. > 

Mrs. A. P. Hegstrom . and Lulu 
were -Friday visitors at the home of 
Mrs. Lena Hallstrom of St. Hilaire. 

Miss Esther Johnson; returned home 
from Grand Forks Friday -where she 
had visited at the Victor Peterson 
home. \ 



Read Forum advertisements and 
know where the best -bargains in the 
city are to be foundJ 



Saturday 

July7 

at the f 

S of N Hall 



The Well Known 




Show 

COMPANY 
Arney Wick 

famous / 

Accordionist and 
■ Comedian 

and his 

Vaudeville 
Troupe 

Presenting - . 

Singing, Dancing; 

and Musical 

Novelties 



■+■ Of course, Mavis Talcum is as 
indispensable as a: razor to well 
grooming after. shaving. Men prove' 
■ that everyday. But don't stop there,.. 
To really enjoy the benefits of Mavis 
Talcum; as millions of both men and . 
women now dp, sprinkle or lightly 
massage the same incomparable 
Mavis Talcum over [the entire ^body. 
That's comfort — arid protection! 
-absorbs perspiration— de- 

TilCUM 
POWDER 





Felix Anderson home Tuesday even- 
ing. J ■ . i 

Gladys and Ferdie Anderson cal- 
led at the Albert Anderson home 
Wednesday [evening. | 

Quite a large number, .of people 
from this vicinity attended the ball 
game at St. Hilaire, Sunday after- 
noon. ; j. i - 

Clara Olson, Lorreta [ Eruse, Mrs. 
Enock Sundholm and Bill Krnse mo- 
tored to Red Lake Fals Sunday even- 
ing. . I -''■'. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert, Anderson and 
daughter; Merriam called at the 
Dahlstrom home, Tuesday afternoon. 

■Rev. Henning Erickson and. Axel 
Erickson visited at the Albert Ander- 
son' home Thursday evening. 

Felix Anderson, Gladys, Bfarie, 
and Ferdie visited at the Chris Krnse 
home Thursday eventa*. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Alfred Sorvig, Evelyn 
and Robert returned home Sunday 
evening after spending a few days 
visiting with friends and relatives at 
Winger and also at other places. 
- Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Oson and daugh- 
ter Alvina visited at the Harvey 
Be rgards home at Thief Biver rals 
Sunday. , 

Mrs. Wallbeek passed! away at her 
home. Sunday evening from a heart 

Miss Alice Naplin and Charles Du- 
bas of Grand Forks N. D. arrived 
here Monday to visit the (former's Bar- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. JcW Naplin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anderson and 



daughter Merriam visited at the AM. 
Dahlstrom home Friday evening. 

Rev. Henning Erickson .of Ogdan, 
Iowa, Alfred Dahlstrom, Hattie.and 
Alvin and "Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. 
Peterson visited at Thief Biver VaBa 
Sunday evening. 

Clara Olson has been employed at 
the Bill Eruse home for some; time. 
: Albert Anderson and Gust Naplin 
were business callers at Wylie Hon-, 
day.. - 

John Scholin, Martin Erickson and 
Alfred Sorvig called at the John 
Eruse home Monday aftetnoon. 

Rev. G. H. Erickson, Axel Erickson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anderscon, Mer- 
riam and Raymond were dinner 
guests at the Alfred Dahlstrom home 
Sunday. 

(Mr. and Mrs. John Naplin, Helen 
and Rose motored to>Crookston, Sat- 
urday. 

Alfred Dahlstrom, Hattie and Al- 
vin and Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Peterson 
visited at the J. A. Anderson home on 
Saturday ' evening. 

Grandpa Naplin visited at the Al- 
fred Sorvig home Friday. 

Felix Anderson and daughter 
Gladys, Mr. and Mrs. Chris Eruse 
and daughters, Shirley Mae and Dar- 
leen, Mr. and Mrs. Axel . Swanson, 
Doris, Lorraine and Eenneth and Mr. 
and Mrs.. Gust Peterson and daughter 
Muriel returned h^me Sun lay evening 
after spending a -couple days at the 
Red Lake Narrows. 

Helen Naplin visited at the Alfred 
Sorvig home Sunday. . 

Axel Erickson arid Rev.'G. H. Erick- 
son called at the John Stiger home 
Tuesday evening. 

Mi-, and Mrs. Charley Ness and 
family were dinner guests at the 
Henry Sorenson home Sunday. 

Kev. and Mrs. Dahle and daugh- 

rs Grace and Margarete, Mrs. 
Forde and Mrs. Haimey and daugh- 
ter 'Arleen visited Monday at the 
at the Gunnnard Lindquist home. 

Verna and Arthur .Almquist spent 
the weekend visiting friends at Fer- 
tile. 

•r Lyda , Muzz y visited with her sister, 
Mrs. Henry Sorenson on Monday. 

Arleen McEercher " returned home 
Friday after spending her vacation 
at different points in Illinois. 

Would Be Pleaied 7 

"What would your father say If he 
heard the awful words you use?" 

"He would be pleased — he Is as deaf 
as a post" — Oazzettino niustrato, 
Venice. v 



ARNIE WICE 

A Guaranteed. Attraction. 
We work clean, so bring the family. 

Fun For Young and Old. ■[ 

You*ll laugh Hill you cry, when you 

see and hear, Arney, "The Funny 

Norwegian." 

SHOWT3TARTS AT 

8:30 

SHARP '■- 
; ADMISSION 

;'■•■'.-- ■.■,15c.-.'2SBb.-. - : M 

" Free Dance to AIL Show 
Patrons, 



; Leg al No|i cfes 

ORDER ; LBmTmGTniE TO FILE 
CLAIMS WITBJIN THBB^ 
MONTHS, AND FOR HEABING 
THEREON. "~*«u 

State of Minnesota), < 
County of Pennington— isaj 

IN PROBATE COURT 
- I" the ihatter of the Estate of 
Bertha M. ; Jacobson, Decedent. 

Letters Testamentary! this day hav- 
ing been granted to Ruth Ida Hoium 
and it appearing by the affidavit of 
said representative thati there are no 
debts -of said decedent: ! 

IT IS ORDERED, That the time 
within which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against her estate in this Cfiurt, be 
and the same hereby is, limited to' 
three months from and after the date 
hereof; and that Saturday the 29th 
« a5 \r f September, 1934,' at 10 o'clock 
A. M., in ,the Probate Court Booms 
at the Court House at Thief Biver 
Falls, in said County,| be, and the 
same hereby is, fixed and appointed 
as the time and place for hearing up- 
on the examination, adjustment and 
allowance of such claims as shall be 
presented within the time aforesaid. 

Let notice hereof be I given by the 
publication, of this order in The Thief 
River, Falls Forum as i provided by 
law. - ! 

'Dated "June 18, 1984. I 
Andrew Bottelson 

(COURT S-EALf ° f ^ ^ 
H. O. Berye ; 

Attorney for Representative 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 

June 21-28 — July 5 

CI ££S£& F0R HEARING ON 
PETOTION FOR PROBATE OF 
WILL. I ■ i ■ '. • 

STATE Oi- MINNESOTA. 

County of|PennIngtonT f S:V 

INfgBOBATE COUBT 

~S , ^ B Z E MATTER OpIthB ESTATE 

r^cfuent T 0rter ' "' Cb f & I ' 0rt "- 

x., TH 5 5 TATE OP MTNNESOTA It 
?f? & ^P 1 *". Kennetn H.. Porter, Ken- 
neth H. Porter, Jr., NetuTovo, aid Ida 
.pve, and all persons intexfeated in the al- 
lowance and probata: of the will at said 
decedent: The petition of Blra C. Por- 
ter being- duly flled in this court, repres- 
enting that; Christopher fi. Porter, ahtr 
known as C. H. Porter, then a resident o 
the County of Pennington State of JUln- 
nesota, died! on the 19th day of June UK 
leaving a last wUl and testameni which 
Is presented: to this court v with said Detl- 
£?".•;,"*,; pray t ln that said Inaurunvrat 
be allowed as the last wiU^ind testament 
of said decedent, and thaUIetters of Ad- 
mlnlstraUon with the wIU> annexed be 
issued thereon to Eira'C . Porter, NOW 
.THEREFORE, you, and, each of. you, are 
hereby cited and requhred; to. show, cause. 
If any youi have,- befo*»r--thui 'jourt, at 
the Probate Court Rooms In the Court 
House, In Thief River Falls County of 
Pennington i State of Minnesota, on the 
21st day of 'July 1984, at 10:00 o'clock A. 
M., why the prayer' of; said petition 
sho uld not be granted. ■ ■ . 

WITNESS .THE HONORABLE, An- 
drew Bottelson, Judge 'bf. said court, 
...and the seal of said' court, this- 25th 
day of June 1934. --■■•■.; 

-.Andrew 
! ■ ; Judge; 

COURT SEAL ■■• 7 
H.O. Bervoi - -.;'.'. 

Attorney for Petlflbnei* ■■) ' 
Thief River, Falls, Minn, i ' 
.. ;raae» July f4| 



Bottelson 



First. Patent .to a .Woman .'. 

While -the first American invention . ^ 
was patented by aj man, the records . ■' 
further state that: the process was ' 
"found out by Sybllle his wife. 1 * For 
19 years after the- enactment of the 
patent law in 1790 not a single one of 
the 10,000 patents issued was'granted" 
to a. woman. The first successful . ap- 
plication from a woman- : was recorded '. 
In 1809 by Mary Kles and was granted'. 
for a method of weaving straw "with ■ 
silk or thread. 



Ilk**' 



Dr.H.J.Rice 
DENTIST .. 

X-RAY LABORATORY - 

Phone — Office, 297 Residence, 241 
First NatieaU; Bank Building 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. ' 



ftjff ejteji iJhJi (JH^tJt *|i «Jiij nj i«^>]» 



I 



Silly Question 

"Every time 1 raise my hand my 
husband gives me a good beating." 
"Why don't you tell the police?" 
"What do they know' about bridge?" 
—Pathfinder Magazine. 



Larson Funeral Home 

CARL B. LARSON 
Licensed Funeral Director 

Ambulance Service — Calls Answered 

Day or Night 

Day Phone 61 Night Phone 148W 

118 La Bree Ave. N. 

- Thief Biver Falls, Minnesota. 



Auction 
Sale! 

A carloaa of broken and 

unbroke high grade 
Percheron and Belgian 

Mares 6c Colts 

Will be sold, to the 
highest bidder ' 

SATURDAY 




1:30 P. M. 



Goodridge I 

Terms will be given on t 
bankable paper. Buyers | 
make arrangements with j 
clerk before sale, other- t 
wise bidder will be.' con- * 
sidered a cash "buyer. i 



FISKE&VENABLE 

A. Diamond, Auctioneer 



♦*♦***********■&♦♦•!■••>*<'•■■>*♦** 



Dr. P. L. Vistaunef « Otafc 

Besides Medical and Surgical, also Electronical Digassh af All 

Diseases. ' -. 

Fundamental Treatments Consisting of: Medlrhew, Tliiili—ica, 

Baths, Massage, Manipulations, Diets, etc are astalalstered. 

Aad,— if reasli ij, laeja j . 

Room 6. Dobner-Meehan Bldg. Phones: Office 383 Residence 280. 

Thief Biver Fals, ] 



NORTHERN CLIN I C 

A. W. Swedenburg, M. D. 
O. G. Lynde M. D. CM. Adkins, M. D-jt 

Priysicians and Surgeons 

Swedenburg Building Telephone 350 

Thief River Falls. Minnesota 



We Will Be BUYING 

Sweet Clover 
SEED 

for the next few days. 

This-will be a good time to cleari-up 
the odds and ends. 

Market Broilers Now! 

"COOPERATION PAYS"? 



j&^ 



LAND O' LAKES 
CREAMERIES, Inc. 



/ 



.g 



»<TENTIONAL DUPLiCATE EXPQfillRir 




THffiF RtVSR FALLS F6Rtftf, TH IJP RIVER f ALLS', MiNNlS6TA'. THURSDAY JULY S, 1534 



SUNDAY 

-at the- 

CHURCHES 



f Ouistta* Science Churdtf 

Sunday service at 11:00 A. If. Sub- 
ject, "Sacrament." 

Sunday : school at 10:00 A. K. 

Wednesday evening meeting at 
7:45} 

Reading room open Wednesday 
from 3 to 5:00 P. M. 



aU. 



cordial invitation is extended; to 



Mavie Lutheran Church 

E. O. Sabo, Pastor 

Sunday, July 8th — Services in. the 
.Silverton church at 11 A. M. and' in 
the Zion church, Germantown at 2:307 
P. M. An offering: for the general 
budget will be lifted at both places 

The Telemarken Y. P. Society will 
be entertained Sunday afternoon July 
8th by Mrs. R. M. Johnson and Mrs. 
Halvor Waale at the Johnson home. 

The Silverton Luther League will 
be entertained Sunday afternoon July 
8th by Mrs. Syvert Hanson and Miss 
Inanda Hanson at the Syvert Hpnson 
home. 

On Sunday, July 15th services in 
the Telemarken church at 11 A. M. 



Aug. Lutheran Church I 



LOCAL NEWS 



and 
this 



Dr. and Mrs. L. V. Johnson 
daughter Eleanor are spending 
week at Twin Lakes. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Benson, Marvin 
and Garfield Benson, and Miss Flor- 
ence Furan motored* to Bemidji on 
July 4th and spent the day. 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul Roy of St. * 
Hflaire spent Tuesday evening, visit- 
ing at the F. Jolincon home. 

Lruvz*. Erickson was a Thief Riv- 
er caller Savirdaj. 

Mr. and Mrs. Trunk Johnson an.»r.t 
bxmuay oa the H. Woolson home near 
Thief River Falls. 

Reuoen and I'aal Anterson a-ctind- 
ed the Lutheran picnic at Thief River 
Falls Sunday. 

Mrs. H. Jepson and Mrs. Geo. Bain- 
bridge attended the canning demon- 
stration which was given Q t St. Hil- 
aire high school Friday. 

Mr. Brown, father of Mrs. W. P. 
Wilson came last week for an extend- 
ed visit at the Wlison home. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Win. Yonke were 
Sunday evening callers at the O. 
Haugen home. 

Mrs. Otto Johnson accompanied 
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Highland and 
daughter to Halstad Sunday where 
they attended* a picnic at that place. 

Mrs. August Swenson and family 



WYANDOTTE 



T^.. S ^l%.I^S^^*7'a^ttafvWtol "ith Mr. Brugge. 



visited at the Clarence Swenson home. 
They also visited at the Olaf Berg-; 
land home at Crookston enroute home. 



,-.. „ tt- , • ^ ■ . Mrs - A - P - An <* ers °n visited Sun- ble a ' nd Clayton visited at the G. A. 

Miss Pern Hawkmson, who is em- fay afternoon at the G. Erickson Wilson hom £ n Sunday afternoon. 



SOUTH HICKORY 



ployed in the city, spent July 4th home, 
with her parents at Wylie I 

Mrs. A. Morissette of Plummer ' • 
spent Tuesday here shopping and I 
visiting friends. | '» 

Gordon Overland spent Tuesday, 
and Wednesday in Duluth attending --. 

to business matters. I the Pleasant View schoolhouse • on 

•Mr. and Mrs. Helmer Carlson and Sunday afternoon, July 1st. The fol- 
daughter Mareheta of Devils Lake lowing program was rendered: songs 
spent Tuesday and' Wednesday with by the audience, reading by Lupella 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Ostrom. ' ' Hanson, two songs by Mrs. John 

Mrs. Tony Carlson of Holt shopped Arntson and a talk by Rev Sigurd 

in the city on Tuesday. I Fladma }\ L ™ ch wa , 3 - s S r - ved by Mes ; 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Robinson at- ' dames John Olson, Bj. Bjornaraa and 

tended the North Dakota State Fair E - H - Oftilie. 

in Grand Forks on Saturday. | The Ncrareth Lrrlies' Aid which 

Miss Alice Oien motored, to Shelley was held at the Olaf Nelson home on 

on the 4th and spent the day with Wednesday afternoon was well at- 

lier parents, Mr. and' Mrs. Henry tended. Outsiders present were: Mrs. 

Oien. Mrs. Oien returned with her Pete Erickson of Issaquah, Wash., 

and will spend some time visiting Mrs. Alfred Anderson and daughter 

here. Ethel of Proctor, Mrs. Olive Chris- 

Miss Marie VattendaluT left Sun- ' tianson and daughters Alice and Mae, 

day for her home at Fisher after Mrs. Arthur Arveson and Mrs. Mar- 
spending a few , 'ays at the Carl Gjer- tin Knutson of Erie and Mrs. Knut ™. .- 6 . „ „• , -:,:-... 

_r. ..._?.. Qualley. It was decided at the meet- . f f le 4,..?5'. v .f .. . Us f ,'i- om th ! s .vicinity 



Mrs. Win. Jasperson and Mrs. Jim 
Evenson attended the Canning dem- 
onstration at Thief River Falls on 
Thursady. 
— — — I Mrs. James Evenson and Elizabeth 

The Nazareth Y. P. S. was he!d"at ™ terta . in «i' J 1 ? 5 ,- , Laura ,, Fere £, an ' 

Mrs. Bertha Adolphs ,and Mrs. Clif- 
ford Hedeen at their home on Friday. 

Miss Mable Jasperson of St. Paul 
visited with relatives here last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Antoff and 
Mrs. Harry Cousin and children visit- 
ed at the Ed. Johnson home Sunday. 

The families of the Clearwater Con- 
gregation attended the picnic at 
Squaw Point Sunday. 

Sigurd Haugen and Warren Wilson 

, of Dist. 125 were among the. group 

that graduated from the eigth grade 

on Tuesday July 3rd. 



in<? that the .Nazareth congregation °" Friday were: Mr. and Mrs. C. 



will hold its annual festival on Sun 
dav July 29th. 

Mrs. Sarah Sannes and son Halvor 
were business callers at Guhy'on F/i- 
(?r.y. 

Mrs. Pete TTrickson of Issaquiih, 



j 

Morning Wbrship-'at 11:00.; Rev. 
A. F. Bergstrom, - St. Matthews 
:;h-. : rch, Chicago, will preach on the 
'.;st for the day. 

Evening service at '.8:00. 

Mid-week service at- 8:00 on Thar*- 
iay ; evening. 

Goodridge Luth. Parish I 

Q. O. Bjorgan, Pastor 

Goodridge Lutheran Church: 

Services in Norwegian by Rev. T. 

T.. Laaseson at 2 d. m. 
** :-:]iania:- 

The Luther League meets Sunday 

ufternobn at the F. Hardisty home. 

Lunch will be served by Mrs. O. 

Peterson and Mrs. F. Hardesty. 

The Ladies' Aid will serve lunch at 

the parochial school program at tha 
•' cliurch Friday, June 13. 
v-vendahl, Torgerson.: 

The Luther League meets Sunday 

evening at the Theodore Berg homa. 
Ekelund, Erie 
■ ""'Hochial school program at tfce 

church Sunday at 8 p. m. 

| : NOTICE 

Next Sunday July 8th 2 o'clock 
.hare will ,be communion services in 
. :i i Clovernook schoolhouse, 

Monday night July 9th. Rev. Carl 
Ostby and John T. Johnson will con- 
duct the meeting in' the Clovernook 
school. J. O. Hoyum. 

. . „ „ i 

F^cand. Evan. Free Church 

J. O. Jacotawn, Pastor 

Sunday school at 10 A. M. 

Moning worship at 11. 

Evening service at 8. 

Prayer meeting on Thursday even- 
ing at 8. 

Union Young Peoples meeting ;at 
::e Mission church next Tuesday eve- 
ning at S. Jennings Jenson, lead«erj 

The Pryer Band meets at 7:80j 

»__ ' I* 

1 The Community Church] | 

E. A. Ooote, Pastor 

. - 

Let U3 not forget during these 
vacation days to keep close to God^ 
whether in the sanctuary or in thJ|~ 
open. We appreciate the loyalty ,01 
the people who attend services when 
they are in town. If away attend 
somewhere if possible. 

The church school -meets through 
lite summer. We are glad, for all to 
attend who can. 

This being the second Sunday in 
the quarter we will have Holy Com- 
•mmion, or the Sacrement of the 
T.'u'd's Supper at the morning ser- 
vice at 11 o'clock. There will be a 
sermon following ihe service. This 

service is 1 open to all followers of Aroline spent Sunday at Grand Forks, 
■r.hri^t whether members of this Miss Maxme Bell will leave Satur- 
■ i.uveh or! not. | ???. . for her home at Bemidji after been employed at Macintosh, has re 

There will be service at Steiner visiting with her aunt, Mrs. D. M. turned to her home, 
■at 2:30 o'clock. Sunday , school at U0 ^"f r3 i _ _ I Miss Mildred Gustafson of Wanke 

1:30. I ' vi fe °; °L S % an , so " °, f Gra " d For,:s ' is employed at the John Olson home. ,- 

There will be no 'evening service V,Sr at the Ted stelam0 h ™= on! A large delegation of people from ! 

in the Community church till further ,£„»■•,,,„. „ , , „ ] thos vicinitv attndod the Setesdals-;* 

. M. s „ Elaine Sorcnson left Satur- ] Uvg at Thief River Falls last weekend.' Mr. 



The Clearwater Luther League will 
be entertained on July 8th at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Wilson 
This is the meeting which was an- 
nounced for July 15th. 

Mr and 'Mrs. Charles Carlson, 
Doris and Clorence, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Otto Rehm motored to Detroit Lakes 
Sunday to visit with Mrs. John Carl- 
son and family. , 

Mrs. Earl Walters and family and 
Mrs. Ed. LaFave of Baudette arrived 
Wednesday to visit with their par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Nelson and 
also 'with other friends and relatives. 
Mrs. LaFave returned jthe" same even- 
ing while Mrs. Walters and her fam- 
ily expect to return Ito : their home 
Wednesday. ! 

Roy Evenson, who is employed at a 
C.C.C. Camp at Chisholm is spending 
a week's ; vacation with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Evenson. 

Bruggeman and 



Henry Brugge- 



man mother, Mrs 
man Sr. ! 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Mathson, Ma- 



HICKORY 



Shoppers and business [ callers 



home. 

Ernest Helgenset returned Sunday 
from Oslo where he has been employ- 
ed. 

• Miss Elaine Helgeson returned Sun- 
day after visiting for a time with her 
aunt, Mrs. Ing. Gullickson of Middle 
River. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Lasalle and 
sons Richard and James left Sunday 
for their home at Minneapolis after 
spending a week as guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. P. Erickson. 

. Mr. and Mrs. Bart Wagenstein, 
daughter Marjorie Anne, and Cloette 
Crown spent Sunday at Clearwater 
Lake. 

Rev. and Mrs. A. F. Eergstrom of 
Chicago are visitors at tht home of 
their son-in-law and daughter, Rev 
and Mrs. H. L. Sjogren. 



CARD 0*F THANKS! 

Plummer Camp No. 9042, M. W 
A. wishes 'to thank the citizens, of 
Thief River Falls for the splendid 
cooperation and turn out at the cele- 
bration June 30. 

We wish to extend our hearty pp- 
preciation for the splendid music and 
drills the Legion Auxiliary drum 
corps gave us during the day and 
evening. 

We hope that we may have your 
friendship and cooperation in the fu- 
ture. 

Marius Waldal, Chairman 
Ed. Jacobson, Secretary 
Entertainment Committee 

Mrs. Laura Naplin and daughter 



Eliason, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Man 
derud and son Oscar, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
A. Dahlen, Mr. and Mrs; Wille Vet- 
tleson and Syvert Teigen, Martin 
Solsang and Carl Bakken. 

Miss_Myrtle Rindahl is employed 



Wash., is visiting at the home of her at the Ben Rindahl home during Mrs. 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Bjerkie. ' Rindahls absence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bj. Bjornaraa and Friends; of Mrs. Ben Rindahl will 
daughter- Solveig accompanied by Mr. be pleased to hear she is improving 
and Mrs. Erick Johnson returned to from her; recent illness, 
their homes on 'Monday evening after | Mr. and 'Mrs. Harold Stenvik are 
having attended the 25th anniversary . the prourid parents of a baby girl 
convention of tha Setesdalslag at the which was born June 27th. 
Municipal Auditorium in Thief River Mr. and Mrs. Bert Coan visited at 
Falls. Mr. Bjornaraa has been pvesi- the Jack Coan home Thursday after- 
dent of the "Lag" since its organiza- noon. , | 
tim. Orland land Mervini Rindahl called 

Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Roed and' child- at the Bj Bjornaraa home" Thursday 
r-:w Helen ar-d Carr.s ox Fartil-* were ! evening. ; I 

?:J!ers at Erick Johnson's on Monday* Rev. S.i Fladmark was a caller in 
i-v.ning. The latter is ?i'.ployei at Thief River Falls Thursday, 
thi Walter Johnson home nt-ar We::ke.| . Mrs. Arnold Korupp and infant 

Harry and Walter Hanson, aec »m- ' daughter arrived home from Thief 
panied by Lutlv'tr and H*\. ; Bjevklic River Falls last Thursday, 
wore business callers at Red Lake Visitors at the Harold Stenvik 
Aeency on Sand<*/ .home Sunday were: The Coi-nelius 

Misses Elna and Emma Mostrom Johnsrud ' family, Reuben Stenvik" 
are visiting at the ho;ri of their family, Mrs. Teloy : Johnsrud and 
brother-in-law an I sister, Mr. and Leon McMahon family and Louie 
Mrs. Albert Arveson near Wanke. j Thrulson. I . 

Ole Bjella and Thor Lunden of Mac- Charlie Thui'lson and Henry and 
Tntosh ware business callers at Olaf Louise Thurlson and : Ben Rindahl 
Nelson's on Tuesday. were busines callers at Thief River 

Miss Thora Bjornaraa who has Falls Monday, 
been visiting at the home of her Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Johnsrud 
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. Teloy j Johnsrud, Ben 
Mrs. Dreng Bjornaraa at Minneapolis Rindahl and Joan Stenvik were call- 
returned to her home on Saturday ers at Thief River Falls ' on Friday 
evening. j They also visited with Mrs. Rindahl 

Miss Mae Chrisianson,. who has who is a patient at a| local hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin' Solsang are 
the proud parents of a baby boy. 



Juanita N. D. Came Saturday evening 
to spend a few days at the H. R. Al- 
len and Martin Bjerk homes, and with 
other relatives. ' •' 

Mrs. George Bakko went Saturday 
evening to visit at the T. Strand home 
in Thief River Falls for a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bjerk, Mr. 
and Mrs. Orris Rodahl, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. W. A. 
Corbet and son were supper guests 
Sunday at the H. R. Allen home. 

The Community M. E. Ladies Aid 
was entertained Friday afternoon at 
the church by Mrs. Myles Jackson 
and Mrs. Charles Huff. 

PARCEL SHOWER * 

A parcel shower was given in hon- 
or of Mrs. Whiter Aubol at her home 
Friday afternoon. A social afternoon 
was spent. and a delicious lunch was 
served, Airs. Aubol received a number 
of useful and beautiful gifts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Beebe, Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harvey Olson of Chicago were guests 
Friday evening at the Lloyd Johnson 
'.iome in Thief River Falls. 

J. E. Brown of Lake City came Fri- 
day to visit at the home of his daugh- 
ter iMrs. W. P. Wison. He returned 
on' Monday. 

Miss Valerie Olson who has been 
visiting at the home of her sister Mrs. 
■■P. Burkee at Fargo N. Dak for over 
a week returned home Sunday even- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Christenson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Ness took a trip on 
Sunday to Leonard, Clearwater Lake 
and Bemidji. 

. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Gunstad who 
hpd spent the week end visiting rela- 
tives. 



BIRTHDAY PARTY 



Mrs. H. L." Sjogren was pleasantly 
surprised* by 25 fr/mds at her home 
on Monday, tne occasion being her 
birthday. The afternoon was spenS 
socially and luncheon was served by 
the self-invited guests. Those tak- 
ing part were Rev. and Mrs. A. F. 
Bergstrom and daughters of Chic- 
ago, Rev. Sjogren, Mesdames Frank 
Carlson, Ole Erickson, Charles Hel- 
r w* &°S a ^^0^ John Longren, 
£* JJ\ Mattson, A. W. Mickelson, Her- 
man MoUne, Laura E. Naplin, H. E. 
Nelson, Helmer Ostrom, O. C. Peter- 
be?g Pe E^th Vi > ^ Mbl « Anna Fe ihl- 
Carol PpW CarIs °, n ' Hilda Erickson, 
£S4 "' and Ag7 ? es and Esthei 



Dr. SPOFFORD 

Optometrist 

— Will be at— 
HOTEL EVELYN, T. .It Falls 

Tuesday, July 10 

Hotel ROYAL, NEWFOLDEN 

Friday, July 13 
Save Your Eyes. It Pays. 



MISS DELTA WOLD IS BRIDE 
OF CHESTER MYROM 



ST. HILAIRE 



uilty Lutheran Church 

ri. I M. Fjolatad, Pastor 



and Sir:- Harry Vinte 



She is making her home with hi.. 
aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Dodge. 
Morning worship at 10 o'clock. Ilet Mf s - Charles Eley and daughter of 
us not neglect our souU these long ! Williams arrived Monday to spend a 
summer days. You will enjoy ycrur «w days visiting Mrs. Eley's mother, 
•n "-'nit much more if you have attend-,™ 1 ": b - *• Cheney. 
., _ t ... -r ..:- ._ .v !-,< Mrs. Ralph Colli-.... „..„ U „ UKI 

v.?..' vi r ' heir home at Colum- j 



Mi 

pmnWrt 5,?!?„ th .y here s,,e wi " , bo I Leonard Pladson o£ Gully was a family" motored to Hillsboro N. D. 
empioyea during the summer months. Sun day guest at the Bj. Bjornaraa Tuesday to visit with relatives. They 



home. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Berg and dough- 
ter Martha accompanied by Nels Zit- 
terberg of Mcintosh visited at the 
Olaf Nelson home on Sunday. 

The Nazareth Ladies Aid wil be en- 
tertained by Mrs. E. H.. Oftelie on 



^ service of worship to the morn- j fi ""-^h CoHins^and ^daughter wVd^eslay^^lW 
In the afternoon an ice cream social ^' a Falls, Montana Saturday after 



GRYGLA 



LOCAL MARKETS 



Tzrtsr Rivaca uui qbains 

Ai repotted by Thief -Blrer Falla Seed 
Hooss 

No, 1 Hard Northern . „ $" , 

No. 1 Dark Northorn .73 

KuiINorthorn flprlnir . J3 

No, 1 Amber Durum ,71 

No* 1 Mixed Durum ,71 

if o. 1 Red' Durum ,g'j 

PIm 1.15 

Oftl* ,34 

B*?i«r .3i 



Bftckwhaatvor hundred 105 

POULTKT H1SEZT j 
Atqaoted by L.&nd O* Likes Creameries, 

Heavry H*n* *H ti or over ,08 

Lto^lhem .oil 

On .oi 

0IU> - .0? 

! -- ■ .00 

.---: .06 

■under 5 ponnd* .> .oi 

LefllMra Bering* r.'- -. .06 

y _ Oolw«>4HDrin*B Jlb.^ .15 

Leatitra BroUen MiW$* oret .U 

Ouk OMim .,-(--: .24 

Bcv^Plrsta S-. .IS 
»«Opd# ;: : 



also attended the state f?ir at Grand 
Forks. ! 

Mrs. R. : L. Hauge, who has been 
spending some time at Bemidji re- 
turned last Sunday to visit relatives 
here. 

Mrs. E. N. Reiersgord and son Tom 
and La, Vaughn Skatrud attended the 
state fair at Grand Forks. They went 
on to Aneta N. D. where the former 
will visit a few days, i 

Robert Black, Mrs. | K. O. Gigstad, 
Klemess and Evel>Ti Gigstad motored 
last Saturday to Hackensaek to be 
present at a gathering of friends and 
relatives. They returned Sunday even- 
ing. ■ 

Mrs. Ole Forde, Mi*s. Tom Harney 
and daughter Eileen arrived Monday 
from Chicago for a visit at the home 
of Mrs. Forde's sister, Mrs. Dahle. 

At the regular meeting and elec- 
tion of ofiiiier£ at the! Men's Business 
Club, which was held Monday night 

m iii3iu tTiti Mike Highland, president; , Myles 

"l ! the Harold Bush~and"Holbrook"fami- Jackson, vice-president; Wendell Cor- 
J ; lies. * I bet, Secretary; and Paul Roy was re- 
Hazel and Ruth. Anderson, Hannah Clara Barstad returned to the O elected treasurer, 
and? Esther Sjoberg and Water Swan- ! J - Peterson home after spending at Mr. and ; Mrs, E. N.; Reiersgord and 
son motored the Grand Forks where ' two weeks vacation at Shelly, Minn j famil y motored last Sunday to Haw- 
they attended the Lutheran conven- ' Harry Ristau of Mavie is visiting pt le ^ to attend a family gathering. 

tion Hio TT T D/i4. n _ nn _ 1 - . I TVTt- nnrl Mr«. TTnrvpv Olonn 

Mrs. E. Burstac? was honor guest 
at .a parcel shower given at her last 
Thursday by a large number of 
friends. Mrs. Burstad was the reci- 
pient of many lovely gifts from 'her 
friends and lunch was served. 

Mrs. J. Fellman, and Harold' were 
Thief River Falls visitors Monday. 

Mrs. F. Bothman ws a Thitf River 
Falls visitor Thursday. 

Mr. and- Mrs. A. Larson and family 
and Ernest Erickson were Thief River 
Falls visitors Thursday. 



:vill bVheld at the Mrs. Palma Loft- ^f"1 in " thre e weeks visiting wicn 
.-•c.ss home under the auspices of our vi. 6 ?; I 

.-^nior Luther League. , Reports will , J?™ 3 Evelyn Helgenset left Sunday * * 

:. ;;ivfin hy our delegates to the re- ~~. r Grafton, N. Dak. where she will' Tbe ball game played here between 

r.- district convention at Bemidji. 1 . 15 ,^ f f ew weeks with her brother- ' Climax and the locals last Sunday 
r he program will begin at 3 o'clock. VJ" 5 f w a Slster » Mr. and Mrs. Eddie was one of the most exciting games 
Everybody welcome,, I m?°«'„j ™ _ T _ | ever played on the local diamond this 

Circlea iwill meet as follows: NoJ 8 
with Mrs. Axel Anderson on Tnurs- 
day evening thta week, No. 10 with 
Mrs. O. T. Gilbertaon on Friday, July 
b'th, No. !6 with Mrs. Iver Aaseby, 
July 12th, No. l£,with Mrs. Jens 
Kierk, July 6th. - 

Always a hearty welcome. 



n >, Mr f«l"? Mr f* Le °nard DuChamp ' season, with the score resulting in 
t«V S- y / et . Urned Frid& y from ai 4 to 1 in favor of Grygla. 
W ;!?S ^x P ^ UrmK which time they I Thor Blikom of Thief River Falls 
visited H. E. Dostal and Fred Du- j visited with Ole Blikom last Sunday. 
mI- ^1 $ hlsh ° lm ' and Mr. and ' Genevive Linn of Warren, spent 
mrs. vie 1-roseth at International last Sunday at her home here. 

ana * I Laura Holbrook and little niece 

. r~- - " " I Patsy Lou Hill of Chicago, Til., ar- 

rived here last Sunday to visit with 



HAZEL 



The marriage vows of Miss Delta 
Wold, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Wold, and Chester A. Myrom, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Myrom was solemn- 
ized at a 10 o'clock ceremony Tuesday 
morning at the Trinity Lutheran 
church, with Rev. R. M. Fjelstatf read- 
ing the services. 

The bride was dressed in a gown 
of ecru lace and carried an arm 
bouquet of roses arte? ferns. Her at- 
tendants, Miss Stella Myrom, sister 
of the groom, and Mrs. John Wold Jr. 
of Rae Heights, S. Dak., wore ankle 
length dresses of pink anc? blue or- 
gandy with harmonious accessories, 
and also carried bouquets of roses 
and ferns. The groom was attended 
by his brother, Arthur and John 
Wold, Jr. brother of the bride. 

Following the ceremony, a wedding 
dinner was served to a few immediate 
relatives and friends at the home of 
the bride's parents. The couple left 
Tuesday afte-noon on a motor trip to 
Winnipeg and other points in Can- 
ada. Mr. and Mrs. Myrom will make 
their home in this city, Mr. Myrom is 
an instructor on the Lincoln High 
School faculty. 

[want ads] 

^Forum. Want Ads, one cent a word 

FOR RENT— 6 room modern house 

ready for immediate occupancy T 

C. Orme, Phone 29 3. 15-lS-ltc 

FOR SALE— Team of good work 

horses, 5 and 7 years old. C C 

Schuster, 622 St. Paul Ave. s'. 




FOR SALE^l Thor washing ma- 
chine, 1 Perfection kerosene stove, 
1 small ice box and' 1 day bed. — Mrs 
Kenneth Porter, 811 Arnold N. 131tp 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— Oldsmo- 

bile coupe. Will trade for good team 
inquire at Magnuson's Feed Store. 
13-ltp 



TYPEWRITERS— If you want to 
in?" o 11 °f trade typewriters— Phone 
103, Hamilton 's. y 13-rtc 

Hay Stumpage:— 80 acres for sale 
at reasonable price. Inquire at 623 
Duluth Ave. No. Thief River Falls 

ltp. 



Children Are Safe At The 

AVALO^ 

Always Cool & Comfortable. 

Fri., Sat., July 6-7 
"WILD GOLD" 

With John Boles, Claire Trevor 
and Harry Green. 

also 6th Chapter 
"Tarzen the Fearless" 

Mat. Sat. 2:30. Adm. B-lB-25c 
Eve. Adm. ]0-20-25c 



Sun-Mon. July 8-9 
'Murder at the Vanities' 

With Carl Brisson, Victor Mc- 
Laglen, Jack Oakie, Kitty Carl- 
isle and Duke Ellington and his 
famous band. 
Matinee Sunday at 2:30 

Tuesday, July 10 

TAKE A CHANCE NIGHT 

Chndren 10c Adult. 15c 



Wed. Thur. July 11-12 

Your Favorite Radio Artists 

On the Screen in Person 

"Doc" Schneider and his TEX- 

AS YODELING COWBOYS. 
Consisting of Comedy, Singing 
Sharp shooting, Yodelng and' 

String band music 
Also — Regular Picture Program' 

"A Private Scandal" 

Starring Mary Brian, Zasu Pitts 
and Philip Holmes. 
, Adm. 10-20-35c 




HIGHEST cash prices paid for 1 
of a 2I? hides - Magnuson's Feed! 
Store. Phone 42. E. Hu sty. 16 7-ltp! 

FOR SALE:— 4 wheel trailer with' 
box and stock rack. Nearly new. Over! 
£i?ed tires— E. T. Burstad 16 -ltp ' 

Any Size Kodak Film .Developed 
Including 8 High Grade Glassy Prints 
a c ] — Salveson Stadio 



orses! 

30-Head-20 
N. P. Stock Yds., R.L.Falls 

Horses as folows: 

Ages from yearlings to 8 
year olds, including well match- 
ed teams, sorrels, roans, blacks 
and bays; well broke, weight 
from 1200 to 1500 pounds. 

If your are interested in 
horses it will pay you to look 
these over. 

Our Prices Are Right, 

Jack Boyd, Manager 



, F0R SALE— Modern home, six 

Th ? 00 f00t Iot - c <>™er Ninth 

and Main at 823. Phon e 372. 17-13-c 

FOR SALE— Horses and Cattle, i 
terms if desired.— Northern Credit , 
Oo- ■ B. J. S haw, manager. 12-tfc 




Fine home sites for sale — Block 17 

Ked Lake Rapids Addition, adjoin' 

ing new highway. Selling feat. 

Get Youra Now 

CITIZENS STATE BANK 



Announcement ! 



resident of Grygla about 18 years ago 
and he states that Grygla is still "the 
biggest town of its 3iz.e" 

Thief River Falls shoppers last 
Monday were Mr. and Ms. J. Maney 
M. and Mrs. Gunder Granum, Moen 
Svendpladsen, Mrs. Ed. Geving, Mrs. 

itu,'??"" 11 daughter Adeline. 

Mabel Geving, who lias been on- 

The Luther League at B. Walseths ' STU* g? he"^^ Erie T? 
was very well attended lost . Friday T»rf m e " nome at Erie, last 



the H. T. Peterson home Mr - ""d Mrs. Harvey Olson 

Ole Nygaard of Mahnomen, arrived rived her< ? Wednesday from Chicago 
here last week to visit at the S Of* v * sit at tlle home! of his parents 
Nygaard, Fladeland, Henry and Soren and wlth relatives - i 
Nygaard home3. Mr. Nygaard was a Rev - C,: An derson and : family re- 



evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gilbertson and 
son Emil and Ernest Erickson, John 
Larson and sons, Marvin and Donald 
Thyren, and' Mr. and Mrs. A. Larcon 
and family spent Sunday at the Q. 
Larson hpmt. 

Helen and Doris Johnson returned 
Sunday from Fargo after visiting the 
past week at the C. Swenson home at 
that place. 



turned Wednesday from a motor trip 
to the Twin cities. i ! 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Harder attended 
the state fair at Grand Forks the past 
week. i | 

Mr. and Mrs. Sever Skattum and 
daughters jAlice and Marie motored to 
Cross Lake near Fosston : on Sunday 
to spend the day visiting! friends. 

' Mrs. E. O. Johnson of 



'Mn and 



e.K 



Tuesday. 

Charlotte Lloyd left for Ada last 
week to visit with relatives. ' ' 

Ray .Stephen.-c.i of Goodridge suent 
bunday and Monday at Ed GevW« Door keys ' Yale k< * s and auto 

Sylvia Jokela of Four Town* I. ' mobiIe "Sh't'on keys ]of all kinds, 
spending a number of days visiting 1 for aU kinds of locks ' made at = h °rt 
™th Mr. a nd. Mrs. SidneT lladriand | Potice at , ! 

The ffian wife does Jittle"T55i3~ !* aV i eI 'f, A „ 
well is always ready to do the bhr 407 Arnold' Ave. South 
thine h«ttMi - K 1 mt-i_j. ti, L 



thing better. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



E Y S.. 



Gun Riepair Shop 



Doe§ Your 
Motor Heat 
Up? 



Thief. River Falls, Minn. I: 



Mr. Lawrence Lasseson, 
of Thief River Falls, has 
been appointed as Local 
Representative for the 
State Farm Mutual Automo- 
bile Insurance Company 
and will- look after all 
matters pertaining to in- 
suring and servicing auto- 
mobiles, formerly taken 
care of by M. R. Levorson 
who is no longer an author- 
ized agent of the State 
Farm Mutual Ins. Co. 

At the present time Mr. Laase- 
son is our only authorized re- 
presentative in Pennington coun- 
ty. . 

W. D. Stegner, State Director 
John A. Gronner, Dist. Agt. 




Watch 
Your \ 
Radiator 



Let us clean the scales, 
rust and other accumu- 
lations from your engine 
block and radiator in 1 
operation with the. 

Marquette FLUSHER 

Complete Radiator 

Repairing and Rebuild- 

mg-Used Radiators 

THRONSON 
Motor Co. 

Pfepne 92 

Cor.3rd~and Knightr 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



>• ■> 



SUNDAY 

/•• -at the- 

CHURCHES 



[Ckzlatfa» Science Chur*] 



Sunday service at 11:00 A. M. Sub- 
ject, "Sacrament" : • 
'■ Sunday school at'- 10:00 A. K. 

Wednesday evening meeting 
7:45. 

Beading room open Wednesday 
from 3 to 5:00 P. ML „ 

A cordial invitation is extended to 
ali. 



Aug. Lutheran Church 

H. £fc SJograny najaaf 



Morning WorshipVat 11:00. Eev. 
A. P. Bergstrom, * St Matthews 
Church, Chicago, will; preach on tha 
last for the day. ' -I ; ' 

Evening service at 8:00. 

Mid-week service.' at 8:00 on Thnra- 
oay evening. :,\- 



Goodridge L^th. Parish 

O.; O. BJorgan, Pastor 



Goodridge Lutheran-Church 

Services in Norwegian by Bev. T. 

L. Lasseson at 2- n. m. 
Bothania:- 

The Luther League meets Sunday 

afternoon at the F. Hardisty 'home. 

Lunch jwill be served by Mrs. 

Peterson and Mrs. F. Hardesty. 

The Ladies' Aid will serve lunch 

the parochial school program at tb» 

church Friday, June 13. 
So?endahl, Torgeraon.: 

The Luther League meets Sunday 

evening at the Theodore Berg hoi 
Ekelund, Erie: 



"Vrochial school program at 
church Sunday at 8 p. m. 



(tetfiF &jVer fciits ^6fttiit-.ia.''.^.vfa<li' gAtt^Mir}^36ti.:T^ffl^AY;jt^ s-mt 



Ma vie Lutheran Church 

E. q. Sabo, Pastor ? 



tiw 



NOTICE 

Next Sunday July 8th 2 o'clock 
.here will be communion services 
ua Clovernook schoqlhonse. 

Monday night July 9Qx. Eev. Carl 
Ostby and John T.'JqhnVon will eon- 
duct the meeting in- the Clovernook 
school. J. O. Hoyum. 



Stand. Evan. Free Churcti 

J. O. Jaeohaon, Pastor 



Sunday, school at 10 A. M. 

Moning worship at,-ll. 

Evening service at': 8. 

Prayer meeting on Thursday even- 
ing at 8. i 

Union Young Peoples meeting at 
,.:e Mission church next Tuesday eve- 
ning at 8. Jennings Jenson, leader. 

The Pryer Band meets at 7:80. 



1 The Community Church 

E. A. Oooke, Pastor 



Let us not forget during, these 
vacation days to keep close to God 
whether in the sanctuary or in tpe 
open. We appreciate the loyalty or 
the people who attend services whin 
they are in town. If away attend 
somewhere if possible. | 

The church schooltmeets through 
the summer. We are glad, for all 
.attend who can. 

* This being the second Sunday ( 
"'the quarter we will have Holy Cpm- 
' muniori, or the Sacrement of the 
Lord's Supper at the morning /ser- 
vice at 11 o'clock. , There will be] a 



Sunday, Jujy 8th— Services in the 
Silverton church at 11 A. M. and) in 
the Zion' church, Germantown at 2:30/ 
P. M. An offering for the general 
budget will be lifted at both places . 

The Telemarken Y. P. Society will 
be entertained Sunday afternoon July 
8th by Mrs. R. M. Johnson and Mrs. 
Halvor Waale at the Johnson ; home. 

The Silverton Luther League will 
be entertained Sunday afternoon July 
8th by Mrs. Syvert Hanson and Miss 
Inanda Hanson at the Syvert Hfnson 
home. . ' 

On Sunday, July 15th services Jn 
the Telemarken church at 11 A. M. 



LOCAL NEWS 



Dr. and Mrs. L. V. Johnsin and 
daughter Eleanor are spending this 
week at Twin Lakes. ' • 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Benson, Marvin 
and Garfield ' Benson, and Miss Flor- 
ence Furan: motored' to Bemidji on 
July 4th and spent the day. 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul Boy of ; St 
Hilaire spent Tuesday, evening, visit- 
ing at tho F. Johnson home.. 

fcii.i'S'. Erickson was a Thief Riv- 
cr caller Savirdaj,. 

Mr. and Mrs! Frank Johnson sn.?r.i 
Sunuav oa the H. Woplson home near 
Thief River Falls. 

Seuoen and I'ajl Anderson attend- 
ed the Lutheran picnic at Thief Biver 
Falls Sunday: = ■"'■•■ 

Mrs. H. Jepson and Mrs. Geo. Bain- 
bridge attended the canning demon- 
stration which was given «t St Hil- 
aire high school Friday. 

Mr. Brown, father of Mrs. W. P. 
Wilson came last week for an extend- 
ed visit at the Wlison home. .'-. 

Mr. and Mrs. Win. Yonke were 
Sunday evening callers at the O. 
Haugen home. 

Mrs. Otto Johnson accompanied 
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Highland and 
daughter to Halstad Sunday, where 
they attended' a picnic at that place. ° . 

Mrs. ' August Swenson and family 



f WYANDttFEE 



jug*>^5J?!^;V.'4 r i 



ijBmemBttmamm 



League will 

ith at the 

O. Wilson 



-" The .Clearwater Luther 
be entertained on July 
home of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
This' is : tble meeting jwhicjh was an- 
nounced fdr July 15tq. ■ I 

_Mr. and] Mrs. Charles Carlson, 
Doris and plorence, arid Mr. and Mrs. 
Otto Rehni motored to Detroit Lakes 
Sunday to visit with Mrs.! John Carl- 
son and family. : 1 , L .. , 

Mrs. Earl Walters jind family and 
Mrs. Ed. EaFave of Baudette arrived 
Wednesday to visit with! their par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Nelson and 
also with bther friends and relatives. 
Mrs LaFave returned the'jsame even- 
ing whileplrs. Walters and her fam- 
ily expect] to return I to their home 
Wednesday. j ■ . | . ' 

Boy Evenson, who is employed at a 
C.C.C. Camp' at Chisholm as spending 
a week's vacation with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Evenson; 

and Mrs. H'. Bruggeman and 



ite&smznL^&L HaSeurivS ysng w 



man mother, Mrs. Henry Brugge- 
man Si'. I ~ j i ■ ' 

Mr.- and I Mrs. Martin Mathson, Ma- 
ble and Clayton visited at -the G. A. 



isitedat.the Clarence Swenson home. 
They also visited at the Olaf Berg-) 
land home at Crookston enroute home." 

i ^r 5 ' A. P. Anderson visited' Sun- „ ie „,,„ uitt . wll ylal « u «n,-,, uc „. . 
-Miss Fern.Hawkinsoni who is em- fe y afternoon at the G. Erickson W ii son home on Sunday afternoon, 
ployed in the city, spent July 4th home . _. | Mrs. Win. Jasperson ahd Mrs. Jim 

with her parents at Wylie Evenson attended the! Canning dem- 

Mra- A. MoWtte h of plumme 5 ' r ■ „„„_ -ttt^^-^p^ Vonstrationlat Thief River Falls on 

spent Tuesday here shopping and SOUTH HICKORY ;Thursady. 

visiting friends. _ I', Mrs. James Evenson and Elizabeth 

G°rd°nOverland spe „t Tuesday, „ „ .. Y p s wa „ h ^T-rJ entertained, Mrs. Laura Feregan, 

and Wednesday in Duluth attending Jkj.^r'v'iew ^loo^ouse f on- Mr<=- Ber 4 a Adol P ns an ^ Mrs. Clif: 
^mTS Maimer Carlson ^tS^S^L^ J^S^^^ ^,^'^-K^..^^^^: 
daughter Mareheta of Devils Lake lowing program was rendMed^ songs 



Miss Mable Jasperson of St. Paul 
visited witih relatives here last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Antpff and 
Mrs. Harry Cousin and children visit- 
ed at the Ed. Johnson! home. Sunday. 



spent Tuesday and' Wednesday with by the audience, reading by LupeUa 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Ostroni. ' : I Hanson, two songs by Mrs. John 

Mrs. Tony Carlson of Holt shopped Arntson and a talk by Rev Sigurd 

:« fi.a .an ^ Ttieci^av i Fladmark. Lunch was served by Mes- m . - _.,. - . , >,, . - . „- 

,t- ln the S lty .°. n . S?'-r. t - .. b™„ Tnhn Olqmi Bi Binrnarin »nd ' The families of the Clearwater Con- 

•'l Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Robinson at- danies John Olson, jjj. jjjornaraa ana tim attended * h • 

tended the North Dakota State Fair E - H - Oftilie. ... . - « - J - - - I 

in Grand<Forks on Saturday. . | The Nczareth Lrdies' Aid which 

- Miss Alice Oien motored to Shelley was held at the Olaf Nelson home on 
on the 4th and spent the day with Wednesday afternoon was well, at- 
lier parents, Mr. and' Mrs.- Henry tended. Outsiders present were: Mrs. 
Oien. Mrs. Oien returned with her Pete Erickson of Issaquah, Wash., 
and will spend some time i visiting Mrs. Alfred Anderson and daughter 
here. j Ethel of Proctor, Mrs. Olive Chris- 

Miss Marie Vottendahf left Sun- tianson and daughters Alice and Mae, 
day for her home at Fisher after Mrs. Arthur Arvesori and Mrs. Mar- 
spending a few i?ays at the Carl Gjer- tin Knutson of Erie and Mrs. Knut 

*Qualley, 



Juanfta N.' D. Came Saturday: evening 
to sperida few days at the H. B. Al- 
len and Martin Bjerk homes and with 
other relatives.. -. .- 

Mrs. ; George Bakko went Saturday 
evening to visit at-the T; Strand home 
in Thief Biver Falls for a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bjerk, Mr. 
and Mrs. Orris Bodahl, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed. Johnson: Mr. and Mrs. W. A. 
Corbet and son were supper guests 
Sunday at the H. B. Allen home. 

The Community M. E. Ladies Aid 
was entertained Friday afternoon at 
the church by Mrs. Myles Jackson 
and Mrs. Charles Huff.- 

; PARCEL SHOWEB 

A parcel shower was given in hon- 
or of Mrs. Walter Aubol at her home 
Friday afternoon. A social afternoon 
was spent -and a delicious lunch was 
served* Mrs. Aubol received a number 
of useful and beautiful gifts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Beebe, Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harvey Olson of Chicago were guests 
Friday evening at the Lloyd Johnson 
jome in Thief River Falls. 

J. E. Brown of Lake City came Fri- 
day to visit at the home of his daugh- 
ter Mrs. W. P. Wison. He returned 
ori Monday. 

Miss Valerie Olson who has been 
visiting at the home of her sister Mrs. 
P. Burkee at Fargo N. Dak for over 
a week returned home Sunday even- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Christenson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Ness took a trip on 
Sunday to Leonard, Clearwater Lake 
and Bemidji. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Gunstad who 
hi>d spent the week end visiting rela- 
.tives. 



- - j , - , picnic at 

Squaw Point Sunday. | [ 

Sigurd Haugen and ;Warren Wilson 
of Dist. 125 were among the. group 
that gradiated from the eigth grade 
on Tuesday July 3rdi 



ncs heme. 

Ernest Helgenset returned ; Sunday 
from Oslo where he has been employ- 
ed. : ' 

Miss Elaine Helgeson returned Sun- 
day after visiting for a time with her 
aunt, Mrs. Ing. Gullickson of Middle 
-River. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Lasalle and 
sons Richard and James left Sunday 
for their home at Minneapolis aftev 
spending a week as guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. P. Erickson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bart Wagenstein, 
daughter Marjorie Anne, and Cloette 
Crown spent Sunday at Clearwater 
Lake. 

Rev. and Mrs. A.' F. Eergstrom of 
Chicago are visitors at tht home of 
their son-in-law and daughter, Rev 
and Mrs. H. L. Sjogren. 



CARD OF THANKS!: 

Plummer Camp No. 9042, M. W 
A. wishes to thank the citizens, of 
Thief River Falls for the splendid 
cooperation and turn out at the cele- 
bration June • 30. 

We wish to extend our hearty ?p- 
preciation for the -splendid' music and 
drills the Legion^ Auxiliary, drain 
corps gave us during the day and" 
evening. 

We hope that we may have your 
friendship and cooperation in the fu- 
ture. t 

Manus • Waldal, Chairman | 
Ed. Jacobson, Secretary 1 
Entertainment Committee 

Mrs. Laura Naplin arid daughter 



sermon following Jhe service, This „ .,-■: 

service is open to all followers j»f Aroline spent Sunday at Grand Forks, 
r-hrist whether members of this Miss Maxme Bell will leave Satur- 
c'lmvch or not ; " ' / d ?? for her ! b°me at Bemidji after 

There will be service at Steiner visiting with her aunt, Mrs. D. M. 
at 2:30 o'clock. Sunday . school at Co J!. ner3 ,i „ „ ■, „ 

J/30 .: / F 1 .Mrs. O. C. Swanson of Grand Forks 

There will be nfi' evening service visited at the Ted Stelamo home on 
in the Community church till furthjer '""jHSff--. .i „ , , „ ■ 

'mttai •"" ■ •' I j Mls i E l? me Sorenson left Satllr- 

,,ouce- ' - ' I day for Duluth where she will be 

• employed -during the summer months. 
She is making her home with her 
aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 



„„ Mi „.,_ „„„ Shopper;; and business I callers _. 

It was decided at the meet> : Th'^ Biver Falls from this vicinity 



ins that the Nazareth congregation 
will hold its annual festival on Sun- 
day July 29th. 

Mrs. Sarah Sannes and son Halvor 
were business callers at Guhy on Fii- 
d.-.y. 

Mrs. . Pete Frickspn of Issaquah, 



HICKORY! 



on -Frida^ were: Mr. and Mrs. C. 
EliaSon, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Man- 
derad and son. Oscar, Mr t and Mrs. H 
A. Dahleri, Mr. and Mrs.j Wille Vet- 
tleson and Syvert Teigen, Martin 
Solsang afad Carl Baltkeri. 
Miss_MyrtIe Rindahl is employed 



Wash., is visiting at the home of her at the Ben\ Rindahl home during Mrs, 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Bjerkie. I Rhidahls ahsence. . j i 

Mr. and Mrs. Bj. Bjornaraa and Friends | of Mrs. Ben Rindahl -will 
daughter Solveig accompanied by Mr. be pleased to hear she is improving. 
and Mrs. Erick Johnson returned to from her ! recent illness. . ' 



their homes on 'Monday evening after 
having attended the 25th anniversary 
convention of the 'Setesdalslag at the 
Municipal Auditorium in Thief River 
Falls., Mr. Bjornaraa has been presi- 
dent of the "Lag** since its organiza- 
tion. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. A. : Roed and> child- 
ren Helen ard Can; s "or Fsrtib wore 
?rJlers at Erick Johnson's on Monday 



Mr. and 'Mrs. Harold Stenvik are 
the pround parents of a ! baby girl 
which was 1 born June 27th:. 

Mr. andj Mrs. Bert Coah visited at 
the Jack Coan home Thursday after- 
noon. . : i 

Orland and Mervin IRindahl called 
Bjornaraa home Thursday 



at the Bj 
evening. 
Rev. S. 



Fladmark was la caller in 



ning. The latter is ?i'.ployc-l alt Thief River Falls Thursday, 
th i Walter Johnson home near We::lre. : l Mrs. Ari&ld Korupp and infant 

Harry and Walter; Hanson ace »m- ' daughter arrived home from Thief 
panied by Ludvlpr and Hen.-/ Bjerklio River Falfe last Thursday, 
were business callers at Red Lake Vhitbrs^at the Harold Stenvik 
Apency on SandV .home Sunday were: The! Cornelius 

Misses Elna and Emma Mostrom Johnsrud j family, Reuben SSlenvik 
are visiting at the ho;"*; of their family, Mrs. Teloy johnsrud and 
brother-in-law anl sister, Mr. and Leon McMahon . family 'and Louie 
Mrs. Albert Arveson near Wanke. j Thrulson. | | 

.Ole B jella and Thor Lunden of Mac- Charlie Thurlson and Henry and 
Tntosh were business callers at Olaf Louise Thurlson and 'Beb Rindahl 
Nelson's on Tuesday. were, busines callers at Thief River 

Miss Thora Bjornaraa who has Falls Monday. | 

been visiting at the home of her Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Johnsrud 
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. Teloy Johnsrud, Beii 
Mrs. Dreng Bjoniaraa at Minneapolis Rindahl and Joan 'Stenvik were call- 
returned to her- home on Saturday ers at Thief River Falls | on Friday 
evening. j They also j visited with] .Mrs. Rindahl 

Miss Mae Chrisiahson, who has who is a patient at a local hospital.^ 
been employed at Macintosh, has re- Mr. and! Mrs. Martin Solsang are 



: Vinlty Lutheran Church; 

R. M. Fjelajad, Pastor | ^ 
Morning worship' at 10 o'clock. IJet 



Dodge. 
Mrs. Charles Eley and daughter of 



not neglect our bouIs these long ) Vllll ^ m3 arrived Monday to spend aiolaf Nelson home on Sundav 
summer dlys. You will enjoy yo]ir ; f|.w daysvisiting Mrs. Eley's mother, - -- - ' ? - ° ? bnnday - 



.-nting much more if you have attend- j &**■ E- F. Cheney. 

;••! a service of/worship in the morn- Mr f\ J 31 ? Collins and daughter 

tug. / I ! h£ r< i if ^ r ? eir home at C°Ium- 

In the afternoon an ice cream social Dm 'alls, Montana Saturday after 
will be held pit the Mrs. Palma Loft- '™S tnree weeks ; visiting: with 
ntss home under the auspices of ohr iS- e ?A ,'■*,''■■ 
-»nior Luther League. Reports will - M ^ 3 ^'yn Helgenset left Sunday 
1 given by our delegates to the re- ; i2!, f t * ra i, ton ' N - Dak. where she will 



turned to her home. 

Miss Mildred Gustafson of Wanke 
is employed at the John Olson home. 

A large delegation; of people from 
thos" vicinity attndad the Setesdals- j 
lag at Thief River F'alls last weekend. ' 

Leonard Pladson' of Gully was a 
Sunday guest at the. Bj. Bjornaraa 
home. - 

Mr. and Mrs. John Berg and dough- 
ter Martha accompanied by Nels Zit- 
terberg of Mcintosh visited at the 



r.c given Dy our delegates to tne re-;-;;.. — ™™", ,«. ^an. wnere she will 
cent district convention at Bemidji. ' S 3 ," a f «w .weeks with her 'brother-' 
The program will begin at 8 o'clock. 55™ and 31st er, Mr. and Mrs. Eddie 
Everybody welcome.:.- I I M ?ttson. 

Circles will meet as follows: NoJ 8 
with Mrs. Axel Anderson on Thurs- 
day evening thii week, No. 10 with 
Mrs. O. T. Gilbertson on Friday, July 
6th, /No. 6 with Mra. Iver AaBeby, 
July 12th, No. 12-.with Mrs. Jefis 
Kierk, July 6th. 

Always a hearty welcome. 



The Nazareth Ladies Aid wil be en- 
tertained by Mrs. E. H. Oftelie on 
Wednesday July, 11th. 



GRYGLA 



LOCAL MARKETS 



THtBT BITKtt tiT.TJi QBAINS 
Af roythud by Thief -Btrer Falls 9eed 
HonW 
Ko. 1 Hard Northern., ^ ** 
No. 1 Dark Northern 
HwvlNorthoro Sprlna- -. 
Ko. 1 Amber Dnrtun 
No. I Mixed DorntQ 
No. I Red Durum 

Barlar 



•19. 

.73 

-■ •* 
% 

Bmok vhast a«r hnnona 1 06 

rOULTBT JC1BKET 
As ansted by Lmnd ©f Ijikes Creameries. 
B.avr H«nj «K » oro**r 
Ulklbwl ':■'■: 



Baaha under 5 ponnda'^; 
OsLaajboraavxiiua r H~. 
OotaaW Iniaaa > lb.~&jf 
LeakanBioUaralKjtfr over 

Oaak Oraam' '^i 

■aas.rinta >-, 



■A 

.00 

■i 



.» 

.11 

M 



„„:? i a °? Mr . 3 - Leonard t DuChamn ' season, witl 

^i»^7* !«% *»- »\* a iV* 



The ball game played here between 

Climax ' and the locals last Sunday 

was one of the most exciting games 

ever played on the local diamond this 

with the score resulting in 

„, , ,. - .-.--. * *■»"«■* ii-um a 1 -* «-" A in favor of Grygla. 

Zma^IP &*£* which ti me they I Thor Blikom of Thief River Falls 
Ph=™„ i Si.- 1 ? 08 , 481 and Wre* Du- I visited with Ole Blikom last. Sunday. 
m„ P ™ at Chisholm, and /Mr. and! Genevive Linn of; Warren, spent 
^s.^ Ole Froseth at Hternational last Sunday at her home here. 

I Laura Holbrook and little niece 
Patsy Lou Hill of Chicago, 111., ar- 
rived here last Sunday to visit with 



Fails. 



the proud parents of a baby boy. 

[ ST. HILAIRE . 

. Mr. and Mr> Harry iVinte: v: c. 
family motored to HHIsboro N. D. on 
Tuesday to visit with relatives. They 
also attended the state} fpir at Grand 
Forks. I "i | 

Mrs. R.j L. Hauge, who has been 
spending some' time at Bemidji re- 
turned last Sunday to visit -relatives 
here. | j 

Mrs. E. N. Reiersgord and son Tom 
and. La Vaughn Skatrud attended the 
state, fair at Grand ForksJ They went 
onto Aneta N. D. where | the former 
will visit a few days. 

Robert Black, Mrs. K. p. Gigstad, 
Elemess afad Evelyn Gigstad motored 
last Saturday to Hackensack to be 
present at| a gathering of If riends and 
relatives. They returned Sunday "even- 
ing. . ■ | • - ' j ' 

Mrs.- Ole Forde, Mrs. Tom Harney 
and daughter Eileen arrived ' Monday 
from Chicago for a visit at the home 
of Mrs. Fbrde's sister, Mrs. Dahle. 
' At the jreguiar meeting and elec- 
tion of ofh.:ei*4 at the Men's Business 
Club, which was held Monday night 
Mike Highland, . president; Myles 



TT A ry-r-i-r «,! J " CU uere laaw ounaay TO VIS1C Wltn- "^"1^- "'& ' — ' . ,^ I ^V ', ,, X — ■ 

iiAZEL I the Harold Bush and Holbrook fami- Jackson, vice-president; Wendell Cor- 

I .'[lies. ! | bet, Secretary; and ~Paul Roy was re- 



Hazel and Ruth Anderson.S^annah ' Clara Barstad returned to the O." 
and' Esther Sjoberg and Water Swan- ! J - Peterson home after spending a 
son motored the Grand Forks where ' t 1 ™ weeks vacation at Shelly, Minn, 
they attended the Lutheran conven-' Harry. Ristau of Mavie is visiting rt 
tion. - : the H. T. Peterson home. 

Mrs. E; Bnrstad' was honor guest ,. 9 ,e ;^?saard of Mahnomen, arrived 
at a parcel shower given at her last 
Thursday by; a large number, of 
friends. Mrsj Burstad was tha reci- 
pient of many lovely gifts from her 
friends and . lunch was served.' 

Mrs. J. Fellman, and Harold were 
Thief River Falls visitors Monday. 

Mrs. F. Bothman; w-s a Thitf River 
Falls visitor Thursday. 
. Mr. and' Mrs. A. Larson and ;famfly 
and Ernest Erickson were Thief River 
Falbf visitors Thursday. 

The Luther League at B. Walsetha 
was very w^ll attended lost. Friday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Won. Gilbertson and 
son Emil and Ernest Ericksov John 
Larson and sons,' Marvin "and Donald 
Thyren, and-iMr. and Mrs. A. Larcon 
and family spent Sunday at the G. 
Larson homtU . "T- -j- 

Helen' and iDoris Johnson returned 
Sunday from'Fargo after visiting the 
past week at the; C. Swenson home at 
that place, j 



Ifa-ji-jW^a^BSAI 



elected treasurer. 



ier 



Mr. and} Mrs. E. N. Reiersgord and 
family motored last Sunday to Haw- 
ley to attend a family gathering. 
- Mr. and Mrs. Harvey j Olson ar- 

ua ~..™.w.. „,„ rived here Wednesday . from Chicago 

here last "week to visit "at "the"s"o I *° ™ it i tlle nome 9f r his parents' 
Nygaard, Fladeland, Henry and Soren ""5 with ljelatiyes. : , ' - .. ■ 
Nygaard home3. Mr. Nygaard was a' Eev - c - Anderson and family re- 
— =j--^ - « ..*»-- - turned Wednesday from a motor trip 

to. the Twin cities. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Hardjer -attended 
the state fair at Grand Forks the past 
week. . | . -■.-■ 

Mr. and Mrs. Sever Skattum and 

daughters Alice and Marie 1 motored to 

Cross Lake near Fosstoh on Sunday 

to spend the day visiting" friends. 

Mr. and! Mrs. E. O. i^Tbhnson of 



resident of Grygla about 18 yeara ago 
and he states that Grygla is still "the 
biggest town of its ate*" 

nr^S 61 R ^ er .F aUs shoppers last 
Monday were Mr. and Ms. J. Maney, 
M. and Mrs. Gunder Grannm, Moeii 
Svendpladsen, Mrs. Ed. Geving, Mrs! 

A&iS^ 80 ? a,,d ^Bhter Adeline. 
„,S el . G S m f l who has been cm- 
Smeipf? P*?^ Cafe for some 
Tuesday. " h ° me at *#*• 1ast 
.^Charlotte Lloyd left for Ada, last 
week to- visit with relatives. 

Ray fcrephenrcj of Goodridge snent 



..KEY 

Door keysj Yale keys 



Sylvia Jokela of Four Ttowna^£-'? obUe: ' i * , r' t ' on ke y s °*' — . 

8 P. en ding a, number of days vMtW* 01 all kinds of locks, made at short 
with: Mr. and' Mrs. Sidney^ladelanf n0tice at 



The man wllb does Jittle things" 
.•well is always ready to do the olo; 
thing better. ■ • ■■ -'» 



Havel's Gun Repair Shop 

407 Arnold Ave. South, 

Thiefc Kiverf Falls, Minn. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




S.. 

and auto- 
all kinds, 



] MBTHDAY PARTY 



Mrs. H. L. Sjogren was pleasantly 
surprised' by 26 intends at her home 
on Monday, .tne ;occasion being her 
birthday. The. afternoon was spent 
socially and luncheon, was served by 
the Belf-invited guests. Those tak- 
ing part were Rev. and Mrs. A. F 
Bergstrom and daughters of Chic- 
ago, Bev.^Sjogreh, Megdames Frank 
■SSf ^' 01e ? I j l:ks o°. Charles Hel- 
quist, James Johnson, John Longren, 
™„„ ■ i J Iatt3 o?,. A. W. Mickelson, Her- 
man Mohne, Laura E. Naplin, H. E. 
Nelson, Helmer Ostrom, O. « Peter- 
son, Peter Vik, and Missesv&uf AU- 

Longr£ ter8 ° n ' and Aenes and^sther 



Dr. SPOFFORD 

Optometrist 

- —Will be at— 
HOTEL EVELYN, T. .R Falls 

Tuesday, July 10 

Hotel ROYAL, NEWFOLDEN 

Friday, July 13 
Save Your Eyes. It Pays. 



MISS DELTA WOLD IS BRIDE 
OF CHESTER MYROM 



The marriage vows of Miss Delta 
Wold, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Wold, and Chester A. Myrom, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Myrom was solemn- 
ized at a 10 o'clock ceremony Tuesday 
morning, at the Trinity Lutheran 
church, with Rev. R> M. FjelstatI' read- 
ing the services. - 

The bride was dressed in a gown 
of ecru lace and carried an arm 
bouquet of roses and' ferns. Her at- 
tendants, Miss Stella Myrom, sister 
of the groom, and Mrs. John Wold Jr. 
of Rae Heights, S. Dak., wore ankle 
length dresses of -pink and' blue or- 
gandy with harmonious accessories, 
and also carried bouquets of roses 
and ferns. The groom was attended 
by his brother, Arthur and John 
Wold, Jr. brother of the bride. 

Following the ceremony, a wedding 
dinner was served to a few immediate 
relatives and friends at the home of 
the bride's parents. The couple left 
Tuesday atte-noon on a motor trip to 
Winnipeg and other points in Can- 
ada. Mr. and Mrs. Myrom will make 
their home in this city, Mr. Myrom is 
an instructor on the Lincoln "High 
School faculty. 



WANT ADS 

[ Forum W ant Ads, one cent a word 

FOR RENT-jo room modern house 

ready for immediate occupancy T 

C. Orme, Phone 293. 15-13-ltc 

FOR SALE— Team of good, work 
horses, 6 and 7 years old.— C. C. 
Schuster, 622 St. Paul Ave. S 



FOR SALE-^-1 Thor washing ma- 
chine^ 1 Perfection kerosene stove, 

l small ice box and' 1 day bed. Mrs 

Kenneth Porter, 811 Arnold N. 131tp 



FOR SALE OR TRADE-Oldsmo- 
bile coupe. Will trade for good team 
Inquire at Magnuson's Feed Store 
13-ltp 



TYPEWRITERS ^-If you want to 

,!£' tf 1 "!? trade typewriters— Phone 
1"°, Hamilton'3. 13-rtc 



Children Are Safe At The '. 

AVALOJN 

Always Cool & Comfortable. 

Fri., Sat., Julr6-7 
"WILD GOLD" 

With John Boles, Claire Trevor 
• and Harry Green. 

also 6th Chapter 
L "Tarzen the Fearless" 

Mat Sat. 2:30. Adm. 6-15-25e 
Eve. Adm. 30-20-25c 



Hay Stumpage:— 80 acres for sale 
at reasonable price. Inquire at 623 
Duluth Ave. No. Thief River Falls. 

— ■ — : "p -; 

HIGHEST cash prices paid for 1 
wool and hides. Magnuson's Feedl 
Store. Phone 42. E. Husty. 16 7-ltp ' 



FOR SALE:— 4 wheel trailer with 
box and stock rack. Nearly new. Over 
6i?ed tires.— E. T. Burstad 16-ltp 

Any Size Kodak Film .Developed 
Indudmg 8 High Grade Glassy Prints 
' i5c — Salveson Studio 



Sun-Mon. July 8-9~ 
'Murder at the Vanities- 

With- Carl Brisson, Victor Mc- 
Laglen, Jack Oakie, Kitty Carl- 
isle and Duke Ellington and his 
famous band. 
Matinee Sunday at 2:30 

Tuesday, July 10 

TAKE A CHANCE NIGHT 
Children 10c. Adults 15c 

Wed. Thur. July 11-12 

Your Favorite Radio Artists 

On the Screen in Person 

"Doc" Schneider and his TEX- 
AS YODELING COWBOYS. 
Consisting of Comedy, Singing, 
Sharp shooting, Yodelng and' 

String band music 
Also — Regular Picture Program 

"A Private Scandal" 

Starring Mary Brian, Zasu Pitts 

.and Philip Holmes.' 

Adm. 10-20-35c 



Horses! 

30-Head-20 
N. P. Stock Yds., R.L. Falls I 

Horses as folows: 

Ages from yearlings to 8 
year olds, including well match- 
ed ^teams, sorrels, roans, blacks, 
and bays; well broke, weieht ' 
from 1200 to 1500 pounds. 

If your are interested in 
horses it will pay you' to look 
these over. 

Our Prices Are Right, 

Jack Boyd, Manager 




, F0R , SALE-Modern home, six 
looms, 100 foot lot. Corner Ninth 
and Main at 823. Phone 372. 17-13-c 

FOR SALE^-Horses and Cattle, 
terms if desired.— Northern Credit 
vo-, B. J. Shaw, manager. 12-tfc 



Fino home sites for sale— Block 17, 
Red Lake Rapids Addition, adjoin- 
ing new highway. Selling Jtat. 
Get Yours Now 
CITIZENS STATE BANE 



Announcement ! 

-Mr. Lawrence Lasseson, 
of Thief River Falls, has 
been appointed as Local 
Representative for the 
State Farm Mutual Automo 

bjle Insurance Company 
and will look after all 
matters pertaining to in- 
suring and servicing auto- 
mobiles, formerly taken 
care of by M. R. Levorson 
who isno longer an author- 
ized agent of the State 
Farm Mutual Ins. Co. 

At .the present time Mr. Lasse- 
son is our only authorized re- 
presentative in Pennington coun- 
ty- ; ' :' '■_ ■ . .-..- 

W. D. Stegner, State Director 
John A. Gronner, Dist. Agt. 



Does Your 
Motor Heat 
Up? 




Watch 
Your 
Radiator 



Let us clean the scales, 
rust and other accumu- 
lations from your engine 
block and radiator in 1 
operation with the 

Marauette FLUSHER 

Complete Radiator 
Repairing and Rebuild- 
: ing-Used Radiators 

THRONSON 
Motor Co. 

5fene 92 ^ 

Cor: 3rd^ad Knight 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



L 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



C 




OFFICIAL- 
PAPER ■ 
OF 
PENNINGTON 
COUNTY I 



VOLUME THREE NUMBER 14 



Historical Society 



sf River 




THIEF RIVER FALLS, PENNINGTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA. 



THURSDAY JULY 12, 19S4 



COURT REFUSES 
TO GRANT WRIT 

AGAINST CITY 

;Judge Holds Council May An 
| ticipate Tax and Earnings 
i In Truck Purchase. 



Application by H. A. Brumund for 
injunction restraining- the city from en- 
tering contract with the Oen Mercan- 
tile company for the" purchase \of a 
fire trucK was denied by Judge oi 
the District Court M. a. Bialttiand, 
in a decision handed down last 1 week. 

The court holey that in absence of 
evidence to the contrary the affidavit 
of the city clerk as to tne state of the 
city's finances must be assumed to be 
correct and that the council has au- 
thority to anticipate the earnings of 
the power plant and tax collections to 
be received into the current expense 
fund. In a memorandum attached to 
the decision the^court states that: 
"the affidavit submitted* in opposition 
by the defendants is made Dy P. G. 
tederson, who has been city clerk 
since 1924 and prior thereto was the 
deputy city clerk from 1914 to 1924 — 
; we must assume that the statements 
and estimates made by him are sub- 
stantially correct." I 

"The affidavit submitted contains, 
apparently, a complete statement oi 
what funcs are on hand, the amount 
of taxes levied, the total amount of 
funds available for the fiscal! year 
1934, and applicable to the liabilities 
oi the city." J 

Referring to the law which the 
plantiff cited in substantiation of 
xheir claim to an injunction the! court 
says: "The section of the statute re- 
lied upon by the plaintiff, section 108, 
chapter 8, laws of 1895, limits the 
authority of city councils and its of- 
ficers to issue bonds or create! any 
debt or liability against the city in 
excess of the amount of revenue ac- 
tually levied and applicable to the 
payment of such liabilities." 

The court further holds that the 
;' revenue" referred to, is sononymous 
with; and includes income from all 
sources referred to in the affidavit 
submitted by the defendants."! .This 
is further borne out, the court says 
by sectioiy/88 of the same act [which 
provides l(or the maintainance in the 
city treasury: of a fund designated as 
the current expense funu* replenished 
by the income of the city and by tax 
levies: Out of such funds shall be 
paid all salaries and expenses of the 
city government not otherwise | pro- 
vided for, "and the cost of all the de- 
partments of the city government 
having no special funds created •'there- 
fore, and the purchase, construction, 
anu repair of all appliances arid ap- 
paratus therein." I 

Funds which will come into thfc 
city's possession thru tax levies and 
saie of electrical energy will replenish 
the current expense fund - thru repay- 
ments to it from funds now | over- 
drawn, the court holds, and is there- 
fore applicable to the purchase con- 
templated by the city. 



Ninth District Legion Band 
Plays at Moorhead Sunday 

Members of the 9th district band 
were guests of the Moorhead* Ameri- 
can Legion Post at Moorhead last 
Sunday. A concert was presented in 
the Moorhead ball park, and the band 
took part in the memorial parade in 
Fargo which was a feature of the 
North Dakota State American Legion 
convention held there. The local 
drum corps appeared, together with 
several other bands and corps re- 
presenting, Minnesota. From 6 P. M. 
to 6 P. M. the 9th district band* play- 
ed over radio station WDAY at Far- 
go, with S. P. Orwoll, director, of the 
local band assisting in broadcasting 
the concert. 



Valley Bands Will Hold 
Annual Picnic Sunday 

The Red River Vally band associa- 
tion, whose membership numbers ten 
bands, will gather in the Moorhead 
city park on Sunday, July 15, for its 
annual picnic. Commencing at Vi. 
noon, each band will play a 25-niinute 
program, while the massed band will 
appear in concert at 4:30 P. M A 
special feature of the day will ' be 
numbers by the well-known Amphion 
chorus of Fargo and Moorhead'. 1 

The municipal band will appear un- 
der the direction of S. P. Orwoll; who 
'£■ thls , year's president of the Red 
Kiver Valley band association. Radio 
station KDFK, Moorhead, Minnesota 
will broadcast the day's program, so 
listen m! 



, Miss Effie Hamry 
visiting at Warroad. 



spent Sunday 



Strong Demand For Farm 
Labor Says H. Davidson 

Howard Davidson, county managei 
of the local reemployment office, an- 
nounced today that the demand for 
farm hands in the county exceeds the 
number of rpplicants and emphasized 
that the local men desiring work of 
this kind should contract the local 
NRS office immediately, otherwise 
outside help may have to be obtained 
Mr. Davidson stated that the local 
office had great success in the place- 
ments last month, and said that of 
the twelve districts of the state, it 
has placed' 3rd and 4th in placement: 
during the last month, 'averaging 2C 
private placements a week in the 
county. 

FIRST~ROUND OF 
TENNIS TOURNEY 
ALMOSTFINISHED 

Tournament Games Are Played 

On Lincoln School 

Tennis Court 



Burglars Get Away With 
_ $60 at Standard Station I 

Thieves escaped with ?60 in 
cash and $12 in checks from the 
safe of the Standard Oil com- 
pany at Main Ave. and Second 
Street on ^Tuesday evening- 
around 9 o'clock, while Harold' 
Eide, the manager of the station 
was attending to a car on the 
grease rack. Chief of Police A. 
B. Stenberg is holding two men 
under suspicion of the theft. 

School Election to be 

Held Tues., July 17 

-4 Men Seek Jobs 

Two new members to the school 
board will be elected for 3-year terms 
by the peop;e of Thief River Falls 
school district No. 18 at the auditor- 
ium next Tuesday evening, July 17 
with the polls being open between the 
hours of 7 and' 8. Four candidates 
have filed for the two posts, namely 
E. M. Bennes, president of the board; 
A. E. Mattson, also a member, W. J 
Douville, Soo Line employe, and R. W 
Woolhouse, manager of the Osborne- 
McMillan elevator. 

NiCK NELSON, PIONEER, 
PASSES AWAY TUESDAY 



SCHOOL BOARD 
BUYS COAL AND 
Ef}UIP|ENTMON. 

Superintendent Morris Bye An- 
nounces School Work* 
to Start Sept. 4. 



The 
July 



At the age of 76 years, Nic Nelson 

passed away Tuesday at a local hospi- ,,„„' - v — i- - 

tal. He was born in Eidsvold', Norway ' n° ra eP°wer m otor for use in 

„„ T~» 1 in »r,-~ .' -M North™., h.i.lrlinrv i,m-- n „l-~ 



Manager Arthur Johnson announ- 
ces that the first round matches of 
the local tennis tournament will b< 
completed this wetk. Eight players 
who are scheduled to meet in the 
quarter finals are George Aanstad 
Lloyd Aanstad, Lincoln Arnold, Mar^ 
'™ Benson, W. G. Claffy, Rev. A. I 
Merth, Gordon Overland, and Tom 
Rowan, Jr. Arrangements have been 
made to . play the matches at the 
Lincoln 'high school cement tennis 
court at any time, the drawings oi 
which are posted' at the court. 

Severe Penalty for Miss-Use 
Of Mail Boxes; Dep\. Says 

, F . e € , d ™ 1 Statutes provide for fine 
ot ¥300 for the placing in mail boxes 
of circulars, posters, bills, etc., Post- 
master Anderson pointed out Wed- 
nesday. 

Use of mail boxes, placed for the 
convenience in delivering mails, for 
depositing of statements, bills Cir- 
culars, etc., has been forbidden by 
postal laws for some time past ana 
the penalty for their mis-use by bill 
peddlers etc., who used them for the 
deposit of mailable matter upon which 
no postage was paid, was no more 
than the collection. of postage due on 
the matter. Now the law has been 
amended to provide a severe penalty 
and reads as follows: 

'Whoever shall knowingly or will- 
fully u'aposit any mailable matter such 
as statements of accounts, circulars 
sale bills or other like matter on 
which no postage has been paid', in 
any letter box established, approved 
or accepted by the Postmaster-Gen- 
eral for the receipt or delivery of 
mail matter on any mail route with 
intent to avoid payment of lawful 
postage thereon; or shall willfully aid 
or assist in any of the aforementioned 
offenses, shall for every such offense 
be punished by a fine of not more 
than $300.00. 



Manufafanng Plant Being Conducted on the 
QT Until Snooping Reporter Discovers It 



Fred Forsberg of 210 Kendall ave- 
nue south, has been "slipping | one 
over" on the people of Thief Eiver 
l-alls for three months. During all 
this time he and his sons havei been 
manufacturing some re- 1 up-to-the- 
minute sweet clover hullers and; seed 
cleaners in a garage away down on 
the south end of Crocker avenue. 
But for an unguarded word which he 
dropped' while down at the Forum 
office a few days ago he might have 
been getting away with it yet. 

However, "Adam fiB|hadRotlJ-vb 
ity was aroused and an investigation 
followed. We pulled a 'coup de friudre' 
and bursting in on them suddenly 
caught them right in the act of manu- 
facturing and assembling one of the 
machines. Being "caught with th€ 
goods" there was nothing for Mr. 
Forsberg to do but to show the lay- 
out and the machines. 

There were key-way- cutting 



chi 



ines, press punches, drill presses. 



metal rollers, crimpers, shears that 
that will just eat its way thru 14 
gauge sheetmetal and patterns! ga- 
lore. Three machines are assembled 
and ready for business and a fourth 
ls iK"- con3 'ruction at this time. 



on December 10, 1858, and came to 
this country in 1869, settling at Red 
Wing. In 1870, he moved to Ells- 
worth, Wisconsin, where he was mar- 
ried in 1883 to Miss Marie Iverson 
who preceded him in -death in 1893. 
They moved to Pennington County in 
1883. Those ■ who survive Mr. Nelson 
are, two dpughters, 'Mrs. Lena Hamm 
of St. Paul, and Miss Inga Nelson of 
Chicago; four sisters, Mrs. Gina 
Voldness and Mrs. Inga Sjolsvold' of 
this community, Mrs. Paula Larson 
on Ellsworth, Wise, and Mrs. Laura 
Stensrud of Los Angeles, California; 
and one brother Ole G. Nelson of 
Spray, Oregon. 

Sei-vices will be conducted Friday 
at 2 o'clock from the Erickson and 
Lund funeral home with Rev. R. M 
Fjelstad officiating, and interment 
will be made in Nord'en cemetery. 



board of education held its 
_ meeting last Monday evening 
and opened bids on the winter's sup- 
ply of coal and or various equipment 
for the city school buildings. 

The Central Lumber Company and 
the O'Hara Fuel arid' Ice Company 
were j awarded contracts for supply- 
ing the city schools with coal. The bid 
of thji former to furnish 225 tons of 
screenings at $8.10 a ton was accept- 
ed, and also the bid of the O'Hare 
Fuel and Ice Company to supply 200 
tons of lump coal at $8.25 a ton. 

The contract to supply four porce 
lain stalls and an ! automatic flush 
tank for the boys' toilet in the Lin- 
coln high school building, went to Ed 
Lee at the bid of $258. He will also in. 
stall four drinking fountains in thi 
Northrup build'ing, for $132. 

Lloyd AInes' bid of $170.18 for in- 
stalling new light fixtures in thi 
Washington school was accepted, and 
two | three-horsepower altmating 
current electric motors for operating 
ventilating fans in the Northrop and 
Knoxt buildings, and a three-fourth 

tht 



Oklee Man Succumbs 
Following Bad Burns 



Northrop building were also pur 
chased from Mr. Alnes on his bid of 
$272. i 

Supt. Morris Bye submitted the 
school calend-r for 1934-35 which wa- 
approyed by the board. Mr. Bye an 
nounced that regular classwork wil' 
begin I on Tuesday, September 4. An- 
nual school bulletins, such as those 
of past years, will be distributed. 

Land 0' Lakes Creameries 
Of District 14 to Hold Picnic 
At Twin Lakes on Sunday 



The Land O' Lakes Creameries of 
District 14 will hold a picnic at Pine- 
hurst i resort on Twin' Lakes on Sun- 
day, July 15. 

An 'excellent speaking and' musical 
program has been prranged including 
addresses by J. H. Hay, deputy com- 
missioner of agriculture and N. A. 
Howalt of Minneapolis. The Halstad 
M;ile quartet will present vocal selec- 
tions and the Mahnomen High School 
Martin O. Mattson passed away band has been engaged for the oc- 
Saturday afternoon, July 7 at a I casion. Dr. Rumreicht's "Little Ger- 
hospital in Erskine after having been j*man Band" will also 1 be on hand to 
severely burned at his farm home add' to the festivities. An Indian 
near Oklee when a kerosene can ex- Pow-Wow is on the program 
ploded as he was starting a fire in Pinehurst resort is 20 miles east 
the range. Mr. Mattson's clothes were I of Mahnomen, and : -18"»miles south of 
burned off, and' he had no means of : Lengby. 
obtaining help as he was alone at j 

the time of the. accident. He was born I n 1...1 r>\ ii ii n 

in Norway, March 11, 1872, and had j KOCKSDUTy LlUD | Holds a 
been a resident : of this country for 



Legion Sponsors Floor Show 
Friday and Saturday Nights 

The American Legion post is 
sponsoring the appearance of the 
La Porte Flame Ramblers at the 
auditorium on Friday and Satur- V 
day evenings. A program of 
dance music and a floor show will 
be presented/ Balcony seats will 
be available for those not wishing 
to participate in the dancing. 

County Board Holds 
Semi-Annual Meeting 

Only routine business was transact- 
ed by the county board at its semi- 
annual meeting on Monday. A ?iJ00 
appropriation was voted to the coun- 
ty fair association and the accrued 
bills were approved and ordered paid. 

The semi-annual report of the 
40i:hty auditor v.js exa.nined, ap- 
proved and* ordered placed on file, 
i'he county highway engineer whose 
term of office* expires in July was,re- 
cained for a period of six months. 
This was done in order to bring his 
term to a close at the first oV the 
year instead of midseason when road 
construction is at its height. Fixing 
oi the county's budget for the coming 
year and the county tax levy was 
postponed until Wednesday, July 18. 
ui the meantime the coumv board 01 
equalization will meet on Monday, 
July. 16. 

ACCIDENfCOSTS 
LIFE OF MRS. 0. 
L. BAKKp WED. 

Wife of Former Street Com- 
missioner and Three Others 
Killed — Two Injured 



il years, coming to Oklee in 1904 
Mr. Mattson's wife preceded him in 
death. last winter, and several child 
ren survive him. ; 

Mr. Mattson's daughter, Mrs. Inga 
Anderson, passed away Monday at 
her home in Minneapolis. She was 
born March 8, 1906, and leaves hei 
husband and one son. Services for 
both Mr. Mattson and his daughter 
were held Wednesday from the Gar- 
nes church near Oklee with Rev. Ler- 
ol of Oklee officiating. 

Center Piers of Bridge 
Bring Poured This Week 

The new bridge is reported as pro- 
gressing nicely, with the concrete 
ready to be poured into the middle 
pier this week. Approximately 60 men 
are, employed on the project which if 
expected to be completed by October 
1st. 



in the business of scarrifying and 
cleaning ^seeds for firms and for 

ISi ."? °. f . the m a<=hmes and there is has just built are beimr install^ T~ 



wood rasps, and' what a back scrat- 
cher that would be when in motion. No 
wonder its called "scarifier" it ought 
to scare the hulls off'n most anything 
even from a "hardshell' republican: 

A sort of an overgrown vacuum 
cleaner is attached' to this cylinder 
° aS ^ S ° ":?' the machine can be set 
right in the parlor and won't even 
lay dust: on /the center table, Mr. /Fors- 
berg says. *hen the seen having been 
thoroughly "scared" goes over a series 
of .sieves and screens and this sepa- 
rates, with the aid of a fan the hull- 
from the seeds. Hulls and cockle burs 
go one way, undersized seeds, pigon 
gross seed, and' such things go an- 
other, and the clean clover seed comes 
up thru an elevator to the sacker. 

The machine which is protected with 
one United States and two Canadian 
patents is better than any that is on 
the market, Mr. Forsberg says. He 

uTe^feTesSmtLSg &S2 SST & ^ "^«™ "^gn^^h 

in the hu!.iT.o= a n.f .„ .yK.^"Busea jirs. William Vaughan and Mrs 

Ruby Macauley as leaders. On July 
18 at the home of Mrs. Richard Pet- 



CANNINtiDEMONSTRATION 
TO B£ HELD NEXT WEEK 

Several canning demonstrations 
were conducted Friday, Mond*ay, and 
Tuesday In the Civic and Commerce 
rooms by the leaders Miss Avis 
Akre and Mrs. A. C. Matheson, and 
Miss Rosine Dahlen and Miss Lois 
Oden. A similar demonstration was 
held in the Lutheran church' at Stj 
Hi.aire on Wednesday with Mrs. Earl 
Jenson and Mrs. W. A. Corbet as 
leaders. 

The canning program if directed 
by Miss Inez Hobart, nutritionist of 
the Farm School and now attached 
to the social service division of the 
state^ERA, and is designed to make 
possible the best use of garden pro- 
duce . by relief clients. 

ThS- schedule of caning demon- 
strations to be held in the various 

townships of the county is as fol- 
lows: 

. At t E ^ ie J n Sta ' r Township on July 
12, at the Peter Lovly home with Mrs. 
Peter Lovly and Mrs. Edward' Sin- 
ger as leaders. At Mavie in Clover- 
Ie _ af Township on Ju 'y 16 ^ the home 
of Mrs. Roger Anderson, with Mrs. 
Koger Anderson, with Mrs. D G 
Brownlee and Mrs. A. W. Oski a<= 
leoders. At Highlanding ' in High- 
landing Township, on July 17 at the 

nnmo *vf 7lrTi.« iiriiii! ii i ... 



Successful Picnic. Weed 
Expert Will Speak Sat. 

The picnic at Valhalla last Sunday 
was very well attended, and the New- 
f olden team defeated! the Rocksbury 
Community Club in kittenball by the 
score of 12-8. Next Sunday, July IB, 
the Rocksbury 4-H club will have its 
annual tour, winding iup at Valhalla, 
where several teams will compete in 
kittenball. The regular league game 
between Smiley and Silverton will be 
played, and the Rocksbury 4-H team 
will play the Hazel 4-H team. 

On July 22, the Kratka girls will 
play the Rocksbury girls at Rocksbury 

The; Rocksbury Community Club 
will have its regular meeting on Sat- 
urday evening, July 14, with the 4-H 
club presenting the | entertainment. 
Professor Clark of the Northwest 
school ; at Crookston will address the 
gathering, and will present a talk 
and explanation on the habits and 
characteristics of weeds to those 
bringing specimens of weeds they 
want identified. I 



,t„ - , , - -- «..« there is 

the usual hopper with roller feed into 
which, the^seec is shoveled. Thelhop- 
per was lifted off and we were shown 
the scarrifiyng cylinder; a bi<* drum 
covered with what looked like coarst 



.. . - - — are being installed in 
their warehouses. 

Mr. Forsberg first started building 
S'""*7 wh 'ch he calls "Combine 
Clover Huller arid Seed Cleaner" at 
Daupliin, Manitoba. ueaner at 



erson in Wyondotte Township with 
Mrs.^ O. Weckwerth and Mrs. Hans 
Frestby as leaders. 
_ A"- demonstration will "also be held 
in the Civic and Commerce associa- 
tion rooms in the auditorium on Fri- 
day July- 20 at 1 o'clock for women 
in the Town of North and from the 
city, with Mrs. V. C. Noper'and Mrs. 
S. E. Hunt as leaders. 



Wheat Curb Associatio n 
Holds Annual! Meeting 
On Saturday, July 7th 

The Pennington County wheat con 
trol association met for its annual 
meeting last Saturday! Alfred Lund- 
gren was re-elected president, Isaac 
Wilson was elected vice-president, R. 
M. Douglass, secretary, . T and Robert 
Lund, treasurer. The wheat inspector 
is out j in the county at the present 
time inspecting the fields, after 
which I the reports will be sent to 
Washington, D. C. and last year'i 
payments will be paid soon after the 
inspection. 



A most unfortunate accident oc- 
cured Wednesday afternoon at ap- 
proximately 1:20 P. M. between Men- 
ahga and Sebeka, Minnesota, when a 
railroad train struck the car driven 
by Rev. Eklund of Menahga, the 
other passenger of which were Mr 
and Mrs. O. L. Bakkenof this city 
daughter and' son, and e. 
woman whose name is unknown. Tht 
latter four lost their lives, while Mr. 
Bakken and' Rev. Eklund are in pre- 
carious conditions at a hospital in 
Wadena. - ..- 



Smiley Club to hold Checker 
Board Dance Frii July 13th 

Ai, Another novelty ''checkerboard" 
dance will be sponsored by the Smiley 
Community club on Friday, July 13, 
at the ; Louis Nelson farm, which is 
6 miles southeast on the Angle Road', 
and 2 miles east. Music will be by 
Shorty ; Davidson and his orchestra, 
and lunch is included with the ad- 
mission price. The proceeds of the 
dance will be contributed towards the 
building of the Smiley Community 
hall, of which appproximately $125 
has been made by?umches, dances, 
etc. The building of. the hall is ex- 
pected to begin in the' hear future. 



He who strikes while the iron is 
hot does not always succeed in mak 
ing warm friends. ;" 




Rocksbury Club Will 
Sponsor Another All- 
Party Rally in August 

The Rocksbury Community club will 
sponsor another political rally some 
time before the general election cam- 
paign closes, according to an an- 
nouncement, made this week by Paul 
Ungelgtad. 

This rally, which they repect to 
stage sometime in August will differ 
from the meeting which was so well 
enjoyed by both voters and candidates 
during the primary campaign, in that 
in this case it will be the major pol- 
itical parties that will be invited to 
present thlir arguments rather than 
the individual candidates. Invitation 
isbeing extended to the county com- 
mittees of the republican, democratic 
and Farmer-Labor parties to provide 
a speaker for the occasion, Mr. En- 
gelstad stated, and lots will be drawn 
to decide which speak first, second 
and third. From a half hour to three 
quarters of an hour will be alloted 
for each speaker and they will be ex- 
pected to confine their talk within the 
time allowed. No mud-sliriging will be 
tolerated, Mr. Engelstad stated', but 
the speakers will be expected to pre- 
sent the platform of their party and 
the return of that party's candidates 
to office. 

' Over GOO people attended the can- 
didates rally held at Valhall just prior 
to the primary campaign, and judging 
from comment on this new plan al- 
ready heard, this second meeting 
should bring several thousand people 
out to hear the speakers. No action 
has been taken on the invitation by 
the several party organization yet, 
but questioned about it, members of 
the farmer-labor county committee 
stated that they will accept the invi- 
tation and secure a speaker for the oc- 
casion. Further particulars will be an- 
nounced when arrangements are com- 
pleted in greater detail, Mr. Engel- 
stad said. 



COUNCIL TABLES 
C W A PETITIONS 
RE: 2 MEN FIRED 

Workmen's Group Threaten to 

Boycott Businessmen 

On Council: 

^ At ^l h , e , m , e , eti , nB Tues day evening 
the CWA Workmen's Protective as- 
sociation presented its petition re- 
questing that W. W. Viebahn, the 
city engineer be • discharged and the 
two men, employees of the light de- 
partment which he discharged with- 
out justification some time ago be re- 
instated', to the council. Chas. Schulz 
acting as spokesman for the work- 
men's group stressed the fact that no 
adequate reason had been given for ' 
t-he discharge of the men in question 
and suggested that the council act at 
once in the matter. 205 names were 
affixed to the petitions m-esenteil to 
the council. Another petition contain- 
™ff ISO names had been lost. 

Chas. Evenson, janitor at the audi- 
torium, addressed the council, and de- 
fended the action of the citv engineer 
He suggested that the council should 
look into the other side of the 
story." 

Alderman McFarland turning to 
Schulz stated that "the incident had 
been closed a month ago and' that he 
could see no reason for reopening it. 
As far as I am concerned the matter 
is closed," he said. 

Jack VanPelt, secretary of the 
ri..™.™ 3 organization pointed out 
ilt>- heSe , people had si &ned the 
petitions after the council had disre- 
garded the demands of the workmen's 

mind the matter is not closed, but 
vei j much open. 

Aldermen Griebstein and president 
of the council Myhrom stated that 
the matter was disposed of as far as 
they are concerned. 

<3^,';V 1 ' eS ?i, ne ., t r hem a secon o time. Mr. 
Schulz said, "You men are all in busi- 
ness and depend upon our trade We 

w^^f 6 that trade adhere we 
want to, and we will trade with those 

wSf4 Ses tha > treat us "S ht - We cm 
boycott you if we want to, and we're 
going to Jo it. There's over two 
hundred people signed that petition 

™« ™/° U B , ? nt '? g0 against aem 
you can. But we have a right to 

trade somewhere else If we want to." 

br e "W""" advised him not 
'£ S7- l h'ghpressure" the council, 
to winch Schulz replied that he was 
buf ull" e t0 , hi ff h P«ssure anyone, 
but that people can trade where ever 
they want to, and they may be wan£ 
>ng to trade somewhere else 

Pn motion by Alderman McFa-land 
seconded by Griebstein the petitions 

^ r fi la t ' d , 0n the ^ bIe an d the matte? 
indefinitely postponed. ."""er 

Bids covering water main were 

?£ T d - §? d * C( ™ t r a <* was allotted to 

£ n v »; % te B r lfing Material «o^ 

pany at ,5 cents per foot. Other 
bids were as followi? United states 
Pipe and Foundry/Co., 97c pr ft- 
American Cast If£n Pipe Co., 97c pr. 
ft.; Marshall-Wells Co., $l.oi.pr. ft • 
and The Crane Co., $1,046.54 for the 
entire amount of the contract which 
included 1020 feet of 6 inch water 
mam and one "I" connection and one 
valve. The prices on the latter two 
items were uniformly about J12 and 
54 in all bids. This brings the Crane 
company's bid' to. about $1.01 pr. ft 
for the pipe. " . 

Dry cleaning license was granted 
to K. E. Dahl and building permits 
were issued to D. V. Snelling, re- 
modeling, to cost about $300; H. T. 
Helgeson, constructing an oil station 
at the corner of Eigth street and 
Dewey avenue at a cost of fSSO. 

Dr. Jacobson appeared on behalf of 
the park board and discussed the 
proposed' condemnation of certain lots 
in the south end. of the city for park 
purposes. 

The bills of the month 
proved and ordered paid. 



were ap- 



Aux. Drum Corps Wins 
Activities Prize at N. D. 
Legion Meet in Fargo 

The Thief River Falls Auxiliary 
drum corps won second prize for 
activities in the drum corps contest 
sponsored- by the North Dakota 
American Legion at the North Da- 
kota American Legion convention at 
Fargo the first part of the week. The 
corps also appeared in the Memorial 
Parade which was a feature of Sun- 
day s convention program. 



Land 0' Lakes Buys Cooperative Creamery. 
Plans For New Creamery Are Being Drawn 



Sale of their present creamery 
building to the Land O' Lakes was 
decided upon by the stockholders of 
the Farmer's Co-operative creamery 
association of this city at a special 
meeting held in the Civic and Com- 
merce association rooms at the audit- 
orium last Friday. 

Under^ the terms of the agreement 
entered into by the creamery associ- 
ation and the Land O' Lakes organiza- 
tion, the latter will construct a new 
creamery on the site formerly oc- 
cupied by the Thief Riverialls Seed 
House retail store which Burned down 
last fall, at the corner/ of Horace 
avenue^, and Second street. The new 
buildipfeTOll bayme story, of brick 
andjjge.^cansj^tion and' will be 
tnrpruuglus*. modern thruout. Tte 
Lanib O'ULakesd will also stand all 
costs of moving the creomery into the 
new structure- when it is completed. 
The Land O' -Lakes will assume about 



present indebtedness under the term 
of the contract. ( 

Plans for the new structure are be- 
ing drawn at this time and eonatruc- 
tion will, be started as soon as poasi- 
ble. 

The' present creamery bnildtaaj will 
be extensively remodeled, Mr/V Q 
Norby, manager of the Land O" Lakes 
stated yesterday. A tunnel eomuctisz 
it with the present plant of tge 1*3- 
O Lakes will be constructed and the 
two buildings will also be constmeted 
above ground with corridors. 

The purchase was made to provide 
more room for the poultry aad •» 
business of the Land O' Lakes" plant 
which has exgetittled'at a rapid rate 
according to Mr. Norby. The top floor 
of the creamery building will be fit- 
ted up to house feeding batteries for 
poultry end will most likely be con- 
nected with the top floor of the pre- 
sent poultry plant which is used for 



one half of the creamery, associationasthe same purpose bym vjsdnct. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



i 



r 






L 




Y 



VOLUME THREE NUMBER 14 



COURT REFUSES 
TO GRANT WRIT 
AGAINST CITY 

Judge Holds Council May! An- 
ticipate Tax and Earnings 
In Truck Purchase. 



Application by H. A. Brumuhd for 
injunction restraining the city from en. 
tering contract with the Oen Mercan- 
tile company for the" -purchase \of a 
fire trucK was denied by Judge ol 
the District Court M. a. Brattiand, 
in a decision handed down last week. 
■ The court holds that in absence of 
evidence to the contrary the affidavit 
of the city clerk as to the state of the 
city's finances must be assumed to be 
correct and that the council has au- 
thority to anticipate the earnings of 
the power plant and tax collections to 
be received into the current expense 
fund. In a memorandum attached to 
the decision the court states that: 
"the affidavit submitted* in opposition 
by the defendants is made ny P. "G. 
Pederson, who has been city clerk 
since 1924 and prior thereto was the 
deputy city clerk from 1914 to 1924 — 
we must assume that the statements 
and estimates made by him are sub- 
stantially correct." 

"The affidavit submitted contains, 
apparently, a complete statement ol 
what fund's are on hand, the amount 
oi taxes levied, the total amount of 
funds available for the fiscal . year 
1934, and applicable to the liabilities 
of the city." 

Referring to the law which the 
plantiff cited in substantiation of 
their claim to an injunction the court 
says: "The section of the statute re. 
lied upon by the plaintiff, section 108, 
chapter 8, laws of 1895, limits the 
authority of city councils and its of- 
ficers to issue bonds or create any 
debt or liability against the city in 
excess of the amount of revenue ac- 
tually levied and, applicable to the 
payment of such liaDilities." 

The court further holds that the 
revenue" referred to, is sononymous 
with, and includes income from all 
sources referred to in the affidavit 
submitted by the defendants." This 
is f urther borne out, the court , says 
by section 88 of the same act which 
provides for the maintainance in the 
city treasury of a fund designated as 
the current expense fund' -replenished 
by the income of the city and by tax 
levies.! Out of such funds shall be 
paid all salaries and expenses of the 
city government not otherwise ; pro- 
vided for, "and the cost of all the de- 
partments, of the city government 
having no special funds created there- 
fore, and. the purchase, construction, 
ana repair of all appliances and ap- 
paratus therein." ^ ; 

Funds which will" come into ; thfc 
city's possession thru tax levies and 
sale of electrical energy will replenish 
the current expense fund thru repay- 
ments [ to it from funds now j over- 
drawn; the court holds, and is there- 
fore applicable to the purchase con- 
templated by the city. j 

Valley Bands Will Hold 

Annual Picnic Sunday 

i ■ "I 

■The Red River Vally band associa- 
tion, whose membership numbers ten 
bands, will gather in the Moorhead 
city park on Sunday, July 16 r for its 
annual picnic. Commencing at 12 
noon, each band will play a 25-minute 
program, while the massed band will 
appear in concert at 4:30 P. M A 
special feature of the day will ' be 
numbers by the well-known Amphion 
chorus of Fargo and Moorhead'.j 

The municipal band will -appear un- 
der the diredtion of S. P. Orwoll! who 
n- thla , year's president of the' Bed 
Kiver Valley band association. Radio 
station KDKK, Moorhead, Minnesota, 
will broadcast the day's program, so 
listen ml I 



Ninth District Legion Band 
Pjays |at Moorhead Sunday 

Members of the 9th district band 
were guests of the Moorhead Ameri- 
can Legion Post at Moorhead last 
Sunday. 'A concert was presented in 
the Moorhead ball park, and the band 
took part in the memorial parade in 
Fargo which was a feature of the 
North Dakota State American Legion 
convention „held there. The local 
drum corps appeared, together with 
'several other bands and corps re- 
presenting Minnesota. From 6 P. M. 
to 6 P. M. the 9th district band' play- 
ed over radio station WDAY at Far- 
go, withiS. P: Orwoll, director, of the 
local band assisting in broadcasting 
the concert. 



Strong; Demand For Farm 
Labor Says H. Davidson 

Howard Davidson, county managei 
of the local reemployment office, an- 
nounced today that the demand for 
farm, hands in the county exceeds the 
number of rpplicants and emphasized 
that the local men desiring wort of 
this kind should contract the local 
NRS office immediately, otherwise 
outside help may have to be obtained 
Mr. Davidson stated that the local 
office had .great success in the place- 
ments last month, and said that of 
the twelve districts of the state, it 
has placed' 3rd and 4th in placement: 
during the last month, averaging 2C 
private placements a week in the 
county. ; 

HRSTROUND OF 
TENNIS TOURNEY 
ALMOSTHNISHED 

Tournament Games Are Played 
On Lincoln School 
'■ Tennis Court 



Burglars Get Away With 
^ $60 at Standard Station 

• Thieves escaped with $60 in 
cash and $12 in checks- from the 
safe of the Standard . Oil com- 
pany at Main Ave. ahd Second-.' 
Street on .Tuesday evening- 
around 9 o'clock, while Harold' 
Eide, the manager of the station 
was attending to a car oh the 
grease rack. Chief of Police A. 
B. Stenberg is holding two men 
under suspicion of the theft. 

School Election to be 
Held Tues., July 17 
—4 Men Seek Job* 

Two new members to the school 
board will be elected for 3-year terms 
by the peopie of Thief River Falls 
school district No. 18 at the auditor- 
uiin next Tuesday evening, July 17. 
with the polls being open, between the 
hours of 7 and' 8. Four candidates 
have filed for the two posts, namely. 
a ^E" Bennes > president of the board; 
A. E. M&ttson, also a member, W. J 
Dduville, Soo Line employe, and R. W 
Woolhouse, manager of the Osborne- 
McMillan elevator. -, 

NICK NELSON, PIONEER, 
PASSES AWAY TUESDAY 



SCHOOL iBOARD 
BUYS COAL AND 
EQUffMENT ION. 

Superintendent Morris Bye An- 
nounces School Work 
! to Start Se'pt. 4. 



The; board of| education held its 
July meeting last Monday evening 
and opened bids on the winter's sup- 
ply of coal and or various equipment 
for the city school buildings. 

The' Central Lumber Company and 
the O'Hara Fuel and' Ice Company 
were awarded contracts for supply- 
ing -the city schools with coal. The bid 
of the former toj furnish 226 tons of 
screenings at $8.-10 a 'ton was accept- 
ed, and also the ( bidj of the O'Hars 
Fuel and Ice Company to supply 200 
tons of lump coal at| $8.25 a ton. 

The contract to supply four porce- 
lain stalls and an automatic flush 
tank for the boys' toilet in the Lin- 
coln high school building, went to Ed 
Lee at the bid of $258i He will also in- 
stall four drinking fountains in thi 
Northrup building fori $132. 

Lloyd Alnes' bid of $170.18 for in- 
stalling new light fixtures in the 
Washington school was accepted, and 
two three-horsepower alt*nating 
current electric motors for operating 



Miss Effie Hamry 
visiting at Warroad. 



spent Sunday 



Manager Arthjir Johnson announ? 
cec that the first round matches of 
the local' tennis tournament will be 
completed this wetk. Eight players 
who are scheduled to meet in the 
quarter finals are George Aanstad 
Lloyd Aanstad, Lincoln Arnold, Mar- 
.T_5 en l? D ', W - G. Claffy, Rev. A. I 
Merth, Gordon Overland, and Tom 
Rowan, Jr. Arrangements have been, 
made to ' play the ^matches at the 
Lincoln high school cement tennis 
court at any time, the drawing* of 
which are posted' at the court. ?_ 

Severe Penalty for Miss-Use 
Of Mail Boxes; Dept. Says 

Federal Statutes provide for fine 
of $300 for the placing in mail boxes 
of circulars, posters, Mils, etc., Pbst- 
master Anderson pointed out Wed- 
nesday. 

Use of. mail boxes., placed for the 
convenience in delivering mails, for 
depositing of statements, bills, cir- 
culars, etc., has been forbidden by 
postal laws for some time past and 
the penalty for their mis-use by bill 
peddlers etc., who used theni for the 
deposit of: mailable matter upon which 
no postage was paid, was no more 
than the collection of postage due on 
the matter. Now the law has been 
amended to provide a severe penalty 
and reads as follows: 

"Whoever shall knowingly or will- 
fully u'aposit any mailable matter such 
as statements of accounts, circulars 
sale bills or other like matter on 
which- no: postage has been paid-, in 
any letter box established, approved 
or accepted by the Postmaster-Gen- 
eral for the receipt or delivery of 
mail matter on any mail route with 
intent to avoid payment of lawful 
postage thereon; or shall willfully aid 
or assist in any of the aforementioned 
offenses, shall for every such offense 
be punished by a fine of not more 
than $300.00. 



At the age of 76 years, Nie Nelson ™ ntl| a';ng fans in the Northrop and 
passed away Tuesday at a local hospi- * Jlox : buildings, ;and a three-fourtt 
tal. He was born in Eidsvold', Norway ; 5? I 3 e 1 ? 0we £ ^??. tor f or use 
on December 10, 1858, and came to ^""hrop building 
this country in 1869, settling at Red 
Wing. In 1870, he moved to Ells- 



In 
worth, Wisconsin', where he was mar- 
ried in 1883 to Miss Marie Iverson; 
who preceded him in -death in 1893. 
They moved to Pennington County in 
1883. Those who survive Mr. Nelson 
are, two dpughters, Mrs. Lena Hamrn 
of St. Paul, and. Miss Inga Nelson of 
Chicago; four sisters, Mrs. Gina 
Voldness and Mrs. Inga SJolsvolfi of 
this community, Mrs. Paula Larson 
on Ellsworth, Wise, and Mrs. Laura 
Stensrud of Los Angeles, California; 
and one brother Ole G. Nelson of 
Spray, Oregon. 

Services will be conducted Friday 
at 2 o'clock from the Erickson and 
Lund funeral home with Rev. R. M 
Fjelstad officiating, and interment 
will be made in Nord'en cemetery. . 

Oklee Man Succumbs 
Following Bad Burns 



Manufacturing Plant Being Conducted „ 
"QT" Until Snooping Reporter Discov 



Fred Forsberg of 210 Kendall! ave- 
nue south, has been "slipping | one 
over" on the people of Thief River 
Falls for three months. During all 
this time he and his sons have I been 
manufacturing some re- 1 up-to-the- 
minute sweet clover hullers* and! seed 
cleaners in n garage away down on 
the south end of Crocker .. avenue. 
But for: an unguarded word which he 
dropped' while down at the Forum 
office' a few days ago he might! have 
been getting away with it yet. j 

However, "Adam fiB|hadRotlJ!.vb 
ity was aroused and an investigation 
followed. We pulled a 'coup de foudre' 
. and bursting in on them suddenly 
caught them right in the act of manu- 
facturing and assembling one of the 
machines. Being "caught with 1 the 
goods" there was nothing for Mr. 
Forsberg to do but to show the lay- 
out and the machines. 
I There were key-way cutting ma- 
chines,: press punches, drill presses, 
metal rollers, crimpers, shears (that 
that will just eat its way thru 14 
gauge Isheetmetal and patterns' ga- 
lore. Three machines are assembled 
and ready for business and a fourth 
^iWncier construction at this time. 
?ii Mr - Forsberg showed us the 'works' 
TO. one of the machines and there is 
the usual hopper with roller feed fnto 
which, the seed' is shoveled. The !hoD- 
per was lifted off and we were shown 
the scamfiyng cylinder; a bi" drum 
covered with what looked like coarse 



on the 
ers It 



S? ( w'"' ?I"? what a back et- 
cher that would be when in motion. No 
wonder its called "scarifier" it ought 
to scare the hulls off'n most anything 
even from a "hardshell' republican! 
A sort j of an overgrown vacuum 
cleaner is attached to this cylinder 
case so that the machine can be set 
right in the parlor and won't even 
lay dust on the center table, Mr. Fors- 



berg says. Then the seen having been 
thoroughly "scared" goes over a series 
of sieves and screens and this sepa- 
rates, with the aid of- a fan the hulk 
from the seeds. Hulls and cockle burs 
go one way, undersized seeds, pigon 
grass seed, and' such things go An- 
other, and the clean clover seed comes 
up thru an elevator to the sacker. 

The machine which is protected with 
one United States and two Canadian 

the market, Mr. Forsberg says. He 

u*T£lt t ™ ei them <»ly *» his own 
use at the present time, being engaged 
in the business of searrifying> and 
cleaning seeds for firms and for 
groups of farmers who desire his ser- 
ves Hi. .is at the preset tinvlin the 
employ offhe Land' O' Lakes !&e£ner! 
ies here fed the machines .wbSSf'he 
has just built are being installed in 
their warehouses. -< 

Mr. Poisberg first started building 
the. machines "which he calls "Combine 

n.^- H « er -. a 2 d Seed Cleaner-™? 
Dauphin, Manitoba. — 



Martin C Mattson passed away 
Saturday afternoon, July 7 at a 
hospital in Erskine after having been 
severely burned at his farm home 
near OWea when a kerosene can ex- 
ploded as he was starting a fire in 

the range. Mr. Mattson's clothes were ._ 

burned off, and' he had no means of ' Lengby, 

obtaining help as he was alone at ■ 

the time of the accident.. He was born 

in Norway, March 11, 1872, and had 

been a resident of this country for 

i! years, coming to Oklee in 1904 

Mr. Mattson's wife preceded him in 

death last winter, and several child 

ren survive him. 

Mr. Mattson's" daughter, Mrs. Inga 
And-arson, passed away Monday at 
her home in Minneapolis. She ' was 
born March 8, 1906, and leaves hei 
husband and one son. Services- for 
both Mr. Mattson and his daughtei 
were held Wednesday from the Gar- 
nes church near Oklee with Rev. Ler- 
ol of Oklee officiating. 



the 
. ., - -— - — „ vfere also pur 
chased from Mr. \ Alnes on his bid of 
$272. : "; | ■ 

Supt. Morris Bye' submitted the 
school ealend-r for 1934-35 which was 
approved by the j board. Mr. Bye an 
nounced that regular classwork wil' 
begin on Tuesday, September 4. An- 
nual school bulletins! such as those 
of past years, will be distributed. 

Land 0' Lakes Creameries 
Of District 14 tciHoId Pifcnic 
At Twin Lakes on Sunday 

The Land O' Lake3 Creameries of 
District 14 will hold a picnic at Pine- 
hurst resort on Twin! Lakes on Sun- 
day, July IB. ... i i 

An excellent speaking and- musical 
program has been erranged including 
addresses by J. H. Hay, deputy com- 
missioner of agriculture and N.". A. 
Hqwalt.of Minneapolis. The Halstad 
Male quartet will! present vocal selec- 
tions and the Mahnomen High School 
band has. been engaged for the oc- 
casion! Dr. Rumreicht's "Little Ger- 
man Band" will also ! be on hand to 
adc to the 1 festivities. An Indian 
Pow-Wow is on the program. 

Pinehurst resort is ! 20 miles east 
of Mahnomen, anil 18 miles south of 



Legion Sponsors Floor Show 
Friday and Saturday Nights 

The American Legion post is 
. sponsoring the appearance of the 
La Porte Flame Ramblers at the 
auditorium on Friday and Satur-^ 
day evenings. A program of 
dance music and a floor show will 
be presented. Balcony seats will 
' be available for those not wishing 
to participate in the dancing. 

County Board Holds 
Semi-Annual Meeting 

Only routine business was transact- 
ed by the county board at its semi- 
annual meeting on Monday. A $300 
appropriation was voted to the coun- 
ty fair association and the accrued 
bills were approved and ordered paid. 

The semi-annual report of the 
jouhty auditor v,us~ examined, ap- 
proved and* ordered placed on file. 
The county highway engineer whose 
term of office expires in July was re- 
tained for a. period of six months. 
This was done in order to bring his 
term to a close at the first of the 
year instead of midseason when road 
construction is at its height. Fixing 
of the county's budget for the coming 
year and the county tax : levy was 
postponed until Wednesday, July 18. 
ai tne meantime the counrv board 01 
equalization will meet on Monday, 
July* 16. . 

ACCIDENTCOSTS 
LIFE OF MRS. 0. 
L. BAKKp WED. 

Wife of Former Street Com- 

missioner and Three Others 

Killed — Two Injured 

A most unfortunate Wcident oc- 
cured Wednesday afternoon at ap- 
proximately 1:20 P. M. between Men- 
ahga and Sebeka, Minnesota, when a 
railroad train struck the car driven 
by Rev. Eklund of Menahga, the 
other passenger of which~"were Mr 
and Mrs. O. L. Bakken of this city 
daughter and' son, and j, 
woman whose name is unknown. The 
latter four lost their lives, while Mr. 
Bakken and? Rev. Eklund are in pre- 
carious conditions at a hospital in 
Wadena. - 



Center Piers of Bridge 
Bring Poured This Week 

The new bridge is reported as pro- 
gressing nicely, with the concrete 
read 1 / to be poured into the middle 
pier this week. Approximately 60 men 
are/ employed on the project which ii 
expected to be completed by October 
1st. 



CANNINGDEMONSTRATION 
TO BE HELD NEXT WEEK 



Several canning demonstrations 
were conducted Friday, Monday, and 
Tuesday in the Civic and Commerce 
rooms by the leaders Miss Avis 
Akre and Mrs. A. C. Matheson, and 
Miss Bosine Dahlen and Miss Lois 
Oden. A similar demonstration was 
heleL in the Lutheran church' at St. 
Hi-aire on Wednesday with Mrs. Earl 
Jenson and Mrs. 'W. A. Corbet as 
leaders. 

The canning program ip directed 
by Miss Inez Hobart, nutritionist of 
the Farm' School and now attached 
to the social service division of the 
state_ ERA, and is designed to make 
possible the best use- of garden pro- 
duce by relief clients. 

Thd- schedule of caning demon- 
strations to be held in the various 
townships of the county is as fol- 
lows: 

1 o At <.?? e J I ! St ? r Township on July 
L2, , at the.Peter Lovly home with Mrs. 
Peter Lovly and Mrs. Edward Sin- 
ger as leaders. At Mavie in Clover- 
leaf Township on July 16 at the home 
of Mrs. Roger Anderson, with Mrs. 
Roger Anderson, with Mrs. D. G. 
Brownlee and Mrs. A. W. OsW as 
leoders. At Highlanding ' in High- 
landing Township, on July 17 at the 
home of Mrs. William Vaughan, with 
Mrs. William Vaughan and Mrs. 
Ruby Macauley as leaders.' On July 
18 at the home of Mrs. Richard Pet- 
erson in JVyondotte Township with 
Mrs. O. Weckwerth and Mrs. Hans 
Prestby as leaders. . 
. i» demonstration will 'also be held' 
in the Civic and Commerce associa- 
tion rooms in the auditorium on Fri- 
• ^ Ju J? 20 at x o'clock for women 
m the Town of North and from the 
Sr 3 k w j£ h Mr8, v - c - Noper and Mrs. 
B. E. Hunt as leaders. '■■'-■ > 



Rocksbury Club ; Holds a 
Successful Picnic. Weed 
Expert Will jSpeak Sat. 

The,picnic at Valhalla last Sunday 
was very well attended, and the New- 
foldeniteam defeated; the Rocksbury 
Community Club in kittenball by the 
score of 12-8. Next Sunday, July IB, 
the Rocksbury 4-H club will have its 
annual tour, winding up at Valhalla, 
where ; several teams will compete in 
kittenball. The regular league game 
between Smiley and Sijverton will be 
played, and the Rocksbury 4-H team 
will play the Hazel 4-H team. 

Oh July 22, the Kratka girls will 
play the Rocksbury girls at Rocksbury 

The I Rocksbury; Community Club 
will have its regular meeting on-Sat- 
urday levening, July 14, with the 4-H 
club presenting the entertainment. 
Professor Clark of the Northwest 
school | at Crookston will address the 
gathering, and will present a talk 
and explanation on the habits ami 
characteristics of ! weeds to those 
bringing specimens of weeds they 
want identified. 

Wheat Curfci Associatio n 
Holds Annual Meeting 

On Saturday, July 7th 

i — i — 

The Pennington County wheat con- 
trol association met for its annual 
meeting last Saturday.. Alfred Lnnd- 
gren was re-elected president, Isaac 
WJilsonj was elected vice-president, E. 
M. Douglass, secretary, and Robert 
Lund, treasurer. The wheat inspector 
is but i in the county at the present 
time inspecting; jthe fields, after 
which | the reports will be sent to 
Washington, D. ' G. and last year't 
payments will be paid soon after the 
inspection. 



i 



Smiley Club to bold Checker 

Board Dance Fri. July 13th 

; -' .—Ml'- 

Another, novelty ["checkerboard" 
dance will be sponsored by the Smiley 
Community club on FrjdayJ July 13, 
at the ; Louis Nelson farm, (which is 
6 miles southeast on the Angle Road", 
and 2 miles east, j Music will be by 
Shorty : Davidson and: his orchestra, 
and lunch is included] iwith the ad- 
mission price. The proceeds of the 
dance will be contributed towards the 
building of the Smilejv - Community 
hall, -of which apttprpximatelv $126 
has been made bywunrehes, dances, 
etc. The building Sgthe hall is ex- 
pected to begin in tEgjhear future. 

He . *ho. strikes while the iron is 
hot does not always succeed in mak 
ing warm friends. 



^j^i.feM'ai fete;.^M^?,^aS 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPosurf 



Rocksbury Club Will 
Sponsor Another All- 
Party Rally in August 

The Rocksbury Community club will 
sponsor another political rally some 
time before the general election cam- 
paign closes, according to an an*" 
nouncement- made this week by -Paul 
Engelstad. 

. This rally, which they repect. to 
stage sometime in August will differ 
from the meeting which was so well 
enjoyed by both voters and candidates 
during the primary campaign, in that 
in this case it will be the major pol- 
itical parties that will be invited to 
present th|ir arguments rather than 
the* individual candidates. Invitation 
is being extended to the county com- 
mittees of the republican, democratic 
and Farmer-Labor parties to provide 
a speaker for the .occasion, Mr. En- 
gelstad stated, and lots will be drawn 
to .decide which speak first, second 
and third. From a half hour to three 
quarters of an hour will be alloted 
for each speaker and they will be ex- 
pected to confine their talk within the 
time-allowed. No mud-slinging will be 
tolerated, Mr. Engelstad stated", but 
the speakers will be expected to pre- 
sent the platform of their party and 
the return of that party's candidates 
to orHce. 

' Over 600 people attended the can- 
didates rally held at Valhall just prior 
to the primary campaign, and judging 
from comment on this new plan, al- 
ready heard, this second meeting 
should bring several thousand people 
but to hear the speakers. No action 
has been taken on the invitation by 
the several party organization yet, 
but questioned about it, members of 
the farmer-labor county committee 
stated that they will accept the invi- 
tation and secure a speaker for the oc- 
casion. Further particulars will be an- 
nounced when arrangements are com- 
pleted in greater detail, Mr. Engel- 
stad said. 



COUNCIL TABLES 
CWA PETITIONS 
RE: 2 MEN FIRED 

Workmen's Group Threateri to 

Boycott Businessmen 

Oh Counqii. 

»i. At oS e . "S^S Tue sday evening 
the CWA Workmen's Protective as- 
sociation presented its -petition re- 
questing that W. W. Viebahn/ the 
city engineer be discharged and the 
two men, employees of the light de- 
partment which he discharged with- 
out justification some time ago be re- 
instated 1 , to the council. Chas. Schulz 
actmg as spokesman for the work- 
men's group stressed the fact that no 
adequate reason had been given for 
the discharge of the men in question 
and suggested that the council act l\t 
°5. ce in the matter. 205 names were 
affixed to the petitions nresentetl to 
the council. Another petition contain- 
ing '190 names had been lost. 

Chas. Evensou, japitor at the audi- 
torium, aciressed the council, and de- 
fended the action of the city engineer 
He suggested that the council Ihould 
look into the other side of the 
story." 

Alderman McFarland turning to 
Schulz stated that the incident had 
been closed a menth ago and that he 
could S ee no reason for reopening it 
As far as I am concerned the matter 
is closed," he said. 

Jack VanPelt, secretary of the 
workmen s organization pointed out 
?„«« se « peopIe had s >8n«-' -he 
SlrfSwi, 8 ^ the . co r eil &d disre- 
garded' the demands of the workmen's 

5S,h P X m ° nt i ago and that in 'heir 
mind the matter is . not closed, but 
very much open. 

of A rt! rmen Griebstein and president 
?L t i° mc ' 1 Myhrom stated that 
the matter was disposed of as far as 
they are concerned. 

q^ ire3 ^ n ?.-9 ,em a secon d time, Mr. 
Schulz said, "You men are all in busi- 
ness and depend upon our trad-a We 

w.l,^ 6 tl !? t trade " anywhe?e we 
want to, and we will trade with those 
businesses that treat us right. We can 
boycott you if we want to, and we're 
gomg to do it. There's over- twl 
hundret.. people signed that petition 

von ^/° U R W . ant *2 80 a ^ ai "st them 
you can. But we have a right to 
trade somewhere else If we want to." 

to t?S tZ a «J i Z hl0m "^sed him not 
to X? 'h'Shpressure" the councU, 
rL-^"? S ? uIz t replied tha t be was 
but ftTf-T* , "^"Pressure anyone, 
but that people can trade where ever 1 , 
they want to, and they may be want- 
ing. to trade somewhere else 
,,„ ° n , m °tion by Alderman McFarland 
seconded by Griebstein theSetitmni 
were laid on the table and ^.natte? . 
indefinitely postponed. .«•«« 

„ n ™ 8 . covering water main were 
*£?%£■ S? d . e"" 4 ™* was allotted to 
£t, Trl ; S fe te Bu ««ng Materialcom- 
pany at 75 cents per- foot. Other- 
bids were as follows: . United States 
i^ipe and Foundry Co., 97c or ft- 
American Cast Iron Pipe Co.; 97c or 
ft; Marshall-Wells Co.° ?1.6l prf ft-' 
and The Crane Co., $1,046.54 for the 
entire amount of the contract which 
included 1020 feet of 6 inch watS 
main and one 'T' connection and one 
valve. The prices on the latter two 
items were uniformly about $1£ and 
?4 in all bids. This brings the Crane 
company's bici to about S1.01 nr. ft 
for the pipe. . ' 

t °}7 cleaning license was granted 
to K. E. Dahl and building permits 
were issued to D. V. Snefling, re- 
modeling, to cost about fSOO: it T. 
Helgeson,- constructing an oil station 
at the corner of Eigth street and 
Dewey avenue at a cost of fSSO. 

Dr. Jacobson appeared on behalf of 
the park board and discussed the 
proposed" condemnation of certain lots 
m the south' end of the city fer park 
purposes. 

The bills of the month were as- 
proved and ordered paid. 

Aux. Drum Corps Wins 
Activities Prize at iV. D. 
Legion Meet in Fargo 

The Thief River Falls AuxWatr 
drum corps won second 'prise for 
activities in the drum corps contest 
sponsored- by the North Dakota 
American Legion at the North Da- 
kota American Legion convention at' 
Fargo the first part of the week. The 
corps also appeared in the Memorial 
Parade which was a feature of Son- 
day's convention program. 



Land 0' Lakes Buys Cooperative Creamery. 
Plans For New Creamery Are Being Drawn 



Sale of, their present creamery 
building to the Land O' Lakes was 
decided upon by the stockholders of 
the Farmer's Co-operative creamery 
'association of this city at a special 
meeting held in -the Civic and Com- 
merce association rooms at the audit- 
orium last Friday. 

Under_ the. terms of the agreement 
entered .into by the .creamery associ- 
ation and the Land O' Lakes organiza- 
tion, -the latter" : will construct a new 
creamery ' oh the site formerly oc- 
cupied by the Thief River Falls Seed 
House retail store which burned down 
last fall, at the corner .of Horace 
aven ue^ jj nd Second street. The new 
bu ^EJSH§£ d1 ' hqcpne story,, of brick 
S?4B»e- 1l S©S ,8 i^ption ant} , will be 
throrbughls? modern thruout. The 
0'OiaJkesi.'will also stand all 



if moving the creomery into the 
new 'structure^-when it is completed. 
The Land O'vLakes will assume about 



present indebtedness under the terra 
of the contract. ^ 

# Plans for the new structure are be- 
ing drawn at this time and construc- 
tion will be started as soon as possi- 
ble. 

The present creamery buildbnr will 
be extensively remodeled, Mr. 1. O ' 
Norby, manager of the Land O/ Lakes 
stated yesterday. A tunnel eon -1 —**- 



orjejialf of t^e; creamery assofjations the same purpose bya vgajsjefc 




■t with the present plant of «s*l»-~ 
O Lakes will be constructed aad> the 
two buildings: will also be constellated 
above ground w^th corridors." 

The purchase was made to provide 
more room for the poultry" «^ as*. 
business of the 'Land O' LakeTplant, 
which has exBttfledfat a rapid ' raiie 
according to Mr. Norhy.' The top floor 
of the creamery building will be fit- 
ted .up to house feeding batterieo for 
poultry and will most likely be con- 
nected with the top floor of the pra- 
wns poultry plant which is used foe 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



■'$ 



nf-rniiri 



■f^giJiVgfe FAtts EofetJM, <M tkP Mvlit Pauls, 'ttiMciSaofrA thursdaV jol¥ la, Mi 1i 



l BOARD OF FIVE TO 
! TAKEJVER<NRA 

General Johnson to Relax Rest 

of Summer, Go on Blue Eaglt 

"Sales Trip". 

I 

Washington— The national recover* 
administration has come to tfefl 
threshold of a new experiment. Hugh 
D 3. Johnson will convert the recovery 
agency's one-man leadership 1st* j ft 
flve-man control for the summer. 

Most of the job of directing NBA 
will be shifted to five assistants. 
Johnson wants to see how NRA cajj 
get along without his hand os tfcff 
helm. The tryout — which Is partly 
informal and designed to give JohW 
eon a chance to relax — also will fee 
an important test of commission ecfcy 
. trol. - [ 

The general's way of relaxing wflO 
he a swing across the country to mB 
the Blue Eagle and . put In s good 
word here and there for the new 
deal. | 

The flve- m an hoard will run NBA 
except for major decisions which 
Johnson must make under the lav. 
On the hoard will be G. A. Lyncfc, 
NRA administrative officer; Robert 
W. Lea, assistant administrator ftar 
industry, and George L. Berry, A. R. 
G:?~cy and George Buckley, division 
Administrators. [' 

After the basic code for small In- 
dustries has been promugated, Jonfr 
Bon plans to put NRA's emphasli eft 
compliance, and it Is this job parti* 
ularly which the hoard will have to 
his absence. j 

Henry Ford's Blue Eagle standing 
still Is being discussed at NRA. Ofr 
flclals say signing of the letter be 
compliance recently approved by John- 
son is necessary before the Ford Mo- 
tor. Company can bid on government 

contracts. I 

400 Start $18,000,000 Sewage Work. 

St. Paul— The start of the $18,O06 r 
000 Twin City Sewage disposal work 
has started with the first crew of 4W 
men building the main tunnel, through 
which, will flow sewage of the two 
cities into the ultimate cleanslns 
plant. This move was but a small lio- 
ginning of the Immense project, 
which will involve a sewage system 
from Camden In north Minneapolis 
to Pigs' Eye island In St. Paul. The 
first contract calls for 5,649 feet of ft 
-tunnel 13 feet, 10 Inches In diameter 
— slightly more than a mile long— 
at- a cost of $449,476.40- 

U.S.. Makes Good In First Bank FalluK 
Washington— The Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation payed off de'|> 
csitora of the first bank to fall under 
the protection of the law passed by 
the last congress to insure hank ac- 
counts. The 1,789 depositors of trie 
Fon du Lac State Bank of East Peo- 
ria, 111., which closed recently, re- 
ceived approximately $125,000, all do- 
posits being insured under the law lis 
$2,500. . I 

Fourth of July Toll Reaches i 176. 
Chicago — American celebrated trie 
Fourth of July with the usual number 
; of fatalities. One hundred and seven- 
ty-six persons met death on that day, 
through accidents, drownings arifl 
crashes. Only 3 deaths were caus- 
ed by. fireworks, once, the chief killer 
on the holidays, one a Minneapolis 
woman and the other a 5-year-old girl 

in Montana, . . I" 

Death Bares $81,000 Hidden In Horns 
' Eau Claire, "Wis. — Eightyone thou- 
cand dollars In old currency was found 
In the home of MrB. Alice Hayden, 
who died last week. Mrs. Hayden 
was the widow of Henry R. Hayden, 
prominent local attorney and finan- 
cier who died in 1903. It Is known 
that Mrs- Hayden l£ft a large estate 
In securities held fa. the bank. I 

Police Battle San Francisco Striken* 

,.'San FranciBco — Fighting betweisi 
700 police and 3,000 union pickets re- 
sulted here from a move by buslnest 
Interests to open forcibly this strifce 
paralyzed port to commerce In the 
face of pleas for peace by President 
Roosevet'B labor dispute committee. 
There have been two deaths during 

the strike. . I 

La Crosse Mill Strike Is Settled. 
La Crosse, Wis. — The strike of i,* 
|400 empoyees of the La Crosse Rub* 
"ber Mills Company, "In progress sines 
April 24, was ended through an agree- 
ment ratified by company executives 
and officials of the United Rubber 
"Workers Federal Union N,o. 18381. 
The full force will return to work.1 



John D. Rockefeller is Ninety-Five, 
Lakewood, N. J. — John D. Rocks- 
feller celebrated his ninenty-fllfth 
birthday at his home here on July S, 
It was a quiet da yfor th egead.foitf 
It was a quiet day for the aged capi- 
talist In company with his son, John, 

Jr. | 

Mine Bombing Is Being Investigated 
. Springfield, 111— The bombing of a 
Peabody mine, endangering 350 coal 
diggers below, was Investigated by 
officials who apaprently had no clues 
to. the identity of the band of masked 
dynamiters. I 

Ring In Tub Marks High Water Limit 
Alton, England— Be cause of tile 
long drouth, Chesterfield Lane, prop- 
rietor of the Swan hotel, had lines 
painted five inches from the bottom 
of all bathtubs, with, a notice asking 
sueste not to fill the tubs beyond that 
level. | 

Law Enforcer Has Four Cars Stolen 

Jackson, Miss. — Attorney General 

1*. Rice Is the chief law enforcement 

official of Mississippi — but so far ble 

has had four automobiles stolen from 

^•te since he took office. _-„_ | 



Eorum advertising is bargain new; 



? PRESIDENILAUDS STATE 

Enthusiastic praise of the state 
of Minnesota and its many attrac- 
tions and advantage's is voiced by 
President L. D. Coffman of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota in a message to 
students printed as an introduction 
to The Gopher, or student year book 
at the university, which recently ap- 
peared. 

"Minnesota is a splendid state," he 
wrote, "It enjoys the perennial at- 
traction of variety. In its southern 
parts it is of the corn belt, yet its 
north is piney forest. T o the weaf 
it blends into the prairies, yet on the 
east it has -access to the Atlantic 
Ocean throTisbthe Great Lakes and 
to the Gulf ofiSTeirico by the Missis- 
sippi river. Its minerals, manufactures 
and forests combine with the pro- 
ducts of the field and the dairy to 
provide a diversified source of liveli- 
hood for its people. 

"To be ranked .with these resoures 
in importance and value to the state 
of Minnesota is its splendid educa- 
tional system. It has been said that 
Minnesota has no other advertise- 
ment the equal of its university. Men 
and women from all parts of the 
world come here to study, often at 
great expense to themselves. Surely, 
if the future of the state is to be 
a developing one, we are to compre- 
hend life so as to be happier, if we 
are to make the most fruitful uses 
of our raw material.sV and if 'we 
ai<! to develop a high' type of social 
organization , we must under all cir- 
cumstances give support to our re- 
searchers and scho.ars. We must con- 
tinue to bring our young people into 
cuHiact with them and with Die 
science, art and ph-Josophy of the 
world. 

"May there be an ever fuller reali- 
sation of the importance of this pol- 
icy when the university becomes sev- 
enty-five years old than there is now 
on the seventy-fifth birthday of the 
state." 

The Gopher was dedicated to the 
State of Minnesota in honor of its 
seventy-fifth birthday. 

iATMNAL PROHIBITION STARTS 
AACK. SAYS VjLG^GALDERWOOD 

National prohibition has officially 
start-- 1 n. i.k. n June \5, Senator 
Sheppani of Te>:a-', v>ho inti-iiiuecd 
ihe 18th amendment seventeen years 
ago, introduced* a proposal for a new 
amendment the purpose of -which is 
to clothe congress with the power to 
regulate or prohibit the manufac- 
ture and sale of alcoholic beverages. 

Section 1 of the resolution grants 
to congress the full power to pass 
uniform laws regulating or prohibit- 
ing the traffic in the several states. 

Section 2 reserves to the several 
states the power to enact regulations 
or prohibition witlun'their respective 
borders, "irrespective of legislation 
by congress." That preserves to each 
state power to pass more strine-ent 
laws than those passed by congress, 
i'Ut leaves the state no power to an- 
null or .defeat congressional action. 

Section 3 prohibits the transpor- 
tation of liquor into prohibited areas. 

Section 4 repeals the 21st amend- 



chaser of feeder cattle especially 
when considering that a year ago the 
corresponding margins were only 64c 
r.er cwl. to S 1 :«' per cwt. In other 
words, the cost of feeder stock has 
been but very little different than a 
year ago while the average price of 
fat cattle is fully ?1.00 above a year 
ago. 



BITUMINOUS ROADS 

TOJE RETREATED 

More than 1,350 miles of bitumin- 
ous surfaced trunk highways will be 
given retreatments this summer by 
the maintenance division of the state 
highway department, according to 
a department announcement. 

Within the past few days the de- 
partment has purchased 4,871,000 
gallons of bituminous material for 
approximately $320,000. It has also 
awarded contracts in each of the six- 
teen maintenance districts of the 
state for the application of the ma- 
terial purchased. The cost of apprica 
tion will be $68,000. 

Maintenance crews have been busy 
getting the roads in shape for the re- 
treatments, and the bituminous work 
will be at its peak in the next few 
weeks. There are approximately 2,700 
miles of bituminous treated roads in 
the trunk system. 

OUTSTANDING HORSESHOW 
WILL BE SlhGEB AT THE 
MINNESOTA oTATE FAIR 

Arrangements have been conclud- 
ed for the staging of the nation's out- 
standing horse show in connection 



Minnesota and North Dakota recentljl 
completed 1 a joint survey; of the Rec 
River of the North and recommend-l 
ed that treatment be ' provided --for) 
sewage arid industrial wastes at alll 
[places from Breckemudge to Grand | 
Forks. j 

"There j are many communities 
■where the purity of drinking water I 
.is dependent upon sewage treatment 
in other places upstream. It is a just 
obligation! upon each j community tc 
see that its wastes are so treated or] 
disposed' of that they; do not conta- 
minate their own water supply or that! 
of other communities. (This obligation! 
will not cease when the drouth ends, 
for untreated sewage is always a me' 
nace unci |low water onlyj makes thej 
danger greater. The drouth has not! 
made sewage treatment) necessory,] 
jut only | emphasized tlie need. No I 
Community which is concerned aboutj 
public health can afford to take chan- 
ges with unsafe sewage disposal." 



TRAPSHOOT TOURtillMENT WILL 

8E HELii IN CONNECTION WITH 
MINN. S|TATE_FAiR SlEPT. 1-8 

An army of trapshooters from all 
parts of the nation will ; compete in 
the first annual Northwestern Class 
Championship Tournament to be spon- 
sored by | the Minnesota ; State Fair 
as one ofj its many features in con- 
nection with the Diamond Jubilee 
celebration, Sept. 1 to 8. j 

The tournament, which | will be re- 
gistered-classified two-day shoot, will 
be held uftder the auspices of the 
Twin Cityj Shooting Association, and 
scatter-gun experts from' coast . to 
coast willj compete, ^ according to 
Harry W.[ Maginnis of Minneapolis, 



with Minnesota's ^Diamond* Jubilee ■ nationally famous sportsman, who 



State Fair, September 1 to 8 announ- 
ces Raymond A. Lee, Secretary. 

It will he a $10,000 show, to run five 
successive nights, from Sept. 3 to 7 
With the leading stables of the coun- 
try competing, the capitol of the 



will be in charge of the details. 

Eighteen beautiful trophies, in ad- 
dition to a cup emblematic of the all- 
round championship, will jbe awarded 
to the winners. Such noted shots as 
Frank Trdsh of Portland, Ore., Mark 



horse show world will be literally j Arie of j Champaign] III., Walter 
transplanted from Kentucky to the Berwyn of Pennsylvania 1U33 Grand 

■HippOdrOnV 1 "*■ f ^ so K+ofo T?aii- I Arnflrinon I Hon^Innn m,„ — *,: 1 



at the State Fair. 

Sixty-one events will make up the 
five-night program. There will be 
classes for three and five-gaited 
horses, hunters and jumpers, saddle 
yearlings, roadsters, polo mounts, 
military horses, harness horses and 
heavy draft hitches. 

Of special interest to show devotees 
will be the five classes in which riding 
skill only will be the basis . of 
the judges' awards. Since there 
are many gifted equestrians in 
the Northwest these classes are ex- 
puclcd io f-cnuillaie with action. 

Several stake events are included 
on the program. Prominent Twin City 
sportsmen and sportswomen have 
uniced to underwrite some of the 
stakes, with the Fair management of- 
fering the balance of the prize money 
which exceeds $10,00o an all-time re- 

C01 '* L "i-eJiMsl 

Assurances already have been re- 
ceived from topnotch stables in Texas 
Kentucky, Oklahoma, Illinois, Pen- 
nsylvania, Wisconsin and Iowa that 
they will include Minnesota on their 
itineraries this year, reports Norris 
K. Carnes, Superintendent of the 



ment by which the 18th (prohibition) show. This'augurs well for the horse 
amendment was repealed: j enthusiasts. Minnesota-owned ani- 

. Section 5 provides that the propos- rnals have cut a wide swath in show 
ed amendment shall be ratified by circles in recent years and many of 
conventions held in the several states, ; the stables rank with the best any- 
which method _ was first in repealing where, 
the 18th amendment. Entries in the horse show division 

The first proposal for a prohibition wiil close August 13. 
amendment was introduced into con- 
fess m 1887). Thirty-three years 
thereafter the 18th amendment' had 
closed 170,000 saloons and had out- 
lawed every -distillery and brewtry 
manufacturing beverage alcohol. In 

1887 there were only two prohibition «mu 11.11.* 

states— Maine and Kansas. Now there ' . ?- he sever S dr0 ^\ , has focus <** at- 
are 20 dry states and hundreds of tentlon on ajl available sources of 
dry counties. In nearly every local 



DROUTH SPURS FIGHT 
ON WATER POLUTION 



water supply", says a statement is 
sued by the Minnesota Chapter of 
the Izaak Walton League. "The short- 
age, of water in many places is made 
doubly serious by unsanitary disposa; 
of sewage into the extremely low 
water courses. The present emergency 
has aroused many communities to a 
realization of the danger, and P.W.A. 
loans and grants have helped to get 
started. 

"Fourteen Minnesota communities 

| with a. population of 33,450 have let 

contracts for sewage treatment plants 

in recent months. Most of these pro 



wet-dry election since repeal the 
drys romped to victory, in some 
cases by a 10-to-l majority. 

National prohibition has started 
back, and it may go fast and far. 

GIVES REASONS WHY FAT 
GATTLE SHOULD BE STRONG 

■ "Less caUli on f'.-I. >h° probabil- 
ity of less cattle on feed', this fall, _ _. „ ,,.„_ 

high priced feed and scarcity of feed jeets are well underway. Total cost of 
and hay all point, toward a more fav- projects is ?561,840. They include 
orable outlook for the future market /Waconia^ Marshall Hutchinson, Red- 
on strictly good grain-fed cattle," 1 wood Falls, Appleton, Montevideo, 
says_ Charles ; E. Lee, head of the cat- 1 Sauk Centre, OrtonviUe, Blooming 

Prairie, Harmony, Wabasha, Fair- 
mont, Glencoe and Watertown. 

"In Lake City," Bemidji, Winona, 
Moorhead, St. Paul and* Minneapolis 
partial contracts have been let or 
plans are in preparation for projects 
with an estimated' cost of $18,611,000 
which when completed will serve 
V79.100 people. Allotments of P.W.A 
funds to three cities, Fergus Falls, 
Morthfield and Hibbing, totaling $701- 
000 have been rescinded, due to fail- 
ure to pass local bond issues. 

"The state boards of health of 



tie department of the Central Coop 
eration, South St. Paul. 

Mr.. Lee, also ■ points out that a 
good many cattle have already been 
(forced to market which orffinai-ily 
would have been fed for a longer per- 
iod. He rays that there will probably 
be a lot of half-fat, warmed-up 
cattle coming to market for some 
time and during the fall and winter 
iuonths,_ strictly grain feds of good 
and choice quality will be scarce. Con- 
sequently they will sell at a premium 
over ordinary kinds. 

t ", R , 1 ^, now '- prime > lo ng-fetf 1200 
to 1400 lb. steers are quotable to $9,. 
00 at $9 1.60 per cwt. but nothing of 
that quality has been offered on the 
market, most offerings being of fair 
SRf^" > lS' ad ' J l and soling at 55.25 tc 
up. The feeder with fat cattle of 
choice quality and. furnish undoubt- 
edly has better days ahead of him." 

Ihe margin between feeder costs 
and fat cattle prices has been far 
more favorable this spring than a 
year ago, according to the weekly 
market bulletin issued by the Central 
Go-Operative Association. The aver- 
age price of stacker and. feeder cat- 
tle shipped- from South St. Paul to 
country points for the last three 
months has been $3.64 for June, S3 75 
for May and $4.02 for April. The 
average fat steer price for the' same 
month has been $6.35 for June, $5.94 
for May and $5.68 for April. Thus, a 
favorable margin of from 1.63 to 
$2.71 has prevailed, the margin for 
June being $2.71. 

These figures are encouraging to 
the feeder and the prospective j>ur- 




..K-E.Y S.. 

Door keys, Yale keys and auto- 
mobile ignition keys of all kinds, 
for all kinds of locks, made at short 
dotice at? 

Havel's Gun Repair Shop 

407 Arnold- Ave. South, 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



American J Handicap Champion, and 
others, will be among the outstand- 
ing field of more than 300 entrants. 

A battery of four traps, will be/in- 
stalled otl Machinery Hill, providing 
an unexcelled range for the contest 
ants. The- shoot will be held BricVay 
and Saturday, Sept. 7 and 8, and 
there will be three classes, entrants 
averaging 93 per cent or better com- 
peting in jClass A; 87 to 93 rfer cent, 
Class B; and under 87i percent. Class 
C. j . i . / 

Minnesota boasts of many crack 
shots, acording to Mr. Maginnis, and 
a representative field of experts will 
carry the [state colors in t'he first an- 
nual competition. Entry/ blanks and 
complete information can be obtain- 
ed by writing to the State Fair of- 
ficials. I ' ' ' ■ 



I /^Kaiidom Ramblings I 

A gretat\many people fail becausi 
they are so Mead sure' they are go:n. 
to. It would be a shame to disappoint 
them. j / / 

II****.' 
Many] aunan gets a reputation 
for dignity\when he really suf- 
fering fram a stiff neck. 

!■**/**■ 

_ Men, like automobiles, to a great 
extent are judged/by their "hilclimb- 
ing ability." 

I * *' *'. * 
Observation more than books, ex- 
perience rather than persons, are tht 
prize ed'ueators. / 

[ *,**.* 
Do thte thing you think is best 
and abide by it like a soldier. 



Larson Funeral Home 

CARL B. LARSON 
Licensed F,uneral Director 



Ambulance 



Service 



nn... — -Calls Answered 

Day or Night 

Day Phone 61 \ Night Phone 148"W 

. life La Bree Ave. N. 

Thief jRiver Falls, Minnesota. 



Announcement l! 

■ t -j 

. Mr. Clarence Lasseson, 
of Thi<3f River Falls, has* 
been appointed as Local' 
Representative for the 
State Farm Mutual Automo- 
bile Insurance Company 
and ytill look after all 
matters pertaining to in- 
suring! and servicing auto- 
mobiles,- formerly taken 
care of by M. R> Levorson 
who is ho longer an author- 
ized agent of the State 
Farm Mutual Ins. Co. 

At the! present time Mr. Lasse- 
son is ] our only, authorized re- 
presentative in Pennington coun- 
ty. T \ 

W. D. Stegner, State Director 
John A! Gronner, Dist. Agt. 



Dr. P. L. Vistaunet's Clinic 

Besides Medical and Surgical, aim Electronical DigMaia at AB 

Diseases. ■ i '- 

Fundamental Treatments Consisting of: Medicines, Tluliaaiis. 
Baths, Massage, Manipulations, Diets, etc. are adaUatatered. . 



Office 383 Residence 280. 



Room 6. Dobner-Mcehan Bldg. Phones: 
Thief Hirer Mb, Ha 



X 



■£r~ 



IS. MOLSTAD PASSES 
AWAY AT 84 YEARS OLD 

n i' ' . * 

At the age of 84 years, Mrs, Sarah 
Molstad passed away at 2 P. M..dn 
Saturday, June 30 at the home of her 
son Albert in Exel Township.' Mrs. 
Molstad was born September 2, 1849 
in Telemarken, Norway, and. came to 
Ridgeway, Iowa in 1857. Five years 
.ater she moved to Spring Valley, 
Minn., and came to Buxton, N. Dak. 
in 1882. Since 1895, Mrs. Molstad' 
has" made her home in Exel Town- 
shop, and has been a resident of 
Marshall county for 39 years. She 
was married in 1882 to Elling N. 
Molstad at Buxton, who with one son 
have preceded hei in death. 

Those surviving are tjwo sons, Oli- 
ver and Albert Molstad both of Exel 
Township/and 6 grand-chidren. Ser- 
vices were conducted at . Silver Creek 
Church on Tuesday, July 3, with Rev. 
L. R. ' Redal of Holt, officiating. In- 
terment was made in Siver Creek 
cemetery. 

GOOD ROADS 



Good roads cut the cost of operat- 
ing automobiles and trucks. The state 
road system is unfinished; there are 
many hundreds of miles to be graded 
and otherwise improved. 

— Springfiell Acfvance Press 



You can never win the heavy- 
weight title by doing light-weight 
stunts. 



Dr. H.J. Rice 
DENTIST 

X-RAY LABORATORY 
Phone— Office, 207 Resides**, 349 

First National Bank Building 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 



sa^^^fi""^*" 



MR. TRAVELER" 

* 

MAKES A 

SNAPPY 

COMEBACK 



AH. ALONE 



Free Soap 

from your 

Watkins Dealer 

2 Bars of Green Palm 

Soap FREE with 1 lb. 

Double Action Baking 

Powder. 

That's just like cutting the 
price of Baking Powder in half 
I give 2 or 3 bars of soap FREE 
with other necessities like spi- 
ces, Extracts, daily used Toi- 
£Iet Articles, needed Medicines, 
etc. which means a savings to 
you of 15c to 25c on an article. 

Wait for Watkins-It Pays 

I will start working in this 
locality with the well known 
Watkins line of spices, ex- 
tracts food products, soaps, toi- 
let articles and stock and 
poultry preparations. My stock 
is new and fresh. You'll enjoy 
using these highest quality 
products, which I will bring to 
your door at a savings to you. 

GEO .' BERKHOLZ 

Central Hotel 
Thief River Falls 




When you are out 

among strangers, it's 

f a happy idea to pick 

up a telephone and 

come back home by 

LONG DISTANCE 

Station-to-Station Rates Are 
40 Per Cent Lower After 
8:30 P. M. For Most Distances 




NORTHERN CLINIC 

A. W. Swedenburg, M. D. 
O. G. Lyiide M. D. C. AI. Adkins. M. D. 

Physicians and Surgeons . . . 
Swedenburg Building J Telephone 350 

Thief River Falls. Alinnesoia 




J? 



+ Of course, Mavis Talcum is as 
indispensable as a -razor to well 
grooming after shaving. Men prove 
that everyday. But don't stop there... 
To really enjoy the benefits of Mavis 
Talcum, as millions of both men and 
women now do, sprinkle or lighdy 
massage the same incomparable 
Mavis Talcum over the entire body. 
That's comforc — and protection! 
Cools — .absorbs perspiration — de- 
odorizes. 




■s. 



T a it ua! 

POWDER 




VJ 



*1 



BOARD OF FIVE TO 
i TAKEOVER NRA 

General Johnsonj to Relax Re$t 
j of Summer, Go on Blue Eaglt 
i "S ales Trip ". 

Washington — The national. rei 
administration haa come to 
threshold of a new experiment. 
3. Johnson will convert the reeovMf 
agency's one-man leadership lata • 
flye-man control for the summer* | 

Most of the fob of directing NBA 
will be shifted to , five assistant*. 
Johnson wants to see how .NBA OBB 
get along : without his hand oa ttit 
helm. The tryout— which Is partly 
Informal and designed to give Job* 
son a chance to relax— also will ftp 
an Important test ot commission 
trol. 

The general's way of relaxing 
he a swing across the' country to 
the Blue Eagle and: put in a gooil 
word here and there for the rum 
deal. - [ 

The five-man board will run NBA 
except for major decisions whl5 
Johnson must make -under the law. 
On the board will be O. A. Lynda, 
NRA administrative officer; Robert 
W. Lea, ' assistant administrator Saf 
industry, and George; L. Berry, A. B. 
Glancy and George Buckley, dlvWaa 
administrators. "1 

After the basic code for small In- 
dustries has been promugated, JohaV 
son plans to put NHA's emphasis ail 
compliance, and It Is this Job partH> 
ularly which the board will have la 
his absence. 

Henry Ford's Blue Eagle standing 
still Is being discussed at NRA. Of- 
ficials say signing of the letter or 
complianoe recently'approved by John- 
son is necessary before the Ford Mr 
tor Company can bid on governm< 
contracts. 



ion OOB" 

tag wfli 
• toaal 



400 Start $18,000,000 Sewago Wi 

St. Paul— The start of the S18,OO0^> 
000 Twin City Sewage disposal work 
has started with -the first crow of 4H 
men building the main tunnel, through 
which, will flow sewage of the ton 
cities into, the ultimate cleansing 
plant. This move was but a small be- 
ginning of the Immense project, 
which "will involve a'sewage Bystent 
from Camden in north Minneapolis 
to Pigs' Eye Island in St. Paul. Tha 
first contract calls for 5,649 feet of a 
tunnel 13 feet, 10 Inches in diameter 
— slightly more than a mile long-f 
at -a cost of $449,476.40- 



U.S. :Make» Good In First Bank Fallurf 
Washington— The "Federal Deposit 
Insurance' Corporation payed off dea- 
csltors of the first bank to fail under 
the protection of the law passed by 
the . last congress to. Insure bank ao- 
countB. The 1,789 depositors of tha 
Fon du Lac State Bank of East Peo- 
ria, HI., which closed recently, re- 
ceived approximately $125,000, all de- 
posits being Insured. under the law ua 
J2.500. ^_ | 

Fourth of 4uly Toll Reaches 178. 

r, Chicago— American celebrated tha 
.-: Fourth of July with the usual number 
4 of fatalities. One hundred and seven- 

• ty : six persons- met death on that daj|, 
through accidents, - drownings and 
crashes. .Only 3 deaths were caua- 1 
ed. by. fireworks, once the chief killer 
on the ' holidays, one a Minneapolis 
woman and the other a 5-year-old girl 

in Montana. ___ I 

Death Bares $81,000 Hidden In Horn* 
"Eau Claire, Wis.— Eightyone thou- 
sand dollars in old currency was found 
in the~ liome of Mrs. Alice HaydenL 
who died last" week. Mrs. Hayden 
was the 'widow of Henry R. HayderJ, 
prominent local attorney and finanr 

; ' cler who died In 1903. It is known 
that Mrs. Hayden left a large estate 
in securities held In the bank. I 



i 

istip 



U' PRESIDENT LAUDS STM 



chaser "of ._.'■ feeder cattle .' especially 
when conside 

cprrespoi ugina were only S4c 

per. ewt. to,-?^ W pt-rSort.-; Itt other 
words, the cost of feeder stock has 
been but very little ^different than a 
year ago while the average price of 
fat cattle is fully $1.00 above a year 

agO.. f .- --■..:;_■■. 



Enthusiastic praise of .the. state 
of Minnesota) and its many attrac- 
tions and advantages is voiced by 
President L. ; p. Coffman of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota in a message to 
stud<ents printed -as an introduction 
to The Gopher, or student year, book 
at the university, which recency ap- 
peared, ''t . 

f'Minnesota;is a splendid :state," : he 
wrote, "It ei joys the perennial at- 
traction of .variety. In its southern 
parts'it is of the corn belt, yet its 
north is piney forest. To the .west 
it blends intoj the prairies; yet 'on the 
east iff has. .access to the: Atlantic 
Ocean through: the Great Lakes and 
to the Gulf of Mexico -by the Missis- 
sippi river. Its minerals,. manufactures 
and forests combine with the pro- 
ducts of , the ffield and the. dairy to 
provide a d'iversine* source of' liveli- 
hood for its people. 

"To be ranked _with these resoures 
in importance and- value to the -state 
of Minnesota) is. its splendid ''educa- 
tional systerd. It" has been- said that 
Minnesota has no other advertise- 
ment the equal of its' university. Men 
and -women !from all parts : of the 
world come : here to study, often at 
great expense to themselves. Surely, 
if the future of the state is to be 
a developing :6ne, we are to compre- 
hend life so as to be happier, if we 
are to makel the' most fruitful uses 
of oiir rawj material.sV and if !we 
am to develop a high type of social 
organization F we must under all: cir-. 
cumstances give support. to our' re- 
searchers and schOiers. We must con- 
tinue to bring. our young people into 
juntact with ; them and with 1lie 
science, art and ph:!osophy of the 
world. i ' 

"May there; he an ever fuller reali- 
sation of theUmpwtance of this poj- 
icy when the university becomes sov- 
enty-five years old than there is now 
on the seventy-fifth birthday of the 
state." 

The Gopher was dedicated to the 
State of Minnesota in honor of its 
seventy-fifth tbirthday. 

IATI0NALPR0N1BIII0N STARTS 
BACK SAYS: V^CALBfRVVOOD 

National prohibition has officially 
starts I o.tk.: n .June J5, Senator 
Sheppard of Teta--, vho - introduced 
the 18th amendment seventeen years 
ago, introducedva proposal for" a new 
amendment the purpose of which is 
to clothe congress with the power to 
regulate or ; prohibit the- manufac- 
ture and sale of alcoholic beverages. 

Section 1 of the resolution grants 
to congress the full power to pass 
uniform laws' regulating or prohibit- 
ing the traffic in the several states. 

Section 2 reserves to the several 
states the power to enact 'regulations 
or prohibition within their respective 
borders, "irrespective of legislation 
by, congress."; That preserves to each 
state power to pass more stringent 
laws than those passed by congress, 
frut leaves the state- no power to an- 
null or defeat congressional action. 

Section 3 prohibits the transpor- 
tation of liquor into prohibited areas. 

Section 4 repeals the 21st amend- _. , *,„„.«.„.„,,, UJ . „ ut: 

ment by which the 18th (prohibition) show. This augurs well for the horse 
amendment was repealed. (enthusiasts. Minnesota-owned ani- 

Section 5 provides that the propos- mals have cut a wide- swath in show 
ed amendment shall be ratified by circles in recent years and many of 
conventions held in the several states,] 'he stables rank with the best ahy- 
which method^was first in repealing where. ■■.-...■■ 

the 18th amendment. 

The first proposal for a prohibition 
amendment was introduced into con- 
gress in 1887} . Thirty-three years 
thereafter the 18th amendment had 
closed 170,000 saloons and had out- 
lawed- every ^distillery , and brewtry 
manufacturing beverage alcohol. In 
1887 there were only two prohibition 
states — Maine and Kansas. Now there 
are 20 dry states and hundreds of 
dry counties.: In nearly every local 
wet-dry election since repeal 
drys romped -to victory, in 
cases by a 10-to-l majority. , .- ... . , - -„ ..-,-. 

National prohibition has istarted d ? ub 'y ?enous by unsanitary disposal 
"back, and it may go fast and i'far. "*•■«—"-"■<- «•- ~" '- '— 



BITUMINOUS ROADS 

TaBEREMATEft 

More than 1,350. mUes .of -hihimibi- 
pns axirfaced, trunk highways will be 
given retreatme'nts: this summer' by 
the. maintenance division of the state 
"highway, department, according: to, 
a department announcement. ^ 

•Within the past. few days the de- 
partment has purchased 4,871,000 
gallons of bituminous material for 
approximately ?32O,00O. It. has also 
awarded contracts in each -of the six- 
teen maintenance districts of 'the 
state for the application -of., the- ma-; 
terial purchased. The cost of apprica- 
tion will be^68,0U0. 

Maintenance crews have been busy 
getting the roaoss in shape for -ttie re- 
treatments, and the bituminous work 
will beat its peak in the next few 
weeks. There are approximately 2,700 
miles of bituminous treated roads in 
the trunk system. 

OUTSTANDING HORSESHOW 
WILL BE SIkGED At THE 

MIN NE» 6TATE FAIR 

Arrangements have been conclud- 
ed for the staging of the nation's out- 
standing horse show in connection 
with Minnesota's Diamondr ; Jubilee 
State Fair, September 1 to 8 announ- 
ces Raymond A. Lee, Secretary. 

It will be a $10,000 show, to run five 
successive nights, from Sept. 3 to 7 
With the. leading stables of the coun- 
try competing, the capitol of the 
horse show world will be literally 
transplanted from Kentucky to the 
HippocVome at the State Fair. 

Sixty-one events will make up the 
five-night program. There will be 
classes foi* three and five-gaited 
horses, hunters and jumpers, saddle 
yearlings, . "roadsters, polo mounts, 
military horses, harness horses and 
heavy draft hitches. , . 

Of special interest to show- devotees 
'will be the fireglasses in which riding 
skill only^^win -be the ^" basis: of 
the .judges* awards. Since there 
are many gifted equestrians ii 
the Northwest these classes are ex- 
ported no scintillate with action. 

Several stake events are included 
on the program. Prominent Twin City 
sportsmen and sportswomen have 
united to underwrite some of the 
stakes, with the Fair management of- 
fering the balance of the prize money, 
whiclr exceeds $10,00o an all-time re- 
cord. - --^aiBlis^ 

Assurances already have been re- 
ceived f rom topnotch stables in Texas. 
Kentucky, Oklahoma, Illinois, Pen- 
nsylvania, Wisconsin* and Iowa that 
they will include Minnesota on their 
itineraries this year, reports Norris 
K. Carnea, Superintendent of the 



see that its -wastes are so! treated or 
disposed', oj that tlitey do I hot conta-; 
minate their Own 'water supply or that 
of other communities. Tlu> obligation 
-will hot cease when the drouth: ends, 
for untreated sewage i4 always a me- 
nace fcntl low water pply] makes the 
danger . greater. The dxoufth has not 
made sewage treatment inecessory, 
out only emphasized jthej need. No 
community; which is -concerned* about 
public healph: can afford} to! take chan- 
ges with unsafe sewage disposal." ' 



Minnesota had North.: Djakpta reoentlj 
.completed ja. jbin^surYey>!j6f - the-B 
Rxyer of :tjier North artd recoinmench- 
ed that "tEeatnie^tVli^\:[:pwHd^' , \ > iASr 
sewage and .industrial: wastes at all 
[places from - Breckenridge " to: Grand 
^orks. .■.".■■- | i " 1 " 

'There are manyji cbmmunitiea 
■jrVhere the purify of drinking water 
isldependent upon sewag^ treatmeni 
id other, places upstream, 'lit is a just 
.obligation upon each. community tc 



Ttel^SHOOT TOURNAMiNT WH1 
BE HELDllN CONNPONWlTH 



MINN. STATE FAIR 



iMftiullllilD 

:■_■■■■ X. w ' , V i ' ' '■"•■■ 

At the age of 84" years, Mrs, Sarah 
Molstad passed^ away at 2 P.; M. on 
Saturday, June'80 at the home of her 
son Albert in Exel Township; Mrs. 
Molstad was born September 2, 1849 
hi Telemarkeh,. Norway, and. came to 
Ridgeway, Iowa' in .1857; Kve years 
later she- moved; to .;' Spring Valley, 
Minn., iand came' to Buxton, Nr Dak. 
in 1882. Since 1896, ' Mrs. Molstad' 
hair made her hoihein Exel Town- 
3hopf:and has been, a^ resident of 
Marshall county ^ for 39: years. She 
was married in 1882 to Elling N. 
Molstad at. Buxton, who with one son 
have preceded hei. in death.' 

Those surviving are two ~sbns, Oli- 
ver and Albert Molstad both of Exel 
Township,' and 6 grand-chidren; - Ser- 
vices, .were conducted at Silver Creek 
Church on Tuesday, July 3, with Rev. 
L. K. Eedal of Holt, officiating. In- 
terment was made in Siver Creek 
cemetery. 

: .'"" i good eoAds 



SEPT. R 



will be fe- 
shoot; will 



GIVES REASONS WHY FAT 
GATTLE SHOULD BE STRONG 



Police Battle Sari Francisco Striker* 

I..' San FranclBCo^ — ^Fighting, betwesti 
700. police and 3,000 union plcketa m(- 
anlted here from a move by business 
interests to open forcibly this strike 
paralyzed port to commerce In the 
face of pleas for peace by President 
Rqosevet'a labor dispute commltteel 
There have been two deaths during 

the strike. ; — 1 

La Crosse Mill Strike Is Settle* - _, F 

La Crosse, Wis.— The strike of 1> ' *?**, Charl es jE. .Lee, head of the cat- 



40& empoyees of the La Croase Rnl^ 
ber Milla Company, "in -progress sines 
April 2.4, was ended through an agreed 
ment ratified by company executives 
and officials of the 'United Rubber 
Workers Federal Union No. 18381, 
The fulL force will return to work. I 



John D. Rockefeller It Nlnety-FJvc 
Lakewood, N. J.— -John D. Rbcka* 
feller celebrated ins ninenty-filftis 
birthday at his home here on July fta 
It was a quiet da yfor th egead fofJE 
It was a quiet day for the aged capi- 
talist in company with his son, John* 

Jr. - . : . I 

Mine Bombing Is Being , Investigated 
. Sprlnsfleld, 111 — The bombing of a 
Peabody mine, endangering 850 coal 
diggers below, was Investigated by 
officials who ' anaprently had no cluea 
t« the identity ot the band ol masted 
dynamiters. , I 

Ring In Tub Marks High Water Limit 
Alton, England— Because of tha 
long drouth, Chesterfield Lane, prop- 
rietor of the Swan hotel, had lines 
painted five' Inches, from the bottom 
of all bathtubs, with, a notice asking 
guests not to fill the tubs beyond that 
level. ■' - I . ". -; ' ■'- | - 

Law Enforcer Haa four Car* Stolen 
Jackson^ Miss.— -Attorney General 
t. Rio* is the chief-law enforcement 
official of Misslssipjbt— but ao far ha 
haa had four automobiles stolen frost 
k *te alnca he took office. 



. Eoram adjrertjsing is 6»V»la BS2 8 



^..^.^MA^M^iMis 



Entries in the. horse show division 
will close August 13. 

DROUTH SPURS EIGHT 
ON WATER POLUTION 

"The severe drouth has focused at- 
tention on all' available sources -of 
water supply", says a statement 1s- 
.. - sued by the Minnesota Chapter of 
some the Izaak Walton League. "The short- 
some, age of water in many places is made 
doubly serious by m 
of 'sewage into the extremely " low 
water-courses." The present emergency 
has aroused many communities to a 
realization of the danger, and P.W.A. 
loans and grants have helped to get 
started. j 

"Fourteen Minnesota- communities 
with a population' of B3,450 have let 
- "Less cattf: on • fo.j. '«• probabil- contracts for sewage treatment plants 
ity of less cattle on feed-, this fall, in recent months. Most of these pro- 
high priced feed and scarcity of feed jects are well underway. Total cost of 
and hay .all point toward a more fav- ' projects is $561,840. -They include 
orable outlook, for the future market Waconia, Marshall Hutchinson, Red- 
on strictly good grain-fed cattle," r wood Palls, Appleton, Montevideo, 

Gauk Centre,. OrtonvrHe,- Blooming' 
Prairie, Harmony, 'Wabasha, Pair, 
mont, Glencoe.and Watertowri. 

-"In . Lake.'.City; Bemidji, . .Winona, 
Mborhead, St. Paul and* Minneapolis 
partial contracts have -been let. or 
plans are in preparation 1 for projects 
with an estimated- cost of $18,611,000 
which when completed : will -serve 
V79.100 people. Allotments of P.W-4 
funds to -jfhre& : cities, Fergus -. Palls, 
Northneld and Hibbing, totaling $707- 
000 have been rescinded, due to fail- 
ure to pass local bond issues. 

"The :state boards "= of health of 



tie department of the. Central Coop- 
eration, South St. Paul. - - 

Mr. Lee, also points out that a 
good many cattle. have already been 
(forced to market whieb -ord-Inarily 
would liave been fed for a longer per- 
iod. He says that there will probably 
be a lot of half-fat, -warmed-up 
cattle coming to market for some 
time and during the fall and winter 
months, strictly grain feds of good 
and choice quality will be scarce. Con- 
sequently they will sell at a premium 
over ordinary kinds. - 

"Eight now, prime, long-fed- 1200 
to 1400 lb. steers are'quotable to $9 - 
00 at $9.60 per cwt. but nothing of 
that quality has been offered on the 
market, most offerings being of fair 
SR 7K "l-S^ 3 ^ ""^wlline;' at $6.25 tc 
up. The feeder with fat-cattle^ of 

S£ C S' qX ^iS ? nd ' farnish nhdoubt- 
edb; has bettlr days ahead of -him." 

lhe margih between feeder costs 
and fat cattle prices has been far 
more favorable this spring than a 
year ago, according to the weekly- 
market bulletin issued by the Central 
Co-Operativej Association. The aver- 
age price of istocker and feeder cat- 
t«e shipped from South St, Paul to 
cbuntry points for the last ' three' 
nfonths has. bfeen $3.64 for June, $3.75 
for May and($4.02 for April. 'The 
average fat steer price for the same 
month has bden $6.35. for June; Sg.94 
for -May and J$5.68 for' April; Tthns;:* 
favorable margin : of - from • '. V8& ;to 
$2X1 ' '••" ""-■ ■--'" 
June 

These fl: 



Door keys, Yale keys and" ; - auto- 
mobile ignition keys of all kinds, 
fqr all kinds of locks, made at short 
notice .at' .", 

HaveFis 7 Gun Repair Shop 

407 Arnold* Ave. South, ... . L ' 

, Thief River Falls,. Minn. 



An army of trapshoDters from all 
parts of t(ie nation will 'compete in 
the first annual- Northwestern; Class 
Championship Tournament! to be spon- 
sored* by the Minnesota 'State F*ir 
as one of its many features in con 
nection with the Diaii 
celebration,' Sept. 1 to 8. 

The tournament, which! 
gistered-classified two-day 
be held under the auspices of the 
Twin City jShooting- Association, and 
scatter-gun' experts from I coast . to 
coast will I compete, : according, to 
Harry W. JMaginnis of Minneapolis, 
nationally J famous spiorts'man, , who 
will be in charge of trie details. 

Eighteen beautiful trophies, in ad- 
dition to a cup emblematic! of the all- 
round championship, will be~ awarcied 
to the winners. Such noted shots as 
Frank Trosh of Portland, [Ore., Mark 
Arie of Champaign; Dl., Walter 
Berwyn of rPennsylvanitj 1933 Grand 
American Handicap Chanipidn, and 
others, will be among! the. outstand- 
ing field of: more than! 300 entrants. 

A- battery of four triapsj.will be in- 
stalled on [Machinery Hill, providing 
an unexcelled range for ,the contest- 
ants. The shoot will be held Friday 
and Saturday, Sept. [7 and 8, and 
there will jbe three .classes, entrants 
averaging 93 per cent 'or better com- 
peting in Class A; 87 to 93 per cent, 
Class B; and under 87 - — . 

c f 

Minnesota : boasts oi 
shots, acording to Mr. 
a representative field of experts' will 
carry the state colors in the first an- 
nual competition. Entry; 'blanks and 
complete information can| be obtain- 
ed? by writing to the State Fair of- 
ficials. '' ■ '■] ' 



■Good roads cut the cost of operat- 
ing' automobiles and' trucks. The state 
road system is unfinished; there are 
many hundreds of miles- to be graded 
and otherwise improved. . 

— Springfiell Adrvance Press 



You can never win the heavy- 

'bSfissr jubTe sssf titl& by doing u « ht - w ^ w 



stunts.. 



percent. Class 

many • crack 
Maginnis, and 



| -< Random Ramblings ] 

A gretat many people'fail becausi 
they are so dead sure they aregoin; 
to. It would be'a shame to disapnoihl 
them: ' I i 

i * * * .* ' I : 
Many ^a man gets! a reputation 
for dignity when he really suf-' 
fering fram a stiff neck 1 . -- 

I.*..:.!- 

Men, like automobiles,, to <a t great 
extent are ] judged by their "hilclimb- 
"ing;- ability." 1 

i .*•*** - - 

Observation more than books, ex- 
perience rather than p'ersons.-are the 
prize ed'ueators. ' ! 

!-*.*'* •* : I 

. ; JJo the thing you think is best? 

and abide by it like a -soldier.'' 



Larson Funeral Home 

-\\ CARL B. LA;ES0N 
Licensed Funeral Director 

' 'I ' !:.- . i. " ■ 

Ambulancej Service— Calls! Answered 

* Day or Night ; " - 
Day Phone 61 Night Phone 14SW 

■ . 118 La Bree Ave; N. 

Thief Biver^Falls,' Minnesota. 



Announcement! 



:Mr. Clarence[ Lassesoii, 
of Thief River jFalls, has 
been alppointed as : Local 
Regres jntative I f of the 
State Firm Mutual Autofno- 

; bile' Insurance Cdinpany 
and will lopisj after all 
matters pertaihjng to in- 
suring ^nd. servicing autp- 
rribbileS, formerly: tak6h r 
care of! by M. Rj Levbrspn 
who is no longeri an lauthor- 
ized agent of jth4 State 
Farin Mutual Irjs.jCo^ 

' At--the'.|present;.time- Mr. Lasse- 

: son .is joiir: only authorized re^ 

presehtative in Peiiningto'n-coun- 

W. D. S'tegner, State Director 
John AJGronneri Dist; Agt. 



f 



\r~r 



j_± 



. ,. Dr. P."L.;Vistaunet's Clinic 

BeaUea Hedied ^and deal,, aba aiilmacal * 

; ' Db 
Fnadai rtiagaf: Hedka 

< _ Bath war bjata, atel at*. I 



Room 



!._T1 : has prSvailedj the margin rf or 
me being ? 2.71. ~ . . . ' ■ 
These flguies ere' encouraging to 
the.'f eeder fHgf tteTpr«s|iec*ivB _Etir- 



Dr. H. J. Rice 
DENTIST 

X-RAY LABORATORY 

Phone—Office,. 207 jtiniMrf . Ml 

First National Bank. BuDdiag 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 



Free Soap 

from your 

Watkins Dealer 

2 Bars of Green Palm 

Soap FREE with 1 lb. 

Double Action Baking 

Powder.., 

That's just like cutting the 
priceof Baking Powder in half 
I give 2 or 3 bars of soap FEEE 
with other necessities like spi- 
ces, Extracts/ daily used Toi- 
let Articles,, needed Medicines, 
etc. wliicH " means a savings to 
yon of 15c to 25c on an article. 

Wait for Waitkins-It Pays 

I will start working in this 
locality with the well known 
Watkins line of spices, ex- 
tracts food products, soaps, toi- 
let articles arid stock and 
Poultry preparations. My stock 
is new and fresh. You'll enjoy 
using these highest quality 
products, which I will bring to 
your door at a savings to you. 

GEOrBERKHOLZ 

Central Hotel 
Thief River Falls 



NO R T H.E.RN.CL I N I C 

A. W. Swedenbiipg, M. D. 

O. G. Lynde M. D. C, M. Adkins. M. D. 

Physicians and Surgeons 

Swedenburg Building — Telephone 350 

Thief River Falls. Minnesota 



d 



MR; TRAVELER 

MAKES A 

SNAPPY 

COMEBACK 




When you are out 

among strangers, it's 

i a happy idea to pick 

. \ up a telephone and - 

come back home by 

LONG DISTANCE 

Station-to-Station Hates Are 
40 Per Cent i Lower After 
8:30 P. M. For Most Distances 




y 




fay V1VAUDOU 



50? 



+ Q£ course, Mavis Talcum is'as 

indispensable as a .razor to •well 

.. grooming after shaving Men prove 

that everyday. But don't .stop there... 

'...'. "to really enjoy ;the benefits of Mavis 

- Talcum, as millions of both men and 
women now do, sprinkle or lightly 
massage the same incomparable 

;'v Mavis Talcum over the entire body. 

I That's Comfort— - and! protection! 
X^ls^absbrbs perspiration— de-? 



odorizes. 



&- ; 



vl 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



INTENTIONAf DllfPLICATE EXPOSURE 



•"Ti~rirrii ■■_,--—-- 



THIEF ftfVER FAILS FORttM, THlgg ftlVfift flALtS, MlNMgSOfA.TBUftS&AY Jtkv 12, 1924 



MINNESOTA NEWS 

Warren— A Marshall county sststr ' 

organization was perfected her*. I j 

Comfrey— Eleven silver foxes, rat- ; 

ued at ?900, were stolen from Krueitr 




brothers' fur farm, 

Duluth— The war department 
approved an allotment of $22,000 
the Duluth district for general eiami 
ations, surveys and contingencli 

Mound— Two thousand p 

gathered here for the celebration 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of 



persona 

at 



Mr. antOMrs. A. M. Holte return- 



ed Sunday'.'evening from the Twin 
Cities, where they enjoyed a several 
days' vacation. 

1 Mrs. Kenneth Upton of Rockford, 
I Illinois, arrived last week and is visit- 
I ing for sveral days with her father, 
Mr. C. J. Lundgren. 
i ■ Mr. and . Mrs. Alvin Steriberg ar- 
rived' Monday from tneir home 



In the Rostrum 



Dear Editor: 



It is now quite a while since I pro- 
mised the people of Eocksbury 'Down- 1 
ship that at some time .during\ the 
summer there would be staged a sec- 




HAS BRIDGE XUNCHEON 

Mrs. Mary V. Shaw 1 entertained 

._■,.. „ = several of her friends at a one o'clock 

ond Political Rally m Valhall Hall, at bride luncheon on Saturday at her 
which time all aspirants for public home. Bridge formed the diversion 
offices would again hjvve the oppor- of the afternoon, 
tunity to meet the Rocksbury voters — o— 

on neutral grounds, without running FORMER RESIDENTS HAVE 
from farm to farm peddling cards for REUNION! 

v01 ; e9 - I Word was riteived this past week- 

Arrangements are now under way that approximately \50 : former Thief 



/ 



founding of the Catholic church her*. r, Vec ' Monday * rom tnelr home at 

/ Thief River Falls-More than 600 - ForTevrartof a"t fte^oma'oflto 4°',-? f^' a 1 d m 1 re ^P^ "- ™<" ?**}* resident,; whWe'now'in 
/OOO oounds of wnni >,„. v.... _.!™i 2L. S-L,.„.?. S ".-_ i.??™ 8 * °5..^S; . Political Rally than the one previous the vicinity of Long Beach, Calfor 



Mr. and ; Mrs. Joe Soderbeg, and to furnish whoever they choose, to — o-l- ! 



cording to figures of Manager Robert I 




' ^ °f- TT , i daughter Patricia Jane, and Florence say whatever they please in defense of ENTERTAIN - FOR OUT-OF TOWN- 

Austin— Hail broke 40 to 50 win- Imuran left Sunday for Detroit. Lakes the nam- and platform. Ample time GUESTS I 

. dows In homes in Mapleview addl- ' wher e they will spend a.week's\yaca- j will be given each speaker. Lots will -- -- 
tion, a suburb north of Austin, and 



Mrs. Nate Harris, and Mrs. P. W. 



ann" 



damaged crops north of Austin 
near Brownsdale. j 

Northfleld— Hurled 85 feet into thm 
Cannon river when a diving platform 



tl0n - V ^ I j« ^f^.J s fe who" speaks first and Mabey entertained 'a grouiTof ' friend= 

C. H. Jung and daughter Harriet last. Notice- will be served on the at the former's home on |Friday after- 



returned'.. Wednesday from a 10 day speakers not to indulge into a mud- noon in compliment to Mrs* A T 

trip during, which they attended the slinging talk, but to give the public Grotte and daughter Helen of Min- 

World's Fair, and made stops at Fon>- i a fal1 ' and square synopsis of the neapolis, Mrs. Doris Halvorson Pope 

collapsed as he w»« »hr,7,r ^""i.lT . du - lac ' Medford, and Lacysmith, WisVrarties principles as the effect the of this 'city and Mrs. Pope's mother 

i-o.iapsea as he was about to dlrs, C onsin, Davenport, Iowa and the •"■mer.ian citizen with equality, .uid Mrs. G. Halvorson " 



Don Foster of Hastings is, recoverinf Twin Cities, 



from internal Injuries. / 



square deal to "11 alike. 



The afternoon was spent 



of j Minneapolis. 



Mr. and .Mrs. Edward . Noto left . Ample notice will be given the pub- preciatiori at the close 



in music ap 
of which a 
by 



Mr. and' Mrs. Berlin Hoium .daugh- 
ter Lorraine and Edith Yonke of 
Thief River Falls were dinner guests 
at the E. A. Yonke home Sunday. 

Miss Lovness, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Ness and family of Thief River Falls, 
Robert Dawes of Norden and Oscar 
Mosbeck spent the 4thl visiting at the 
Nels Swanson home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vern Miller are re- 
joicing over the arrival of a baby- 
girl born Sunday, July 8th. 

John Foster of Thief River Falls 
spent several days last week visiting 
at the Ernest Yanke home. 

Alma Johnson of Thief River Falls 
spent several days last week Isabelle 
Syverson while looking over her 
farming interests. 

Mr. ad Mrn. Victor Trsuchmann and 
children of Agder were guests at the 
Walfred Carlson home the 4th and 
helped Mrs. Carlson celebrate her 
birthday. 

Sunday dinner guests at the Wm. 
Ristau home were, Rev. and Mrs. V. 
E. Schroed'er and family and Lillie 
Johnson, Viviap Evelyn ai:J Uob 
Votava of Thief River Falls. 



Marie, Lydia and Melvina Jablinske 
were visitors at the Home of their 
grandmother, Mrs. Freida Meyers, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Eric Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Adolph Wold and family were Wed- 
nesday evening visitors at the Wal- 
fred' Carlson home. 

Ed Thorstad of Thief River Falls 
and Axel Stark and Melvin Swen- 
son were visitors Friday evening at 
the Bert Thorstad home. 

Marina Yonke spent several days 
last week visiting at the P. P. Reier- 
son home in Thief River Falls. 

urrlinand Wilken who is employ- 
ed at the Nis Anton farm spent Sun- 
day at the home of his parents,, Mr t 
and Mrs. Gust Wilkens. 

OH Olson called it the R. H. Jab- 
linske home Sund'ay afternoon. 

Evelyn Votava of Thief River 
Falls is making a short visit at- the 
home of her brother-in-law and sis- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ristau. 



Daylight in Muscuml 
Swedish museums have a system of 
artificial lightlni! for exhibit hulls, so 
that pictures and other objects are 
seen as If In clear riaylijrht- 



Wlnona— A public works adminis- I Sunday for Detroit Lakes where they lic in ord er to set aside other acti- two-course luncheon was served 
tratlon loan and grant of $298,000 for-' will enjoy a few days' vacation. vi ties, if they choose to partake in a the hostesses. 
a fchool was changed to a grant of They will also visit with relatives at tyue non-partisan Political Rally, 
*"' The grant Is 30 per cent of j Gary, Minn. 



$84,500. 

the cost of labor and material. I Mrs. Frank Tunberg, and 

St. Paul— At least six weeks' work Roger and' Wallace left Sunday eve 



staged for the public's benefit to get a 
sons I stmare deal out o:C a Political Meeting. 



will be required before any report on 
the investigation Into alleged misaW 
• of PWA funds in Minnesota can b. 
made, Capt. Robert Radford, In chars* 
of the probe, reported. 

St. Paul — Uncle Sam has bought* 
total of 636,293 head of catta la Mt«. 
nesot'a. North and South Dakota and 
Wisconsin- In the campaign to relief* 
the drouth situation. It was annonnn- 
' ed at University Farm. 

Wlllmar— Wlllmar's old curfew ortj- 
nance has been dug up and Its atrial 
enforcement in the future has been 
ordered. A special whistle has beta 
placed on the municipal plant and ift 
' will be blown each day. j 

iCrookston — Red River valley cro» 
conditions have Improved remarkably 
the last few weeks, making the vallss 1 
as a whole the garden spot of the 
northwest, reports T. M. McCall of tan 
Northwest Experimental station. 

Hutchinson— Disappointed when bit 
offer of marriage was refused, Georg. 
P.; Fimon, 34, farmer, shot and 'wound- 
ed Opal Krasen, 16, former Hutchin- 
son girl, and then killed himself. Tht 
shooting occurred In Minneapolis. \ 

(Minneapolis — After the case hod 
been delayed several times, Congress 
man Francis Shoemaker appeared In 
Municipal Court and paid the $50 flno 
imposed upon him after he had been 
convicted of disorderly conduct dar- 
ing the truck drivers strike. J 
St. Paul — Minnesota beer drinkem 
paid $7,247,3y0 in federal taxes on 44*. 
933,570 gallons of beer during tha 
12-month period ending June 30, £•» 



BIRTHDAY PARTY 

-„ Several little friends jgathered at 
Yours for a morej enlightened citi- th . e B - O. Norby home.; on Friday 



ning for the Twin Cities where they ?. ena jy in matters pertaining to Pub- afternoon to help lone j Norby cele 



will visit for several days with 
friends and relatives. 

Miss Violette Jacobson and Miss 
Doris Wiener, who (&re employed in 
the city left Monday for Black Duck 
where they will spend a week's vaca- 
tion. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson,- son 
Henry, and daughter Anna, Mrs. H. 
Johnson, and Mrs. C. Lund'berg and 



lic Welfare. 



, brate her ninth birthday, j A delicious 
Paul Engelstad. ■ Iu " cneon was served- at a green anc 
white appointed i*ible by i Mrs. Norby 
the centerpiece of which iwas a green 
and white birthday cake, a gift of 
Mrs. Mary Shaw. The little guests 
were Barbara, Betty Anne, and Mar- 
garet Jacobson, Joan Dahlquist, Mary 

_ and Edward Chommie, Kathleen Scan- 

- -.. ~. _..^„ e „ m , Dust storms get (under the eye- 1 £ m ' mo f ™ ia Me y* r > a ^ d Be ™<* 

son of Oakland, California, motored llds °* a sreat many, people, and they j - . I 

to Roseau on Sunday .and spent the : a *'f. I 1 *?}? *.° produce some major * 



SOMETHING IN YOiJR EYE? 
KEEP IT OPEN SAYS 'DOC 



HIGHLANDING 



day visiting with friends. * " I ?asualties via the eye route, accord- 
Mrs. O. C. Paulson and children ing to a bulletin from the Minnesota ' • 

are enjoying a visit with Mrs. Paul- | f **** Medical Association issued to-] Ed. Korstad purchased la new Ford 
son's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pete , da 7j I V "8 last week. 



Jorgenson at Leeds, N. Dak. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Richards, daughter 
Ethel, Mrs. Thyra Snyder and son, 
Donald, motored to Detroit Lakes on 
Friday and will spend some time 
vacationing there. 

Miss Eleanor Kelly is visiting for 
several weeks at the home of her 
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence Fournier at Red Lake 
Falls. 

Mrs. Dean Hollenshead of Bend', 
Oregon, and Mrs. H. H. Oerding of 
Coquille, "Oregon accompanied by Mrs. 
Eugene Grover of Glyndon, Minn., 
irrived Thursday for a visit wfth 
Mrs. Minnie Shetler. Mrs. Hollen- 
shead and Mrs. Oerding had previ- 
ously attend-ed the World's Fair and 
visited with relatives in Chicago and 
with Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Grover 
at Glyndon. 

Roy Lambert motored to Baudette 
Sunday, and his son George return- 
ed home with him the same day. 

Harry Severson. spent a several 
days vacation in the Twin Cities last 



seph Wolf, collector of internal ror* week, 
nue reported. The heaviest consume ! . Miss Ma *e arefc Wiener is vacation- 
tion came in June, 1934, when l,3B|> I in * thls w ^ at . B . lack P«ck 
6T> M i, ftnq w „o L ro * »i»»*r I Clarence O. Enckson left Sunday 

Lu^lZ r^, d - . U for Minneapolis where he will spend 

Luverne— The Jmal encampment rf a wee k j n connection with his new 
the Southwestern Minnesota Graat . duties as Norwestern Minnesota re- 
Army of the Republic probably wfll presentative with the Lee Overall 



be [conducted in Windom in 1935. D£o> 
banding of the organization Is nndir ' 
consideration, because of ithe decrease T 
in j membership and the resnltlniff 
heavier financial burden for ami' 
viv,ors. I j I 



Company. 

Marvin Peterson of Plummer was in 
the city on business on Tuesday. 

Mr. antv Mrs. Harry Prugh spent 
Wednesday in Duluth on matters of 
business. 

Miss Helen Grotte, and her mother. 
Mrs. A. T. Grotte of Minneapolis left 
Saturday for their home at Minnea- 
polis after haying been guests since 
Tuesday at the L. C. Poue home. 

Mrs. O. Laura, Mrs. John Houghum 
and Esther and Milferd Houghum 
motored to Hendrum on Sunday and* 
spent the day with friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Axel Hagan and Mr 
and Mrs. William Barstad of Ray. N 
Dak., and Mrs. Jacob Berg of Ken 
nedy left Tuesday after spending e 
short time visting Mrs. Barstad'f 
aunt, Mrs. H. O. Rod in this city. 
,,,„,, : , Miss Arline Zellmer of Hill City 

recruiting office in federal building. ' Minnesota, arrived Monday and is 
The new corps members, most d| yjsiting this week with her friend 
them under 20, will remain in campV ! Miss Jean Mellby. 
until Sept. 30. They are the stated ! Mrs. G. Haiyorson of Minneapolis 
share of 30,000 new men being added arrived last week and is visiting foi 
to CCC units in northwest statei H a ? extended time with her daughter, 

drS Ii? fed6ral *™ nt r ! Mr D a°nd SrriX ^Tchel, and 
drouth relief program. j daughter Lois of Plummer were Tues 

Redwood Falls— The seventh distrlM day visitors, in the city, 
encampment of the Veterans of Folk | Miss Elizabeth Jorde left Sunday 



Wheaton— For the first time la tta 
corporate existence of more than ft 
half century, the village of WneatoA 
has been; assured of an adequate w^ 
ter| supply. A new well drilled ofM 
mile east; of the village Is testing al- 
most 500 1 gallons per minute and wlji 
produce water in sufficient quantity , 
to care for a town 10 times its list, : 

Minneapolis — Recruiting of Minne- 
sota's 7,500 new CCC members to ba 
assigned to 70 CCC camps in tap 
northwest continues at the U. S. armV [ 



The following instructions for re-; The young folks of this community 
moval of foreign bodies from the eye enjoyed a party at the i Geo. Gunder- 
ball are given in the bulletin so as to son home Saturday night, 
avoid the serious infections that too 1 ' Alvin Klemmentson motored to 
often result from bungling, ama- . Thief River Palls Saturday night, 
teur attempts to get them out. | Miss Cora Krause and Charles 

First When you feed something ' Kraus e of Thief River Falls visited at 
strike your eye, try not to close your ^ e Martin Johnson home Sunday, 
lids. Sudden forceful closing of your Mr - and Mrs - Benny Howard motor- 
lid'j may furthur embed the particle e<i to Goodridge Monday, 
in' the eyeball. j i Edward ■ Korstad spent] a few days 

Hold the lids apart with your fin- ' ?' ^B^.^Vif k f v!th friends 
gers. The sudden rush of tears which *T r T „ h 'f E i v r f ^ a,ls c ;. ' , 
natures provides will help flush it out. , j,„ Jiw n„f;f-' . Sle ?.'^ !! "" "" 

o_„„„ j « tv. .■ ■ daughter Dolores motored to Gatzke 

Second: If the same stinging sen- Sunday 
tailor, i is still there after a minute or | Mr. and Mrs. Otto ParnW and fam- 

^n ttl Ju* ^ "TS look and % enjoyed an outing at Red Lake on 
grasp the lid m its central portion. Sunday 

^°nnS Ul ^u he ^ UPPer T 1 Ii n 0Ver the ^ l0W ; Mr - a ' nd Mrs - A - Johnson motored to 
er one roll the eyeballs upward and Thief River Falls Saturday, 
release _th e upper lid. The edge of the | Miss Elva OverwnlH r»tL 



lower lid or its lashes may brush off 
the particle if it is und-er the upper lid 
Try it two or three times if necessary. 

If these maneuvers are unsuccess- 
ful, it is probable that the foreign 
body is embedded in the cornea, the' 
shiny portion immediately in front of 
the pupil, an area on which you should 
keep hands oif. 

The doctors especially warn against 
allowing any one to use a knife or a 
pocket handkerchief \ or a toothpick. 
That's the way grave infections 
which sometimes result in impaired 
sight get into the ; eye. If several 
hours must elapse before you can 
get expert help, the bulletin advises 
application of plain boric acid oint- 
ment or plain petrolatum-not carbo- 
lated to the eyeball, in the meantime 
keeping the eyes closed and quiet. A 
spoonfull of castor oil or olive oil. 
sterilized by putting 'it into a cup 
which is in turn placed in a pan of 
boiling water for 10 or 15 minutes 
and then cooled' completely, can be 
used instead. D 



eigh Wars, with 208 delegates and 
terhates from 16 posts and 2,000 mem- 
bers and visitors in attendance, elect* 
ed] the following officers; District, 
commander, John W. Lauterback, R«4- 
wood Palls; senior vice command.*, 
Ivar Neson, Willmar; junior viceco» 
mander, Edgar Marcotte, Marshall* 
Judge advocate, George Barnes, Refr 
wood Falls ; quartermaster, Cnrtot 
Paulson, Tracy. 

Frazee— One bite from a plecd Ot 
"candy'* nearly proved fatal for Lonlt 
Rebholz, prominent farmer of Hobufc 
near here. While In a stora htv% 
Rebholz picked up a toy Fourth of 
July torpedo and mistaking It for A 
piece of candy, took a bite of It. B 
exploded. When the Bmoke cleared' 
away, Rebholz' injuries Included W 
teeth missing, upper lip and part <ff> 
tongue torn off, roof of mouth that' 
tered, lower jaw mangled and BUMtffe 
split open from ear to ear. 

St. Paul — Appointment of NatfcM 
Harris, engineer for the hoard of Mflfr, 
mate and; taxation, as state engfa«tW 
and director of the work dlvlsloa tf. 
the state emergency relief admiaifr' 
tratlon was announced by I*. P. Xta> 
merman, assistant administrator. 

Minneapolis — Unable to relMM ft. 



for Grand -Forks where she will en- 
joy a visit with relatives. - 

A group bf girls are enjoying, a 
week's outing at the W. Parbst cott- 
age at Red Lake Narrows. Included 
in the group are Marion Sponheim 
Ebba and Helen Tweten, and Madge 
and Louise LaBree. 

Miss Kathleen Monsbroten left 
Sunday for Grafton, N. Dak. where 
she will spend a week visiting with 
friends and relatives, 
j Mrs. H. Halland, and daughters 
JMarine, Celia, and Judith returned 
Tuesday evning after a several days 
trip to Fargo, N. D. and Gary, Minn. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson, son 
Reubin, and daughter Mabel left Fri- 
day on a 10-day trip during which 
time they will motor to the Iron 
Range and to Barron, Wisconsin, 
visiting with Mr. Johnson's relatives 
at the latter place. *) 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Evenson and 



D C A BORROWERS ARE 
REPAYiNGJHFIR LOANS 

Many of Minnesota's 1509 PCA 
oorrowers have already begun to re- 
oay their loans, using^the opportunity 
make partial repayments, savs E. 
0. Johnson, Vice-President of the 
Production Credit Corporation of St. 
Paul, which supervises the 88 assoc- 
iations in the 7th district. 

This state had 1,695 members on 
Tune 20, including members who had 
joined at the time of organizing the 
associations in order; to get them 
foing, but who d'id not at that time 
any loans. On June 20 the loans to 
Minnesota members amounted to 
?828,000, the average loan in this 
state being S542 per borrower, Mem- 
ebrship consists of those fprmers who 
have borrowed from the PCA and 
hav« paid £5 per share for class E 
stock for each $100 they borrowei 
None but members mav borrow, and 
no replicant pays for his shares until 
he has received his loan. 

All these loans are made upon good 
security for periods of 6 months, 9 
months, or a year, depending upon 
when the member expects to have in- 
r.'.we *w"v. which he may renay his 
loan. Rep!ice"-.er:t= 1-c-ing mare fvora 
nunint or occasional marketing of 
farm products are weekly ranging up 
to several thousand dollars. 

Renewals may be h?d in eases 



two children left Monday for their where there is sufficient security and 
home at Hibbing after visiting a week th» borrower has sImti , SvC 
with Mr. Evenson's parents, Mr. and „n n effort tn »tf.f ^ willinAess 
Mrs. Charles Evenson, and with Mrs. These loans ire not t \, Dhh ™? om , 

fnTerson 3 "*' ^ ^ ^ M fi*«™*^^lJ?5X 
^.naerson. I soecml arrangements to •' meet the 



iuiaa ijurraine zjenmer arrwea Mon- ^. m ,n, D ,-*„„4.:„l. i. I . . . . *" c 

day from Crookston_and splat brief £™V±°^ J^ : » r j: "iT 1 ^ !». ,s ,- 



Miss Lorraine Zellmer arrived Mon. 

u»y from Crookston and sjient brief :,,„„- i..-. t y,-""-~" "* J ?"-T 

time visiting with Miss Alice Lar- ' 1"^' , ' ,^A VI earn ">ire from which 
son and other friends. For the past ' TV the treasury of the local 
year Miss Zellmer has taught school "! !, oc ' atlon *J b : uld "P a guaranty 

„-..- „ _ near Crookston. l a nd reserve fund, and to pay future 

long advertising sign ho was town** > Mrs. Lloyd Johnson and son' spent ,r e ,r when * h e! reserve is huilt 
Prank Faulkner, veteran flier, erssfc- Iast week en d visiting Mrs. Johnson's ' „"-f , VT C ™\ , !, tne ""tstendlno- 
ed--at the Wold-Chamherlala flsU II ' Pf r S ntS rV. M T- and M «- H. F. Hanson ™?^.f I l oans L" the 88 

aa--auto' E vrn P»,,iVtT=. ^ ^^Is^i I at st - HilWre. ,v | associations amounted to S2.109.000, 

ininor iS talSv^. th ,%£££ Mrs - Ma ^ Stenberg, Arthur, Otto,l on J ^V^> an<J at i«> a t time there 1 
irrffi fl= Ji T 7, i ,?SiTS^I and ^ea Stenberg motored to Roseau I were 6 - 504 b °irowers. 

into flames and was demollshsi m S)! on Sunday and spent the day visfttag <„,„„ "•' h— v 

, with friends. y visiting shop.in your easy-chair by reading 

' • the message of Forum advertisers. | 



Miss Elva Overwold returned Sun- 
day from Fargo, where j she visited 
with her sister for a. week. 

Miss Alice Parnow of iThief River 
Falls spent "Sunday at the home of 
her parents Mr. and Mrs. Otto Par- 
now. I 

Miss Elva Overwold is spending a 
few days at the C. Hjelle home. 

Misses Dorothy Korstad and Viv- 
ian Johnson were among the guests 
at the Victor McLeod home in .Good- 
ridge Tuesday night. The party was 
in honor of Miss Helen Kast who is' 
leaving for the Cities soon. 





Thief River Falls 
Seed House 



Oen's Grocery 1 

28Z 



\ 



aisins 



Thompson's Seedless 
4 lbs. 



MATCHES, Six Box Carton 



.<£_ 



23c 



Dessert Jell 



Land O' Lakes, 

All Flavors. 

6 for 



25c 



Salmon 

Tall Pink 
2 foi- 

■Ski <*t9^w 



Land O' Lakes 

Cheese 

2 lb. box 

43c 



Peaberry 

Coffee 

3 lbs. 

59c 

Finest Flavor and 
Quality 



NECTIN;, Large 8 ounce bottle 



10c 



Rolled Oats, 9 lb. bag 



29c 



Cocoa, j Our Family Bran d, 2 lbs. 10c 

Imitation VANILLA Extract, 8 oz btl. 25 c 



WATERMELONS, large size 



Phone 169 



"TRADE AT PEN 'S AND SAVE* 1 
We AppfeS^gHtour Business. 



of ?10,000. 



55c 



Fre& Delivery 






i 


■■■! 






!' 













DEFECTIVE PAG£ 




Thief ftiVsR falls forum, thief ftiVEft falls, MiMtresof A.Tauit6t>AV julv is, 1934 



MINNESOTA NEWS 




Warren — A Marshall county taMp 
organization was perfected her*. ' | 

Comfre^— Eleven silver foxes, ral» , 
ued at ?90D, were stolen from Kruegw | Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Holte return- 
brothers' fur farm. led Sunday, evening from the Twin 
department has Pi ' Hm ™^--- «—• —■»—-> - 



Duluth— The war 
approved an allotment of $22,000 for 
the Duluth district for general examin- 
ations, surveys and contingency 

Mound— Two thousand poraong 
gathered here for the celebration of 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of tttf 
founding of the Catholic church her*. 

Thief River Fails— More than 500,- 



Cities where they enjoyed a several 
days' vacation. 
r Mrs. Kenneth Upton of Rockford, 
i Illinois, arrived last week and is visit- 
1 ins for sveral days with her father, 
Mr. C. J. Lundgren. 
1 Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Stb^berg ar- 
rived' Monday from tneir home at 
Detroit, Michigan to be the guests 



Dear Editor: 

It is now quite a while since I pro- 
mised the people of Rocksbury Town- 
ship that at some time during the 
summer there would be staged a sec- 






_k_ 



HAS BRIDGE LUNCHEON 

entertained 



Mrs. Mary V. Shaw cnierwunua ■ m * J 

_._.„ several of her friends a; a one o'clock ! Ness and family of Thief River Falls, 

ond Political Rally in Valhall Hall, at bride luncheon on Saturday at herI Robert ^ awes of Norden and Oscai 

which time all aspirants for public home. Bridge formed Mnsk " Al ' - — ■"*" * u " Ai - X - "'-■ :t: L iL - 

offices would again liave the oppor- of the\aftemoon. I 

tunity to meet the Rocksbury voters V — 

on neutral grounds, without running FORMER RESIDEN 

from farm to farm peddling cards for REUNJOT<i 

v "* es - I Word was rfteived this past week 

Arrangements are now under way that approximately 50 * — - - 



- ... „ _, former Thief 

for .jpvral H«v* «t tfc« »,n«- ^f m« >^ i \. a . bl ££6 r » and more inspirations River Falls residents, who are now in 
000 pounds of woo! has been~pooW SLfs&bSS after'^Wch^y^li j If tto^eVe"* "^ '"^ -''- -'^ ° f ^ ^^ ^^ 



J. Lund. 

Austin— Hall broke 40 to E0 win- 
dows in homes In Mapleview addi- 
tion, a suburb north o£ Austin, and 
damaged crops north of Austin nn« 
near Brownsdale. 

Northfield— Hurled 85 feet into til* 
Cannon river when a diving platform 
collapsed as he was about to dhffc ,„„„„., „„ 
Don Poster of Hastings 14. recovering Twin Cities' 

,ro ; l '° 1 ™ 1 !?h, u , ries - i „ J I Mr - and M «- Edward N °t° >«t 

Winona— A public works adminia- I Sunday for Detroit Lakes where they 
tration loan and grant of 5298,000 for ' will enjoy a few days vacation, 
a school was changed to a grant of They will also visit with relatives at 
$84,500. The grant is 30 per cent' of 1 Gary, Minn. 

. . Mi , g ^ Fran j c Tunberg, and sons 

] Roger_ anci Wallace left Sunday eve- 




SANDERS 



Mr. ami Mrs. Berlin Hoium daugh- 
ter Lorraine and Edith Yonke of 
Thief River Falls were dinner guests 
at the E. A. Yonke home Sunday. 

Miss Lovness, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 



the diversion ! Mosbeck spent the 4th visiting at the 
Nels Swanson home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vern Miller are re- 
joicing over the arrival of a baby 



TS HAVE 



cording to figures of Manager Robert l Mr. and ; Mrs. Joe/ Soderbeg, and to furnish whoever they choose, to . - —o- ^ 

daughter Patricia Jane, and Florence say whatever they please in defense of ENTERTAIN - FOR OUT OP Tnww 
Furan left Sunday for Detroit Lakes the rmrty and platform. Ample time GUESTS I ur_luWiN 

where they will spend a week's vaca- ' will be given each speaker. Lots will Mr?. Nate Harris and Mrs P W 
tlon - ' I , be di-awn to see who speaks»first and .MSbey entertained a group of' friend* 

C. H. Jung and daughter Harriet last. Notice will be served on the ut the former's home on iFriday after- 
returned -.. -Wednesday from a 10-dav speakers not to indulge into a mud- noon in compliment to Mrs A T 
trip during which they attendedthe shnging talk, but to give the public Grotte and daughter Helen of Mm- 
""'""' " a fair and square synopsis of the neapolis, Mrs. Doris Ha'lvorson Pope 

parties principles as the effect the of this city and Mrs. Pope's mother 



World's Fair, and made stops at Fon- 
du-lac, Medford, and Lacy smith, -Wis- 
consin, Davenport, Iowa and the 



the cost of labor and material, 

St. Paul— At least six weeks* work 
will be required before any report OB 
the investigation into alleged mlsuso 
of PWA funds in Minnesota can >• 
made, Capt. Robert Radford, In charffB 
of the probe, reported. 

St. Paul — Uncle Sam has bought a 
total of 636,293 head of catte In Mia- 
nesota. North and South Dakota aa4 
Wisconsin In the campaign to rella»« 
the drouth situation, it was announc- 
ed at University Firm. I 
I Willmar— Willmar's old curfew or«- 
fiance has been dug up and Its strict 
enforcement in the future has be'sa 
ordered. A special whistle has beea 
placed on the municipal plant and : It 
will be blown each day. ;' 

Crookston — Red River valley crop 
conditions have improved remarkably 
the last few weeks, making the vall'«y 
as a whole the garden spot of the 
northwest, reports T. M. McCall of tbtj 
Northwest Experimental station. | 

Hutchinson— Disappointed when hit 
offer of marriage was refused, Georgt 
F. Flmoh, 34, farmer, shot and wound- 
ed Opal Krasen, 16, former Hutchin- 
son girl, and then killed himself. Th« 
shooting occurred In Minneapolis. J 

Minneapolis — After ■" the case had 
been delayed several times, Congrese 
man Francis Shoemaker appeared la 
Municipal Court and paid the ?50 An© 
imposed upon him after he had beea 
convicted of disorderly conduct dar- 
ing the truck drivers strike. ] 
St. Paul— Minnesota beer drinkem 
paid S7,247,3y0 in federal taxes on <V 
933,570 gallons of beer during tltt 
12-month period ending June 30, £» 
seph Wolf, collector of- internal ro70» 
nue reported. The heaviest consume ! 
tion came In June, 1934, when 9,39f> ' 
632 gallons were taxed. I | 

Luverne— The final encampment flf 
the Southwestern Minnesota Grand 
Army of the Republic probably wffl 
be conducted In WIndom In 1935. D&'. 
banding of the organization is nnd«r ! 
consideration, because of the decreasa 
in membership and the resulting 
heavier financial burden for rar- 
vlvors. ! / I 

Wheaton— For the first time in ttS 
corporate existence of more than Q 
half century, the village of WheataB 
has been assured of an adequate wi> 
ter supply. A new well drilled osi 
mile east of the village Is testing afr 
most 500 gallons per minute and wffl 
produce water in sufficient quantity 
to care for a town 10 times its its*, 
Minneapolis — Recruiting of Mlnni- 
sola's 7,500 new CCC members to b« 
assigned to 70 CCC ' camps in tin 
northwest continues at the U. S. army | 
recruiting office In federal building; ] 
The new corps members, most of 
them under 20, will remain In campa ! 
until Sept. 30. They are the stated ! 
share of 50,000 new men being added 
to CCC units in northwest states as 
a part of the federal government^ , 
drouth relief program. I I 

Redwood Falls— The seventh distrts* 
encampment of the Veterans of Fol^ 
eign Wars, with 208 delegates and at- 



Amei-.ian citizen with equality, , and Mrs. G. Halvorson of 

square deal to "11 alike. The -afternoon was spent 

Ample notice will be given the pub- Preeiation at the close 

lie in order to set aside other acti- two-course luncheon wa 

vities, if they choose to partake in a tne hostesses, 
true non-partisan Political Rally, 

staged for the public's benefit to get a BIRTHDAY PARTY 
square deal out of a Political Meeting. Several little friends 
Yours for a more enlightened citi- tne **• O- Norby home 
-' iA ■ ■ - - • afternoon to help lone 



Minneapolis. 

in music ap- 

of which a 

i served by 



girl born Sunday, July 8th. 

John Foster of Thief River Falls 
spent several days last week visiting 
at the Ernest Yanke home. 

Alma Johnson of Thief River Falls 
spent several days last week Isabelle 
Syverson while looking over her 
farming interests. 

Mr. ad Mrn. Victor Trsuehmann and 
children of Agder were guests at the 
Walfred Carlson home the 4th and 
helped Mrs. Carlson celebrate her 
birthday. 

Sunday dinner guests at the Wm. 
Ristau home were, Rev. and Mrs. V. 
E. Schroed«er and family and Lillie 
Johnson, Vivian Evelyn an J liou 
Votava of Thief River Falls. 



Marie, Lydia and Melvina Jablinske 
were visitors at the home of their 
grandmother, Mrs. Freida Meyers, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Eric Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Adolph Wold and family were Wed- 
nesday evening visitors at the Wal- 
fred' Carlson home. ^ 

Ed Thorstad of Thief River Falls 
and Axel Stark and Melvin Swen- 
son were visitors Friday evening at 
the Bert Thorstad home. 

Marina Yonke spent several days 
last week visiting at the" P. P. Reier- 
son home in Thief River Falls. 

t-rriinand Wilken who is employ- 
ed at the Nis Anton farm spent Sun- 
day at the home of his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gust Wilkens. 

OH Olson called -\t the R. H. Jab- 
linske home Suncay afternoon. 

Evelyn Votava . of Thief River 
Falls is making a short visit at- the 
home of her brother-in-law and sis- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ristau. . 



ning for the Twin Cities where they f- 6 "^,!" mattei 's pertaining to Pub 
will visit for several days with., We " are - _ __ _ 

and relatives. 

Violette Jacobson and 



Paul En gels tad. 



with, 

friends 

Miss Violette Jacobson and Miss 
Doris Wiener, who are employed in 
the city left Monday for Black Duck 
where they will spend a week's vaca- 
tion. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson, son 
Henry, and daughter Anna, Mrs. H. ^ 

Johnson, and Mrs. C. Lund-berg and ,., Dust storms get under the eye- 
son of Oakland, California, motored Illis °* a . £ reat man y people, and they 
to Roseau on Sunday and spent the are Ilkel y t° produce some major 
day visiting with friends. | casualties via the eye route, accord 



SOMETHING IN YOUR EVE? 
KEEP IT OPEN SAYS 'D9C 



brate her ninth birthday, 
luncheon was served at 
white appointed iable by 
the centerpiece of which 
and white birthday cake 
Mrs. Mary Shaw. The 1 
were Barbara, Betty Anne, and Mar- 
garet Jacobson, Joan Dahlquist, Mary 
and Edward" Chommie, Kathleen Scan- 

j Ion, Sonia Meyer, aln d Bennet 

. Ommodt. 



gathered at 

on Friday 

Norby cele- 

A delicious 

a green anc* 

Mrs. Norby 

was a green 

gift of 

little guest: 



Mrs. O. C. Paulson and children 
are enjoying a visit with Mrs. Paul' 
son's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jorgenson at Leeds, N. Dak. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Richards, daughter 
Ethel, Mrs. Thyra- Snyder and son, 
Donald, motored to Detroit Lakes on 
Friday and will spend some time 
vacationing there. 

Miss Eleanor Kelly is visiting for 
several weeks at the home of her 
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence Fournier at Red Lake 
Falls. 

Mrs. Dean Hollenshead of Bend*, 
Oregon, and "Mrs. H. H. Oerding of 
Coquille, "Oregon accompanied by Mrs. 
Eugene Grover of Glyndon, Minn., 
irrived Thursday for a visit wfflx 
Mrs. Minnie Shetler. Mrs. Hollenf 
jhead and Mrs. Oerding had previi 
ously attended the World's Fair and 
visited with relatives in Chicago and 
with Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Grover 
at Glyndon. ■* 

Roy Lambert motored to Baudette 
Sunday, and his son George return 
ed home with him the same day. 

Harry Severson spent a several 
days vacation in the Twin Cities last 
week. 

Miss Margaret Wiener is vacation- 
ing this week at Black Duck. 

Clarence O. Erickson left Sunday 
for Minneapolis where he will spend 
a week in connection with his new 
duties as Norwestern Minnesota re 
presentative with the Lee Overall 
Company. 

Marvin Peterson of Plummer was in 
the city on business on Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Prugh spent 
Wednesday in Duluth on matters of 
business. 

Miss Htjlen Grotte, and her mother. 
Mrs. A. T. Grotte of Minneapolis left 
Saturday for their home at Minnea- 
polis after having been guests since 
Tuesday at the L. C. Poue home. 

Mrs. O. Laura, Mrs. John Houghum 
and Esther and Milferd Houghum 
motored to Hendrum on Sunday and 1 
spent the day with friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Axel Hagan and Mr 
and Mrs. William Barstad of Ray. N 
Dak., and Mrs. Jacob Berg of Ken 
nedy left Tuesday after spending v 
short time visting Mrs. Barstad'i 
aunt. Mrs. H. O. Rod in this city. 

Miss Arline Zellmer of Hill City 
Minnesota, arrived Monday and h 
visiting this week with her friend 
Miss Jean Mellby. 

Mrs. G. Halvorson of Minneapolis 
arrived last week and is visiting for 
an extended time with her daughter, 
Mrs. Doris Halvorson Pope. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mitchell and 
daughter Lois of Plummer were Tues 
day visitors in the city. 

Miss Elizabeth Jorde left Sunday 
for Grand -Forks where she will en- 



HIGHLANDING 



ing to a bulletin from the Minnesota . 

„ u ,-.f tate Medical Association issued to-| Ed. Korstad purchased! a new Ford 
Pete . da y- | V-8 last week. I 

The following instructions for re-;' The young folks of this community 
moval of foreign bodies from the eye enjoyed- a party at the > Geo. Gunder- 
ball are given in the bulletin so as to so n home Saturday night, 
avoid the serious infections that too 1 Alvin Klemmentson (motored to 
often result from bungling, amp- . Thief 'River Falls Saturday night, 
teur attempts to get them out. | Miss Cora Krause and Charles 

First When you feed something ' Krause of Thief River Falls visited at 
strike your eye, try not to close your tne Martin Johnson home Sunday, 
lids. Sudden forceful closing of your Mr - an<1 Mrs - Benny Howard motor- 
Ii& may furthur embed the particle ed T J'? Goo d rid ge Monday, 
in the eyeball. i Edward • Korstad spent 1 a few days 

Hold, the ..depart with your ^fin- ' ^Th^Ri ve'r VJuf I""" 1 ^^ 



Mr. and Mrs. S. '"Sic! 



gers. The sudHeh- rush of tears which 

natures provider will help flush it out. i j, n „ M „ n „ lft _ ,- i , . _ i¥ 

o„ nT „i. T* +u tt ™ *.• ■ daughter Dolores motored to Gatzke 

fcecond: If the same stinging sen- Sunday I 

twc 0n hilH St von? 6 l,« f tei * 1 ", in 'i te °i' ! Mr ' and Mrs ' 0tt0 Parnow and fam- 
™« ?K S n> t '. l00k and ,ily enjoyed an outing at Red Lake on 

grasp the lid m its central portion. Sunday j 

S°nnS U V ft fi h t» 1 UPPer iJ i n ° Ver th ^ l0W ; Mr - a ' nd Mrs ' A " Johnson motored to 
er one, roll the eyeballs upward and Thief River Falls Saturday. 

WW? 6 Up , Pei i d ' ThG 6d P °l th ^ Miss Elva Overwold returned Sun- 
}S™ n ^i°% ,1? f -I m ?u y brU8h ?7 dfl y from Far e°- whew! she visited 
the particle if it is unter the upper hd with her sister for « wpp* 
T ry it two or three times if necessary, 



Daylight in Muscumi 
Swedish museums duve a system of 
artlncial lighting for exhibit hulls, so 
that pictures ami other objects are 
seen' as if In clear daylight, 
C .^_ 



If these maneuvers are unsuccess- 
ful, it is probable that the foreign 
body is embedded in the cornea, the 
shiny portion immediately in front of 
the pupil, an area on which you should 
keep hands off. 

The doctors especially warn against 
allowing any one to Use a knife or a 
pocket handkerchief or a toothpick. 
That's the way grave infections 
which sometimes result in impaired 
sight get into the eye. If several 
hours must elapse before you can 
get expert help, the bulletin advises 
application of plain boric acid oint- 
ment or plain petrolatum-not carbo- 
luted to the eyeball, in the meantime 
keeping the eyes closed and quiet. A 
spoonfull of castor oil or olive oil. 
sterilized by putting 'it into a cup 
which is in turn •phCceM in a pan of 
boiling water for 10 §r>-15 minutes 
and then cooled* completely, can be 
used instead. 



ternates from 16 posts and 2,000 meni- • J ov a visit with < relatives. 



A group of girls are enjoying, 
week's outing at the W. Parbst cott- 
age at Red Lake Narrows. Included 
in the group are Marion Sponheim 
Ebba and Helen Tweten, and Madge 
and Louise LaBree. 

Miss Kathleen Monsbroten left 
Sunday for Grafton, N. Dak. where 
she will spend a week visiting with 
friends and relatives. 

Mrs. {H. Halland, and daughters 
Marine, Celia, and Judith returned 
Tuesday evnjng after a several days 
trip to Fargo, N. D. and Gary, Minn. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson, son 
Reubin, and daughter Mabel left Fri- 
day on a 10-day trip during which 
time they will motor to the Iron 
Range and to Barron, Wisconsin, 
visiting with Mr. Johnson's relatives 
at the latter place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Evenson and 



bers and visitors in attendance, elecV 

ed the following officers: District 

commander, John W. Lauterback, Red- 
wood Falls; senior vicecommandtfv 

Ivar Neson, Willmar; junior vlceco» 

manderX Edgar Marcotte, Marahallj 

Judge adVocate, George Barnes, Rec- 

wood Pails; quartermaster, Christ. 

Paulson, Tracy. I 

Frazee — One bite from a piece Of 

"candy" nearly proved fatal for Loulii 

Rebholz, prominent farmer of HobEli^ 

near here. While in & store hss% 

Rebholz picked up a toy Fourth oC 

July torpedo and mistaking it for at 

piece of candy, took a bite of It. tt 

exploded. When the smoke cleared 

away, Rebholz' injuries Included flt 

teeth missing, upper lip and part «C{ 

tongue torn off, roof of mbuth ■hti>' 

tered, lower jaw mangled and movBfc 

split open from ear to ear. j 

St. Paul — Appointment of NeCUhB 

Harris, engineer for the board of **tfr. 

mate and taxation, as state engiBMJr 

and director of the work dlvlaloa 4f 

the state emergency relief admlsi^' 

tration was announced by L. P. Sn%> 

merman, assistant administrator. I . I year Miss Zellmer has taught'school asi \ n ciauon to build up a guaranty 
Minneapolis— Unable to rel«ue e near Crookston. . and reserve fund, and to pay future 

long advertising sign he was toviaft ' Mrs. Lloyd Johnson and son spent , Vlden ot ? when thp reserve is built 

Frank Faulkner, veteran flier, enufc- lasfc week e "d visiting Mrs. Johnson's " •? i * P( T C m I , , fche ""tstandfno- 

ed:-at the WoH-Ohamherlata 0.U M. ' ^if^/ 1 " 1 Mrs ' H - F - H ™» . S^itl^^Sed"™ Kim'oOO 

Sr^ n l r ^ n ^ l 22l ^.^Stenbers, Arthur, Otto, l°" *!».•;» -ndrtffiS timfther ! 
i SJS « f y ' * *?* ~*t and In ea Stenberg motored to Roseau I were 5 ' 504 •'""owers. I 

[into flames and was demolish* * f ! . on Sunday and spent the day visS =u„„ • : — ^ 

with friends. y visiting Shop.m your easy-chair by reading 

I 'he message of Forum advertisers. I 



D C A BORROWERS ARE 
REPAYJNGJHFIR LOANS 

Many of Minnesota's 1509 PCA 
norrowers have already bejruri to re- 
lay their loans, using-the opportlmit'.- 
make partial repayments, savs E. 
". Johnson, Vice-President of the 
Production Credit Corporation of St. 
Paul, which supervises the 88 assoc- 
iations in the 7th district. 

This state had 1,695 members on 
Tune 20, including members who had 
ioined at the time of organizing the 
associations in order to get them 
■roing, but who d'id not at that time 
any loans. On June 20 the loans to 
Minnesota members amounted to 
$828,000, the average loan in this 
state being S542 per borrower. Mem- 
ebrship consists of those fprmers who 
have borrowed from the PCA and 
hav« paid $5 • per share for class P 
stock for each $100 they borrowe-i 
None but members^ may borrow, and 
no pplicant pays for his shares until 
he has received his loan. 

All these loans are made upon good 
security for periods of 6 months, 9 
months, or a year, depending upon 
when the member expects to have in- 
I""' '""" which he may renay his 
loan. Rep'nce>-.er:l= 1-eing rrmfie from 
ciirunt or occasional marketing of 
farm products are weekly ranging up 
to several thousand dollars. 

Renewals may be " 



two children left Monday for their wlS; e "th"eVe to"ZumcleSt icm-ity^and 
home at Hibbmg after visiting a week tho Wrower l>as shown , a .will n-ness 
with Mr. Evenson's parents, Mr. and *md [effort to m„=f v," IV- lm ^ ess 
Mrs. Charles, Evenson, and with Mrs. Th4e loans are n„f J'\ obh * ?n ' lons . 
Evenson's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carl with '4mergencv" loi= ponfused 
Anderson i . emer eency loans made under 

Miss Lorraine Zellmer arrived Mon- 1 £ ou th Sr,* 8 "\ ?& u th * 
day from Crookston and spent brief fnes, loans th'e™- 6 S , tr,CtIy S'.'l" 
time visiting with Miss Alice Lar- ■ "iu „„ ? *' Vi. I ln<?s f I om wWch 
son and other friends. For the past Yl'j ™J nto thetrrosury of the local 
year Miss Zellmer has taught .rhonl ass "Ciation to build up a guaranty 



with her sister for a week. 

Miss Alice Parnow of | Thief River 
Falls spent "Sunday at the home of 
her parents Mr. and Mrs. Otto Par- 
now. I 

Miss Elva Overwold is spending a 
few days at the C. Hjelle home. 

Misses Dorothy Korstad and Viv- 
ian Johnson were among the guests 
at the Victor McLeod home in Good- 
ridge Tuesday night. The party was 
in honor ,of Miss Helen Kast who is 
leaving for the Cities soon. 




Thief River Falls 
Seed House 

Telephone 55-W 




Oen's Gro 





Thompson's Seedless 
4 lbs. 



28c 



MATCHES, Six Box Carton 



23c 



Dessert Jell 



Land 0' Lakes, 

All Flavors. 

6 for 



25 



c 



Salmon 

Tall Pink 
2 for 



Land O' Lakes 



2 lb. box 



Peabcrry 

Coffee 

3 lbs/ 

59c 

Finest Flavor and 
Quality 



NECTINi Large 8 ounce bottle 



10c 



Rolled Oats, 9 lb. bag 



29c 



Cocoa, Our Famil^Bran d. 2 lbs. 19c 

Imitation VANILLA Ext ract, 8 ozbtl. 
WATERMELONS, large size 



25c 
55c 



Uft|t£f flOiOOO. 



: { "TRADE AT GEN'S AND SAVE' 
Phone 169; ■-■■! We Af^fSESp^l'our Business. 



Fr^|' Delivery 




INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOrTTrf 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



A 




■iaKaaii 



MINNESOTA NEWS 



Warren— A Marshall county talMy 
organization was perfected bar*. 

Comfrey — Eleven silver foxes, 

ued at J900, were stolen from Kruefer 
brothers' fur farm. 

Duluth— The war department 
approved an allotment of $22,000 
the Duluth district for general 
atlons, surveys and contingent!! 

Mound— Two thousand parapi 
gathered here for the celebration of 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of ' tta 




Thief fefVER tAilsfdkm, jsifig SiVgft fALta, tfflWgsofA.fgpft^r>A : g my a, mi 









^rr^^-i^T; 



Mr. andlMrs. A. M. Holte return- 
ed Sunday!" evening, from the Twin 
mmm Cities, where they enjoyed a several 
j^ days' vacapon. 

' Mrs. Kenneth Upton of Rockford, 
Rlinois, arrived last week and is-visit- 
ing for sveral days with her father," 
Mr. C. J. Lundgren. 

Mr. and i Mrs. Alvin Sttriberg ar- 
rived* Monday from tneir home at 



founding of the Catholic chnrrh hHZ ^ vea Mon11a y lTom tne >r home at 
■fhl.f %.„.. T^r „.„^*. h l? , ,P et " i t. Michigan to be the guests 



In the Rostrum 



Dear -Editor: .' 

It is now quite a. while since I pro 
raised the people of Rocksbury Town- 
ship that at some time during the 



HAS BRIDGE |LUNCHEON 

-■-■„. ,„ t . - Mrs. Mary V. Shaw entertained 

summer there would be staged a sec- several of her friends at a one o'clock 
ond Political Rally in Valhall Hall, at bride luncheon on Saturday at her 
which : time all aspirants for public home. Bridge formed ' the diversion 
offices .would- again have the oppor- of the afternoon. :! 

tunity to meet the Rocksbury voters ; oi— '■] 

on neutral grounds, without running FORMER RESIDENTS HAVE 
fromjfarm to farm peddling cards for , REUNION 
v "* ea - I Word was received this past week 
„,™.r in„.,„<„,„ »„ „» ,». „,„.,.„ Arrangements are now under way that approximately i 50' former Thief 

cording to figures of Manager Robert I Mr. and? Mrs. Joe Soderbeg, and to furnish whoever they choose, to _____ — o— ■ I 

a ■ « „ . I daughter. Patricia Jane, and Florence say whatever they please in defense of ENTERTAIN - POr! OTiT rtv Tnww 

Austin— Hail broke 40 to 50 wi_- Imuran Irft Sunday for Detroit Lakes the party and platform. Ample time laalAl *> *o^ OUr-OF-TOWN 

dows in homes In Mapleview addl- ,whe re tBTeywill spend a week's vacs,-' will be given each speaker. Lots will Mrs. Nate Harris! and Mrs P W 

tlon, a suburb north of Austin, an* bon - ; J : I be -ia™ to see -who speaks first and Mabey entertained a' group of ' friends 

damaged crops north of Austin an* C - H.-Jiing and daughter Harriet last Notice will be served on the at the former's home on (Friday after- 

nea/ Brownsdale. I returnedvWedaesday from a 10 Jay speakers not to indulge into a mud- noon in compliment to Mrs A T 

NoVthfleld— Hurled 85 feet into lh» Mp duri *g,; which they attended the slinging talk, but to give the public Grotte and daughter Helen of Min-' 

Cannon river when a divinz „Iarft£» F°, rid ".£*&• and ->SS de stoDS at Fon - " " r ■ - 8 9 nare synopsis of the neapolis, j Mrs. Doris' Halvorson Pope 

... . " ™ en a alvu « Platform d u-lac, Medfbrd, andYatysmith, Wis- Parties principles as the effect the of this city and Mrs. Pope's motheV 

consin, Davenport, Iowa and the fimer.< an citizen \vith equality, .ind Mrs. G. Halvorson I of : ! Minneapolis 



SANDERS 



_i 

Mr^ an<5 Mrs. Berlin Hoium ~,daugh* 
ter Lorraine and Edith Yonke of 
Thief River Falls were dinner guests 
at the.E. iA. Yonke home Sunday. 

Miss Ldvness, Mr. and Mrs". Harry 
Ness and family of Thief- River Falls, 
Robert Dawes of Norden and Oscar 
Mosbeck- spent the 4th visiting at the 
Nels . Swansoh home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vern Miller are re- 
joicing over the arrival of a baby 
girl born Sunday, July 8th. 

John Foster of Thief River Falls 
spent several days last week visiting 
at the Ernest Yanke home. 

Alma Johnson of Thief River Falls 
spent several flays last week Isabelle 
Syverson while looking over her 
farming interests. 



Marie, Lydia: and Melvina Jablinske 
were visitors at the home of their 
grandmother, Mrs. Freida Meyers, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Eric Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Adolph Wold ;and fatipily were Wed- 
nesday evening rvisitofs at the Wal- 
fred' Carlson home. --"■ 

Ed Thorstad of- Thief River Falls 
and Axel Stark and " Melvin Swen- 
son were visitors Friday evening at 
the Bert Thorstad home. 

Marina Yonke spent several days 
last week visiting at the P. P. Reier- 
son home in Thief River Falls. 

evrtinand Wilken who is employe 
ed at the Nis Anton farm spent Sun- 
day at the home of his parents, Mr— 
and Mrs. Gust Wilkens. 

' OH Olson called it the R. H. Jab- 
linske home Sund'ay afternoon. 

Evelyn Votava of Thief River 



collapsed as he was about to diva, 
Don Foster of Hastings li, recoverin. 
from internal injuries. 



school was changed to a grant 
. $84,500. The grant is 30 per cent 
the cost of labor and material. 



square deal to -11 alike. 



The afternoon was spent in music ap- 



Twih Cities! _ _ ^ 

w , j,, | Mr. and Mrs. Edward Nofo 'left Ample notice will be given the pub- preciation at the close: of which *a 

winona— a public works adminia- I Sunday for Detroit Lakes where they ncr in orde r to set aside other acti- two-course luncheon, was served by 

tration loan and grant of J298.000 tor> will enjoy a few' days vacation, "ties, if they choose to partake in a the hostesses. '. '{ 

of They will also visit with relatives at tnic non-partisan Political Rally, — o-r 

of j Gary, Minn. | staged for the public's benefit to get a BIRTHDAYi PARTY 



nM& ¥*?" y iCt0r Tl3uchmann and Falls is making a short visit at- the 
willw r A S der , were S?" 3 *? «' the hoxne of her Mother-in-law and sis- 

Sw?M~ arl r 0n i h ° me *,"£ 1 th - t nd ter, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ristau. 

helped Mrs. Carbon celebrate her 

birthday! 

Sunday dinner guests at the Wm. 
Ristau home were, Rev. and Mrs. V. 
E. Schroeder and family and Lillie 
Johnson, Vivian Evelyn ar.i Uob 
Votava of Thief River Falls. 



Daylight in Muienml 
Swedish museums liuve a system of 
artificial lighting for eshililt halls, so 
that pictures and other objects are 
seen as if in clear dnyllglit. 



Mrs. Frank Tunberg, and sons 



square deal out of a Political Meeting^- Several little friends I gathered at 



St Paul— At least six weeks' work Roger and' Wallace left'Sunday eve-' Yours for a more enlightened ciU- the B. O. Norby hdmej on Friday 
111 he rpnnirAii iiarn» a o„ w -„ « l nino- fn* th* Trd n rs*-; a « n.1.^^^ *i.„.. zenary in matters Dertnininn- fn Pnh_ afternoon to help lone i Norbv colp. 



: P 



will be required before any report p* 
the Investigation into alleged misdtW 1 
• of PWA funds in' Minnesota can %• 
made, Capt. Robert Radford, in charflt 
of the probe, reported. i 

St. Paul — Uncle Sam has bought;'* 
total of 636,293 head of catte In Min- 
nesota, North and South Dakota ski 
; Wisconsin- in the campaign to reltora 
the drouth ^uation, it was annotiB*- 
' ed at University Farm. I 

Wnimar^-WUlmar's old curfew ordi- 
nance haa heen dug up and its Btrtot 
enforcement In the future has beta 
. ordered. A special whistle has bej 
places on the municipal plant and 
1 will he blown each day. 

Crookston — Red River valley crop 
conditions have improved remarkabiy 
the last few weeks, making the valley 
as a whole the garden spot of tat) 
northwest, reports T. M. McCall of tan 
Northwest Experimental station. I 

Hutchinson — Disappointed when bit 
offer of marriage was refused, Georg* 
P. Pimori, 34, farmer, shot and wonnoV 
ed Opal Krasen, 16, fortner Hutchin- 
son girl, and then killed himself. Ta» 
shooting occurred In Minneapolis. I 

Minneapolis — After the case had 
been delayed several times, Congreia 
man Francis Shoemaker appeared in 
Municipal Court and pafd the $50 flno 
imposed upon him after he had bean 
convicted of disorderly conduct dni* 
ing the truck drivers strike. j 

St. Paul— Minnesota beer diinkeia 
paid ?7,247,3y0 in federal taxes on 4V 
933,570 gallons of beer during ^ftigT 
12-month- period ending June 30, £•*> 
seph Wolf, collector of internal rtnrft* 
nue reported. The neaviest consum^ 
tlon came In June, 1934, when f,30& 
632 gallons were taxed. I 

Luverne — The final encampment «f' 
the Southwestern Minnesota Gnat 
Army of the Republic probably wfll 
be conducted In Wlndom In 1935. Da> 
banding of the organization Is nndtr 
consideration, heca-cse of the decrease 
In membe'rship and the resnltlaf 
heavier financial burden for nr> 
vivors. | (' 

Wheaton— For the first time In ttt 
corporate existence of mora than ■ 
half century, the village of Wheatot) 
has been assured of an adequate wa> 
ter supply. A new well drilled oaW 
mile east of the village Is testing al- 
most 500 gallons per minute and wttl 
produce water in sufficient quantity 
to '■ care for a town 10 times It» ilia, 
Minneapolls-i-Recruiting of MInna» - 
sola's 7,500 new CCC members to bin 
assigned to 70 . CCC camps in tfca 
northwest continues at- the U. 3. army 
recruiting office in federal building 
The new corps members, most flt 
them under 20, will remain In campa 
until Sept. 30. They are the state** 
share "of 30,000 new men being added 
to ! CCC units in northwest states aa' 
a part' of the federal governmentia 
drouth relief program, \ 

Redwood Falls — The seventh diatriat 
encampment of the Veterans of Foft 
elgn Wars, with 208 delegates and al- 
ternates from 16 posts and 2,000 rneri- < 
bers and visitors in attendance, elee^ 
ed the following officers: District 
commander, John W. Lauterhack, Red- 
wood Falls; senior •vlcecommandet'a 
Ivar Neson, Willmar; Junior vicecon*- 
mander, Edgar Marcotte, Marshalli 
judge advocate, George Barnes, Red- 
wood Falls; quartermaster, Chrlft 
Paulson, Tracy. j 

Frazee^One bite from a piece Ofi 
"candy" nearly proved fatal for Lonla 
Rebholz, prominent farmer of Hohait 
near here. ' While in a store hefa» 
Rebholz picked up a toy Fourth at 
July torpedo and mistaking It far a 
piece of candy, took a bite of It M\ 
exploded. When the smoke cleared, 
away, Rebholz' Injuries Included 9# 
teeth missing, upper lip and part 4fj 
tongue torn off, roof of mouth aha»> ; 
tered, lower jaw mangled and moaaV 
split open from ear to ear. ! 

St. Paul— Appointment of NataaB 
Harris, engineer for the board of eaflfc, 
mate and taxation, aa state engineer 
and director of the work division ^ 
the state emergency relief admlat*> 
tration was announced by I*. P. Sba> 
merman, assistant administrator, j ■ 
Minneapolis— Unable to releasa • 
long advertising sign he was " -'-- 
Frank Faulkner, veteran flier. 



ning- for the Twin Cities where they f- 6 "^,? 1 matters pertaining to Pub 



Paul Engelstad. 



SOMETHING, IN YOUR EYE? 
KEEP IT OPEN SAYS 'DOC 



will visit for several days with hc WeIfa re. 
friends and: relatives. 

Miss Violette Jacobson and Miss 
Doris Wiener, who are employed in 
the city left Monday for Black Duck 
where they will spend a week's vaca- 
tion. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson, son 
Henry, and daughter Anna, Mrs. H. -_ 
Johnson, and Mrs. C. Lund'berg and ,. Dus t storms get under the eye- 
son of Oakland, California, motored lu4j ?.* a .' srfia.' many people, and they 
to Roseau on Sunday and spent the • are Ilke 'y to produce some major 
day visiting with friends. I casualties via the eye route, accord- 

Mrs. 0. C. Paulson and children ™B -to a bulletin from the Minnesota 
are enjoying a visit with Mrs. Paul- \ S^te Medical Association issued to- 
son's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pete , " ay ; 
Jorgenson at Leeds, N. Dak. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Richards, daughter 



afternoon to help lone j Norby cele 
brate herninth birthday.! A delicious 
luncheon ,was served] at ja green anc 
white appointed ijble byi Mrs. Norby 
the centerpiece of which 'was a green 
and white birthday I cake, a gift of 
Mrs. Mary Shaw. The Uittle guests 
were Barbara, Betty! Anne, and Mar- 
garet Jacobson, Joan Dahlquist, Mary 
and Edward Chommie; Kathleen Scan- 
Ion, Sonia Meyer, a;nd Bennet 
Ommodt. ; | ; 

I HIGHLANDENG ~ I 



Ethel, Mrs. Thyra Snyder' and" son, 
Donald, motored to Detroit Lake3 on 
Friday and will spend some . time 
vacationing" there. 

Miss Eleanor Kelly is visiting for 
several weeks at the home Of her 
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. -and 
Mrs. Lawrence Fournier at Red Lake 
Falls.' 

Mrs. Dean Hollenshead of Bend*, 
Oregon, and: Mrs. H. H. Oerding of 
Coquille, "Oregon accompanied by Mrs. 
Eugene Groyer of Glyndon, Minn., 
irrived. Thursday for a visit with 
Mrs. Minnie Shetler. Mrs. Hollen- 
shead and, Mrs. Oerding had previ- 
ously attended the World's Fair and 
visited with relatives in Chicago and 
with Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Grover 
at Glyndon. 

Roy Lambert motored to Baudette 
Sunday, arid his son George return- 
ed home with him the same day. 

Harry Severson spent a several 
uays vacation in the Twin Cities last 
week. 

Miss Margaret Wiener is vacation- 
ing this week at Black Duck. 

Clarence O. Erickson left Sunday 
for Minneapolis where he will spend 
a week in connection with his new 
duties as Norwestern Minnesota re- 
presentative with the Lee Overall 
Company. 

Marvin&Peterson of Plummer was in 
the city on business on Tuesday. 

Mr. and* Mrs. Harry Prugh spent 
Wednesday in Duluth on matters of 
business. 

Miss Helen Grotte, and her mother. 
Mrs. A. T. Grotte of Minneapolis left 
Saturday for their home at Minnea- 
polis after having been guests since 
Tuesday at the L. C. Poue home. 

Mrs. O. Laura, Mrs. John Houghum 
and Esther and Milferd Houghum 
motored to Hendrum on Sunday, ant? 
spent the day with friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Axel Hagan and Mr 
and Mrs. William. Barstad of Ray. N 
Dak., and Mrs. Jacob Berg of Ken 
nedy left Tuesday after spending s 
short time visting Mrs. Barstad': 
aunt, Mrs. H. O. Rod in this city. 

Miss Arline Zellmer of Hill City 
Minnesota, arrived Monday and ii 
visiting this week with her friend 
Miss Jean Mellby. 

Mrs. G. Halvorson of Minneapolis 
arrived last week and is visiting* foi 
an extended time with her daughter, 
Mrs. Doris Halvorson Pope. 

Mr. and Mrs. John . Mitchell and 
daughter Lois of Plummer wereTues 
day visitors', in the city. 

Miss Elizabeth Jorde left Sunday 
for Grand rlForks where she' will en- 
joy a visit ..with relatives. . 

A group. ;of girls are enjoying. 
week's outing at the W. Parbst cott- 
age at Red Lake Narrows. Included 
in the group are Marion Sponheim 
Ebba and Helen Tweten, and Madge 
and Louise "LaBree. 

Miss Kathleen Monsbroten left 
Sunday fpr'Grafton, N. Dak. where 
she will spend a" week visiting with 
friends arid;. relatives. 

Mrs, H. Halland, and daughters 
Marine, Celia, and Judith returned 
Tuesday evhihg after a several days 
trip to Fargo, N. D. and Gary, Minn. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson, son 
Reubin, and daughter Mabel left Fri- 
day on a 10-day trip during which 
time they will motor to the Iron 
Range and to Barron, Wisconsin, 
visiting with : Mr. Johnson's , relatives 
at the latter place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Evenson and 



Ed. Korstad purchased a new Ford 
V-8 last week. I 

The following instructions for re-; The young folks of this community 
moval of foreign bodies from the eye enjoyed a; party at the v Geo. Gunder- 
ball are given in the bulletin so as to son home; Saturday night. 
avoid the serious infections that too 1 Alvihi Klemmentson .motored to 
often result from bungling, amp- , Thief River Falls Saturday night. ' 
teur attempts to get them out. Miss Cora Krause and Charles 

First When you feed something Krause of Thief River Falls visited at 
strike your eye, try not to close your "*£ Martin Johnson home Sunday, 
lids. Sudden forceful closing of your ^ r * am * M ^* Benny Howard motor- 
Iidu may furthur embed the particle ed T J? Goodridge Monday, j 
in the eyeball. j Edward ■ Korstad spent a few days 

Hold the lids apart with your fin- ' f—^^Si^VT* * ith frienda 
gers. The sudden rush of teara which fr ?£ ^Sl?- 3 ^ l^h. 



natures pro vide j will help flush it out. 
Second: If the same stinging sen- 
sation is still there after a minute or 
two, hold your head ererft, look and 
grasp the lid in its central portion. 
Now pull the upper lid over the low- 
er one, roll the eyeballs upward and 
release the upper lid. The edge of thej 



Mr. and Mrs. S. j Sien"-dnon »•■ 
daughter Dolores motored to Gatzke 
Sunday. | ; 

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Parnow and fam- 
ily enjoyed an outing at Red Lake on 
Sunday. ! ! 

Mr .and Mrs. A. Johnson motored to 
Thief River Falls Saturday. 

Miss Elva Overwold returned Sun- 



IMWr |aShe , S *"% E ™*?S °ay ^rOm-FarFo where 6 shT a vis1?ea 
the Particle if it is uncfer the upper lid with her sister for a Week. 
1ry_rttwo or three times if necessary. J - Miss .Alice Parnow of Thief River 

Falls spent "Sunday iat the home of 
her parents Mr. and! Mrs. Otto Par- 
now. | 

Miss Elva Overwold is spending a 
few days at the C. Hjelle home. 

Misses Dorothy Korstad and Viv- 
ian Johnson were among the guests 
at the Victor MeLeod home in Good-, 
ridge Tuesday night. The party was ' 
in honor of Miss Helen East who is", 
leaving for the Citiessooh. I 



If these maneuvers are unsuccess 
ful, it is probable that the foreign 
body is embedded in the cornea, the' 
shiny portion immediately in front of 
the pupil, an area on which you shonld 
keep hands off. 

The doctors especially warn against 
allowing any one to Use a knife or a 
pocket handkerchief or a toothpick. 
That's the . way grave infections 
which sometimes result in impaired 
sight get into the eye. If several 
hours must elapse 1 before you can 
get expert help, the bulletin advises 
application of plain boric acid oint- 
ment or plain petrolatum-not carbo- 
luted to the eyeball, in the meantime 
keeping the eyes closed and quiet. A 
spoonfull of castor oil or olive oil. 
sterilized by putting "it into a cup 
which is in turn placed in a pan of 
boilinq; water for 10 or IB minutes 
and then cooled 4 completely, can be 
used instead. 



D C A BORROWERS ARE 
REPAYINCJHEIR LOANS 

Many of Minnesota's 1509 FCA_ 
I'lorrowers have already begun to re- 
oas^their loans, usingHhe opportunity 
make partial repayments, says E. 
C. Johnson, Vice-President of the 
Production Credit Corporation of- St. 
Paul, which supervises the 88 assoc- 
iations in the 7th district. 

This state had 1,695 members on 
Tune 20, including members' who had 
ioined at the time of organizing the 
associations in order, to get them 
■roing, but who did not at that time 
any loans. On June 20 the loans to 
Minnesota members amounted to 
?828,000, the average loan in this 
state being $542 per borrower. Mem- 
ebrship consists of those fermers who 
have borrowed from the PCA and 
havn paid $5 per share for class B 
stock for each ?100 they borrowei 
None but members mav borrow, and 
no replicant pays for his shares until 
he has received his loan. 

All these loans are made upon good 
security for periods of 6 months, 9 
months, or a year, depending upon 
when the member expects to have in- 
; we ' r 7 which he may renay his 
loan. Replacer-erto l-cing matfe from 
oimtnt or occasional marketing of 
farm products are weakly ranging up 
to several thousand dollars. 

Renewals may be 



s*m to 



two children; left Monday ^for that wherelhere irsuffMent'security^and 
home at Hibbing after visiting a week th» borrower has shown » Sin LJ2 
with Mr. Evenson's parents, Mr: and »„d effort to 2»f ■ ^?. , P' ,in ™ ess 
Mrs. Charles 'EvensoS, and with Mrs. Tn™ lo^ns are ^ot r^V 61 ^ " 3 ., 

sees pa ? ents ' "*• and ^.^.^ssynV^'^rsss 

Miss Lorrafae Kilmer arrived Mon- ! TZth sKo^h^^H*' ^ 

day from Crookston and spent brief s"™ n . , w^^"' jL™- are "i™* 1 * b " s r 

,«me visiting with Miss Alice' Lar-'^f • !' £ e f arn ">Bs from which 

son and other friends. For the paat mU T°J nto J*e treasury of the local 

year Miss Zellmer has taught school aaR , oclat i°n to hmld up a gnaranty 

'near Crookstpn. . and reserve fund, and to pay future 

I Mrs. Lloyd Johnson and son spent' ^ en „'l s wnen the res erve is hunt 

last week end visiting Mrs. Johnson's un J? , _ i ne . r CPnt nf the outstanding 



parents, Mr. : and Mrs. H. P. Hanson "^P' 4 ?' stock. Total loans in the 88 

-'• «"■ TT -'- I - 3 . ^ .associations amounted to S2.I09 000 

Stenberg, Arthur, Otto, ' ^i"?-?^? v an ^ * 4 t^ 1 time there. 

D — T -nberg motored to Roseau I m 

on Sunday, and spent the day visiting! 




at St Hi 
Mrs. M: 



ed^at'the Wold-Chamberlahi 
: aSSgaiitOgyro. Faulkner escape! 

Ut jlO.OOO. I j| with friends.! - y ™'«ng. Shop.in your easy-chair by reading 



L i I with friends, ' 

i.l 




Thief River Falls 
Seed House 



pen's Grocery I 



Thompson's Seedless 
4 lbs. 



28c 



1MDATCHES, Six Box Carton 



\sert Jell 



Land 0' Lakes, 

All Flavors. 

6 for 



23c 

25c 



Salmon 



Tall 



Pink 



2for 




Peaberry 

Coffee 

3 lbs. 

59c 

Finest Flavor and 
Quality 



NJSCTIN^ Large 8 ounce bottle 

Rolled 



10c 



Cocoa, 



Oats, 9 lb. bag . . . a^c 
Our Family Brand, 2 lbs. 19c 



Imitation VANILLA Extract 8 oz btl. 25c 



Phlone 168 



^ATE^ELONS, large size 



"TRADE, Ajj^J'S AND SAVE" 
We Ap$ima0to\ir Business. 



55c 



Fr^JDaivery 



--!- 



I the message of Forum advertisers. 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 




!^--5>.t»-a>.^.wgj*^ 






■t^ ^ijfLi^g ^^ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



^gfe^^ 



£ 



TJiiEE fitViife FAILS g6ftt!M, Efligg- RiVSB FALLS.! MIMNfiSOTA. 



ki 



Thief River Falls Forum 

Official Paper of 'Pennington County 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

. Published Thursday of each| week by the 
Forum Publishing Company 

K. M. Aalbu and H. L. Schuster, Proprietors ! 
E. M. Aalbu, Editor. Bernice Berge, City E^iito 



Editorial Comment 

\ From Our Exchanges <r 



Citizens State Bank Building. Thief River Falls, Minn 



Subscription $1.00 per year in 



the United States. 



"Entered as second-class matter, April 27, 1932, a* 
the post office at Thief River Falls. Minnesota, undet 
Act of March 3, 1879." 



WHOSE FAULT IS IT, IF IT ISN'T MORE? 

Commence on Red '-Lake com tys share of the in- 
come tax ' recently distributed to t le school districts of 
the stete by the state tax commission, the Red Lake 
Falls Gazette deplores that the [distribution is nob 
larger. "The principal trouble- with the income tax, is 
that it does not bring in enough money," they state, "It 
■was estimated that the state would collect $'5,000,000 
the first year. Instead of that itj collected about one 
fifth." 

Our understanding of the announcement released 
by the tax- commission was that this distribution was of 
tne first half year's collections, sc that it would seem 
that the Gazette is only half right when they state that 
it failed to bring more than one-filth of the sum es- 
timated. . i-^Lsiafejafletittij 

The Gazette is one of those newspapers that are to 
blame for the income tax bringing less relief to the 
taxpayers. They were among the newspapers of the 
state which were listed in a poll of the state's papers 
as being opposed to .the statutoi-y income tax. It 
might be enlightening for the Gazette to also know that 
those members of the legislature vhich they have held 
up as model and examplary lawmakers that it would "be 
well for all other to emulate; sucl. as for instance. Mr. 
Hitchcock of Hibbing, opposed the income tax, and due 
to their efforts, the rate of taxatio i stops at 5 per cent 
on all incomes of $10,00.0 and over. The farmer-labor 
members favored* a higher rate on large incomes. Some 
of them -were quite outspoken in favor of as high as 
forty per cent, on incomes of hah! a million and over, 
Thanks /to Hihchcock,. Quinlivan, Kern, Pfaender and 
others the tax was hard enough to pass with the rate as 
it is. /With these men out of the running and with a 
splendid chance of electing a farrier-labor majority in 
'the next legislature, it. is possible that the Gazette will 
have to worry less about the sun brought into 
state's coffers by this tax in the future. 



PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT CURSES HIS OFFSRING 

The awful toll on human lives that is taken by the 

automobile was deplored, Saturday by President 

Roosevelt, who in commenting on .he situation said: 

"We cannot afford' to tempojrize with this pro> 

blem.. Those who use the highways must realize 

the responsibility they take when they take the 

wheel. Safer conditions of travel undoubtedly 

would contribute to the greater use of the high 

ways now that shorter working, hours, and more 

leisure time are assured by the National Recovery 

Act." 

In view of the fact that there are even now in mid- 
summer, some fifteen million unemployed, which is just 
about equal to the unemployment peak, the latter part 
of the president's .statement is an 
comment which we shall pass by. 
Kit A tizzies; three 'Barrow report;; bloody strikes and 
riots ir.-'iill parts- of/the country; and ever swelling re- 
lk-i lists, the presicen^ is still harboring any illusions 
nLcuut : jus much touted National Recovery Act, he is 
more sanguine than the most uninformed country bump- 
kin. : 

What we wish to call attenth n to at this, time is 
the fact that Mr. Roosevelt him; elf must accept the 
"blame for the major part of. the increase in automobile 



invitation to caustic 
If -after a year of 



fatalities. "..Motor. -.registrations h; 



(reds of "thousands of people who drove cars in the past 



can no".^longer..afford- tcF own them. 



ve dropped. Hund* 



B.ut automobile ac- 



GERMAN^S BATH OF BLOOD 
. (St. Paul Daily News) 



m 



THURSDAY JULY 5, W__L 



W. C T. U. NOJTE5 



As further details become known it appears that 
Hitler has been . quite thorough in cleaning his Nazi 
house. 

More than 100 former aids and leaders of the 
Brown Shirts have been summarily executed according 
to reports of eye witnesses. Substantiation b"f this is 
to be seen in the refusal of the government to make 
public the list after an earlier announcement th t it 
would be submitted. 

Germany has had its bath and it only remains to 
be seen whether the immersion will be sufiicient to ward' 
off other attempts to get rid of Hitler. 

Hitler, himself, is only a catspaw of a group of 
large industrialists who have held Germany in bondage 
since, if not before, the war. He built up his own fol- 
lowing and thereby became a useful person to the group 
which is engaged in exploiting the country. When he 
ceases to be useful, or it is deemed-time for a change of 
policy, Hitler will go the way of some of his subordin- 
ates. 

Meanwhile, no doubt, Clarence Darrow expressed 
the general feeling in this country and, perhaps, in- 
ternationally, when he hoped that Hitler would* soon 
get a dose" of his own medicine. 

It is more immediate importance to us, however, to 
be eternally on guard that Hilterism or some equiva^ 
lent does not get a foothold in our United States. An 
increasing number of half-wits here' are playing with 
the idea of some form of dictatorship. They might 
take a look at Germany today. If they enjoy this kind 
of government by terrorism and d*eceit, they should 
join Hitler. 



' them mere boys and girls* drop in for 
I casual drinks and even more casual 

L ; "necking'* . . . dimly lighter dance 

Large bodies move slowly. Public ' room . . . couples twist and writhe 
sentiment has been, and still is slow in drunken rythm to music . . . girl, 
to express iitself in relation to the re- apparently intoxicated', . dancing on 
suits of -repeal. Yet the tide of pro- top of table . . . couples dance clos- 
test is rising. The school authorities er .and closer . . . students of high 
of San Diego are shocked ^it the evils school obviously only 14 or 15 years 
and the defiant indecency of the le- old ... blond child of about 16 ia 
galized traffic. O. A. Darnell, one of dancing, skirts to her hips. Most .of 
the members of the school board is the girls appear to be of the nice 
quoted- in 1 vigorous denunciation of type to be found in West Side homes. 
present conditions. "In the old sa- The articles indicate that many of 
loon days/' he says, f'we had much the nice type of girls are led into the 
better regulations . to protect our vorte x of rum m these licensed gild- 
children. . Now every movement is for e( ** dens. 

liberalization. Those who voted for . An incipient tide of indignation 
repeal are|sorry. Thejresults are not and apprehension is rising. It may 
at all. what was expected. Condi- sweep on to a mighty flood. A 
tions are much worse noWj— crime and United Press dispatch under Wash- 
bootlegging have increased." ■ ington date line states that "wet and 
The truth is dawning enf the pco- dry Senate leaders' are agreed that 
pie. It blares from the pages even conditions resulting from repeal are 
of papers which were strong advo- intolerable, and that prohibition will 
cates of repeal only a few months soon return unless there is speedy 
ago. The! St. ** &ui Dail^ News re- improvement." The congressman who 
cently ran a series of j front-page ed- voted to declare 3.2 per cent beer 
itoiials which told- of thej denaueheny" non-intoxicating now see that the ac- 
of youth— --and even childhood in that tion was a blunder. Millions who 
city. In Chicago papers we read, voted to ratify repeal are now sick 
"Young men pnd women, some of at heart over the results. 



Minute: Sermons 

By Dr. Crawford Grays 

Eight great forces are con- 
tending for -the mastery of the 
world's youth: nationalism, 
sectarianism, cigarettism, com- 
munism, jazzism, commercial- 
ism, alcoholism and Christian- 
ity. 

It's alright to have different 
shells but only one aim — square 
shooting. 

Government control will nev- 
er take the place of self-con- 
trol. 

Slow growth is necessary for 
strong roots. 

Most of the injustices per- 
mitted locally and elsewhere 
will never be" arrested so long 
as so many ideas called justice 
enjoy liberty. 

Some ideas called "red" now, 
will be white one of these days. 




DRUNKEN DRIVERS 

(Pope County Tribune) 



According to W. G. Calderwood, Well known pro- 
hibition worker, deaths caused by drunken drivers have 
increased in van alarming pace since repeal . went into 
effect, it is estimated that the cost to the nation of 
the increased automobile Wrecks due directly to intoxi- 
cated* drivers h^s amounted to $70,000,000 for the first 
year. In checking up the utomobile accidents that 
nappen nowadays, the story seems always to be about 
the same, that the driver of one of the cars has been 
having too many beers or drinks. Even in Glenwood, a 
business man stated that he was awakened one night 
when a young man tied to wrap his car around a tele- 
phone post while under the influence of strong drink. 

Alcohol, gasoline and speed. will not mix and* soon- 
er or later the nation will be aroused. to the extent that 
no drunken or half drunken driver will be allowed to 
drive. 



MR. RICHBERG'S ERROR 
(Minneapolis Tribune) 

It is a little distressing to learn from Donald R. 
Richberg, chief counsel of the NRA, that the national 
recovery administration is without an answer, to the 
problem it purports tj solve. We refer, of : : course, to 
the problem oi keeping wages high for the workers^ 
prices low for the consumer, and protecting small en- 
terprises at all times from the burdensome consequences 
of special CDd*es. 

in commenting on the second Darrow report, Mr. 
Richberg said: "±-erhaps, before its labors are conclud- 
ed, the uoarJ will iurmsh its answer to ! the knotty ques-' Moscb.. _._ i .--- _ , _ 
tion as to how industry should be operatied to produce ' distribution under the live year plan, 
nigh wages for labor, low prices for consumers and at 'But in Moscow shops were thronged, 
the same time protect those small enterprises which can 1 in Paris ajhalf a dozen clerks -leaped to 



LEFT AND RIGHT COMES TO 
GRIPS IN FRANCE 

Condensed fom ■ "Tumult in 
France'] by Mathew Jjosephson 
in Common Sense magazine for 
' June, 1934, by R. M. jAalbu. 

Returning to western Europe from 
Russia, one undergoes a snock, as 
in descending from a ! ratified moun- 
tain air into the plains. Here in these 
cities, all ; the' worn, hypocritical lur- 
nishings of "bougeois" society are 
sail incredibly preserved. In the cafes 
and streets the prostitu ;es still ply 
their trade; the pimps are still ele- 
ganly dressed; tne stockbrokers on 
tneir-wayito tne bourse are ruddy and 
cheerful, though swarms j of beggars, 
greater than ever betore, beset the 
pedestrian from every hand. The most 
persistent among them,! the official 
agents oi": beggary who devote them- 
selves to i keeping the ; unemployed in 
their fixed condition of iiiisery. They 
call for alms in the name of the Ro- 
man church, the Salvation Army, the 
Red Cross or Hitler,; depending on 
me country. J- ] 

For a month 1 had 1 -; lived among a 
people so busy building cities of so- 
cialism that there was no time for 
charity nor for armies |of [unemployed. 
Nor "was the lethargic; pace of econo- 
mic activity in western Europe cred- 
ible after Kussia. Why so many "For 
Rent" or '*To Let"] signs everywhere*/ 
Uespite the modest ^'recovery" an- 
nounced in the spring of 1934, X grew 
laminar with slogans of business de- 
cay in Polish, German; Dutch, French 
ana Spanisn as well as .English. The 
shop windows were more brilliant and 
aouiiiiantly stocked thaii those in 
despite - the great gains — 



WEEKLY WASHINGTON LETTER 

Two Minnesota Congressmen Stay 
at Washington 

All indications point to Congress- 
Jeunesse atriote. Finally there v/~ ma ft Lundeen as the last of the 
the hope that the Anceins Combatants ' Minnesota delegation to leave Wash- 



of 3,000,000 ex-soldiers ; 
swung "upon the road to 



composed 
would be 

fascism. No one knows who fired the 
first shots into the ranks of .the un- 
armed veterans on the night -of Feb- 
ruary 6th. The trick was nearly turn- 
ed — yet to date, the exsoldiers 
have not come out for fascism. They 
are divided' by lines including social- 
ists, communists and democrats ' 



ington after the adjournment of Con- 
gress. Congressman Shoemaker was 
the first to be found in the home state , 
arriving in March to conduct his Sen- 
atorial campaign. Chase followed sev- 
eral weeks "later, also before adjourn- 
ment, returned to Washington before 
the close of the session, and has now 
left for Minnesota again. Arens, John- 
son, Christianson, Knutson and Hoi- 



great numbers. In the streets of the ' dale left L , soon after adjournment, 
If anch cities, the communists ■ a-id Senator Shipstead is expected to leave 
socialists far outnumber the "Royal- I within a d*ay, the Schall, .who has no 
ists, J. P.'s and Croux de Feu com- ■ campaign on his hands this year, will 
bined and in conflicts, nearly always probably remain for a few -weeks, 
rout them. This of course is no pro- T '"" 1 ~ "'" ' — * ; " ~r n M--*^ «- - 
mise of salvation so long as the work- 
er's parties fail to win complete gov- 
ernment power and the fascists mean- 
while work to spread disorder. 

In the historic events of February, 
these who desired a Fascists capital- 
ism rioted against the "corruption" of 
the present parliamentary-capitalist 
regime. The industrialists and bank- 
ers who preside over France's moun- 
tain of gold, but are dissatisfied* with 
parliamentary government stood be- 
hind the fascists up to a certain point. 
The crisis was artfully intensified; the 
country was thrown into alarm and 
after a few tumultuous days the par- 
liamentary alliance between the radi- 
cal, (really "liberal") party of Her- 
riot and the Social-Democratic party 



Kvale is kept in Washington 
member of the sub-committee of. the . 
House Military Affairs Committee in- 
vestigating War department pur- 
chases of automobiles, planes, etc. He 
will probably be in Washington for 
about ten days. 

The date of Lundeen's return is 
still indefinite. He expects to call on 
several Department officials to sound 
them out on certain Minnesota pub- 
lic wjarks projects, including the North 
Minneapolis Harbor, the Chicago 
Chain of Lakes, the Lake Minnetonka 
.and Minnehaha Creek restoration pro- 
ject, and the development of the St. 
Croix River, giving a nine-foot chan- 
nel to the city of Stillwater. 

Also on his calander are calls on 
Relief Administrators, for the pur- 



cidents -mount in number with appalling rapidity. 
The. .St. Louis County Independent says: / 

"Study of the statistics reveal that a nrajority 
of thq 766,500 automobile accidents in the United 
StateB in 1933 occured an strajight, dry roads in 
clebr weather, and" involved cars in good condition 
driven by persons with a year or more experience. 
Over 76 per cent of these drivers were persons of 
mature age-r— from 25 . to 64. T le majority of the 
30,000 d'^aths and 850,000 injure 1 must be attribut-. 
ed to ,!t hinders." — (or booze.) [ 

The addition in parenthesis Is ours. Gasoline and 
alcohol will not mix. The age oi speed and machines 
\ requires. a sober people and if ihe accident statistics 
v tell any tale at all, they tell us that we are less a sober 
p'eople today than we were under prohibition. We never 
held and co "hot' now hold any particular briefs of pro- 
hibition. It was not a success. No attempt was ever 
made^to make it asuccess. Mr. Roosevelt knows this 
and knew it when he advocated repeal so " fervently. 
The blessings of a 'balanced budget,' the millions for 
recovery, the millions who were to reemployed if we 
would only repeal prohibition has proven to be a chim- 
era, and Mr.NRoosevelt'will have to face the f"ct that 
he was" the main sponsor of repeal, and consequently he 
will also have to\face the responsibility for the appaling 
increase in motor Natalities. His will be the larger of 
the share that can be placed on any individual. In the 
final analysis the blame must lay on the American peo- 
ple themselves who allow demagogues and cheap poli- 
ticians sell them one gold, brick after another, who will 
allow themselves time and\time again to be stampeded 
over precipices. \ _ 

We heard a man say a few days ago that a person 

should know better to drive a cor when he is drinking. 

This is typical of our average mental age. Common 

sense would tell anyone that he slfduld* know better than 

' to drink, whether- he is driving a car or not. 



only survive by paying low wages and charging high 
prices. The NRA would welcome an authoritative an- 
swer to this question." 

No one will take issue with Mr A Richberg when £t 
characterizes this question as a -"knotty!' dne. What 
will flabbergast the nation is the frank admission, by 
the chief counsel of the NRA, that it is still casting 
about for an authoritative answer to that quesion. Mr. 
Richberg, of course, was indulging in a polite sniff at the 
Darrow board. If the board is so ominiscient, he was 
asking in effect, why doesn't it tell the NRA how it can 
guarantee a square deal for the worker, the consumer 
and the small industry at one and the same time? 

The truth is, obiviously, that the Darrow board 
can't and doesn't pretend to be able to do so. The pro- 
blem which Mr. Richberg stated so admirably is NRA's 
own. What the NRA was supposed to do he now pre- 
sents as a problem in higher economics which baffles 
even the great mind of Clarence Darrow. 

The Richberg statement, of course, was a sly dig at 
the Darrow board. Where it erred was in making the 
job which NRA has attempted appear virtually impos- 
sible of accomplishment. Certainly the "knotty ques- 
tion" has never been stated more accurately than by 
Mr. Richberg himself, who has now placed himsilf in 
the unenviable position of inviting the .Darrow board to 
help the NRA chase rainbows. 



HITLER 



CALIFORNIA HAS A 

"Heads will roll" said Hitler, when uprisings against 
his tyranny took place in Germany. And heads have rol- 
led, and the uprising has been quelled for a -time but we 
tremble to think of the fate that will be his\and his 
henohmen's when the day of settlement " comes\ Ger- 
many will probably" be purged of "Hitlerism," but it 
will be in a bath of blood which |will make the French 
revolution appear like two small boys . in aback-alley 
scrap. 

"Any man who fires a shot in) the air will be court- 
martialed. Shoot to kill," said Col. H. H. Mittelstaedt, 



the men under him on 
strike in San Francis. 



of the California state militia, to 
strike duty in the longshoremen 

co. And* so "heads are to roll" injj America among those 
■who demand justice from the robber barons of industry, 
If this would-be-murderer has his) way. And American 
industry is to be "purged in"'blood|" until no slave again 
dares to lift up his voice against Ja rotten economic sys- 
temtfwhich denies to' all but a small portion of the popula- 
tion an- opportunity to provide for themselves and their 
children a decent living. 

"Shoot to kill" and forever i ilence the mutterings 
of those. who still have a job; but have nothing else. 
; King George issued such an prder in 1776 and for 
. 158 years we have celebrated the 
nasty in America. But King Capital will not profit from 
his example, for tyrants never learn. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



PEOPLES LOBBY SAYS CONGRESS STARVED 

PEOPLE TO SUBSIDIZE PROPERTY 

(St. Louis County Independent) 

"The 73rd' Congress will be known as the Congress 
which subsidized property and starved people," says the 
People's Lobby through its executive! secretary, Ben- 
jamin C. March. He points out that "at least five 
million people are far below a decent living standard, 
and as many more near it." 

Although nearly two-fifth of the total national in- 
come in 1932 was from property and 6 per cent of the 
people received most of this property income, Marsn 
says, "most legislation enacted by the last Congress 
was to protect property interests, at the peril of pro- 
ducers and consumers." 

, The housing bill program is described' as "sinister 
handouts to land speculators and profiteers in building 
materials," in the Lobby statement; the Public Works 
administration has "degenerated into federal largesse 
for landowners and allied parasites; and the R. F. C. is 
called "first aid to gambling financial interests." 

The Revenue Act, Marsh says, "cuts consuming 
power of the masses by about one and a half billion dol- 
lars, for the benefit of the rich. The masses of the un- 
employed are worse off today than in March, 1933 
while the unemployed— still four-fifths of the peak— are 
kept on a puritanical diet for which the next generation 
will pay." 

. \ ■ O— 

\ A SERIOUS SITUATION 

Last Friday at Muscatine, Iowa Howard Wells and 
his wife.X-lara, ended their troubles by walking hand 
lnhancS intoNthe waters of the Mississippi river. With- 
out work for\« long time, and nothing to. eat in the 
home, they became tried of the battle and decided to 
end their miBery.\ . 

To the police who arrived at the Well's home, one 
of the Wells childrenNsaid: "We hadn't had anything to 
eat for a week, so this^morning, ma and- pa went down 
and walked into the riveV' 

AND THIS HAPPENEB IN THE UNITED 
STATES WHERE THE FABSer GETS LITTLE FOR 

ra,™™ N o BKCAUS1S TI &*P IS AN °VER PRO- 
• J „ w " Something is wrong, somewhere.— Brecken- 
ndge Telegram. 



serve you; a surfeit of 'merchandise 
was altered "for sale." But few people 
bought anything. Many of the con- 
veniences jto be liad so easily in Paris 
"L,itue Bourgeoisie" as I; lingered in 
the spring of 1934. Economic excesses 
had ueen jmodest in spite of the 
Stavinskis and the mass industrial- 
ism of the ill-fated Citroen; modest, 
compared I to those in jthe United 
States. Therefore her depression had 
ueen a minimal one. The system of the 
bourgeois-d'amociatic parliament hall 
suffered, j The years following the 
reace had been prosperous for i ranee 
but world events and world markets 
began to touch even her. And because 
French populace is still better fed and 
more self-respecting than neighbor- 
ing countries, the reaction to a modi- 
fied depression is more veciferous 
than elsewhere. Besides; the French 
temper is imore impetuous and vecifer- 
ous. ■ ■ | . 

When ttie depression reached al- 
most its full force they saw the tax- 
payers ribts of early 1933. A year 
later the j streets were given over to 
combat between militants. The royal- 
and Madrid were still | lacking in 
Russia, yet I had the impression that 
it was western capitals that were top- 
syturvy rather than trie Russian. 

The people of the west persisted 
stubbornly in ignorance I of the new 
society rising in the east. Continuing 
with oldipretentions, prejudices, fears, 
hatreds, class divisions. They were in 
agony." Europe's old 1 agony. 

France jwas still the paradise of the 
ist-fascists' rioted nightly near the 
chamber of deputies. [Walking in the 
once peaceful boulevard Saint-Ger- 
main one|woul be caughfj between the 
fists of the Camelots du Roi and the 
clubs of the police. Thej police "put- 
down" the royalists very gently, fra- 
ternizing! with them while "arresting 
them. 'At the other side| of the town, 
before the Hotel de ■ Vil'e, the same 
police consented crowdsjof Commun- 
ists with! drawn revolvers). For the 
cohorts of the Action Francaise, nu- 
merically] weak tho [they were, had 
their part to play, and the police 
knew it. i 

There are at the most j 15,000 active 
royalists in France, j against 250,000 
"Humanite" and approximately 500,- 
000 'votes for communism. The rdyal- 
ists have no working! class following; 
but they have a legion of middle-class 
youth who court excitement and' en- 
joy being the ultra-modern playboys 
of polities'. They receive Stipends from 
capitalisiis like Coty,' an4 in a pinch 
they have been known to fill out their 
ranks with Senegalese and Algerians 
at- five franks per riot] Their func- 
tions are limited by! thp paymasters 
to provoction. The capitalists have no 
interest m the last of the Bourbons; 
but they! would pay jthe royalists to 
provoke fnot only the working class 
but also |as on Febuary JGth, the shop 
keepers and government employees, 
until a sufficient tumult is worked up 
to "feel'! for a dictatorship. This is 
^precisely} what honest Observers be- 
lieve happened on February 6th. 
. Definitely alligned! with the royal- 
ists, are the two . other ; fascist move- 
ments; ihe Croix oe Feu, and the 



of Leon Blum was broken; and the pose of gaining assurance that 
"Bloc National" was revived ^uncVer adequate allotment of funds will be 
the leadership of Doumergue. ' made for schools. Al though the pri- 

The republic was "saved" as the mary is over and his opposition in the 
franc had been "saved" and the war third district is definitely known, he 
lad been 'won" by the bloc national.^ stated on the floor of the House June 
The quarrelling fractions among the 18 that he. expects to stay m Wash- 
ipitaiists and the middle class was ington until he receives assurance 
united as effectively as by a fascist that an adequate allotment will be 
coup d'*etat. The government of "pol- ' made for schools in' adljtion to the 
itical truce" (having, excluded the 107 
(Continued on next page) 



dhe, FIRESIDE. 
PHILOSOPHER: 

By ALFRED BIGGS 



Happiness is a state of mind. 



Nature never duplicates. 



A rich mind is better than a fill! purse. 



After all, your's is only one point of 
view. 



A day without a good deed Is a day lost. 

• • * 
A prosperous fool is a pain in the neck. 



Don't wait until he is dead before yon 
praise him. 



The law assumes you're innocent until 
you're broke. 



?75,000,000 provided* in the Loans to 
Industry Bill for teachers' salaries. 

GENERAL JOHNSON "CAN'T 

TAKE" DARROWS CRITICISM 
After submitting his final 120 page 
report, which doubtless contains 
plenty of dynamite, but will not be 
made public until the White House 
sees fit to publish it, Clarence Dar- 
row.greatest criminal lawyer in Am- 
erica, severed his connection with the 
NRA. Johnson has no use for Dar- 
row's scathing denunciation of "mon- 
opolistic" and "oppressive" codes, and 
Darrow has no use for Johnson's fear 
of criticism. _______ 

staves Orought From Africa 
While, there are no definite figures 
on the number of slaves brought from 
Africa to the western hemisphere, thla 
Importation went on for about 3G0 
years, from about 1517 to about 18S0 
when the last, slaves were Imported 
Into Cuba and Brazil. One estimate 
places the number at 12,000,000. 



Many Wood Ties In Mile 
There are about 3,000 wood ties to 
the mile on a railroad. 




V 



A fighting Chance 

There's a good, oldlbaseball maxim 

That is true of life, as well; 
And it ought to be adopted 

By the f olkB who try to tell 
Whether fortune will be better 

In the days that lie ahead, \ = 
Or be full of disappointments ■ v3 

And unhappiness, instead. F 

It's a mighty helpful doctrine 

For a man to contemplate 
When he's facing loss or failure, 

Whether trivial or great; 
It wili give him hope.and courage; "■ 

It will show him at a glance 
That you never are defeated J 

While you have a fighting chanca 

Any baseball star will tell you 

That he plays to get the breaks-^ 
Bearing down just so much harder 

In the face of bad mistakes; 
And he wins a lot of ball games, 

For he knows beyond a doubt 
That "a game is never ended 

Till the final man is out!" 






Thief River Falls Forum 

Official Paper of Pennington County 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



1 



; • Published Thursday of each Week by the i 

Forum Publishing Company \ .. 
I R. M. Aalbu and H. L. Schus Iter," Proprietor* j 
M. Aalbu, Editor. Bernice Berge, City Edito 



# 



Editorial Comment 

From Our Exchanges 



W. C. T.U, NOTES 



Citizens State Bank Building. 



Subscription $1.00. per year in 



Thijef River Falls, Minn 

in 



^'Entered as second-class matter, April 27, 193$, at 
the poet office at Thief River Fails, Minnesota, dnde* 
Act of March 3, 1879." ' 



WHOSE FAULT IS IT, IF IT ISN'T MORE?; 

Commen'ing on Red -Lake county's share of the in- 
come tax 'recently distributed to the school districts of 
the *t»te by the state tax commission, the Red Lake 
Falls Gazette deplores that the I distribution is j not 
larger. "The principal trouble with the income tax, is 
that it does not bring- in enough money," they state, "It 
■was estimated that the state woild collect $5,000,000 
the -'first year. Instead of that it I collected about one 
fifth." I 

Our understanding of the arnouncement released 
by the tax commission was that th s distribution was of 
tne first half year's collections, sen that it would seem 
that the Gazette is only half right [when they state- that 
it failed to bring more than one-fjUh of the sum es- 
timated. J J . >tt«.:dfiiftiAAMfliA 
The Gazette is one of those newspapers that are to 
blame for] the income tax bringhjg less relief to the 
taxpayers, j They were among the newspapers of ; the 
state which were listed in a poll of the state's papers 
as being opposed to .the statuto sy income tax. It 
might be enlightening, for the Gazette to also, knowj that 
those members of the legislature which they have; held 
up as model and examplary lawmakers that it would be' 
well for all other to emulate; such 1 as for instance Mr. 
Hitchcock i>f Hibbing, opposed the income tax, and due 
to their efforts, the rate of taxatio . stops at 6 per.' cent 
on all incomes of $10,000 and over. The farmer-labor 
members favored* a higher rate on large incomes'. Some 
of them Were quite outspoken in ' 'avor of as high as 
forty per cent, on incomes of hall; a million and over. 
Thanks to j Hihchcock,. Quinlivan, Kern, Pfaender ; and 
others the ,tax was hard enbugh to pass with the rate as 
it is. With these men out of the running and with, a 
, splendid cliance of electing a farmer-labor majority in 
the next legislature, it .is possible that the Gazette'- will 
have to worry" less about the sun . brought into ; the 
state's coffers by this tax in the future. 



PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT CURSES HIS OFFSRING 

The awful toll on human lives that is taken by the 
automobile j was deplored, Satu -day by President 
Roosevelt, who in commenting -on t lie situation said: 
"We| cannot afford to temporize with this pro- 
blem.. Those who "use the. highways' must realize 
the responsibility they take when they take the 
wheel. Safer conditions of travel undoubtedly 
would contribute to the greatei use of the high 
ways now that shorter workinj . hours . and more 
leisure time are assured by the National Recovery 
Act." ; . ^ ■*■ I . 

In view of the fact that there are even now in imid- 
-. summer,- some fifteen million unemployed, which is-! just 
about equal to the unemployment [peak, the latter ipart 
of the president's .statement is nnll invitation to caustic 
comment which we shall pass by.} | If -after a year of 
NKA tizzies; three 'Darrow reports; bloody strikes* and 
riots in-'all parts of the country; and ever swelling re- 
lief lists*! the president is . still harboring any illusions 
abountj ; hisr much ' touted National j Recovery Act, he is 
more sanguine than the" most uninformed country bump- 
kin, -"i- J- || . 

What we wish to call attention to at this, time is 

the fact'- that Mr. Roosevelt himbelf .must " accept the 

\blame for the major part of the increase in automobile 

^fatalities. " rvMotor. -registrations have dropped. : Hundj- 

#reds of 'thousands- -of .--people who drove cars" in thetpast 

* can no^lo'njjer--ftfford--to : -:"own themlj B.ut automobile ac-^ 

cidents -mount in number, with appalling rapidity.' 

The. .Si. Louis County Independent says: 

".Study of the statistics reveal that a majority 
of the 756,500 automobile accidents in the United 
States in 1933 occured an straight, dry roads -in 
clebr" weather, and" involved cars: in good condition 
. driven by persons with a year or -more experience. 
Over- 75: per cent of., these drivers were persons ( of 
: mature age^-f rom ' 25 . to ■ 64. The majority of the 
30,000 deaths and 850,000 injured must be attribut- 
ed to _ blunders.**- — (or booze.) ■ j | " 

The addition in parenthesis, ^s ours. Gasoline, and 
alcohol will not mix. The, age of \ speed and machines 
requires.aj sober people and if rthe accident statistics 
tell any ; tale at all, they tell us that we are less a sober 
peoplo today than we were under prohibition. We never 
\ held and c«o not' now Hold any particular briefs of? prd- 
\ hibition. It was not a success. (No attempt was! ever 
made to make it asuccess. Mr. Roosevelt knows i this 
and knew] it' when he advocated jrepeal so "fervently. 
The blessings of a 'balanced budget,' the millions for 
recovery, [the millions -who were to reemployed if we 
would only repeal prohibition has proven to be a chim- 
era, and Mr. Roosevelt will have to face the f"ct that 
he was" thje main sponsor of repeal^ and consequently he 
will also have to face the responsibility for the appaling 
increase in motor fatalities. His jwill be the larger of 
tho shareithat can be placed on any individual.; In the 
final analysis the blame must lay on the American peo- 
ple themselves who ! allow demagogues and cheap! poli- 
ticians sell them one gold brick after another, who will 
allow themselves time., and time again to be stampeded 
over precipices. ~. -j 

We heard a man say a few days ago that a person 
should know better to drive a car when he is drinking. 
This is typical of our average mental age. Common 
sense would tell anyone that he should 1 know better than 
to drink, '■ whether he is driving a car or not. 



GERMANY'S BATH OF BLOOD 
(St. Paul Daily News); ._■ v 



,-li 



As further details become known it appears, that 
Hitler has been .quite thorough" in cleaning his Nazi 
house. - 

More than 100 former aids^ajad- leaders of , the 
Brown Shirts have been summarily executed according 
to reports of eye witnesses. Substantiation ft this is 
to be seen in the refusal of the government to make 
public the list after an earlier announcement tht it 
would be submitted. 

Germany has had its bath and it" only remains to 
be seen whether the immersion will be sufficient to ware* 
off other attempts to get rid of Hitler. *■ ■■ 

'Hitler, himself, is only a catspawi of a group of 
large industrialists who have held Germany in bondage 
since, if not before, the war. He built up his own fol- 
lowing and thereby became a useful person to the group 
which is engaged in exploiting the country. When he 
ceases, to be useful, or it is deemed- time for a change of 
policy, Hitler will go the way of some of his subordin- 
ates. ^ ; 

Meanwhile, no doubt, Clarence Darrow expressed 
the general feeling in this country and, perhaps, in- 
ternationally, when he' hoped that Hitler would* soon 
get a dose of his own medicine. 

It is more immediate importance to us, however, to 
be eternally ' on guard that Hilterism or some equiva^ 
lent does not get a foothold in our United States. : An 
increasing number of half-wits here" are playing with 
the idea of some form of dictatorship. They might 
take a look. at Germany today. If they, enjoy this kind 
of . government by terrorism and deceit, 'they should 
join Hitler.. '". ^\ 

DRUNKEKf DRIVERS 
(Pope County Tribune) 



them -mere^bbya'siwl ,!gi*hY drop in for 
casual" drinks and 'eyen . more, casual 
Vneckihg*'. V^: dimly, lighter- dance 
Large bodies move slo^-lyj Public' room . . . couples' twist and : writhe 
sentiment has been, and still is slow "a drunken rythnr to jausic: . :■ . girl, 
to' express itself in relatioA to the re- : apparently intoxicated, dancing on 
suits of -repeal. : Yet thejtide of pro-: top of .table .... , couples dance clos- 
test is rising, jrhe school authorities er and closer . . .students of high 
if'San Diego are shocked kt the evils school obviously only 14. or 15 years 
and the defiant indecency, of the le- 'old • .. , blond child of about ,16 is 
galized traffic. O. A. Darhell, one;of dancing, skirts to her hips. Most of 
the members of the school board is the girls appear to he of the nice 
quoted* in 1 vigorous denunciation ' of type to" be found ;.in West Side homes.' 
present conditions. "In the old . sa- The, articles indicate that ; many of 
loon days," he. says, "weThad much the nice type of girls are led into the 
better regulations . to protect our vortex of ruin in these hcensed^gild- 
children. Now every movement is for € " dens. -~ 

liberalization. Those wh<J voted for . An incipient tide of indignation 
repeal are|sorTy. The. results are not and apprehension is rising. It may 
at all what was expected. Condi- sweep on to. a mighty flood.' A 
tions are much worse nowf-erime and United Press dispatch under Wash- 
bootlegging have increased.". ington date line states that "wet and 
The truth is dawning bn.the peo- dry Senate leaders' are agreed that 
pie. It blares from the [pages even conditions resulting from repeal are 
of papers, which wore strong advo- intolerable, and* that prohibition, will 
cates of repeal only a few months SO on return unless there is Bpeedy 
ago. The: St. Paul Daily] News re- improvement." The congressman who 
cently ran a series of front-page ed- voted -to declare 3.2 per cent beer 
itoriais which told' of the deoaucheny non-intoxicating now see that the ac- 
bf youth— and even childhood In that tion was a blunder. Millions who 
city. In Chicago papers, we read, voted to ratify repeal are now sick 
""Xoung men pnd wome i, some of at heart over the results. 



The 



LEFT AND RIGHT COMES TO 
GRIPS IN FRANCE 



According to W. G. Calderwood, well known pro- 
hibition worker, deaths caused by drunken drivers; have 
increased in an alarming pace since repeal^ went into 
effect. It is estimated that the . cost to the nation of 
che increased automobile wrecks due directly to ihtoxit 
cated* drivers has amounted to £70,000,000 for the first 
year. „ In checking up the utomobile accidents ..that 
happen nowadays, the story seems always - to be about 
the same, that the'driver of one of the cars has ; been 
having too^ many beers or drinks. Even in Glenwood, a 
business man stated . that he ' was awakened one night 
when a young man tied to wrap his; car around a tele- 
phone post while under the influence of "strong drink. 

Alcohol, gasoline^ and speed will not mix and* soon- 
er or later the nation, will be aroused, to .the extent that 
no drunken or half drunken driver will be allowed to 
drive. 



MR. RICHBERG'S ERROR 
(Minneapolis Tribune) 

It is a little distressing to learn from Donald R. 
Richberg, chief counsel of the NRA, that the national 
recovery administratic n is. "without an answer, to the 
problem it purports tj solve. We refer, of course, to 
che problem oi keeping wages high for the workers^ 
prices low for the consumer, and protecting small en- 
terprises at all times. from the burdensome consequences 
of special cotJes. / "■'/. 

in commenting on the second Darrow report, Mr. 
Richberg said: 'perhaps, before its labors are conclud- 
ed, the uoarJ will lurnish its.answer to the knotty ques- m. v ^„.. ^— «-.--,-■ - 

tion as to how industry should be operatied to produce ' distribution under thej live year' plan, 
nigh wages for labor, low prices for consumers and at'But in Moscow. suops;were thronged, 
the same time protect those small enterprises which can' in Paris a half a dozen; clerks ieaped to 



Condensed 
France" by 



Mathew ■ 



in Common Sense magazine for 



June, 1634, by R. M.: 



MinaterSermons 

By Dr. Crawford Grays 

Eight . great-forces are con- 
tending for j the mastery of the 
world's youth: nationalism, 
sectarianism;- cigarettism, com- 
munism, jazzism, . commercial- 
ism, alcoholism and Christian- 
ity. ! 

IVa alright to have different 
sheila but only one aim — square 
shooting. 

Government control will nev- 
er take the place of self-con- 
trol. ^ 

Slow growth is necessary for 
strong roots. : . 

Most of the injustices per- 
mitted locally and elsewhere 
will never be ; arrested so long 
as^so many ideas called justice 
enjpy liberty. ■ 

Some ideas called "red" now, 
will be white one of these days. 



— » 



Liberal Digest 



fom '. "Timult in 



Josephson 



Aalbu. 



Returning to western Europe. from 
Russia, one undergoes jaVsnock, as 
in descending from a ratified moun- 
tain air into the plains. Here in these 
cities, all IthtTworn, liypocritical lur- 
nishings of "bougeois" : jsociety are 
still incredibly preserved; tin the cafes 
and streets the' prostitutes still" ply 
their trade; the pimps ajre still eie- 
ganly dressed; t;he stocl :brokers" on 
tneir way to tne bourse ai e ruddy and 
cheerful, though swarms of beggars, 
greater than ever before, beset .the 
pedestrian from every hati d. The most 
persistent; among tinsm, 1 the official 
agents of 'beggary who devote them- 
selves to: keeping the! unemployed" in 
their fixed condition of • rnisery. They 
call for alms in the riame| of the Ro- 
man church, the tialvation Army, the 
Red Cross or Hitler^ depending on 
tne country. ( . i ■ ; i 

For a month I- hacs liv^d among a 
people so ; busy building cities of so- 
cialism that there was ;no time for 
charity nor for armies; of unemployed. 
Wor was the lethargic phce of econo- 
mic activity in western Europe cred- 
ible after Kussia. Why so many "For 
Rent" or '|To L,et" sighs dverywhere? 
uespite the modest |"redovery" an^ 
nounced iri the spring j of : .934, 1 grew 
iamiUar with slogans; of business de- 
cay.in Polish, German, Dutch, .French 
anaitspanish as well as h-ngiish"; The 
shopwmdows were more ' 1 riniant and 
abtt^mntly stocked . than- those in 
Moscow despite the 'great gains in 



WEEKLY WASHINGTON LETTER 



Two Minnesota: Congressmen Stay 
at Washington 

All indications point to Congress- 
Jeunesse atriote. Finally there wS £?* Lundeen as! the last of the 
the hope that the Anceins Combatants' Minnesota delegation to leave Wash- 
composed of 3,000,000 ex-soldiers,' '"" "*™ *■"* "'' , "" °"* "* n "" 

would be swung upon the road to 
fascism. No one knows who fired the 
first shots into the ranks of .the un- 
armed -veterans on the night of Feb- 
ruary 6th. The trick was nearly turn- 
ed — yet' to date, the exsoldiers 
have not come' out for fascism. They 
are divided* by lines including social- 



ington after the adjournment of Con- 
gress. Congressman Shoemaker was 
the first to be found in the home state 
arriving in March to conduct his Sen- 
atorial campaign. Chase followed sev- 
eral weeks later, alsp before adjourn- 
ment, returned to Washington before' 
the close of the session, and has now 
le$$for Minnesota again. Arens, John- 
ists, communists and democrats in ' sonAGhristianson, Knutson and. Hoi- 
great numbers. In the streets of thft^ale left soon ^after adjournment. 
lfanch cities, the communists and Senator Shipstead" is expected to leave 
socialists far outnumber the "Royal- 1 within- a day, the Schall,.who has no 
ists, J. P.'s and Croux de Feu com- campaign on his .hands this year, will 
bined and in conflicts, nearly always probably remain for a few weeks, 
rout them. This of course is no. pro- Kvale is kept in Washington 



mise of salvation so long as the work- 
er's pariieii fail to win complete gov- 
ernment power and the fascists mean- 
while work to spread disorder. 

In the historic events of February, 
these who desired a Fascists capital- 
ism rioted against the "corruption" of 
the present parliamentary-capitalist 
regime. The industrialists and bank- 
ers who preside over France's moun- 
tain of goldi but are dissatisfied* with 
parliamentary government stood be- 
hind the fascists up to a certain point. 
The crisis was artfully intensified; the 
country was thrown into alarm and 
after a few tumultuous days the par- 
liamentary alliance between the radi- 
cal,; (really "liberal") party of .Her- 
riot and .the Social-Democratic party 



member of the sub-committee of the 
House Military. Affairs Committee in- 
vestigating "War department pur- 
chases of automobiles^planes, et£ He 
will probably be in Washington foT 
about ten days. 

The date of Lundeen's return is 
still indefinite. He expects to call on 
several Department officials to sound 
them out on certain Minnesota pub- 
lic works projects, including the North 
Minneapolis Harbor, the Chicago 
Chain of Lakes, the Lake Minnetonka 
.and Minnehaha Creek restoration pro- 
ject, and the development of the St. 
Croix River, giving a nine-foot chan- 
nel to the city of Stillwater. 

Also on his calanderare calls on 
Relief Adroinistrators, for the pur- 



only survive by paying low<iwages and charging hjgh 
prices. The NRA would welcome an authoritative an- 
swer to this " question." _^* 

No one will take issuefwrth^Mr^. Richberg ' when A. 
.characterizes this question as & "knotty" one. What 
will flabbergast the nation is the frank admission, by 
the chief counsel' of the NRA; that it is- still casting 
about for an authoritative answer to that quesion. ' Mr. 
Richberg, of course, was ind«ulging in a polite sniff at the 
Darrow ■ board. If the board is ' so ominiscient, he was 
asking in effect, why doesn't it teli the NRA how it can 
guarantee a square deal for the worker, the consumer 
and the small industry at one. and the same time? 

The truth is, obiviously, that the Darrow board 
can't and doesn't pretend to be able to do so. The pro- 
blem which Mr. Richberg stated so adroirably is NRA's 
own. What the NRA was supposed to do he now pre- 
sents as a problem in higher economics which baffles 
even the great mind of Clffrence Darrow. - 

The Richberg statement^ of course, was a sly dig at 
the Darrow board. Where it erred was in making the 
job which NRA has attempted appear virtually impos- 
sible of accomplishment. Certainly the ''knotty ques- 
tion" has' never been stated more accurately than by 
Mr. Richberg himself, who has now placed hirasslf in 
the unenviable position of inviting/the .Darrow board to 
help the NRA . chase rainbows, 



CALIFORNIA HAS A HITLER 
"Heads will, roll" said Hitler, jwhen uprisings against 
his tyranny took place in Germariy. And heads have rol- 
led, and the uprising has been quelled for a. time but we 
tremble to think of the fate that will be his and his 
henchmen's when the day of settlement ' comes, i Ger- 
many will probably be purged |bf "Hitlerism," put it 
will be in a bath of blood which will make the French 
revolution appear like two small boys in aback-alley 
scrap. | j- .....-.—.-... 

"Any man who fires a shot in the air will beicourt- 
martialed. Shoot to kill," said Col. H. H. Mittelfetaedt, 
of the California state militia, toj the men under him on 
strike duty in the longshoremen j strike in San :Ffancisr 
co; And bo "heads are to roll" in America among: those 
who demand justice from- the robber barons of industry, 
If this would-be-murderer has his way. And American 
industry is to be "purged in "blood" until no slavef again 
dares to }ilt up his, voice against (a rotten economic sys- 
tem which denies to" all but a small portion of the papula- 
tion an- opportunity to provide for themselves and their 
children a decent living. 

"Shoot to kill" and forever 



PEOPLES LOBBY SAYS CONGRESS STARVED 
PEOPLE TO SUBSIDIZE PROPERTY 

(St, Louis County Independent) 

"The 73rd' Congress will be known as, the Congress 
which subsidized property and starved people," says the 
People's Lobby through its executive secretary, Ben- 
jamin C. March. He points out that "at least five 
million people are far below a decent living standard, 
and as many more near it." 

" Although nearly two-fifth of the total national in- 
come in 1932 was from property and 5 per cent of the 
people received most of this property income, Marsn 
says, "most legislation enacted by the last Congress 
was to protect property interests, at the peril of pro- 
ducers and consumers." 

The housing bill program is described) as "sinister 
handouts to land speculators and profiteers in building 
materials," in the Lobby statement; the Public Works 
administration has "degenerated into federal largesse 
for landowners and allied parasites; and theR. F. C, is 
called "first aid* to gambling financial interests." 

The Revenue Act, Marsh says, "cuts consuming 
power of the masses by about one and a half billion dol- 
lars, for the benefit of the rich. -The masses of the un- 
employed are. worse off today than in March, ' 1933 
while the unemployed-^stiU four-fifths of the peak— are 
kept on a puritanical diet for which the next generation 
will pay." 



of Leon Blum, was broken; and the pose of gaining assurance that an 
"Bloc National" was revived, undjer adequate allotment of funds will be 
the leadership of Doumergue. " » made for schools. Al though the pri- 

The republic was "saved* r as the mary is over and his opposition in the 
franc had been "saved" and the war third district is definitely known, he 
-iad been 'won" by the blocjiational. stated on the floor of theJIouseJune 
The. quarrelling fractions among the 18 that he expects to stay in Wash- 
tnitaiists and the middle' class was ington until he receives assurance 
united as effectively as by a fascist that an adequate allotment will be 
coup d-'etat. The government of "pol- ' made for schools in adlition to the 
itical truce" (having excluded the 107 $75,000,000 provided* in the Loans to 



silence the mutterings 
of those. Jwho still have a job; bu; have nothing; else. 
""' " " order in 1776 ; and for 



King George issued such an 
. 158 years we have Celebrated the overthrow of Ids dy- 
nasty in America. But King Capital will not profhj from 
his example, for tyrants never learn; 



A SERIOUS SITUATION 

Last Friday at. Muscatine, Iowa Howard Wells and 
hl f wife, Clara, ended their troubles by walking hand 
inhand* into the waters, of the Mississippi river. fWith- 
out work for a long time, and nothing.-to eat in the 
home, they became tried of the battle" and decided to 
end their misery. 

.f ^ P oli ce who arrived at the. Well's home,: one 
of the Wells children said:. "We hadn't had anything to 
eat for a week, so this morning, ma and* pa went down 
and walked into the river." " -:■;'■ 

AND TH IS ^PEJ^njr THE TUNIT^lfrSjS? ffi] 



STATES WHERE THE PARMER GETS LITTLE FOR 
St^S^P' BECAUSE THEEE IS AN- OVERiPRO- 
UUCTION. j Something 'is ^ -wrong;: somewherefeBifedretf-- 
ndge Telegram. 



serve you; a surfeit !of merchandise 
was attered "for sale.'1 Bui few people 
bought anything. Many of the con- 
veniences to be uad so easily in .Paris 
"JLiittle Bourgeoisie" as I lingered in 
the springj of 1934. Ecpnoitoie excesses 
uadi ueen modest in | spite of. the 
Stavinskis! and the mass industrial- 
ism of the ill-fated Citroen; modest, 
compared to - those in f;he United 
States. Therefore her depression had 
ueen -a miniftial one. The system of the 
bourgeois-camocratin parliament hall 
suffered, j The years following the 
±-eace had 'been prosperous for Irance 
but world j events and world markets 
began to touch even h'er. .fnd because 
Drench populace is still better fed and 
more sel±'4respecting than^ . neighbor- 
ing countries, the reaction to a. modi- 
fied depression is more veciferous 
than elseiyhere. Besides^ the French 
temper is more impetuous and vecifer- 
ous. \ I , ., ' . 
When the depression reached al- 
most its full force' they saw the tax- 
payers rfdts of early. 1933.- A year 
later the streets were given over to 
combat between militants The royal- 
and' Madrid were still: lacking in 
Russia-yet I had the' impression that 
it was^vestern capitals that were ^top- 
syturvy rather thanthe Russian. 

The people of the [west persisted 
stubbornly in ignorance of the new 
society rising in the [east) Continuing 
with old pretentions, prejudices, fears, 
hatreds, cjass divisions. They were in 
agony.' Europe's old' agony. 
. France Iwas still the paradise of the 
ist-fascists rioted nightly, near the 
chamber of deputies.l Walking in the 
- - • ■ " Saint-Ger- 

_ between the 

fists of the Camelots dii 
chibs of the police. The 
down" the royalists very gently, fra- 
ternizing with them whiU "arresting" 
them. 'At the other Bid« j'of the town, 
before 'the. Hotel de! Vilje, the same 
police consented crowds ]of Commun- 
ists with ! drawn revolvej-s). For the 
cohorts of the Action Francaise, nu- 
merically! weak tho .they were, had 
their part to play, jand j the police 
knew it. I ' ' | h- .. . 

There are at the most 15,000 active 
royalists I in France, 1 against 250,000 
"Humahite" and approximately .500, 
000 votes! for communism. The royal 
ists'have'no working class following; 
hut they have a legion ofi middle-class 
yoiith who court excitement and' en- 
joy being the ultra-rnddern playboys, 
of polities'. They rece5ve|stipends from 
capitalists like Cotyy and in a. pinch 
they have been known to fill out-their 
ranks .with Senegalese and Algerians 
at^fiv'e: franks, p"er iriot. Their fun<> 
tions are limited by thi paymasters 
to provbetion. The capitalists have : .no 
interest in' the last Jot ithe Bourbons; 
but' they \ would' pay- .thej 'royalists . to 
provoke not only "the working class 
bht:also as' on 'Febnaryi Gtb, the' shop 
keepers . and governinenli :' 'employees.* 
until a' suilcient; tuninltj-W ' worked up 
tot *f eel'.'j for a 'dictatarbhip: This is 
precisely I what- honest: observers; ;be^ 
ueve happened oh;Februiiry 6th. " . 
. \J)efinitely_'alligned wiui-the! royal T 
-ia&^^.^B^o^t&efjfascistf'inove^ 
ments: ;the' aB-Sfeui'-aji-irthe, 



(Continued on' next page) 



G^, FIRESlDia 
PHILOSOPHER" 

By ALFRED BIGQS 



Happiness Is a state of mind. 

'.***'..■'■ 
Nature never duplicates. 

A rich mind Is better than a ful! parse. 

After all, four's Is only one point of 
view. 

* * * . 

A day without a good deed is a day lost 

A prosperous tool is a pain In the neck. 

• '*"■* 

Don't wait until he Is dead before you 

praise him. 

*.■•••.- 
Theiaw assumes you're innocent until. 

you're broke. 



Industry Bill for teachers' salaries. 

GENERAL JOHNSON "CAN'T 

TAKE" DARROWS CRITICISM 
After submitting his final 120 page 
report," which doubtless contains 
plenty of dynamite, but will not be 
made public until the White House 
sees fit to publish it, Clarence Dar- 
row.greatest criminal lawyer in Am- 
erica, severed his connection with the 
NRA. Johnson has no use for Dar " 
row's scathing denunciation of "mon- 
opolistic" and "oppressive" codes, and 
Darrow has no use for Johnson's fear 

of criticism. ^^_ 

aiAvas urought From Africa 
"While there ore no definite figures 
on the number of slaves brought from 
Africa to the western hemisphere, this 
Importation went on for about 360 
years, from about 1517 to about 1880 
when the last^-slaves Were Imported 
Into Cuba and Brazil. One estimate 
places the number at 12,000,000. 



Many Wood Ties in Mil* 
There are about 3,000 wood ties tq 
the mile on a railroad. 



Roi and the 
police "put- 



A tfgMing CR&iYC* 







There's a good, old baseball maxim 
That is true oi Ifife, as we.ll; 

And ft ought to be adopted 
By the folks who try to tell 

Whether fortune will be better ■ . i 
.. In the days that lie ahead, \. 

Or be full of disappointments 03 
And unhappiness, instead. F 

If s a mighty helpful doctrine 

For a man to contemplate * . 
When he's facing loss or failure. 

Whether trivial or great; 
It will give him hope and courage; 

It will show him at a glance 
That you never are defeated A 

While you have a fighting chance 

Any baseball star will tell you 

That he plays to get the breaks-^ 
Bearing down just so- much harder -; 

In the face of bad mistakes: 
And he wins a lot of ball games, 

For : he knows beyond a doubt 
That "a game is never ended 

Till the flrial man is out!" i 




n 




.. RitEff klVSft t MtUP 6&PM;.iJBlgg- Ri^SR EAM.S; .MINNESOTA, THOSSDAY JULY 8, 1984 " 



Our Comniunity Builders 



THE CITY'S FIRST CLERK _ _ 

LATES STORY OF COMMUNITY'S 

EARLY STRUGGLES. 



The gentleman selected as our 



years, 



55" . as P ro ^ at « judga for twelve 
'commencing in 1920. 

Lars Backe did much to ^promote 
good schools and was a member of 



first 



of artiSei S'"J he local sch ° o1 board for 23 yeara ^ 
Lars Backe, an unswerving and IfUr- 1 Sl^"^^ 1 ?'*? 1 ^?* I » de ^ end *»™ t 
~i~* A «i*««p«r * n * ™™™,7„if~ WT^E I School District No. 18 during its 



subject in this series 

Lars Backe, an unswer 

minded pioneer and« community build- 1 «l!"f „ M „ n ,„*„ v ,,. .. «,„ - 

er, who has wa,tched our city of Thief ,lirst .y<»«. la ^ r holding the ^office of 

River Falls 




pass nearly 

half century ofj 

milestones 

its growth and] 

progress. 

Lots , Backe! 
was' born 
Norway on' 
August 2 9 ; 
1856, the son] 
of Bartel and 
Eline B'acke 
who were far- 
mers of the old 
country.! He[ 
received his ed- 
ucation ! and' 
early training I 

in his native land, and came to Min- 
nesota in 1880. He worked on a home- 
stead in Marshall County previously 
to coming to Thief River Falls in 
1888. Backe spent several years in 
Arygle, i but returned- here in 1891 
and has ] made his residence here 
since. 

Mr. Backe has t^ken an active part 
in organizing the city and laying 
the foundation for what our city is 
today. In the various city offices he 
has held, he has proven himself] en- 
tirely capable and efficient, upholding 
the public interest and trust. i 
* From 1893 until November 4, 1896, 
Backe held the office of village! re- 
corder, being the second person to 
holil- that office. In 1S9G, the city or- 
ganization took effect, and his judg- 
ment proved indispensable in this! big 
step toward our city's upbuilding, 
Mr. Backe has an interesting anec- 
dote to relate in regard to this period: 
It seems that the sawmill people jwho 
had their holdings across the river, 
opposed the organization of the 'city 
because it would bring them into] the 
corporate limits. They preferred* to 
be in the town of North because taxes 
would be higher in the city. They 
applied for a mandamus against the 
newly elected city officers under] the 
city organization with intent to keep 
in the old village council. The man- 
damus proceedings were set aside, 
and an appeal was made to the Sup- 
reme Court which decided* that I the 
city was duly organized as Thief 
River Falls under the provisions of 
Chapter 8, Laws of 1895. But j the 
lumber interests were dissatisfied, 
and so one day when Mr. Backe, {the 
new city clerk, was on a business 
trip to Crookston, they made an' |at- 
tempt to] overthrow the new govern- 
ment, and re-establish the old village 
council. ; Upon returning in the eve- 
ning, Backe was surprised to find' a 
crowd waiting outside the city hall, 
with a meeting of the old village 
council in full swing inside, passing 
bills and transacting matters of busi- 
ness in their own way. The key: of 
the city ! hall had been given to i the 
police, which Backe obtained and then 
entered his office. He was ordered to 
get out, jwhereupon Backe informed 
them that he had been elected 'city 
clerk by; the people and had a right 
to be there, and said it was for them 
to get out. They did, and there jwas 
no trouble thereafter. 

From 1896 and for the ensuing 
fourteen | years, Mr. Backe served! as 
city clerk. In 1911, he was elected 
mayor, and held that office for two 
terms, during which time he was] in- 
strumental together with the library 
board*, in! bringing the Carnegie Pub- 
lic Library to the city. He seryed 



he was 
number 



president, and up to 1922, 
treasurer of the board' for 
of years. 

Always looking to the public wel- 
fare, Backe was one of the first vol- 
unteers of t the i local fire department 
in its early days, and was secretary 
of that organization for several years. 

He took part in the building of the 
city electric light plant, and getting 
it under way. There was considerable 
entreaty, opposition and discourage- 
at its commencement by private fo- 
terests who wanted to gain control 
of the plant rather than have it city 
owned. Mr. Backe says that Carl 
Kretzschmar, who had control of its 
power site, deserves a lot of credit 
for refusing to let the power inter- 
ests get control. "These were . the 
years during which the real founda- 
tion of the city was laid by men with 
foresight for the public welfare," 
Mr. Backe says. 

Mr. Backe was married July, 1884 
in Ottertail County, Minnesota to 
Kerstie Loken, who passed away 
December 1889. Three children blessed 
the union: Emma, who is Mrs. 
Gaston Ward of this city; Bartel L. 
who is employed with the U. l S. mail 
service in Los Angeles, California; 
and Clara (Mrs. S. Loveid) who pass- 
ed away in the summer of 1933. 

Backe was p charter member of 
the Lutheran Synod* Church, which 
later incorporated to the TriiJity 
Lutheran Church, and up until a few 
fears ago, he was secretary of that 
organization. He is also a member 
of the . Sons of Norway, and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. - 

"All one has to do is to use com- 
mon sense and do something for the 
public interest" is the motto which 
Mr. Backe has abided by and which 
accounts for his enviable wisdom and 
jud'gment throughout his personal 
and public life. He has made his 
home for uany years with his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Gaston Ward in this city, 
ind finds peace and enjoyment in his 
daily walks and visits with his old 
friends, and in communion with his 
God. 



LIBERAL DIGEST 

(Continued, from page four) 



SPRING' BREEZES. 



Never say die! Up, man, and try! 

Do not pluck the beard of a stranger 

God sends meat and the devil sends 
cooks. 

Pessimism Is contagious, but some 
have It worse. 

Man has his happy moments — when 
a worry Is lifted. 

There's no tax on the fuel that keeps 
a farm horse going. 

Optimists are what sometimes make 
other people pessimists. 

Some men laugh because others do; 
they see little reason for It. 

If one Is a strict party man he may 
believe too much that Isn't so. ' 

A pun that Is "built up to" lackB 
savor ; most of them do, anyway. 



53H*9S2fE*KS*HE»2&*Ef^SfEfS5£jn 



l.jSave With Safety.. I 



! . 



Kuriko (genuine) 89c 
Mineral Oil 1-2 gal. 88c 
Rub Alcohol, pt. Igc 



INSULEN, U 20--10 ic 



U 40--10 cc 



Milk of lVfagnesia, pt. Z9c 



Olive Oil, pt. 



49c 



Forhans Tooth Paste 49c 



98c 



81.77 



U 80--10 dc 



BAYER ASPIRIN, box of 12 now 

bottle of 24, now 
t" of 100 now 



Kleenex, 3 for 



50c 



Bathing Caps IO to 39c 



Fresh Lime Freeze lOc 



Shave Brush 



$3.49 



ISC 
25c 

69c 

29c 



Halibut Oil Caps, "gj 89c 
Little Dick w ° r ^ §g-« sc 



Complete line of Tobaccos, Pipes, Cigars, 
Cigarettes,! Cleaners, etc. 

Visit our Fountain land refresh yourself— 
The best place in the city to keep cool. 

Thief Rivet* Pharmacy 

D.H. Ekeren&Sons . 

"The Rexall Store" 




Socialit deputrel) could cut budgets 
by lowering- civilj service salaries dis 
charging railway workers and re- 
ducing pensions as thoroughly as any 
fascist government, its secret police, 
making preventive arrests, cowing 
the populace could function as ruth- 
lessly-always under democratic laws 
— and less wastef ully than a horde of 
colored "shirts." But the working 
classes were brought together in tht 
United Front. 

The Socialist party of France has 
a less shameful record than that of 
Germany before 1933. Its policy hat 
been one of growth during abstenta- 
tion from power. The last two year 
of "negative collboration" with the 
middle party of the "radical-social- 
istes" during which it could be truth- 
fully said that some of the sums voted 
for Austrian loans were used* to shoot 
down Austrian socialists— have proven 
disastrous. The socialists now pursut- 
the tactics of the United Front with, 
the Communists — and more real. than' 
was formerly possible * in Germany.^ 
Street action, strikes, manifcsta 
tions — some of them on an enormous] 
scale are never honestly reported in 
the French press; — continue frorr 
week to week. After the February 
days in Paris and Vienna, the mood] 
of the workers is serious, not only in 
France, and Spain but also in Bel- 
gium, Switzerland, Sweeten, Holland 
Fascism as it is practiced , in Ger- 
many has not whetted the appetite of) 
the masses for a Hitler or a Doll 
fuss. 



There: is a fear of war everywhere. 
I had occasion to! talk with people 
of all sorts about war dnd was aston- 
ished atj the growing) pacifism in 
France, j All remarked in effect with 
one voice, "I would ad lief go ;to a 
madhouse as to thei front again." The 
French government could not have 
launched "preventive"; vfcr against 
Germany if it had wanted to. Now the 
revival of the class struggle gives 
hope that imperialist .^Var may be 
postponed for some time in western 
Europe. I i : 

At the present time lit is common 
report that the workers! are constant- 
ly arming themselves, and the police 
consequently runt for their nests of 
arms. ■ j 

Capitalism -js fighting a defensive 
battle. This explains the contradic- 
:ions off its maneuvers for instance, 
the salary cuts of 800,000 civil 



workers ;will tend to deepen the- de- 
pression.; But jcapitalism 



,-- r is still trem- 

incouslyi stroAg in comparison with 
Germany and Italy. It can hold the 
country well in hand, it can buy off 
Hitler for ,e time. It need not meve 
toward autocracy unless the great 
niddle party, the "Radical" should 
ipht. But must not forget the long 
tradition ; of militancy, tenacity and 
Courage of the French working class— 
especially in Paris— a decisive turn 
towards Fascism might I bring a_ civ- 
il conflagration which (would make 
he episode in Vienna ceem like a 
mic opera. I 



THEATRE 



Sons of Norway Hall 

ABSOLUTELY SAFE FOB KIDDIES / "" 



Ice Crystals Not! Alike " 

Photographs of 5,000 1 Ice crystals 
how no two exactly alike In their 
beautiful patterns. I 



Sunday and Monday 

July 15 <& 16 

Moran & Mack 

"THE TWO BLACK CROWS" 
in The GREATEST & FUNNIEST 
ALL TALKING Comedy Feature 




ADMISSION: 

5c and 15c 



EYK 




A FREE T 




TO THE 



Minnesota Sta 

Just Get Ten New Subscriptions 




Fair 

the Forum 




Prizes for Every Contestant 

j A FREE ticket good at the gate and grandstand 
tor every contestant who scores 100 points or more. 

; lOOO^points entitles contestant to a round trip rail- 
way ticket; Minneapolis and return and a ticket to the 
lair, good jfor admission at the gate and at grandstand. 

rL ^int? ry ^? po # ts m contestant scores in ex- 
cess of Wa points will get $1 cash for spending money. 
No limit, get all you can. . < y 

Here Are the Rules f" 

CONTEST is open to any boy or girl from 10 to 15 years of age ONE 
NEW YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION 'counts ^ 
100 points, one renewal for one year counts ^^ 
50 points. Bring in one renewal or one 
new subscription to make your entry and 
get a* receipt book and instructions. This 



will count on your tota 
as the others you get 



Prize Winners 

will be provided 

with escorts on trip 



FAIR OPENS SEPTEMBER 1st 



score just as well 
Start: now. THE 




Contestants Must Have Their 
Parents Consent to Enter, 



Everybody Waiits Trie Forum-?^ Only $1 Per Year! 

Get the Jump omit! ± Start Right Now! 








DEFECTIVE PAGE 





CITY'S 



'/ 








fkffiff hiVfift tJ&M-p OttlMripifig; l^R'^AtlS; jMtt^j^^a^^ 



KE- as probatej jndg3 for twelve 



LATES STORY OF COMMOTntys | commencS in °920 
KARLY STRUGGLES. f^-^SX.i A^ 



EiARLY STRU GGLES. . j I Im BaEkrdia'much to^promote 

The gentleman selected as our '■ first 'ff^^S ^. "? d l .' w !5 ? m S? lber "* 
subject in this series of articles is > Sf iS^Ju^ 00 } V*? 1 1°/ , 23 y ^- 
Lars Backe, an unswerving and ^ I &l^ 1 ^!J^S J clerk ,2 f *? d *P end <?? t 
minded pioneer and' immunity bu Id- &°L "?&& A ;™" £T?&» '5 
» ~ h ° TS.J? td » d >» ci * ° f W* urSid'Sfknd'up +?&£* C wf 




River . | Palls 
pass nearly af 
half century ofj 
milestones in 
its growth and 
progress.' 

Lars Backe 
was born 
Norway" on 
August 2 9, 
1856, the son 
of Bartel and 
Eline Backe 
who were far- 
mers of tHe old 
country. j He 
received his ed- 
ucation j a n d 
early training I 

in his native land, and came to Min- 
nesota in 1880. He worked on a home- 
stead in ! Marshall County previously 
• to coming to Thief River Falls in 
1888. Backe spent several years in 
Arygle, !but returnee.' here in 1891 
and has ; made his residence here 
since. ; 

Mr. Backe has t^ken an active part 
in organizing the city' and laying 
the foundation for what our city is 
today. In the various city offices jhe 
has held, 1 he has proven himself en- 
tirely capable and efficient, upholding 
the public interest and trust. 

Prom 1893 until November 4, 1896, 
Backe held the office of village [re- 
corder, being the second person; to 
holu thatj office. In 1S96, the city| or- 
ganization took effect, and his judg- 
ment proved indispensable in this j big 
step toward our city's upbuilding. 
Mr. Backe has an interesting anec- 
dote to relate in regard to this period: 
It seems that the sawmill people who 
had their holdings across the riyler, 
opposed the organization of the city 
because it would bring them into j -the 
corporate' limits. They preferred*; jto 
be in" the town of North because taxes 
would be! higher in ' the city. They 
applied for a mandamus against jthe 
newly elected city officers under {the 
city organization with intent to keep 
in the old village council. The man- 
damus proceedings were set aside, 
and an appeal was made to the Sup- 
reme Court which decided that Itihe 
city was duly organized as Thief 
River Falls under the' provisions' jof 
Chapter 8, Laws of 1895. ^ But tjhe 
lumber interests were dissatisfied, 



president, 

treasurer of the board* for a number 

of years, j 

.Always looking to the public wel- 
fare, Backe was one of the first vol- 
unteers of (the local fire_ department 
in its early days, and was secretary 
of that organization for several years. 

He took part in the building of the 
city electric light plant, and getting 
it under way. There was considerable 
entreaty, opposition and discourage- 
at its commencement by private In- 
terests who wanted to gain control 
of the plant rather than have it city 
owned. Mr. Backe says that Carl 
Kretzschmar, who had control of its 
power site, deserves a lot of credit 
for refusing to let the power inter- 
ests get control. "These were the 
years during which the real founda- 
tion of the city was laid by men with 
foresight for the public welfare," 
Mr. Backe says. 

Mr. Backe was married July, 1884 
in OttertaiT, County, 
Kerstie Lolcen, who 
December 1889. Three children blessed 
the union:; Emma, . who is. Mrs. 
Gaston Ward of this city; Bartel L., 
who is employed with the U. S. mail 
service in Los Angeles, California; 
and Clara (Mrs. S. Loveid) who pass- 
ed away in; the summer of 1933. 

Backe was p charter member of 
the Lutheran Synod* Church, which 
later incorporated to the TriiKty 
Lutheran Church, and up until a few 
fears ago, he was secretary of that 
organization. He is also a member 
of the . Sons of Norway, and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elk^ - 

/All one lias to do is to use com- 
mon, sense and do something for the 
public interest" is the motto which 
Mr. Backe has abided by and which 
accounts for his enviable wisdom and 
judgment throughout his ' personal 
and public ' life. He has made his 
home for nany years, with his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Gaston Ward in this city, 
ind finds peace and enjoyment in his 
daily walks and visits with his old 
friends, and in communion with his 
God. 



LIBERAL DIGEST 

(Continued! from page four), " 

Socialit deputies) could cut budgets 
by lowering: civil service salaries dis- 
charging railway workers and re- 
ducing pensions as thoroughly as any 
fascist government. Its secret police, 
making preventive arrests, cowing 
the populace could function as ruth- 
lessly-always under democratic laws 
—and. less wastefully than a horde of 
colored "shirts." But . the working 
classes were brought together in the 
United Front. 

The Socialist party of France has. 
a less shameful record than that of 
Germany before 1933. Its policy hat 
been one of growth during abstenta- 
tion from power. The last two years 
of "negative collboration" .with the 
middle party' of the "radical-social- 
istes". during which it could be truth- 
fully said that some of the sums voted 
for Austrian loans were used* to shoot 
down Austrian socialists— have proven 
disastrous. The socialists now pursue 
the tactics of the United.- Front with 
the Communists— and more real than 
was formerly possible • in Germany. 
Street action, strikes, . manifesta- 
tions—some of them on an enormous 
scale are never honestly reported in' 
the French press — continue fron 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m^^^^lbm 



w 



■jMsaa 



t ?? ler P ■ '** a fear cif war everywhere 
I had 'occasion to .talk ■ with, people 
of all. sprts about- war 'and was aston- 
ished, at "the : growing pacifism in 
Francei.All remarkedilin effect with 
one voice, ''I would- as lief go to • 
madhouse as to the: front again." The 
French government ;•' could not have 
launched "preventives w)»r against 
Germany if it had wanted to. Now the 
revival |of the class struggle gives 
hope that, imperialist Lyvar "may be 
postponed for some'- time in western 
Europe.j. i i| 

At. the present' time[ it is common 
report that the workers are constant- 
ly arming themselves, iknd-the police 
consequently runt for Sheir nests of 
arms. j. j - ; ' . 

Capitalism is fighting a defensive 
battle. This explains the contradic- 
:ions of its maneuvers for instance, 
the salary cuts of j 800,000 civil 
workers- will tend, to deepen the de- 
pression. But capitalism is still trem- 
md'ously strong in comparison with 
Germany and Italy. ; It] can hold the 
:ountryJwell in hand, it can buy off 
Hitler for a time. It need not move 
toward autocracy unlesk the great 
niddle party, the '^Radical" should 
ip . . B V t must not forget the long 
tradition of militancy, {tenacity and 

-•ourage of the French working class 

ispecially in Paris— a decisive turn 

sir- ■ ■ ■ 



of the workers is serious, not only in 
France, and Spain but also in Bel- 
Minnesota to gium, Switzerland, Sweden, Holland 
passed away Fascism as it is practiced in Ger- 
many has not whetted the appetite of 
the masses for a Hitler or a Doll 
fuss. 



and so one day when Mr. Backe, 



the 



new city j clerk, was on a business 
trip to Crookston, they made an at- 
tempt to overthrow the new govern- 
ment, and re-establish the old villfilge 
council. Upon returning in the eye- 
ning, Backe was surprised to find* a 
crowd waiting outside the city Kail, 
with a meeting of the old' village 
council in! full swing inside, passing 
bills and transacting matters of busi- 
ness in their own way. The key \ of 
the city hall had been given to ^he 
police, which Backe obtained and then 
entered his office. He was ordered! to 
get out, whereupon Backe informed 
them that he had been elected city 
clerk by the people and had a right 
to be there, and said it was for them 
to get out. They did, and there v^as 
no trouble- thereafter. { ! 

From 1896 and for the ensuing 
fourteen years, Mr. Backe served jas 
city clerk! In 1911, he was elected 
mayor, and; held that office for two 
terms, during which time he was i in- 
strumental together with the library 
board', in bringing the Carnegie Pub- 
lic Library ' to the city. He served 



THEATSE 



Softs of Norway Hall 

■! '' * ABSOLUTELY SAFE FOR KIDDIES " 



week to week. After the February. •i°™ r M?? s ™ ,m "l^tf bria S *- clv - 
days in Paris and Vienna, the mood 



1 conflagration which I would make 
he episode in Vienna seem like 
Eomic opera. 



Ice Cryitals Not Alike 

Photographs of 51000 Ice crystals 
show no two exactly alike In' their 
beautiful patterns. I 



Sunday and Monday 

July 15 M. 16 

Moran Sc Mack 

"THE TWO BLACK CROWS" 
in The GREATEST 6c FUNNIEST 
ALL TALKING Comedy Feature 



ADMISSION: 

5c and 15c 



if 
ir 



SPRING BREEZES 



Never say dlel' Up, man, and try! 

i Do not pluck the beard of a stranger 

God sends meat and the devil sends 
cooks. :-■'". 

Pessimism la contagious, bat some, 
have it worse. 

Man has his happy moments — when 
a worry is lifted. 

There's no tax on the fuel that keeps 
a farm horse going. 

Optimists are what sometimes make 
other people pessimists. 

Some men laugh because others do; 
they see little reason for It. 

If one is a strict party, man he may 
believe too much that isn't so. \ 

A pun that Is "built up to" lacks 
savor; most; of them do, anyway. 



..Save With Safety, 



Kuriko (genuine) 89c 
Mineral Oil 1-2 gal. 88c 
Rub Alcohol, pt. 15c 



Milk of Magnesia, pt. 29c 



Olive Oil, pt. 



49c 



Forbans Tooth Paste 49c 



INS1LTLEN, U 20-10 c|c 
|" U 40-10 cc 



98c 



U 80-10 cc 



51.77 



$3.49 



BAYER ASPIRIN, box of 12 now ; 
j' " bojttle of 24, now 

1' " !!" of 100 now 



asj j 



69C| 



Kleenex, 3 for 



50c 



Bathing Caps IO to 39c 



Fresh Lime Freeze 10c 



Shave Brush 



29c 



Halibut Oil Caps. <££ 89c 
Little Dick w °££ SjJ" 5c 



Complete line of Tobaccos, Pipes, Cigars, 
I Cigarettes;; Cleaners, etc. 



Visit our Fountain 
The best place in 



;and refresh yourself- 
the city to keep cool. 



Thief Rivdr Pharmacy 

O.'H. Ekeren & Sons 
"The Rexall StdreV 




Y KIDS! 




A FREE TRIP 

TO THE 

Fair 

1 1 ■ " ■ 

Just Get Ten New Subscriptions to the Forum 





^*r : 




Prizes for Every Contestant 

A FREE ticket good at the gate and grandstand 
for every contestant who scores 100 points or more. 

lOOOrpoints entitles contestant to a round trip rail 



way 
fair, 



ticke 
good 



., Minneapolis and. return and a ticket to the\ 
tor admission at the gate and at grandstand. 



/ 



Prize Winners 

will be provided 

with escorts on trip 



' %iS? ry f °P° int s the contestant scores in ex- 
cess of lOpapomts will get $1 cash for spending money. 
JSJo limit, get all you can. ■■ ■ . y 



Here Are the Rules 



CONTEST is operi to any boy or girl from 10 to 15 years of age 

NEW YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION counts W 
100 points, one renewal for onejyear counts ■ Wl 
50 points. Bring in one renewal or one 
new subscription to make your! entry and 



ONE 



get a receipt book and 
will" count on your tota! 
as the others you get. 



FAIR OPENS SEPTEMBERflst. 



instructions. This 
score just as well 
Start now. THE 




Contestants Must Have Their 
Parents Consent to Enter, 



Everybody Wants Tlje Foruni-!^ Only $1 Per Year! 



Get* the Jump 



Start Right ifow! 




MM 



^ILVBRTON 



ms* river uiU HWti, MxM $M$ Utit imBk6U$3m*i>iY fot? 11 uu 



Ida Dahl of Thief River Falls , vis 
fted Sunday at A. Carlson home. 
; Carl Berggren waa a n overnight 
quests atithe 0, Omundson home Sat- 
urday. I 1 

' Mr\ and Mra. Cecil David of j La- 
crosse Wisconsin arrived Tuesday and 
yti\\ visit jwith the latters parents' Mr. 
em> Mrs.jG. Nesland. 

Mr. and Mrs, O. O. Homme,] |son 
Ole and daughter Thelma visited] lasl 
week with friends and relatives ni] In 
ternationpl Falls. ! | 

Ellen Carlson who is employed;, in 
Thief Riyer Falls spent Sunday :\viti 
her parents. Mr. and Mrs. A. Carl- 
son. | '^ijjl* 
Mr. and Mrs. O. Bratteli and daugh 
ter Tillie' of Grygla spent Sunday at 
the G. Nesland home. \ ' 

Edna Qmuncls". of Hazel spent; last 
week at the O, Omundson home ' 

Mr. arjd Mrs. Rudolph Hanson mid 
son Duahe of Kratka visited onjSun- 
my at the E. Angel home. '■- \ 

Anna Homme returned home Thurs- 
day from International Falls. 



! GOODRD3GK 



ter^in-law of Mrs, Just and Miss Ea^ 
ther Evenaisjer neice of Mrs, Juat 
came Monday night fom Canto N* D., 
to visit at the Emil Just home. __^ 
Mr. and Mrs. E, N. Reiersgord and 
son Tommy left for Detroit Lakes Fri- 
day to visit, "a few days. 

N, E, Beehe moti.rfiii. to Warren 
Sunday to visit Irieads. 

Good Will Tour 
Ahout 75 men are expected to a1> 
-end the Good Will Tour which is be- 
.ig put on by the Business Men's club 
.mU iarmerp of the surrounding ter 
.itory on Tuesday, They will go to 
Jemidji, The local Juvenile Band will 
-ccompuny them and play a few sel- 
ections in the different town they tra. 
.el through, 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Satterberg re 
-urned home Wednesuay evening from 
-iound i-ake near tirairierd alter hav- 
.ig spent since Monday evening witi* 
elaiives and friends from St, Paul. 
Norma Bucklin left Thursday- foi 
Jrookston being called by the death o. 
.er grandmother with whom she has 
.een living, 
Mrs. V, G. Brink and daughtei 



Mr. and Mrs. A, S. Goudland and 
son Clarence and Mrs. Lilledahl of 
Shelly, jMinn., were callers at th* 
A. . Maiidt home Wednesday. \ 

A large number of young i^oIlGi 
from thip community attended the 4til 
of July celebration at Eri«, ' ] 

Eugene Haird of Waukegan, 111, ar- 
rived Sunday to visit at the hojna of 
his friends Raymond and. Myrtla 
Stephenson. ' i 

Hazel | Thoreson and Gordon i Ker- 
cher were callers at Thief River jFaUfl 
Thursday. 

Stephen Singer returned Tuesday 
from Minneapolis. i 

Mr. and Mrs. Hans Rod spent Wed- 
nesday at Bemidji enjoying the j 4th 
of July celebration there. 

The baseball game played? between 
the Gully and Goodridge teams result- 
ted in a, vietory for the home team 
the score being fl and 8. ; i 

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Mandt attend- 
ed the Marshall county fair Friday. 



ST. HILAIRE 



Mrs. J. Wahlbeck Called 

A number of friends from this com- 
munity attended the funeral services 
from Mrs. J. Wahlbeck, which was 
held Thursday afternoon at the Swed- 
ish Lutheran church of Black River. 
Mrs, Wahlbeck had a sudden attack of 
the heart while on her way home from 
Crookston, after visiting her daughter, 
' Mrs. Carl Sevensoh. Mrs. Wahlbeck 
was born in Varmland, Sweden on 
April ll\ 1856 and was 78 years 2 mo. 
11* days jof ac:« at time of her death. 
She was] highly esteemed as a neigh- 
bor and friend. Mrs. Wahlbeck is sur- 
vived by; 4 sons, Malford of the CCC 
Camps at Red Wing; Albin, Selmer 
and William who reside at home. The 
daughters are Mrs. Carl Swanson of 
Crookston, Mrs. Alex Mel in of ;Wylie 
Mrs. Roy Sumpter of this village and 
Mrs. R. Sagmoen of Thief River ; Falls. 
She is survived by ten grand child- 
ren and! one great grandchild. Rev. 
Herman i Larson officiated. Interment 
was mad.'- in the cemetery adjoining 
the church. 

Miss Blanche Huff, who teaches in 
the city schools of Minneapolis came 
last of the week to spend part of her 
summer v 'Cation at the home of her 
sister Mrs. H. Winter. 

The Norwegian Lutheran Ladies' 
Aid was entertained Friday by Mrs. 
Pete Simonson, Mrs. Ole Hagglun'.l 
and Mra. Joe King at the church par- 
lors. A large crowd attended. 

Miss Pearl Simonson of Crnndon, 
returned home to visit her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Simonson, after 
having visited friends of relatives at 
Minneapolis and Dqluth . since the 
close of 1 school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hauge anil 
children 1 and some relatives of Thief 
River Falls returned home last Sun- 
day evening from International Falls 
afLer attending funeral services of a 
nephew'of Mrs. Hauge. ' 

Mr. and Mra. Carl Nelson and fam- 
ily of Minneapolis motored herej Tues- 
day to spend the 4th of July at Mrs. 
Nelson's mothers' home, Mrs. Mary 
Sherva. 

Mr. and Mra. 'John Gunstau 1 mot 
ored Ti.esday, northeast/ of Thief 
River Falls to attend funeral services 
of Mrs Signe Molstad of the com- 
munity near Steiner, I 
Korer. and Inez Hovet and ! Gert- 



rude B: 
ed here 



okken of Grand Forks rnptar- 
laat of the week an* visited at 



cIh; b visiting t'Wcmla and relative ai 

R lynolds N, D 

. Rev, M, L, Dahle of St, Hilait\i \\a/i 

Friday jailer at the Selmer Olson 
homo to vd'ill H*ivui' Hanson vm ? 
ill. 

Mr, and Mrs, Edward Johnson and 
on Erwin, Mr, and Mra, Victor 
Seholin and family, Mr. and Mra, 
Victor Seholin and family and Mr, 
>nd Mrs, John Seholin and* family en* 
joyedPa picnic and visited relatives at 
Jrookston Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs, Reuben Rux and son 
Russel and Ellen Lindbloom shopped 
in Thief River Falls Tuesday, 

Mr. and Mrs, Soren Knutson, Alice 
.ind Leo, Olaf Larson and Mr, and 
Mrs, Emil Larson spent the week 
jnd visiting relr.tives at Cohasse| and 
Coiora'ne, 

Mam-its Seholin, who is employed at 
.Varren spSht Sunday at the home of 
us parents, Mr, and Mrs, John Scho^ 
Jr, 

Emil Rux returned to Reynolds N, 
> last week whore h.' is employed. 
His nephew, Floyd Rux accompanied 
him after visiting some time with hiB 
grandparents, 

Mrs. Annie Lindbloom 



OLD BIKE LAWS 



STILL ON jTHE BOOKS 



ARE 



returned 
home from "Thief River Falls Sunday 



.cuth, Mrs, Guimard LinUquist, Mrs. 

.1, Sorenson, onci Art Jacobson motor- .,__.,._._ _.„ _ ,^ 

,d to Crookston Friday to attend thfc|«ter visiting a few days with friends 
al of Norma Bucklin's grand- »na relatives, 

The 4-11 cJuh members enjoyed a 
tour and visited the home of each 
.nemher and later stopped at the Nick 
JcholtS 1 ome where they had a picnic 
dinner And spent tM tlittnoiin there. 

Reuben Rux and son Russel and El- 
len Lindbloom called* at the J, O, Ny- 
berg home Thursday, 

Mr. and Mra. John Hohisel and fam- 
ily spent Monday i-vening at thr> homo 
of Mr, and Mrs, John Swanson. 

Henry Schniedeo, Marie, Irene and 
Richard left Tuesday for a visit witii 
friends at Fairmont, 

Mr. and' Mrs, Victor Peterson and 
son Roland spent Wednesday at the 
Gust Johnson home. 

Mrs. Annie Lindbloom visited with 
Mis, Reuben Rux on Monday, 

Mr. end Mrs. Roy Lindquist of Min- 
neajK-lis spant a few days visiting his 
parents Mr. and Mrs, C. A, Lindquist, 

Miss Lu!u Hegstrpm visited" Mon- 
day at the home of Mr. and Mrs, 
i^mil Larson, 

Mr. and Mrs. DeCreamer, Misses 
Hulda Mosheck and Mable Lindbloom 
and Floyd Camfield of Thief River 
Falls and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rux 
wore Sunduy visitors at the Reuben 
Rux home. 

C, A, Nelson was a Wednesday eve- 
ning visitor at the Christ Person home, 



the home of Mr. and Mrs. Knute Kol- 
stad. -•maa^l 

The lpca] Juvenille band directed by 
Supt. Reiersgord played Wednesday 
afternoon ut th? Pennington Count;. 
rural school fraouation exercises a 
Thief River Falls. 

Mr. and Mrs. Orris Rodahl of Hoi 
are the; proud parents of a bahy ho; 
born Wednesday at a hospital in Thie 
River Falls, Mrs. Rodahl has beei 
spending several weeks at th-3 |hom 
. of her -inrenta i.ere Mr. and Mm ' Mar- 
tin Bjerh, 

A lage arowd atttend^J the Nci.rwe 
gian I^uthf.'-vu iJ.ricas Soc.ety ict 
: cream social ui-ith v.*as held Saturda; 
r.!ftht ajt th.' If. K ITaps'-n hoipei ; 

A large number of frieda , gave 
Mrs, Geo. Bakko a surprise party at 
her home Tuesday aftenoon. A pocia 1 
time! was had and a delicious lunch 
was served. 

M. R. Hauge, -who was taken to 
Thief iRiver Falls hospital about 
weeks ago, died Tuesday , 

M. and Mrs. E. O. Johnson left nn 
Thursday morning for their hoihf at 
Juanita N. D., after having spent 
several days visiting relatives. ' 

Walford Wahlbeck left the first of 
week fpr the CCC camps at Red Wing 
a£fief being called home for his moth- 
er's fuperal, 

M, and Mra. Carl Swanson and! fam- 
ily of j Crookston arfe visiting at the 
Wahlbeck home for a few days,; hav- 
ing been called by_ the death of; Mrs. 
Swonson'a mother "Mrs. J, Wahlbeck. 

Mr, and Mrs. Ole Sande and daugh- 
ter Donna and Ruth of St. Paul ar- 
rived Sunday to visit with relatives 
at Thief River Falls and here for sev- 
eral days. 



uner 
.nother 

Mr. and Mrs, Otto Johnson, Ed, 
.lauske and Mrs. Oscar Hauge spent 
.he weekend at Bemidji with relatives-. 

Mr, and Mrs. Earl Jenson and son 
Jarmo were dinner guests Sunday ai 
Jie Lee Beehe home. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sande and fam- 
ily of Thief River Falls visited Sun- 
day evening at the Clicord Schantzen 
home. 

Picnic 4th of July 

A gathering of friends and rela- 
tives enjoyed a picnic at Red Lake 
Falls Wednesday. Those present were 
Mr. and Mrs. John Gunstad and family 
Mr. and Mrs. Anton Johnson and fam- 
ily, Mr. and Mrs, Jens Almquist and 
family and Mr. and Mrs. Ole Hagg- 
lund and family, Mrs. Eftie Rollanu 
and sons Mrs. Mary Aubol, Mi'., and 
Mrs. Andrew Hanson and iamiiy Mr. 
jind Mra. Gust Holtin of Grand Forkt 
Mrs. Esther B.enson and son Clinton oi 
Grand Forks Mrs. M, Brink of Grand 
Forks. 

Garnes-St. Hilaire Gume 

The local baseball team motored to 
Games Sunday to play a game of 
baseball on their diamond, A very 
exciting game was played, the local 
team leading the score until the last 
mning. Final score was 15-16 in Gar- 
nes favor. 

A party of friends and Edna Alm- 
.mist came from Grand Forks Wed- 
nesday evening and visited at the 
Jens Almquist home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hans L. Sande of 
Thief River Falls visited Thursday at 
;he Cliirorcl Schantzen and Henry 
Sande homes. 

Murit Berhow, Selma and Herman 
Johnson and Albert Overland of Fer- 
tile visited Sunday at the Jens Alm- 
quist home. 

Picnic 4th of July 

A few friends and relatives gath- 
ered at the H. R. Allen home -1th of 
July and enjoyed a picnic. Those 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Froeman 
Allen of Hazel, Orris Rodahl of Holt, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Johnson of Juanita 
N. D., Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bjerk, 
Mrs. George Bakko, Mr. -and Mrs. W.- 
A. Corbet and son Mr. and Mrs.H . R. 
Allen. 

Mr and Mrs. Henry Olson motored 
to Oklee Sunlay and visiteod at the 
Albert Johnson home. 

Supper guests Sunday at the Ed 
Peterson home were Mr. and Mrs, Ed 
Christiansen and family. John Huff- 
stad of Grand Forks and Mr. and Mrs 
Oscar Ilorgie and family of Hazel. 

M. and Mrs. Ole Hoff, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nels Hoff, Dally Bernow and Ernest 
Dutrnan all of Fertile visited at the 
Jens Almquist home Monday., 

Mrs. J. Amble of Grand Forks came 
Monday to spend a few days at Mrs. 
Geo. Bakko's home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Walter of Crooks- 
ton, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hillshoin and 
family of Portal N. D. were suppei 
cjueats Saturday at the H. R. Allen 
home. 

A. Dahlstrom came Thursday from 
Alvarado N- D. to visit for some time 
at the home of his son Arvid Dahl 
strom. 

Mr. and Mrs. Evert Johnson of War 
ren spent Sunday at her parents, Mr 
and Mrs. James Kinney's home. 

Mr, and Mrs. Henry Ness and son 
and Mrs. Ed. Peterson visited Sunday 
afternoon at the Oscar Borgie home in 
Hazel. 

James Kinney and Albert Hilligoss 
came Thursday evening from Bem- 
idji. Albert Hilligoss returned on Sun 
day. 

Miss Dorothy Olson left for Warren 
n Sunday! to visit friends, 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Highland mot- 
■red to Shelly Sunday and attended 
he Dedication of the Betheny church 

Melvin Norhe went to Holt or 
Thursday on business. He returned 
home Monday. 

Jack McKee of thief River Falls and 
Harwood Olson motored jFrklay to 
Mentor where the formed transacted 
rush 



BRAY 



Mrs, 



Catherine Evensizer ond: els- 



* A large crowd attended the fourth 
if July picnic at the John Kruse 
»rove on Weunesday, A program wa: 
given consisting of numbers by the 
string band the Anderson quartet, the 
ahoir. Rev. Fjelstad was the princi- 
pal speaker, and a short talk 
riven by Rev, Bloom of Grand Forks, 
A bnll game was played. The St, 
: Iilaire team played the local boys, 
St. Hilaire being the winners, 

Mr. and Mrs, Reuben Rux and son 
Russel and Mr. ond Mrs. Andrew Art>- 
loff and family were Wednesday even 
ing dinner guests at the David Rux 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Swanson and 
family visited at the home of Mr 
Annie Lindbloom Sunday evening, 

Mrs. Paul Ortloff of St, Hilaire 
spent the week c-nd with her piste: 
and brother-in-!aw Mr, and Mrs. Nick 
Schalz, 

J, O, Nybai<£ was a business caller 
at the Regben Rux home Friday, 

ri orge thidulaom, Flroy Orljtft 
Harry Ru» spent a few 



;- Elirf^ and 



WYANDOTTE 



Mrs. W, E. Roese, will entertain the 
Clearwater Ladies' Aid at her home 
on Wednesday afternoon, July 18th. 
A cordial invitation (s extended? to 
everyone ta attend. 

Miss Cora and Hattje Holvorson, 

win are employed in St. Paul, are 

njnying a month's vacation at the 

hor.ie of their parents, Mr, and Mrs, 

Thoo Halvorjon. 

Morris Wilson returned Mondav 
from an extended trip through North 
Dakota and Montana, 

Evelyn Evenson left last week to 
visit relatives at AcVms, N, D, 

Roy Evenson returned on Monday 
to a C C. C. camp at Chisholm after 

weeks vacation at the home of his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Evenson. 

Miss Bertha Schaack returned home 
after a two and half weeks visit with 
her sister, Mrs. Dan Van Risaengham 
and her aunt, Mrs. Frank Spartz, both 
if Onamia, 

Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Shmway and 
Mr. and Mrs. Roymond Shumway of 
Smiley, spent the Fourth Pt the M. 
J, Schaack home. 

Mr. ano Mrs. John Gerordy and 
daughttr of Fail-fax are visiting Mr, 
Gerardy's sister, Mrs. H. L. Brugge- 
nian and their relatives at Plummer, 

Mrs. R, E. Walters and children re- 
turned to their home in Baudette on 
Friday afier visiting Mrs. Walters' 
-*ather, Julius Nelson, for a week. 
Mrs. Walters' was accompanied; home 
by her sister, Mra, Emma RtfSd and 
son Clyde of Inkster, N. D„ who had 
also viaited at the Nelson home. 

Mrs. Ray Rockwell visited on Tues- 
doy with her husband at the Oak- 
land Park Sanitorium at Thief River 

White Muskrat 
There Is no such animal as a white 
muskrat as a breed of animal, White 
animals of many different kinds "hap- 
pen" and this Includes muskrnts, but 
they are albino animals. Tboy have 
in value npiirt from being puriositlW 



One get of laws, passed in 1897 
and still In force, la puzzling the of*, 
flclala, says the I-na Angeles Times, 
These jaws provide Unit the county 
supervisors can grant f franchises for 
as long as fiO years, fq>j roads, paths, 
etc,, for bicycles and other horseless 
vehlclesi .No one seems [to know Just 
exactly what It means,, but the .law Is 
still on the hooka and ajiggestala for 
gotten ^occupation wlilph might or 
might npt he resuscitated with profit* 

And tiere are some pjdnts both ey? 
cllsts and autolsts should hear in 
mind. |lt Is unlawful jfor a bicycle 
to be parked In a loading zone, but 
|t Is also unlnwTul for a truck or 
other vehicle to damage] ft. The cycl- 
ist can] collect damages, even though 
he himself haB broken [the law. On 
the other hand, n cyclist is one of the 
few persons who [a Hahle for both 
real find" punitive n>inujyes If, while 
breaking the law, he Injures a pedes- 
trian. fA cyclist rjdlng on the left 
side of the street faces j the full limit 
of damqge action If^he hits anyone. 



imiT-j 



j Effocti of Smoking 
Completion of testa fiy Dr, A, L, 
Winsor.iof Cornell university, Indicate 
that the effect of smoking nn °n the 
human hody depends upon the Indi- 
vidual smoker, says j Pathfinder Maga- 
zine, Not only the physique of the 
smoker j hut the mannep of smoking 
and the amount smoked are the de- 
termining factors. He found that one 
cigarette— If Inhaled^wns enough to 
affect the steadiness of a non-smoker 
but a cigarette now and then actual- 
ly steadied a regular snooker. Exces- 
sive smokers have a tendency to un- 
steadiness. He found 'that the h'od.v 
develops a tolerance for nicotine up 
to a certain point iand excessive In 
this ense Is tnken to mean an amount 
beyond that point, ! 



Flea Mart Seeks Tariff Aid 

The demands of (he jlonlers at the 
Marche ;aux Puces that the wares that 
they se|l shall not be subject to for 
eign competition ts quite natural In 
these protectionist times, writes the 
Paris correspondent of the London 
Sunday j Observer. ''Buy French fleas 
only" la no doubt their dry. Of course, 
fleas are not the only things sold at 
this faraousuiarket, in spite of Its name, 
although they are the only live stock. 
Any kind of Junk— Including an occa- 
sional artistic masterpiece or anti- 
quarian rarity and a large number of 
"fnkea"— can be foijnd there; but Its 
really important trade I Is"* In second- 
hand clothes; and It fa upon these 
that higher Imporj. djities are de- 
aiandedj i 



World Represented; at Meals 
A report on the crjffeej tea and spice 
industry In Cannda showa how half the 
world la called on to contrihute some 
of the most common things of the 
meal table. For example. British Rasi 
Africa supplies most of:the cloves for 
Canadians. Mustard seed comes from 
the Netherlands, nutmegs from thp 
Straits Settlements and the British 
\Vest Indies, pepper frn'm the rtrltlsh 
and Dutch East Indies, Ceylon and 
the Straits Settlements-; spices from 
the Fnr Rast, glngej - from British In- 
dia and Spain. In ^ return for these 
products Cannda sells to the countries 
from which they are inught wheat, 
flour and a variety of manufactured 
products,- 



For Salc:- 

1931 Chevrolet 'Six' 
1 1-2 ton truck. Dual 
wheels, 157| in!, wheel 
i>ase, overload spring 

\v< Good Condition 

Peoples IGarage 

Angus, | Minn. 



Used Car 




Look into our used car sale. Trade off your old one fpr one 
better. One that is new In appearance and reconditioned^ You 
perhaps plan a vacation and by trading before you cou)d ekrn the. 
expenses of that trip by taking advantage of our salq, 
We list a few, select one and ask to drive' theni 



I- 1933 Ford V-8 TudOT Sedan. 
1- 1033 Ford V-8 Coupe. 

1- 1033 Ford V-8 Pickup 

2- 1031 Ford Tudor 

2- 1029 Pontlao Sedan 
- 1932 V-8 Tudor 

1- 1928 Dodge Truck, long wheel 
base, 

1- 1928 Chevrolet Fordor 



\- 1928 Essex Sedsjn 

1- 1929 Ford Tudo? 

1- Model 'T' Truck,' alpo 1 pure 
brerj Guernsey Bpll,; (papers 
on same can be attached 

1- 9 year old bay wiarp 
1- Cow and Calf \ 

1- Used Tractor Brush Breaker 

2- Used Mowers, 

>f cars, 



Visit our service station, Qu'ok service on all makes 

LUND and TUNBElfrG 



Your 



'The Home of 
PHO 




Dealers 



er Service" 

20 .? 



DEFECTIVE PAGE II 



JULY 

Clear 



JLsL^C 



Money Saving Reductions on Our 

Entire Stock of 

CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS 



J40FF 



On all Spring and 
Fall Topcoats 




FLORSHEIM SHOES 




• Florshelm values at regular prices are famous 
— so the present sale saving is just so much 
extra profit to you. Don't' lose money by wait- 
ing till too lotel Buy your shoe requirements nowl 



| Men's Dress 

I Oxfords 

H All leather, .calfskin— 

§ Best styles and remai k- 

' able values at this price. 

$245; 



Freeman 

Oxfords 

This line includes all 

sport models — Regular 

$5.00 value 

$429 



Work Shoes 



All leather, no composition soles, 
value at 



■ 6 in. 



6 in. 



A splendid 



16 in. 



$2.49 $4*49 



All merchandise from our regular stock. No 
special purchases have been made for this sale. 



Extraordinary Values- 
Two Racks of 

Bostonian Oxfords 



Tan Colors-Sizes 6 1^2 to 11 

Made to sell at $7.00 to S9.D0 

WHILE THEY 
,' LAST 




$2.95 



rmsm s 



ERIE 



The Ernest Peterson family I of 
Grand Forks spent the Fourth with, 
relatives ] in this community. j 

A very large crowd attended Itlie 
4th of July celebration at the C. 0. 
Elg farm. 

This community was saddened! to 
hear of the sudden death of Oliver 
Tommertfahl of Detroit Lakes. jHe 
was formerly an active farmer 
Star township. 

T. B. I Condon of Warren, was a 
business ', called around these parts 
on Tuesday of last week. 

Tharald Tharaldson has the honor 
of suggesting the name chosen jfor 
the new creamery in Deer Park. The 
name which is "River Valley Cream- 
ery," was picked out of a list i of 
over thirty suggestions. The farmers 
are now planning a co-operative. store 
which will bear the same name. > 

A large audience was present at 
the Parchocial School program given 
by Inga j and Janet Trontvet at the 
Eklund church. Sunday evening. 

The Rec; Owl Store of Thief River 
Falls will give a free movie show at 
the Clover Nook school house 
Monday ievening, July 16th. Lunch 
will be -served by the Erie 4-H club. 



THtSF.RiVEB FALLS FOfefrM, JH^F RlVfiR FALLS, MfN#fiSQTA. THUHSDA? ' JtJtY 12, 1934 



NQRDEN 



KRATKA 



Willis and Ernest Grindeland were 
over night guests at the Eddy JjLui- 
son home Monday. 

Martin RUat called in Thief River 
Falls on business Saturday. ' 

Emma Rhbdegard called on her 
friend Mrs. Gerhard Hanson Satur- 
day afternoon. 

i*tr. and Mrs. Gerhard Hanson and 
daughter Eleanor left for Warroad 
Sunday to visit with friency. 

Mrs. Charlie Sorenson visited' her 
mother Mrs. Bertha Sauger of Stien- 
er, Saturday. 

Soren Sorenson, C. T. Slinger, Ed. 
Johnson - and Gordon Olson attended 
.-he stock holders meeting of the co- 
operative creamery last j?'riday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Rust and Mrs. 
Gerhard Hanson and . daughter Elea- 
nor attended Young Peoples* Society 
in Thief River Falls Thursday. ■ 

Sam Johnson arrived Wednesday 
ipending the day with friends and rel- 
atives, and returning the same day 
to Grand Forks N. 1>. 

Mrs. Gerhard Hanson and Miss' j 
Emma Rhod'egard are entertaining' 



Oline Skaar returned home Sun- 
day after visiting her aunt, Mrs, 
Voldness. 

"Grandma" Johnson visited a week 
with Mrs. Martin Anderson, returning 
home Sunday. 

The 11-F telephone line has been 
out of order since the hail storm and 
a repair man was called to get the line 
in order again. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Johnson visit- 
ed with his mother, Mrs. Carrie 
Johnson Sunday. 

The Good Cheer Club held a picnic 
dinner at the Carl Amer farm Sun- 
day. Coffee and ice cream was served 
by the club. 

The Trinity Luther Ladies Aid is to 
be held at the Jens Kirk home Thurs- 
day./ 

.t^alph Olson returned home Sunday 
from Fort Snelling where he has been 
enlisted in CCC camps. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. E. Dydahl and 
daughter Lew Ann and Lydia Lock- 
rem visited at the Knute Knutseth 
home Sunday,. 

! Mrs. A. K.. Lockrem and daugh- 
ter Judith went to Bagley Monday on 
Business. 

Gertrude and Judith Lockrenii 



l%J™&Jr£?L£°™??i the Eleanor Hanson and Alma Rust called 



Gospel (meetings will be held in the 
Hofdahl school starting on July |l5 
and continuing through the week 
every night except Tuesday. Every- 
body welcome. i 

Miss Erne 1 Hamry of Thief River. 
Falls spent the Fourth with her ai»-i 
ter and lirother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Cohick. 

Alma and two grandsons of Grand 
Forks pre visting "with her parents, 
Mrl and ! Mrs. Knute Austin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bordeau of 
Grand' Forks spent Wednesday with 
Mrs. Bordeau*s mother, Mrs. Hilda 
Wilson. I 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Runnestrand 
and family visited over tht Fourth 
with relatives at Bagley and Shevlin. 

Donald Hoff of Fargo is visiting 
with his uncle and 1 aunt, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert Hanson. 

Louis Johnson is a guest at the 
Hilda Wilson home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Votava and 
two children, and. Mrs. Healer all 
from near Gully spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Lendobeja. 

Ingvold Hanson, who has been tak- 
ing up the bacber trade at Fargo, 
arrived here Wednesday and will be 
employed! at a barber shop in Thief 
River Falls. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hanson mo- 
tored to Mcintosh with Mr. and Mrs. 
Odin Hanson of Silverton, on Thurs- 
day, to attend the funeral of Mrs. 
Henry Clemenson, who died last Sun- 
day. .■■ | 

Miss Laura Knutson, who is a 
nurse at jthe Physicians hospital at 
Thief River Falls, spent Friday eve- 
ning withl her mother, Mrs. S. Knut- 
son. | rf . . 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Johnson and 
two sons [visited with Mr. and Mrs. 
Odin Hanson near Silverton on Fri- 
day evening. | 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Waale had as 
guests from Wednesday until Fri- 
day, T. Waale and sons, Halvpr 
Skretvedt ! and daughters, Ole Skret- 
vecvt and Hilda Skretvedt from Niels- 
ville, Minn. j 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cohich and 
child were social callers at the A. 
Brailand home on Sunday. I 

Mrs. Ole Hofdahl's sister, who has 
been visiting hare for some time, 
left on Saturday for her home at 
Havre, Mont. j 

Mr. and- Mrs. Bert Johnson and 
son were social callers at the Knute 
Austin home Sunday forenoon. 

The Young People's Society, which 
was held at the R. M. Johnson home 
on Sunday, was well attended. I 

Mr. and. Mrs. Joseph Johnson and 
two sons jwere social callers at the 
Simon Brailand home Sunday eve.. 

Archie, Fred and June Wilson were 
visitors in Thief River Falls Satur- 
day evening. 

Miss Mable Brevick spent the week 
end with her parents here, Mr. and 
Mrs. Olaf I Brevick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Hanson 
and son ivisited with the latters 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. Angell in 
Smiley on Sunday. 

Simon Brailand was a business 
caller in Thief River Falls on Thurs- 
day. 



Norden church Tuesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Johnson vis- 
ited at the home of his brother Ed. 
Johnson and C. T. Slinger Wednes- 
day afternoon. 

Mrs. Carrie Johnson is spending 
the week end with her son Albert 
Johnson and friends in Thief River 
Falls. - ^ 

Norma"n, Kenneth and* Laurena 
were visitors at the S. Hoviek home 
Tuesday. • j 

lone Hanson spent the week end 
witht her grandmother, Mrs. Alfred 
Olson and aunt Cleo. 

Mrs. Alvin Comstock spent Tues- 
day with her mother Mrs. A. Olson 
and with her sister Mrs. Elmer Han- 
son. 



in Thief R"iver 
Monday. 



Falls on business, 



GRYGLA 



This was almost a deserted* village 
on the 4th of July. With celebra- 
tions within 15 or 20 miles distance 
on all sides most citizens of our city 
felt patriotic enough to go and show 
their colors at one place or another. 
Roy Brown, manager of the Texeco 
Oil Station, left on a pleasure trip 
to Winger last week. 

Donald Holbrook and family of In- 
ternational Fells arrived here last 
: xittii- 1 Sunday to visit at the W. A. Hol- 
*m&«4 brook/ home. 



Kenneth Lyden is staying with bis! Rufcsell Wentz and Edna Peterson 

aunt and uncle on the Rhodegard of Grand Forks, N. p. arrived here 

farm helping with the haying. j last Saturday enroute to Red Lake. 

Lydia Lockrem for the past week They were accompanied from here by 

Lyd'ia Lockrem has been staying at Mr. and Mrs. O. J. . Peterson and 

the M. Rust's Dydahl's homes the past daughter Adelaide. 



day to attend* the County fair and 
also to visit with Mr. and Mrs. fid. 
Sbanley. i 

The Grygla 4-H club i held its July 
meeting last Saturday afternoon. An 
interesting .program was given and 
games were played the balance of the 
afternoon. The members and their 
leaders are contemplating a trip to 
Red Lake for their next! meeting. 



HAZEL 



Poverty Due to Illness 
It is estimated that 20 per cent of 
the poverty In normal times Is attrib- 
utable to chronic Illness. 



Indian Mounds, Golf Hazards 

In the Mississippi valley many golf 
courses have as hazards Indian mounds, 
made centuries ago. 



Monastery of St. Stephen 

The Monastery of St Stephen, which 
was founded by the Byzantine Emper- 
or Andronlcus, Is one of the 14 mete- 
ora, or hanging monasteries, built on 
Isolated rocks of Thessaly, northern 
Greece. It Is* separated from tha 
ground behind a deep, narrow chatm, 
which Is spanned by a drawbridge. 



Quite a number of friends from here 
attenlec- the funeral for the late Mrs. < 
Anna Walbeck at Thief River Falls' 
last Thursday. | 

Mrs. Gust Larson and son Stanley 
visited' at the Art Swanson home on 
Tuesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. Bergland from 
Crookston spent the Fourth here at 
the Aug. Svenson home and also with 
other relatives. ( 

The girls Sewing class of the 4-H 
club met at the BainbrjcJge home on 
Friday. j 

Edel Sparby of Grygla came here 
Tuesday evening and is spending 
some time here with friends. 

Mrs. James Kenney and daughter 
Ellen of St. Hilaire hiked out to 
the Aug Swenson home Friday where 
they spent the day visiting. 

Mr .and Mrs. F. Ulrick and son Lew- 
is visited Sunday at the A. P. An- 

Mrs. John Asp was a caller at the 
derson home. ! 

Mrs. John Asp was a caller at the 

Erickson home where little Jimmy 



seriously 



ill. Jimmy 



Thief River Falls hos- 



| EAST ROCKSBURY | 

• ! _» 

The Rocksbury 4-H club will hold 
its annual; tour on Sunday, July 15. 
The tour jwill start at ten o'clock 
sharp from' the Andrew Arne farm, 
continuing; to the Toomey, S. Het- 
land, Henry Oen, Anna Anderson, 
Myrom, Louisie Anderson in Thief 
Oliver Falls, T. Steve, O. Lian, E. 
Tlatfenson.j and Engelstad farms .and 
having a jpicnic at Valhalla. Any- 
one outside the club, wishing to come 
please bring sandwiches for your 
family and one other dish. In the 
afternoon !a ball game will be played- 
between Silverton and Smiley. 

Remember the Community Club on 
Saturday (evening, July 14th. The 
4-H club will furnish the program. 

Henry Hanson and Hans Hanson 
of Fargo- motored to the Andrew 
Arne home on Saturday where they 
visited until Sunday. They were ac- 
companied) back by Mrs. Hans Han- 
son and sons who have been visiting 
here for "the past two weeks. 

Ed. Hoxiske spent Saturday and 
Sunday at Bemidji visiting with his 
brother, Joe Hauge. 

Miss Margaret Palm visited on 
Friday evening and Saturday at the 
home of her sister, Mrs. Carl Finstad. 

Mr. and! Mrs. Otto Johnson and 
Mrs. Hauge were Wednesday evening 
visitors at; the Ed. Houske home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Weiberg of 
Grand Forks spent Sunday at the 
S. Weiberg home. 

Mr. and: Mrs. Pete Iverson and ' 3 
children and Olaf Ness of Langdon, 
N. D., came Saturday for a few days 
visit at the Iver Iverson home. ! 

Let thei Forum advertisements be 
your mail-6r<5er catalogue. j 



week. 

Olaf Lappygard had the misfor- 
tune of running in the ditch the 4th 
of July night, he was on his way to 
a dance. The car is badly smashed. 
He was taken to the hospital, badly 
cut up. 

Howard Gulseth and his sister 
Myrtle spent Sunday afternoon vis- 
iting C. T. Slinger and his daugh- 
ter Bessie. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sjolsvold called 
in a Thief River Falls hospital to vis- 
it Nic Nelson. 

Miss Gena Sjolsvold visited at the 
R. M. Jablinske home Sunday. 

Mrs. M. Grant spent Monday af- 
ternoon visiting Mrs. Eddy Johnson. 

Miss Ethel Lorenson /visited her 
sister's Carrie and Mable of Thief 
River Falls, Friday. 

Arthur Larson called on Soren Sor- 
enson Friday. 

Mrs. A. Anderson and sons Willie, 
Chester and LaVern spent Tuesday 
evening visiting Mrs. S. Hoviek and 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eddy Johnson and 
sons, Earl, Donald and' Lyle and 
Dolores and Relein, spent Wednes- 
day visiting Mrs. D. W. Ayers and 
family. 

Lawrence and Chester Olson and 



Ross Schmidt of Crookston is vaca- 
tioning at the H. M. Hope home. 

Leona Bucholz left for Grand Forks 
last Tuesday after having spent a 
number of days visiting with rela- 
tives and frienda. 

Clarence Peterson and 1 Alice Sal- 
veson motored to Mavie to visit with 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ristau last Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. Laseisson and two children of 
Viking are visiting with her sister, 
Mrs. Tom Knutson of Spruce Grove. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hope and 
Russell Franzman motored to Ers- 
kine one day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rube Sandberg and 
Mr. and* Mrs., Clifford Bjorkman of 
Thief River Falls left last Sunday on 
a tour to Underwood, Duluth and 
other parts of the state. 

The Union Sunday school of Crook- 
ston is having a 10-day Bible School 
at the school house this week. Miss 
Cornelius and Miss Brunes are cap- 
able instructors and they will give a 
program by the children next Thurs- 
day evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pete Sveden of Bran- 
son were Sunday visitors at the Anna 
0. Brown home. Edith Engelbert. 
Gertrude and Gordon accompanied 
them on their return trip to spend a 



¥iu- ^ n( ? Mrs - GIenn 01son and j week visiting friends at" that place. 
Albin Peterson spent the fourth at the Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Maney and 

children motored to Warren last Sun- 



Gordon Olson farm, 



Gilbertson 
was take to 
pital. 

Ernest Erickson was a Grygla visit- 
or last Tuesday . j 
man home Saturday evening. 

The 4-H club met at the F. Both- 
H. Fellman was a Thief River Falls 
visitor Saturday. j 

Legal Notices 

CITATION FOR HEARING ON 
PETITION FOR PROBATE OF 
WILL. j 

STATE OP MINNESOTA,' 
County of Pennington, saj 

IN PROBATE COTJKT 

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE 

OF Christopher H. Porter; also known 

as C. H. Porter, or Chris H. Porter, 

Decedent. ■! . 

THE STATE OF MINNESOTA TO 
Elra C. .Porter, Kenneth HJ .Porter, Ken- 
neth H. Porter, Jr., Nettie jOve, and Ida 
Ove, and all persons Interested in. the al- 
lowance and probate of the will of said 
decedent: The petition ofjjElra C. Por- 
ter being- duly filed in this'icourt, repres- 
enting that Christopher H; Porter, also 
known as C. H. Porter, then a resident of 
the County of Pennington State of Min- 
nesota, died on the 19th day of June 1934. 
leaving a last will and testament which 
is presented to this court with said peti- 
tion, and pray In that said instrument 
be allowed as the last will and teatament 
of said decedent, and that betters of Ad- 
ministration with the will annexed be 
issued thereon to Elra C. I Porter, NOW 
THEREFORE, you, and each of you, are 
hereby cited and required to show cause, 
if any you have, before this ^ourt, at 
the Probate Court Rooms! in the Court 
House; in Thief River Falls C&unty of 
Pennington State of Minnesota, on the 
21st day of July 1934, at 10:00 o'clock A. 
M., why the prayer of llsaid petition 
should not be granted. II 

■WITNESS THE HONORABLE. An 
drew Bottelson, Judge of said court, 
and the seal of said court, this 25111 
day of June 1934. | 

Andrew " Bottelson 
s. Judge. 

C&URT SEAL .1 

H.J O. Berve, | 

Attorney for Petitioner i 

Thief River Fall-j. Minn. 

June 28 July &02 



' JMAA^f^LIUl^liMMM 





r *w*. 



But ACT NOW' .When- We Jcfi/.e/ea ranee W£M£AH IT: 



.Thrifty customers are hurrying to Penney's this week •• 

■nap up the big clearance bargains I Don't miss this granA 

opportunity to save on timely needs with lots of summer stfl 

ahead. 

Many clearance items are not advertised but all are plainly 

marked throughout the store. Act now! ~ 

CLEARANCE IN 

MENS SUITS 

Reduced because we need the room for our new fall 
stock — A real buy that you can't affoid to pass.' 



Mens Work 

Shoes 

Made of choc, retaned 
leather, water resisting, 
composition sole. - 



Mens Summer 

Underwear 

Long legs, short sleeves 

—a weight right for 

warm weather. 

sizes 36 to 46 



Mens Blue Chambray 

Shirts 

Specially priced for this 

event. Sizes 14 1-2 to 

17. 



$9© 



r 



Closing Out Mens Dress 

Straw Hats 

Odds and ends of sum- 
mer stock, priced to 
sell at 

98c 



J. C. Penney Co. 



iBOt) 



DEPARTMENT • f T9 l| 




THOUSANDS have changed to this new su_ 
gasoline and report gains of 1 to 3 miles more 



MOTORISTS everywhere 
are changing to the new 
supercharged Super Shell and 
talking- about their extra 
MILEAGE. 

Owners of all types, of cars 
report that Super Shell gives 
them from 1 to 3 miles more 
per gallon. 

We knew that Super Shell 
would be a great success, be- 



cause Shell's new supercharg- 
ing process packs up to 6900 
extra firing charges into every 
gallon. These extra firing 
chargesgiyeyougreaterpower, 
quicker pick-up, and — as you 
motorists tell us — from 1 to 3 
miles more per gallon. 

Getthese extrafiring charges 
in your car— at no extra cost. 
Keep an accurate check of 



and 



your mileage, 

why supercharged 
is taking the country 



percharged 
per gallon 



you'fl know 

Super .Shell 

by storm. 





SHELL 

'edfor even More Mileage 

OOTzfeht, MM, Shell Petroleum Oarpozation 



GET YOUR 

MILEAGE"CHECK> 

at any 

SHELL STATION 



OEN MERCANTILE 

Hulk and Service Station, Atlantie at 8th St. 
North Main Avenue Service Station 



its body in hot weather -gives More Mileage 



t (M/BEPARTMENT 

Aaseby Garage at 3rd St. 

0. K. One Stop, Main Ave. .ft list St 



DEFECTIVE PAGE | 




r? 



r- 






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thief ftfyfeit. falls F6RtrM, thdSF hiVer faLLs, tttNtrtiSofA 



SUNDAY 

-at the- 

CHURCHES 



i Mavie Lutheran Church 

i I E. O. Sabo, Pastor! 

Sunday, July loth: Services in tht 
Telemarken cnurch at 10:30 |A- M. 

Thei confirmants will meet j at Tele- 
marken .Monday, July loth '■ at 2 ir 
M., |at Suverton, July 17th at 2 P. 
M., and at Highlanding, Friday. Jul} 
13th at 2 P.M. 



Rev. Fjelstad to Conduct 
Services at Lake of the 
Woods Camp July 16-20 

Rev. E. M. Fjelstad, pastor of the 
Trinity Lutheran Church, will be in 
charge -of the evening inspirational 
services ■ at the Lutheran Bible camp 
which will "be held next week at the 
Lake of the "Woods near Baucjatte. 



| Scand. Evan. Free Church 

I ! J. 6. Jacobson, Pastor 

* • 

Sunday school at 10 A. M. 
Morning worship at 11. Special of 
, ferine for China Mission. 
Evening worship at8. 
Prayer meeting Thursday evening 

Miss Euth Turnwall will entertaii 
the 'sewing circle at the church 01 
Friday evening. 

Union Youni* People's meeth% al 
the Swedish Mission Church nex, 
Tuesday evening at S, led by Mis: 
Johanna Peters. Prayer begins a. 
7:30J ! 

The Mission offering taken Sunda} 
morning will go to Mrs. Bergstron. 
and Julius. , „ . ^mtM&i 



I Aug. Lutheran Church 1 

[^ H. L. Sjogren, Pa*W ) 

Morning worship at 11:00. j 

Evening service at 8:00. 

Mid-week service at 8 P M. on 
Thursday. 

Ladies Aid on Friday, July 13, al 
3:00.| Mrs. C. \V. Mattson, hostess. 

The Luther Leogue will meet on 
July; 17 at 8:00. This meeting will 
be helij at John Longrens. Those 
entertaining are John Longrens, Mrs 
Edgar Longren, and Miss fit th Lee. 
This jwill be a social meeting. In cast 
of inclement weather we shall meet 
in the Church. 

The Woman's Missionary w 11 meet 
on Thursday afternoon, July 19, II 
weather permits we shall meet at 
John Longrens. 

GOSPEL MEETINGS! 



Cooperative Creameries Will 
Hold Picnic Sunday, July 22 

The Northwestern Group Co-opera- 
tive picnic, which had been postpon- 
ed from a previous date, will be held 
at Grygla on Sunday, July 22. Sev- 
eral speakers will be present as well 
as a band and many other features. 
John Brandt, president of the Land O' 
Liakes ' creameries will be unable to 
.peak as was orginally planned. 



Local Women, 38 Years Dies 
in Local Hospital Saturday 

Miss Klevestad ,a resic-ent of the 
_-ity for nine years, passed away Sat- 
urday at a local hospital. She was 
jorn January 28, 18U6 at Fosston, 
and leaves two brothers and one sis- 
,er. Services were held Thursday, at 
Jagley, Minnesota. 



Fireworks Thrill World's Fair Crowds 



thtosbaV iWi 12, 1934' 



V 



Gospel meetings will be held in the 
Hofdahl School, 1 mile south and % 
mile west of Kratka Bridge, starting 
Suncay, July 15, and continuing thru 
the week, every night except Tuesday 
The Gospel Team from Thief Rivei 
will be in charge of the pro 



Falls 



ed to 



gram, A cordial invitation is extend- 



all. 



I 



COMMUNITY CHURCH 
E. A. Cooke, Pastor 



Sunday, July 15: 

Service at St. Hilaire at 8:30 A. M. 

Church school at Thief River Falls 

at 9:45. , ■ ^ 

j uing worship at 11 o'clocTf oy 

the pastor. There will be special 

music. . & ., 

In the evening the "Passion Flay" 
will be given in motion picture. This 
is a rjare treat as few have been able 
to see that famous production. There 
will be no charge for this picture but 
an offering will be taken to defray 
expenses. This will be of interest to 
both adults and children. 

The pastor and his wife will be 
starting on their vacation Monday tc 
be gone for three weeks. The pulpit 
will be supplied, each Sunday morn- 
ing in their absence." 

*TRLNITY LUTHERAN CHURCH*! 
j. R. M. Fjelstad, Pastor | 



Morning worship at 10 o'clock A. 
M. 

The pastor will leave in the after- 
noon for the Lake of the Woods Bible 
Camp which will be in session July 
16-22. He will return for mornin 
services, July 22nd. 

Trinity Ladies' Aid will be enter- 
tained by circle No. 10 on Thursday. 
July !l9th. 

Always a hearty welcomed 
I - 

When ft Congressman Resigns 

When a congressman wishes to re 
sign [he sends his resignation! to the 
governor of his stute, or to the pre- 
siding ollieer of the house of congress 
of which he is a member. The usnnl 
practice In the house Is to send chp 
letter of resignation to the governor, 
also notifying the speaker of the house. 
If the member resigns directly to the 
aenatie or the house, the body to which 
he belongs orders the presiding ofllcer 
to Inform the governor of his state of 
the resignation. 



LOCAL MARKETS 



i 

THIEF EIVEK FALLS GKAIN3 
Asreuoited by Tbioi River Falls Seed 
| House 

No. 1 Hard Northern $ .79 

No.|l Dark Northern .70 

No. INorthern Spring .73 

No. i Amber Durum .71 

No. 1 Mixed Durum .71 

No. i Red Durum .(13 

Flax 1.53 

Oats .'H 

Borlby .39 

Rye | /3 

Buckwheat per hundred 1 05 

POULTRY MARKET 
As quoted by Land O' Lakes Ciearm-rlcs 



Heavy Hens 4« lb or over 
Llcht hens 
Cox j 
Stags 
Goose 
D Dobs 
. Dnclcs under 5 pounds ; 
Leghorn springs 
Colored Springs 2 lb. up 
Leghorn Broilers liilb or over 

PRODUCE 
Cash Cream 
Eggs. Firsts 

Seconds 



.03 



ESTHER AMREN MARRIED 
TO KENNETH CHRISTIE 

Miss Anna Amren, and Kenneth 
Christie, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. S 
Christie of this city, were married on 
Sunday evening at the Swedish Luth- 
eran parsonage with Rev. H. L. Sjo- 
gren reading the service in the pre-, 
sence of Miss Ruth Jorde and Rol- 
land Christie, brother of the groom. 

A reception was held at the groom't 
home following the ceremony. Mr.- 
Christie is employed with the local 
Peterson- Biddick company. The 
couple will make their home at 408 
Aiarkley Avenue Sotlth. 



LOCAL NEV/S 




Brilliant' fireworks displays are a 
quent night feature at the new 
rld'a Fair '.'« Chicago. This bomb 



Is one of the many that burst on open- 
ing night. The buildings are, left to 
right: Federal building, Sky Ride and 



Electrical group. The opening day 
crowd was surprised to find the Fair 
complete. 



Miss Lila Holt returned Wednesday 
after having enjoyed a month's vaca- 
tion during which she spent most of 
tiie time visiting with her brother 
Ervin Holt at San Diego, California. 
Miss Holt took a southern route bus 
trip to San Diego and made stops at 
Kansas City, Missouri, and Albuq- 
uerque, New Mexico. On her return 
she made stops at Salt Lake Ciiy, 
Utah, and points in Nevada. 

Sunday guests dt the A. C. Mathe- 
ion home were Mrs. Emily Solidakke 
of Drayton, N. D., Mr. and Mrs. H. 
M. Hanson of Warren, and Mrs. L. 
Bjorsness and cjaughter Lillian of 
i-lewf olden. 

Approximately 30 cars of. local 
residents motored to Wan-en on Fri- 
day and attended the Mashall County 
rair as a goodwill delegation from 
this. city. 

Among the local people who attend- 
ed the district picnic of the Odd Fel- 
lows and Rebeckahs at Maple Lake on 
Sunday were Mrs. C. H. Jung, Mrs. 
J. W. Ruane, Miss Rose Erickson, Mr 
and Mrs. Charles Schultz, Adolf 
Eklund, Charles Fisher and Dr. P. L. 
Vistaunet. There was an attendance 
of approximately 75 at the picnic. 

'Mr. and* Mrs. A. J. Lee, son 
Emmett, and daughter Alice of Edin- 
burgh, N. Dak. visited last week at 
the J. O. Kivle home. Selmer Kivle 
returned with them and will spend 
some time at Edinburgh. 
* R. M. Aalbu -is leaving this evening 
to attend a meeting of the Farmer-La- 
bor newspaper publishers and editors 
at Minneapolis. He wll return on Sat- 
urday morning. ' 

W. Et" Rowe, candidate for district 
judge, spent Thursday in this city on 
matters of business. ^— . 

Mrs. William Sheecy and daughter 
Rose are enjoying a visit in Columbia 
Fails, Montana with Mrs. Sheedy's 
father, John Kivel. On their way 
there they made a stop at Glaciei 
National Park. 

Miss Charlotte McAnnany anc 1 
Charles Dablow spent last Sunday 
in the game reserve at Thief Lake, o' 
which Robert Fordder hos charge 
They were guests at the Fordde 
home. 

Mrs. Lily Reetz and daughters Shir** 
ley and Arlene of Minneapolis, ar- 
rived Moncuy and will spend some 
time as guests of Mrs. C. H: Jung 

Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Lindberf and 
daughter Adeline motored to Fargc 
on Thursday, returning on Friday. 

Mrs. M. Jonas of St. Paul is visit- 
ing at the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
C. Wiltrout in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo. Haney and two 
sons of Los Angeles, Calif., are vis- 
iting at the home of Mr. and? Mrs. T 
C. Haney. 



English Unite Sports 
Sports In ull piirts of the world Is 
being united by English, according to 
u European student, and football is 
one of the games with an almost uni- 
versal lar.guage. The French play 
"football," and Spanish and South 
American countries call It "el futhol," 
which Is near enough. The German 
"outside" wing man scores a "goal" 
In football, he plays for Ms "team" 
and does his "training" If Ids club Is 
playing for a "cup." And' the game 
Itself, as in France, is "football." Play- 
ers in Prance. Germany and Italy are 
all penalized by the referee If they 
have committed a "foul." In fact, no 
fontballer need worry about being mis- 
understood anywhere In the world. 
"Gnai,** "offside" and "center" are 
practically universal words today. 



Tills Bird Has Speed 

At wiilt'ly-suparuted points on the 
prairies. s:iys Nature Magazine, you 
ai:d outcrops of sandstone, forming 
eli:Ts or ln:ttes, and here you are sure 
to lind In V.:q portholes or on ledges the 
brli-k-red rggs of that most Splendid 
of all our birds of prey — the prairie 
falcon. A bird of marvelous speed and 
indomitable courage, this little falcon 
typifies the wild freedom of the Great 
Plains. Less frequently you come up- 
on the eyries of tfie majestic golden 
eagle. The nests, which are often 
used for generations, are added to, 
year after year, until the material 
composing them would All the. body of 
a wagon. 



The World's Cil Supply 

Petroleum in known deposits and at 
the rate of the present consumption 
is sufficient to last the world for the 
next 30 centuries, according to Dr. 
Gustave K^Ioff, of Chicago. With only 
2,000,000 acres of oil well- producing 
in the United States alone, Doctor Eg- 
loff points out that America has 
f.'IOOjDOO.COO acres of possible oil land 
that is ye! to be explored and devel- 
oped, i 



Appendicitis Deaths 

Every twenty-sis minutes some one 
In the United Stales dies' of 'appendi- 
citis, says a writer in Hygela, the 
health magazine, commenting that de- 
lay and wrong medicines cause 18,000 
of the 20,000 deaths from appendicitis 
each year. 



Sense of In completion 

"How did you like my radio talk on 
current events?" 

"It seemed kind of Incomplete to 
me," answered Senator Sorghum. "Tt 
didn't contain a word about coffee, 
tooth paste or patent medicine.** 



Canada's White Population 

Canada's white population is more 
than 50 per cent of British origin and 
nearly 30 per cent French origin. 



EARTH'S INTERIOR 

YET TO BE EXPLORED 



N 



-E^F 



With all unknown lands mapped 
the explorer of tomorrow must turn 
his attention to the earth's interior. 
Explanation of the surface Is nearing 
completion, yet the earth a few miles 
beneath Is still as secret as was the 
Western Hemisphere; before Columbus. 

Man has penetrated two miles 
down by means of oil \veU drills and 
has descended one mile Into a gold 
mine, but these depths are mere pin 
pricks compared to the 4,000 miles 
that lie between the_ earth's surface 
and Its center. It will not be neces- 
sary to drive a tunnel through "the 
earth to learn about Its Interior, ac- 
cording to Prof. W. T. Thom, Jr., of 
Princeton university. One possible aid 
to exploration of the Interior Is the 
airplane, with which photographs may 
be taken to disclose Inter-relations be- 
tween widely separated geological 
structures, according to Popular Me- 
chanics. I 

Delicate gravity; balances are 
available for disclosing rock forma- 
tions burled under: less dense depos- 
its. Devices have b}en produced for 
"listening in" oil' explosion waves 
started through the earth by settlnj 
off TNT charges. 






• l! 



ij 



Lutheran Free Church 
Holds Convention For 
Four Days This Week 

Commencing yesterday, the young 
people's federation of the Lutheran 
Free Church assembled in this city 
for a 4-day convention. Rev. J. T. 
Quanbeck of Roseau, the district 
president, will preside at the conven- 
tion, the theme of which will be 
"Walking with God". Dr. B. M. Chris- 
tenson of Minneapolis who is a speak- 
er of renown, will address the young 
people on Friday mornikg and even- 
ing, Saturday afternoon tend Sundav 
morning and afternoon. 

The sessions for the first .three 
days will be conducted at the Ziorr 
Lutheran Church, while the Sunday 
services will take place at the city 
auditorium. Meetings will take place 
on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday al 
10:30 in the morning, at 2 in tfie 
afternoon, and at 8 in the evening. 

Blame It on the Women 

"Women stir up trouble In poll 
tics," said HI llo, tile sage of China- 
town, "because of the natural house- 
keeping sense that insists on having , 
the dust swept out of dark corners." I 



GRACE JAHR IS BRIDE TO 
HALSTAD MAN 

Of interest to local people will be 
the marriage of Miss Grace Jahr, 
daughter of Mr. and' Mrs. A. C. Jahr 
of the city, to Alve Johnson of Hal- 
stad, Minn., on Saturday, June 30, at 
Crotokston. The young couple /will 
make their home at Warren where 
the groom is employed. 



Erickson and Lund 
FUNERAL HOME 

M. P. ERICKSON 

Funeral Director 

Prompt Ambulance Service 

321 N. Main 

Day and Night Phone 404-W 



Children Are Safe At The 

AVAL ON 

Always Cool & Comfortable. 

Fri., Sat, July 13-14 
. "Hips, Hips Hooray" 

With — Robert Woolsey and Bert 
Wheeler, also — 7th Chapter, 
"Tarzan the Fearless." 

Mat. Sat. 2:30. Adm. B-15-25c 
Eve. Adm. 10-20-25c 

Sun-Mon. July 15-16 
"OPERATOR 13" 

With Marion Davis, Gary Cooper 

and Four Mills Brothers. 

Matinee Sunday at 2:30 

Tuesday, July 17 

TAKE A CHANCE NIGHT 

Children 10c. Adults 15c 

WedThur. July 18-19 
"Thirty Day Princess" 

Starring Sylvia Sidney anO 
Gary Grant. 

—ONE CENT SALE— 



WANt" 



ADS 



CAN IT BE DONE?' - b^c™ 




Tail Gate Eixvator 

QoUlPPINff THE TAIL GA*£ OP A TRUCK WITH ELEVATORS 
POWERED OT fTHE MOTOR WU. PERMIT EASY HAHDUNO OF 
ttEAW CJBJ6CTS. CAN IT BS DONE? 



| Forum Want Ads, one cent a word 

FOR RENT — 6 room modern house 
ready for immediate occupancy. — T. 
C. Orme, Phone 293. 15-i3-ltc 

' FOR SALE — Team of good work 
horses, ~5 and 7 years old. — C. C. 
Schuster, 622 St. Paul Ave. S. 



■n 



Do you think this Idea Is practical? Write Bay Gross in care of this newspaper ' 



FOR SALE: Small pigs, $2.00 each. 
First come first served. C. F. Carlson, 
Hazel, Rt. 2 16-ltp 

-FOR SALE: Modern house at 401 
Knight Ave. So. another at G16 Duluth 
No.. Half section of land, 3 miles west 
of St. Hilaire at $12 per- acre. Inquire 
at Ole Moen's Real Estate Agency. 
Many more bargains coll and see us. 
308 Horace No. 45-ltp 



TYPEWRITERS:— If you want to 
buy, sell or trade typewriters — Phone 
198, Hamilton's. 13-rtc 

HIGHEST cash prices paid for 
wool and hides. Magnuson's Feed 
Store. Phone 42. E. Husty. 16 7-ltp 



FOR SALE: — 1 wheel trailer with 
box and stock rack. Nearly new. Over 
sized tires. — E. T. Burstad 16-ltp 

Any Size Kodak Film .Developed 
Including 8 High Grade Glassy Prints 
25c — Salveson Studio 



FOR SALE— Modern home, six 
looms, 100 foot lot. Corner Ninth 
and Main at 823. Phone 372. 17-13-c 



FOR SALE — Horses and Cattle, 
terms if desired. — Northern Credit 
Co., B. J. Shaw, manager. 12-tfc 



Fin e home sites for sale — Block 17, 
Red Lake Rapids Addition, adnoin< 
ing new highway. Selling feat. 
Get Yours Now 
CITIZENS STATE BANK 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



I! 



*lp- 



J5 






thief sfvfeia. fails gdfttfft. Titer ktveb faiis, ^rJESbTA 



SUNDAY- 

-at the- 

CHURCHES 



ivi 



avie Lutheran Church 

E. O. Sabo, Pastor! 



Sunday, July 16th: Services in tht 
Telemarken -church at 10:30 ! A- M. 

The eonfirmantii will meetjat Tele- 
marken ,Monday, July Itith at U ±- 
M., 1 at Suverton, July 17th |at 2 P. 
M.,i and at Highlanding, Friday, Julj 
13th at 2 P.M. j 



Scand. Eyan. Free Church 

| J. O. Jacobson, Pastor I 



Sunday school at 10 A. M. 
Morning worship at 11. Special of- 
, ferine for China Mission. | 
Evening worship at8. 
Prayer meeting Thursday .evening 

Mis3 Ruth Turnwall w^ll entertair 
the ; sewing circle at the church oi 
Friday evening. I 

Union YounR: People's meeting at 
the Swedish Mission Church nex\ 
Tuescsay evening at 8, led' by Mis: 
Johanna Peters. Prayer begins 
7:30. j 

The Mission offering taken jSundaj 
morning will go to Mrs. Hergstron. 
and Julius. , _ . ...■■... L—ui«f 



Rev. [Fjelstad to Conduct 
Services at Lake of the 
Woods .Camp July 16-20 

Rev.; R. M. Fjelstad, pastor of the 
Trinity Lutheran Church, will be in 
charge; of the evening inspirational 
services at the Lutheran Bible camp 
which will be held next week at the 
Lake of the Woods near Baudette. 



i 



Aug. Lutheran Church 

H. L. Sjogren, Partw 



M. 



Morning worship at 11:00. 

Evening service at 8:00. 

Mid-week service at 8 P 
Thursday. \ 

Ladies Aid on Friday, July. 13, at 
3:00. Mrs. C. W. Mattson, hostess. 

The Luther Leogue will meet on 
July 17 at 8:00. This meeting wilt 
be held- at John Longrens. j Those 
entertaining are John Longrens, Mrs 
Edgar Longren, and Miss Ruth Lee. 
This will be a social meeting. In cast 
of inclement weather we shall meet 
in the ChVch. 

The Woman's Missionary will meet 
on Thursday afternoon, July ] 19, If 
weather permits we shall meet at 
John Longrens. 

GOSPEL MEETINGS!! 



Gospel meetings will be held in the 
Hofdahl School, 1 mile south and % 
mile; west of Kratka Bridge, starting 
. Sunday, July 15, and continuing thru 
the week, every night except Tuesday 
The ! Gospel Team from Thief Rivei 
Falls will be in charge of j the pro- 
gram. A cordial invitation is extend- 
ed to all. *. i 



i |" COMMUNITY CHURCH j 

I E. A. Cooke, Pastor j I 

* ; 1 ■ 

Sunday, July 15: j 

Service at St. Hilaire at 8:30 A. M. 

Church school at Thief River Falls 

at 9':45. ' I -«** 

kiung worship at 11 o'cloclf uy 

-the ipastor. There will be 'special 

music. j , ^ 

In| the evening the "Passion Flay" 
will jbe given in motion picture! This 
is a j rare treat as few have been able 
to see that famous productions There 
will jbe no charge for this picture but 
an offering will be taken to j defray 
expenses. This will he of interest to 
bothj adults and children. j 

The pastor and his wife wilf be 
starting oh their vacation Monday tc 
be gone for three weeks. The pulpit 
will Jbe supplied each Sunday! morn- 
ing^in their absence.' " ■ 



I TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 1 
I I R. M. Fjelstad, Pastor. | 

Morning worship at 10 o'clock A. 
M. | 

The pastor will leaved in the after- 
noon for the Lake of the Woods Bible 
Camp which will be in session July 
16-22. He will return for mornin 
services, July 22nd. 

Trinity Ladies' Aid will be enter- 
tained by circle No. 10 on Thursday. 

hearty welcome! 



Julyj 19th. 
Always 



When a" Congressman Resigns 

When a congressman wishesj to re- 
sign! be semis his reslgontlun ;to the 
governor of his state, or to ilie pre- 
siding olticer of the bouse of congress 
of which he Is a member. The usun) 
practice in the house Is to send thp 
letter of resignation to the governor, 
atsolnotlfylng the speaker of the, house. 
If the member resigns directly {to the 
■ena'te or the hnnse, the body to which 
he belongs orders the presiding officer 
to Inform the^governor ot his state of 
the 'reslgnatfnn. j 



Cooperative Creameries Will 
Hold Picnic Sunday, July 22 

The Northwestern Group Co-opera- 
tive picnic, which had been postpon- 
ed from a previous date>\will be held 
at Grygla on Sunday, July 22. Sev- 
eral speakers wilL be present as well 
as a band and many other Nfeatures. 
John Brandt, president of the Land O' 
.bakes ^creameries will be unable to 
.peak as was orginally planned. 

Local Women, 38 Years Dies 
in Local Hospital Saturday 

Miss Klevestad ,a resident of the 
_-ity for nine years, passed away Sat- 
jrday at a local hospital. She was 
jorn January 28, 18y6 at Fosston, 
and leaves two brothers and one sis- 
;;er. Services were held Thursday at 
3agley, Minnesota. 



^^^^^^s^^^^^^y^^^^j^ 



MroabAV'itfclr 12, isW 



■-r*r~:- **p^T? >*\it.. ■*■<■*». 



Fireworks Thrill World's 



ESTHER AMREN MARRIED 
TO KENNETH CHRISTIE 

Miss Anna Amren, and Kenneth 
Christie, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. S 
Christie of this city, were married on 
Sunday evening at the Swedish Luth- 
eran parsonage with Rev. H. L. Sjo- 
gren reading the" service in the pre-i 
serice of Miss Ruth Jorde and Hol- 
land Christie, brother of the groom. 

A reception was held at the groom's 
home following the ceremony. Mr. 
Christie is employed with the .local 
Peterson- Biddick company. The 
couple will make their home at 408 
Markley Avenue South. 

LOCAL NEWS _ 1 




JL 



Brilliant' fireworks displays are .a 
quent night feature at the new 
rld'a Fair *.u CMeago. This bomb 



Is one of the many that burst on open- 
ing; night. The buildings are, left to 
right: Federal building, Sky Ride and 



day 



Electrical group. The opening 
crowd was surprised to find the Fair 
complete. 



Miss Lila Holt returned Wednesday 
after having enjoyed a month's vaca- 
tion during which she spent most of 
the time visiting with- her brother 
Ervin Holt at San Diego, California. 
Miss Holt took a southern route bus 
trip to San Diego and made stops at 
Kansas City, Missouri, and Albuq- 
uerque, New Mexico. On her return . 

she made stops at Salt Lake "City, ' practically universal words today. 
Utah, and. points in Nevada. 



English Unite Sports 

Sports In all parts of the world Is 
being united -by English, according to 
a European student, and football Is 
one of the games with an almost uni- 
versal language. The French play 
•'football," and Spanish and South 
American countries call it "el futbul," 
which la hear' enough. The German 
"outside" wing man scores a "goal" 
in football, he plays for his "team" 
and doe3 his "training" If his club Is 
playing for a "cup." And the game 
itself, as In France, Is "foothall." Play- 
ers In France, Germany and Italy are 
all penalized by the .referee If they 
have committed a "foul." In, fact, no 

j footballer need worry about being mis- 
understood anywhere In the world. 

I "Goal," "offside" . and "center" are 



Sunday guests at the A. C. Mathe- 
ion home were Mrs. Emily Solidakke 
of Drayton, N. D., Mr. end Mrs. H. 
M. Hanson of Warren, and Mrs. L. 
Bjorsness and daughter Lillian of 
Newfolden. 

Approximately 30 cars of. local 
residents motored to Wan-en on Fri- 
day and attended the Mashall County 
Fair as a goodwill delegation from 
this city. , 

Among the local people who attend- 
ed the District picnic of the Odd (Fel- 
lows and Rebeckahs at Maple Lake on 
Sunday, were Mrs. C. H. Jung, Mrs. 
J. W. Ruane, Miss Rose Erickson, Mr 
and Mrs. Charles Schultz, Adolf 
Eklund,; Charles Fisher and Dr. P. L. 
Vistaunet. There was an attendance 
of approximately 75 at the picnic. 

'Mr. and' Mrs. A. J.. Lee, son 
Emmett, and daughter Alice of Edin- 
burgh, N. Dak. visited last week at 
the J. O.' Kivle home. Selmer Kivle 
returned with them and will spend 
some time at Edinburgh. 
» K. M. Aalbu-is leaving this evening 
to attend a meeting of the Farmer-La- 
bor newspaper publishers and editors 
at Minneapolis. He wll return on Sat- 
urday morning. ' 

W. E. Rowe, candidate for district 
judge, spent Thursday in this city on 
matters of business. 

Mrs. William Speedy and daughter 
Rose are enjoying a visit in Columbu 
Falls, Montana with Mrs. Sheedy's 
father, John Kivel." On their' way 
there they made a stop at Glaciei 
National Park. 

Miss Charlotte McAnnany anc" 
Charles Dablow spent last Sunday 
in the game reserve at Thief Lake, o< 
which Robert Fordder hos charge 
They were guests at the Fordde: 
home. ' ■ 

Mrs. Lily Reetz and daughters Shir 
ley and Arlene of Minneppolis, ar- 
rived Monday and will spend some 
time as guests of Mrs. C. H: Jung 

Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Lindberp* and 
daughter Adeline motored to Fargt 
on Thursday, returning on Friday. 

Mrs. M. Jonas of St. Paul is visit- 
ing at the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
C. Wiltrout in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo. Haney. and two 
sons 'of: Los Angeles, Calif., are vis- 
tine at the home of Mr. and* Mrs. T 
C. Haney. 



This Bird Mai Speed: 

At widely-separated points on the 
prairies, says Nature Magazine', you 
Bud '/outcrops of sandstone, forming 
eUffsxtr bi:ttes, and here you are sure 
to find in the portholes or on ledges the 
br>k-red rggs of that most splendid 
of all our birds of prey — the prairie 
falcon. A bird of marvelous speed and 
indomitable courage., this little falcon 
■typifies the wild freedom of the Great 
Plains. Less frequently you come uur 
on the eyries of the majestic golden 
eagle. The nestB, which are often 
used for generations, are added to, 
year after year, until the mnti'iinl 
composing them would All the body of 
a wagon. 



The World's Cil Supply 

Petroleum in known deposits and at 
the rate of the present consumption 
Is sufficient to last the world for the 
next 30 centuries, according to Dr. 
Gustaye EgibtT, of Chicago. With only 
2,000,000 acres of oil well- producing 
In' the United ^States alone, Doctor Eg- 
loff points out that America has 
1^100,000,000 acres of possible oil land 
that Is yei to be explored and devel- 
oped. » 



Appendicitis Deaths 
Every twenty-six minutes some one 
In the United States dies of appendi- 
citis, says a writer In Ilygela, the 
health magazine, commenting that de- 
lay nod. wrong medicines cause 18,000 
of the 20,000 deaths from appendicitis 
each year. - . ■ 



Sense of Ihcompletibn 
"How did yon like my radio talk on 
current events?" 

"It seemed kind of Incomplete to 
me," answered Senator Sorghum. "Tt 
didn't contain a word shout coffee," 
tooth paste or patent medicine.* 



Canada's White Population 
Canada's white population Is more 
than 50 per. cent of British origin and 
nearly 80 per cent French origin. 



EARTH'S INTERIOR 

YET TO BE EXPLORED 



With all unknown lands mapped 
the explorer ofi tomorrow must turn 
his attention to the .earth's interior. 
Explanation of the surface ds nearlng 
completion, yet the earth a few miles 
beneath Is still as secret 'as was the ( 
Western Hemisphere, before Columbus. 

Man has penetrated two miles 
down by meansj of oil .we^l drills and 
has -descended one mile" Into ri gold 
mine, but these, depths are mere pin 
pricks compared to the 4,000 miles 
that He between the^ earth's surface 
and Its center, jit . will hot be neces- 
sary to drive a tunnel through The 
earth to learn about Its Interior, ac- 
cording to Prof; W. T. Thom, Jr., of 
Princeton university. One possible aid 
to exploration of the Interior Is the 
airplane, with which photographs may 
be taken to disclose Inter-relations be- 
tween widely ! sepnrited geological 
structures, according -to Popular Me- 
chanics. : j 
, Delicate gravity balances are 
available for disclosing rock forma- 
tions burled under : less dense depos- 
its. ^Devices Have been produced for 
"listening in" ion explosion waves 
started through ■ the earth by setting 
off TNT charpes. 



Lutheran Free Church 
Holds Convention For 
Four Days This Week 

Commencing yesterday, the young 
people's federation of the Lutheran 
Free Church- assembled in this city 
for a 4-day convention. Rev. J. T. 
Quanbeck of Roseau, the district 
president, will preside at the conven- 
tion, the theme of which will be 
"Walking with God". Dr. B. M. Chris- 
tenson of Minneapolis who is a speak- 
er of renown, will ad'Jress the y«ung 
people on Friday morning and even- 
ing, Saturday afternoon and Sundav 
morning and afternoon. 

The sessions for the first three 
days will be conducted at the Zioir 
Lutheran Church, while the Sunday 
services will take place at the city 
auditorium. Meetings will take place 
on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 
10:30 in the morning, at 2 in the 
afternoon, and at 8 in the evening. 

Blame It on the Women 

"Women stir up trouble In poll 
tics," suid HI Ho, the sage of China 
town, "because of the nutural house- 
keeping sense that insists- on having , 
the dust swept out of dark corners." 



CAN IT,. BE DONE? - b^c™ 




r Tail Gate ^levator 

toUIPPINff THE TAIL GATE OP A TRUCK WTTH ELEVATORS 
POWEEEO By |THE MOTOR WIU. PERMIT EASY HANDLING OF 
HEAVY PBJECTS. CAN IT BE DONE? 



GRACE! JAHR IS BRIDE TO 
HALSTAD MAN 

Of interest to local people will be 
the marriage of Miss Grace Jahr, 
daughter of Mr. and' Mrs. A. C. Jahr 
of the city, to Alve Johnson of Hal- 
stad, Minn., on Saturday, June 30, at 
Crookston. The young couple will 
make their home at Warren where 
the groom is" employed. 

\ 

Erickson and Lund 
FUNERAL HQME 

M. P. ERICKSON ; 

Funeral Director 
Prompt Ambulance Service 
321 N. Main 
, Day and Night Phone 404-W 




Children Are Safe At The 

AVAL ON 

Always Cool & Comfortable. 

Fri., Sat., July 13-14 
"Hips, Hips Hooray" * 

With — Robert Woolsey and Bert 
Wheeler, also — 7th- Chapter, 
"Tarzan the Fearless." 

Mat Sat. 2:30. Adm. B-lB-25c 
Eve. Adm. ]0-20-25c 



Sun-Mon. July 15-16. 
"OPERATOR 13" ^ 

With Marion Davis, Gary Cooper 
and Four Mills Brothers. 
Matinee. Sunday at 2:30. 

Tuesday, July 17 

TAkE'A CBjANCE NIGHT 

ChUdren 10c. AdultB 15c 

Wed. Thur. July 18-19 
"Thirty pay Princess" 

Starring Sylvia Sidney and' 
Gary Grant. 

—ONE CENT SALE- 



Ito you think Chla.ldea Is practical? Write Bay Gross In care of this newspaper 



WANT ADS) 

Forum Want Ads, one cent a word 

♦ • 

FOR RENT — 6 room mod-em house 
ready for immediate occupancy. — T. 
C. Orme, Phone 293. 15-13-ltc 

FOR SALE — Team of good work 
horses, ~% "and 7 years old.^-C. C. 
Schuster, 622 St. Paul Ave. S. 



FOR SALE: Small pigs, ?2.00 each. 
First come first served. C. F. Carlson, 
Hazel, Rt. 2 16-ltp 

FOR SALE: Modern house at 401 
Knight Ave. So- another at 616 Duluth 
No.. Half section of land, 3 miles west 
of St. Hilaire at $12 per acre. Inquire 
at Ole Moen's Real Estate Agency. 
Many more bargains call and see us. 
308 Horace No. 45-ltp 



TYPEWRITERS =— If you want to 
buy, sell or trade typewriters — Phone 
198, Hamilton's. 13-rtc 



HIGHEST cash prices paid for 
wool and hides. Magnuson's Feed 
Store. Phone 42. E. Husty. 16 7-ltp 



FOR SALE: — 1 wheel trailer with 
box and stock rack. Nearly new. Over 
si7ed tires. — E. T. Burstad 16-ltp 



Any Size Kodak Film .Developed 
Including 8 High Grade Glassy Prints 
?5c — Salveson Stadio 



FOR SALE— Kodern home, six 
looms, 100 foot lot. Corner Ninth 
and Main at 823. Phone 372. 17-18-c 



FOR SALE — Horses and Cattle, 
terms if desired. — Northern Credit 
Co., B. J. Shaw, manages, 12-tfc 



Fine home sites for sale — Block 17, 
Bed Lake Rapids Addition, adjoin- 
ing new highway. Selling feat. 
Get Yours Now 
CITIZENS STATE BANE 




DEFEQtlVJE PAGE I INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



VOLUME TH» 



MBER! 15 



THIEF EIVEE FALLS, PENNINGTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA. 



THURSDAY, JULY 19, 19ai 

r . 



COUNTY BOARD! 
FIXES TAX FOR 
FOR NEXT YEAR 

- — — ' | 

Old Age Pensions May be Pay- 
able After January 1st 
1935. 



The board of county commission- 
ers met at the court house Wednes- 
day, July ;18, and completed the bud- 
get for the year 1934. The budget 
submitted j by County Auditor H.j L. 
Fowler was accepted 1 ' by the board! It 
calls for a : tax levy of $110,400. which 
is a reduction from last year's tax 
levy. | 

In the budget of anticipated expen- 
ses for 1934, $31,675. would be needed 
for county revenue, $23,125. for the 
poor fund, $60,500. for the road and 
bridge fund, $15,000. for bonds and 
interest, and' $4,400. for the sanator- 
This gives a grand total : of 



City Swelters As The 
Thermometer Hits 100 



The hottest weather of the season 
was registered on Tuesday and 1 Wed- 
nesday of this week when the ther- 
mometer reached in the neighborhood 
of 103 in the shade. Other communi-| 
ties report temperatures of from 
100 to 1P5. [ 

A cooling shower fell Wednesday 
e\ening here. | 



Thief River Falls Farmer- 
Labor Club to Meet Friday 

The Thief River Falls Farm- 
er-Labor Association club will 
hold its repular July meeting at 
the court rooms on Friday (to- 
morrow) evening. " 

Several important matters will 
come before the club, Mr. ^ P. A. 
Harris, president, angpunces and 
all members are urged to attend. 



State Department of Agriculture Asks '• 
Puhlcity on Misinformation on Clover 



Looking forward to the possible 
extension, of the emergency educa- 
tion program under the. relief ad-min- 
istration : in September, JVIr. E. ; M. 
Phillips, Commissioner of Education, 
Word has been brougnt to the state same ulanf. requests that .all unemployed teach- 

d.partment of agriculture that one Mr., Bull said that the two van- ers .™ ; are residents ;of Minnesota 
Mr. Barzen is volunteering erron- \ ties are as distinct as red and black "P^r . w . lth the Emergency Educa- 
ous clover information to the farmers raspberries, adding that "the fact tion Division of the -State Depart- 
in the northern section of the Bed remains that unless the seeds of the ment of Education. While there is 
River Valley, according to C. P. Bull, j two are mixed one with the other, n0 - indication yet as to the number of 
director of the seed and weed (Xvi- 



JOBLESS BEDS 
ARE ASKED TO 
FILE WITH EED 

PIcns Are Under Way to Extent 
Emergency Edubaiion 
Projects, i" 



white will produce white and yellow teachers who may secure -relief em- 
will produce yellow. Kr. Bull de- Payment, Mr Phillips states that he 
clared that there is a dire need f or ' > 8 desirous of having all unemployed 

is painstaking farmers who will grow teachers registered. 

"" " ' " " " ' Under the Emergency 



sion of the state department 'of ag- 
riculture. 

Mr. Bull stated that Barzen 

„ _ .advising farmers that orginally all these two varities of clover pure and 

$134,700. which is nearly $10,000. less sweet clover was yellow blossom a"nd - unmixed, 
than the grand total expenditures for ( tnat a ft er several years of selection | He issued this statement, he said, 
1933. j | • • a white blossom variety was origin- for the purpose of correcting any 

To meet the budget, Fowled esti- 1 a ted. Gradually, therefore, the white false impression that seed growing 
mated that the following tax levy blosson is reverting to yellow bios- farmers' of the Red River Valley may 

' som. He aso stated that botli white t have gained by Mr. Barzen's as- 
and yellow blooms are found on the ' sortions. 



Governor Olson Will Speak 
At the Old Millsite Sunday 

Governor Floyd B. Olson will 
speak at a Farmer-Liabor rally 
at the Old Millsite, 10 miles west 
of Newfolden on Sunday, July 
22. 

■ The program which starts' at 
noon has on the roll several 
prominent speakers among them 
Lieutenant Governor K. K. Sol- 
berg, candidate for Secretary of 
State, Senator R. T. Buckler, can- 
didate for CongresB from the 9th 
district, Judge M. A. Brattland 
and Richard Rice of Alvarado, 
candidate for State Senator from 
Marshall, Roseau and Kittson 
counties. 

The governor's address is slat- 
ed to star t at 3:45 P. M . 

New Girls Activities 
Are Planned by PTA 



would be required: county reveriue : 
$32,00., road and bridge fund, $37,00. 
poor fund, $23,000., bonc-j and inter- 
est, $13,000., sanatorium fund, $4,400 
The total] levy will then be $110,400. 
The list of applicants for old age 
pensions was also discussed, although 
none were granted in the list of one 
hundred applications as the list is 
yet incomplete. Any person over 70 
years of age who has lived in the 



Peppy Kittenball Gaines 
Feature Valhall Program 



At Valhall on Sunday, July 15 
close to 500 Smiley, Silverton, Rocks- 

- bury, Hazel and Thief River Falls 

county"for T5 years'is eligible for the people witnessed some real expert 
pension, and will receive $5.00 a ' kittenball playing. ■ Four games were 
month if the pension is granted. Pay Played in the course of the after- 
ments will begin January 1, 1935. I noon. Rocksbury anc; Hazel 4-H 
' , „ ,„ - f v „„.. 1 teams contested a thrilling game in 

No changes were made in ^ the real ; wW h Ro< , ksbury emerged victorious 
estate assessment '" ^hief River The ffidrf , 

Falls, St.! Hilaire, and Goocvidge bj . „^„ „i = ,„„f h„ - - - — 

the commissioners sitting as a board 
of equalization, these all being accep- 



4-H CLUBS WILL 
SPONSOR STYLE 
AT AUDITORIUM 

ponna Brink is Winner in Cake 
.Baking and Will Compete 
. in District Meet 



ted as submitted by the assessors. 

Dr. Lynde Is Injured 
In Aiito Spill Monday 

Returning from a call near Wylie 
shortly after midnight on Monday 
morning, iDr. O. G. Lynde sustained 
several injuries to the jaw, kness, 
and teeth^ when totally fatigued^ he 
fell asleep at the wheel of his car* 
and turned over in the ditch. The 
accident decured on the Black Rivdi 
road where the Wylie road joins trk. 
Sf. Hilaire road'. Dr. Lynde was* 
knocked unconsciuos; but upon re- 
gaining consciousness, he was able tc 
walk to a nearby farm for assist- 
ance. Dr; Lynde resumed his duties 
again on j Wednesday. 

Duck Hunters Must Have 
Migratory Bird Stamp o h 
Licenses Says P. 0. Dept. 

. It has ; been announced by Post- 
master Ai And'arson that migratory 
bird stamps or so-called "duck 
stamps" will be available August 1st 
at the postoffice at the price of one 
dollar each. All who hunt migrator} 
bii'ds, ducks, geese, etc., must secure 
one of these stamps. An amend- 
ment to the migratory bird law pro- 
vides for (this stamp, and all migra- 
tory bird I hunters over sixteen years 
must have one whether they have a 
license or j not. The stamp is good:for 
one year,] expiring June 1st of the 
following j vear after which it is ob- 
tained j 

Those having a state game license 
must take it to the ' postonice anj 
have the [ stamp affixed; while thost 
who are jno.t required to have a 
license must have the stamp affixec 
to their certificate by the postmaster. 



Definite Information 
on Bakken Accident 



More definite information can 
gwen this week regarding the auto 
m.bile a Jcident in whlc i Mrj. O. 



game played by Smiley and Silver- 
ton was hotly contested, A thrill by Donna Brink of the St. Hilaire 4- 
the audience was manifested from a H club won first place in the cake 
thunderous side line support. The -Baking contest on Wednesday, and 
game resulted in a 9-7 score in I will' be given an opportunity to com- 
favor of Silverton. The Silverton \ pete "with the winners of rive otner 
and Rocksbury girls teams played a counties in a contest at Crookston in 



August, the winner of which will re- 
ceive a. free trip to the Minnesota 
State Fair in September. Bernice 
Saugen of the Steiner club placed 
second, and Esther Hetland of the 
Rocksbury club won third place. 
Of the 123 girls in the county 4-H 



fine game ending in a victory for 
Rocksbury team 10-0 

No cuubt the game played by the 
Bill's Eat Shop vs. the Pennington 
County All-Stars will stand out as 
a masterpiece of kittenball history. 
Bill's Eat Shop with 6 imported _ 

league players including Bill Groslie clubs enrolled m sewing approximate, 
was crushed to an undisputed defeat ly 75 will appear in a style revue at 
in a score of 13-3 in favor of the the Lincoln High School on Triday. 
All-Stars. The greatest thrill ex- July 20th, commencing at 1 o'clock' in 
hibited, resulted in the 6th inning the afternoon. Preliminary practice 
with the- All-Stars at bat. 3 men on for .the. style revue and-clasaes on 
bases and 2 men out. At this point pressing" clothes, table manners, and 
both teams were determined to hold making wooden buttons will be given 
their own. With a nice fly - into \ in the morning. The winner of thir 



revue will be given a free trip to the 
state fair to take part in a style 
revue conducted- there. 

The girl in the senior clothing div- 
ision having the best exhibit .will al- 
so receive a trip to the state fair 
The two winners of the junior div- 
ision of the clothing exhibit will be 
given free trips to the junior short 
course at the University farm next 
spring. The clothing' exhibits will 
also be displayed at the Pennington 
County Fair. 

On Tuesday,. July 24th, Bread 
Achievement Day will be held at Lin 
coin High School starting promptly, 
at 10 o'clock/The two winners hi 
this demonstration will be awarded" 
by free trips to the state fair. 

4-H Club Leaders 
Meet With Douglas 

The Pennington County 4-H club 

»r a_I 7T* »„ ,™„,,™i ' lea^rs and presidents held a meet- 

Manager Art Johnson announced h g. f Count A t 

today that the city tennis tournament D » , on lMt Tuesday eve nihg. - 

is coming along nicely with much It 5 decided that the 4-H clubs 

public interest being evident. An up- f silvert Eri st . Hilaire Bray! 

set occuream the first round matches and fiocksbury would have exhibit 

when John Brederman defeated Fatti- fa h * Pennington County 

er A. I. Merth, ? - seeded played and , Au ft wa * a[s0 d 

favored to play in the quarter finals, vM , h club Members will assist Mr. 

by 9-7, and 6-4. Douglass with the club exhibits at 

The other winners in the first round t j le fa ;j._ Earl Engelstad will have 

of the men's singles tournament are charge of the 4-H dairy calves; 

be K. Halldin, M. Benson, G. Overland, Charles Joyce will have charge of the 

■°-i... rnrunson; E. Eiohter, T. Rowan, pou it v y; Martin Hanson of the swine; 

L- j. Biedermann. D. Fabriaa., A v Rps- Harold Jorstad of garden and potato 



center field,^Bill adjusted his hat and 
made a graceful rush to meet" the 
fiy, but alas, like a vanishing bubble 
it rolled gracefully into the- stubble; 
and from that inning on the All- 
Stars had no more trouble. 

Watch for the announcement of the 
return game. Be present .and give 
yourself a treat. 

TENNIS MATCH 
ENTERS FINAL 
SUN JULY 29 

Yf. Benson and G. Aanstad are 

Winners in the Quarter 

Finals 



\ > ... , . 

Program as it was operating curing 
.he last school year, ;822. employed 
teachers were given employment at 
ane time or another during the course 
jf the program. They provided ed- 
ucational and recreational opportuni- 
ties for more than 40,000 person; 
ranging from sixteen to sixty-five 
years of age. 

General fields of educational work 
_a which unemployed and needj 
teachers may be employed are: gen- 
eral adult education, worker's educa- 
tion, rural education, nursery schools 
and parent education. Pr6jects with- 
in the above field are initiated local- 
ly, under the administration and sup- 
ervisory of local, school authorities. 
'.Mr. Phillips urges that unemploy- 
ed- teachers wishing to be considered 
for relief employment during the en- 
suing year write the Emergency Ed- 
ucation Division requesting applica- 
tion and eligibility blanks. Regis- 
tration is completed when thesi 
forms have been filled out, signed. 
and returned to the Emergency Edu- 
cation Diivsion. It will not be nec- 
essary for teachers to call personally 
at the State Deparrtment in making 
application. ■ 

NRS Office Wjllbe open 
I Saturday Nights to Take 
Care of Farm Placements 

■■- It has' been announced that the 
farm placement division of the local 
National. Reemployment; Service office 
Trill be open on Saturday evenings 
hereafter from 7 to 9"6'clock, begin- 
ning this coming Saturday, and con- , 
tinuing through the harvest season. , 
Farmers who wish tr hire addifemal| 
labor should call at the NRS office 
where their demands will receive inr- 
mediate attention. 

ERA Funds May Be 
Secured to father 
Co. Historical Data 

At a special meting of the Library 
Board of the Carnegie! Public Li- 
brary, it was decided that the board 
would try to sponsor a collection -o. 
historical information and data ox 
this county, providing the project i 
paid for out of » Federal Fund, it 
has -been put up to the ERA with 
the object that the maWrial thus col- 
lected can later be turned- over to a 
county historical society when one it 
The outcome of the pro- 



Girls who have been reiterating tc 
Education ■ mothers and themselves the question- 



What is there to do these hot 
days?" might find the question an- 
swered in the three-fold project now 
being experimented with under the 
direction of the Parents-Teachers 
Association: The leader of the pro- 
ject will be Miss Harriet Helquist. 

The activities consist of Dramatics 
Arts and Crafts, and Sports. Thosi 
girls wishing to take advantage of 
this opportunity, should register on 
Saturday, July 21, between the hours 
of 2 and 4 o'clock on the fir3t flooi 
of Lincoln High School. 



C. W. A. DECIDES 
TO TAKE ACTION 
AGA1NSTC0UNCIL 

Circularize the City With Bills 

Stating They "Will Not 

Patronize." 



Taxpayers' Suitito 
Stop Truck Purchase 
Goes to Dist. Court 

The case of H. A. Brummund vs. 
the city of Thief River Falls oaal- 
mg witn the purchase of a motorized 
lire truck will be tried in the fall 
term of court. 

Notice for trial in the regular term 
of court w s served by Paul A. Lund- 
gren, atto.'uey for plaintiff iollowing 
an adverse decision irom the court oi 
petition for an injunction restraining 
che city from entering into the pur 
chase. 



W00LH0USE AND 
BENNES ELECTED 
TO SCHOOL JOBS 

A. E. Mattson is Defeated fot 

Re-election; Douville 

Gets 137 Votes. 



On Tuesday evening, the residents 
of Thief River Falls School District 
18 elected E. M. Bennes and R. W. 
Woolhouse as directors on the board 
of education for three-year terms 
Mr. Woolhouse was elected by 16t 
votes, and Mr. Bennes was re-electec 
to the board by 150 . votes. Thj; 
other candidates, A. E. Mattson anc 
W. J. Douville, received 149 and 13 r i 
votes respectively. The. regular ">jr 
ganization meeting will be held" tlie 
lirst Saturday in August when /tht 
two elected directors will take 'theii 
places on the school board 1 . 

Olaf Neset, clerk of the schoo! 
board, revealed in his annual repor. 
presetting the opening of the electior. 



Following- the Giilt refusal Of $4 ' 
city council to reconsider their ac* 
~on in regard to the city' employe** 
discharged by the (:ity engineer W. 
W. Viebahn, the CWA Protective as- 
sociation decided at their meeting 
-ast Wednesday evening to- take dras- 
tic action against the members of the 
-iity. council to force them to at 
least give the dismissed men a hear- 
ing. On motion which was passed un- 
animously they decided to withevaw . 
.heir patronage from the business- . 
men on tlie council and from the firms- 
imli which thjy arc cyiinecied. A 
committee was selected to distribute 
nandbills stating the li We Will Not 
fauoni::e" followed by a list of the 
members of the council and the firms 
tliat they are connected with. 

The entire city and many of the 
neigiiooring towns were circularized 
on Saturday evening and on iuonaay. 
Some severe criticism of their ac- 
tion was voiced by .-several business 
men who stated th£t they tnought 
it would be uiiiair to surne innocent 
parties. 

Tii is phase of the hiatter was dis- 
cussed at the organization's meeting 
mst evening anu a statement to the 
public was prepared and handed* to 
the newspapers in the city wherein 
they clarify their position. 

The statement follows: 
Statement to the Public: 

The CWA Protective Association 
wishes to take this means to inform 
he public why wa have decided that 
we will not patronize the members of 
..he cuy council or Tiuoi Kiver Falls 
nor the firms with which they are 
connected 

The iSty council has been very un- 
fair tj local labor. Tinea men who 
nave served the city for many year* 
nave be mi discharged and their places 
nlled with men from- otner places. In 
i-he ease of the last two the CWA 
yrmccLive Association has requested 
tnat the council reinstate them . in 
ulieir positions and that it dispense 
with tue services of the city engineer, 
who is himself an imported man. ana 
absolutely unnecessary in the set-up 
of the city's business. There is ample 
evidence to show that he is unquali- 
fied to hold the position that he has 
and is absolutely without experiene*- 
as an engineer in charge of a larg* 
utility. such as our water and? light de- 
partment. 

This request was tossed aside with- 
out being given any consideration. 
When we asked that a reason be giv- 
en for the discharge of these men 
we were told that "they refuse to co- 
operate" and that "they -are inefii- 
(Continued On Back Page.) 

Churches Rev. Lerohl's 
Call Will Hold Fest 



carry it out. 
consented to 
endorsed. 



W. CY 
do the 



Stephens 
.work if 



Cities Should Read 
Danger Signals, 
McDonell Says 



taKkdi uf ihis city was instantly i erj l. Arnold, W. G. Claffy, J. Al'- ex ],ibtis: Dona Brink of the home the Minnesota Taxpayers 
killed, together with three others, nol( j, c. Lee, L. Aanstad, G. Aanstad, i00n0 mics a partment; and Severen tion, in a talk over WCCO, that the 
and hvo j of the ear's occupants onc j v. Jung. ■ Barst-d of the open classes dapart- debt adjustment plan for mumei- 

tevere.y injured. " | j n tne second round quarter finals men t I paluies cannot be used by solvent 

tragedy occured between Men- m. Benson defeated K. Halldin in the Y ne count y 4.H club picnic is plan- cities to postpone payment of debts, 
when fl rs t bracket by 6-0, 6-2, and in the j f either August 19 or 23 at The primary purpose of the munici- 



ahga and Sebeka, Minnesota, _ w _ _ t i cltlllwI «.«-« *« «» — . - 

ti.e car wjas struck by a Great North-, fourth bracket" G. Aanstad defeated HT'h!andini" W furTher" 3b announcement pal adjustment act is;:to provide a 
era passenger train. Mi's. Bakken, y. Juns by (5-4, G-4. ... ■ of which will fo ^w :n a .ater ed.tion means by which insolvent communi- 

, of tne paper. 



SECOND STOCKHOLDERS 
MEETING IS CALLED TO 
ACT ON CREAMERY SALE 



Auditcr Fowler to Place 
on Interim ax.Coma i jsicn 



passenger train, fill's. Bakken ( . y. Jun^ 
was instantly killed, as also was Mrs.} The final match, which will tJ^cide 
T. Ekeluhd anu her twelve-year-old the city champion, is planned to be 
son of Menahga, and Miss ttebecoa played on Sunday, July 29, except in p pw ; t -. , 

Eorein^a missionary from ,, China. \ the condition of inclement weather. \a3V£mor U-S n AppClIlIS 
O. L. Ba.lken of this city, and/Re/, 'i 1 .- A cordial invitation is extended to the 
Ekelund, [Lutheran pastor of/cmn-ji.-e.. '• public to attend these matcnes wide 
in r-icnuiiga and Sebeka, are report- are held every night at the Lincoln 
ed as seriously injured. | ! High School tennis courts. 

The report of t.ie a.cldent has it 
that tin* luriver ha-* stopped tneicai 
at the railroad crossing to let j the 
tram pass, but bad fai.ed to put: tue 
car in neutral gear, only holding tlie 
clutch down with his foot. He moved 
J.i.i toot from the clutch pedal with 
the result that the car sprang j for- 
ward into the path of the oncoming 
train and was cut in two. 

After having been in a Wadena 
hospital I since the accident, Mr., . Lt . . , ,., . 

Bakken has now returned to Ms home of the municip_al_ auditorium 
in , this city. 



organized. 

ject all depends on an appropriation polls, that the balance on hand July 1 

being received by Federal Aid to 1933 was ?7,535.52. Revenue from 

~" ""' "' v — - ha; current taxes amounted to ?41,2s9. 

it iz Id.; trom delinquent taxes, $7/j»j.iy 

irom rural credits aid, $719.34; from' 

j tax on rural credit lane, §oti&.6ii. 

from apportionment, $9,893.40; from 

state uiu, :*3o,iD3.4U; anu irom ouiui 

! sources, :pd,i=i:^.y4. The total revenue 

was §lu7,au4.59. 

Mr. Neset further quoted the dis 
bursements for the year as follows: 
for "general control, $4,8ol.38; foi 
instruction, §til,82!2.o5; for operation 
%>±J,0l8.2u;'±"or maintenance, ¥2,533.02 
i.or auxiliary agencies and cordinate 
Associa- activities, 53,964.5a; for fixed charges 
$i,o41.74. The total for current ex 
p^nse was $86,731. b7. There was ai 
unexpended balance of petty cash o 
S20.03.- 

Tue amount spent tor capital out 
lay was $2,397. Vi", and for deb; ser 
. ice, ^>7,49U.D0, giving a grand . to- 
\&l for (As bursements of ^i>6,6 18.87 
The total cash on hand July 17 wa 
h : -10,71o.72. ' 



A warning was issued i^oday 
James P. McDonnell, president 



by. 
of 



The stockholders of the Thief Riv-| 
er Falls Creamery Association wilK 
hold another meeting on Friday, Aug. 
in the Civic and Commerce rooms 
as the 
first meeting of July 6 is held uncon- 
stitutional because the notice col- 
ling for the meeting of the stockhold- 

ON PRESIDENTIAL ESCORT S^." 01 - ^ ' he PUrP ° S ' "*■*'*' 



HARRY ROBINSON IS SERVING 



H. Trl. Fowler, auditor of Penning- 
ton County, ha3 accepted an"appo'nt- 
ment'by Gov. Floyd B. Olson to an 
Interim Commission on Tax La.vF 
which ^will m ko j ecoimrur.da'rlons 
to the governor and to the next. stall 
legislature. 

AuxTary Will Ban-fit 
Froa Circu3 to b; S!iown 
Here en Wed., August 8th 



, tv3s couiif work out ;o£ their difficul- 
ties with the cooperation of their 
creditors, he stated. ■' 

"Our cities, and government all 
along the line, should read the dan- 
ger signals. Emjarrassment that re- 
quires such adjustments as these njw 
provid'jj lor banktui>t ; cities, will 
come eventually to any unit of gov- 
ernment that disregards t» princi- 
ples of economy. Trouble is waiting 
1,-it cities that carry on an extended 
program of short-time borrowing 
. nu ihat continue to j create long-time 
bond is3ues that are ^unwar^anteJ.. 
I No business, not even [public busi- 
i ness, can long be "solvent, unless i> 
i balances its budget, j lives within its 
j income, and meets its honest obliga- 
jtions. 1,300 units of local govern- 
! ment are now insolvent" he stated. 

'•If we continue to go: on the theory 
that the future generation will bene- 



JOHN BRANDT TO 
SPEAK AT GRYGU 
COOP PICNIC SUN. 



.Word has been received that a local ! Mr. and Mrs. Earl Smith, Mr. and 
boy, Harry Robinson, son oi Mi. land. Mrs. A. £. Robinson, and Misi """ 
Mrs. A. P. Robinson; is on the U. S. S. Anderson^ attended the pagi _ 
'New Orleans which is an escort Itaska St' te Park last Sunday.' 
cruiser_to the U. S. S. Huston on Mr.and Mrs. E. A. Stoughton and cents," and twenty cents for adults. 

which President Roosevelt is taking two daughters motored to Itaska ~ 

his vacation to the Hawaiian Islancis , State Park on Sunday and spent the 
and the Pacific Coast. day there. 



The Seal Brothers circus will pre- fit by all our bond issues, and there 

sent an afternoon and evening per- fore future generations should' bear 

formance in Thief River Falls on part of the cost, let; us see how our 

Wednesday, August 8, at .the vacant children itill come outii The money 

orma Jots^on the corner of Sixth street | that our municipalities borrow at 4 

It al andfSnd State avenue.- TSie admis; per cent today wfei^ouhle in 2i 

• sibfi-. price for children ^ill be ten years. This means ^yflr. every million 

~~Tits, and twenty cents for adults. ' dollars of 4 per cent': bonds that we 

The exhibition is being sponsored issue will cost our chidren'two mil- 

for the benefit of the Auxiliary Drum j lion dollars at maturity over' 25 

Corps. __ years' time, -.-I -' : l __. 

i """TTT' 

r 



. A misunderstanding of inform ■ 
'-.Ion given us caused the paper U 
print an erroneous report in las 
y.'uek's eu'ition that * John Brandt 
President of the Land O' Lakes as 
sociation would be unable to be pre 

ent at he Northwestern Group Co 
operative picnic which is to be helt 
Sunday, July 22, at Grygla. Tht 
article should iiave stated that Mi- 
Brandt -was un&ble to speak las 
Lime because the picnic was post 
poned, but he will be present, am 
will be the principal speaker at Sun 
day's picnic. 

Other adclvesses and musical selec 

tiogjs afeffeJ^ilaS °° S iven - A E° oc 
tinSSfe §®$ur«Pto all who attend. 



The five congregations served by- 
Rev. J. K. Leroul of Oklee will hold 
their fifteenth annual lestivalon Sun- 
aay, July 'j.z, with services in Salem 
church, Games, at 11 A. M. Dinner 
.vill be served by the ladies' aids in 
.Valhougs grove at the old Games 
place, wnich is across the road from 
opong's This p^ace is 8 miles east oi 
riummer, and 6 miles north and one 
.nile west of Uklee. Rev. R. M. Fjel- 
itad will give the main address on the 
afternoon program which will be 
.ieid in Wuiiiougs grove 

Addresses will also be given by 
Attorney Jens Grothe, Kav Flao 
itiark ana others, ami a number of 
imisicai selections and song.i will 
complete the program. Tne public 
is curaially mviteu to attend! 



TWO bit IN WRECK 
AT MIDDLE RIVER 



A tragic automobile, accident took 
iace Duiwetn atrathcona an Middle 
.iiver on Monday night when a car 
riven by Joe Vogel of Fergus Falls 
jollideu 1 with a car occupied by Fred 
urmson ol urookston and another 
■ccupiint. Both cars were coming 
from SLrathcona, with- Johnson's car 
.i tue leaa. Johnson stopped his car, 
.nd together with the oilier occu- 
pant, was stamiing on the road with 
.iteno en hailing Vogle to stop. 
.'ogel was apparently going at a 
ast speed, and not seeing the other 
ar or its occupants on the" road, 
rashed headway into them, killing 
ohnson immeu'.ately. The other ' oc- 
;upant was saved by- his jumping into 
tie nearby ditch. Vogel's car then 
.wc-rved around and went into the 
■ Lher side of the ditch. Vogel waa 
..pparently all right bet'ore the cc- 
.upant of Johnson's car hiked back 
o SLrathcona for aid, but was found 
lead on their return. A coroner 
.■/as summoned from Warren and the 
. odies were taken to Middle River. 

Mr. Johnson wos a salesman for 
;he Hash-Finch Company, at Crooks- 
con, while Mr. Vogel was -salesman 
for the Diamond Match Company %" 
Chicago. " ■ 



Miss •" Violette Jacobson left on 
Monday! to sbend the second week of 
her vacation at 'Minneapolis. 



Mr. jind Mrs. Otto Skog, Mrs. Skog 
aid Arthur Lamay . of Wadena Sun- 
day to visit at the home" of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Skog. Mrs. M. Skog is 
spending several weeks with her son, 
while the others returned to Wadena 
on Tuesday. _ 




\ 



\ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




! ~.^1-mfSsst?vv<i! 



»:i OFFICIAL • 
*: PAPEB A 

! ' : i of 

PENNINGTON 
'■'■'■ COUNTY 



VOLUME THx 




THIEF RIVER PALLS, PENNINCST ON COUNTY, MINNESOTA. 



THURSDAY, JULY 19, 1934 



COUNTY BOARD 
FIXES M FOR 
FOR NEXT YEAR 

Old Age Pensions May be Pay- 
able After January 1st 
1935" 



The board of county commission' 
ers met at ithe court house Wednes 
day; July 18, and completed the bud 
get for the ■ year 1934. The budget 
submitted j by County Auditor H. iL. 
/ Fowler was accepted by the board.: It 
-/calk for a' tax levy of $110,400. which 
is a reduction from last year's tax 
levy. I : ! 

In the budget of anticipated expen- 
ses for 1984, $31,675. would be needed 
for county revenue, $23,125. for the 
poor fund, $60,500. for the road and 
bridge fund, $15,000. for bonds and 
interest, and' $4,400. for the sanator- 
ium. This gives a grand total :of 



City Swfelters As The 
Thermometer Hits 100 

The hottest weather of the season 
was registered on Tuesday and' Wed- 
nesday of this week when the ther- 
mometer reached in the neighborhood 
of 103 in the shade. Other' communi- 
ties report temperatures of . t from 
100 to 105. • 

A cooling' shower fell Wednesday 
evening here/ 



Thief River Falk Farmer- 
Labor Club, to Meet Friday 

The Thief River Falls farm- . 
er-Labor Association , club will ;; 
hold its regular July meeting at 
the-: court rooms on Friday (to- 
morrow) evening. ? : 

Several important matters will 
come before the club, Mr. P. A- 
Harris, president, announces and 
all members are urged to attend. 



ARE ASKED TO 
FILETOIEED 

Plods Are Under Vifay to Extent 
Emergency Eduiaiion 

I. '." - '.■ " Projects'. 1 ;!;.' 

State Department of Agriculture Asks ; ei^o?S3Jcy p edS 
Publcity on Misinformation oh Clover %tf£^ a £S&$g t g?SL 

_J :.' "V. -' : Phillips, Commissioner of Education, 

Word has been brougnt to the state same juant . IffS^ £f ^SrfSJTS 9 ^!^^ 

department of agriculture that one Mr^-Bull said that the two van- fg.™ "» ^'^^^""SSf, ,^ 
Mr. Barzen lis volunteering erron- \ ties are as distinct as red and black JfP"**? .*?* h ft e rt Em ?bS2, Cy r?i"!J" 
ous clover information to the farmers raspberries; adding Sat "the fact ta WDlvmra of the Jtate Depart- 
in the northern section of the Bed 'remains that unless the seeds of the mWt .of Education. While, there is 
River Valley; according to C. F. Bull, two are mixed one with the other, noj indication yet as to the number of 

- '• - white .will produce white and yellow . t?»chers who may secure, -relief ;em- 

will produce yellow. ' Kr. Bull de- ployment, Mr. Phillips states that he 
dared that there is a dire need for 'is [desirous of haying ;aU unemployed 



director of the seed and weed divi- 
sion of the state department "of -/ag- 
riculture. - ' UlUt^i .MlOb WlCi« ,a M UUC 1IGEU 1U1 ..' j.-, ■-■ . , ' . 

Mr. Bull stated ;that Barzen is painstaking farmers who will grow teachers registered. 

„- grand total ;oi advising farmers that orginally all these two verities of clover pure and -_ Under the Emergency; 

$134,700. which is nearly $10,000. less swee t clover/was yellow blossom a'Bd unmixed. 
than the grand total expenditures for tnat ^ ter seve ral years of selecti»n 
1933. | --.a white blossom variety was origin- 
To meet the budget, Fowled esti- 1 a ted. Gradually, therefore, the white 
mated that the following tax levy blosson is rteverting to yellow blos- 
would be! required: county revenue, ' som . He asb stated that both white 
$32,00., road and bridge fund, $37j00., ' and yellow blooms are found on the 
poor fund, $23,000., bondtf and injer- ' - — 

est,; $13,000., sanatorium fund, $4,400 p eppy KittgnJjaU Games 



He issued this statement, -he said, 
for the purpose of correcting any 
false impression that seed growing 
farmers* of the Red River Valley may 
have gained by Mr. Barzen's as- 
aortions. 



Governor Olson WilT Speak 
At the Old Millsite Sunday 

Governor Floyd B. Olson will 
speak at a Farmer-Labor rally 
it the Old Millsite, 10 miles west 
of Newf olden on Sundiy, July 
22. 

-The program which, starts 'at 
noon has on the roll several 
- prominent speakers among them 
lieutenant Governor K. K. §ol-' 
berg, candidate for Secretary of 
State, Senator E. T. Buckler, can- 
didate for Congress from the 9th 
district, Judge M. A. Brattland 
and Richard Rice of Alvarado, 
candidate for State Senator from - 
Marshall, Roseau and Kittson 
counties. - 

- ' The governor's address is slat- 
ed to sta rt at 3:45 P. M . 

New Girls Activities 
Are, Planned by PTA 

Girls who have been reiterating to 

unaer me emergency, ^uucuuuu mothers and themselves the question: 

Prbgram as it was operating during "What is there to do these hot 



Education 



The total levy will then be $110,400. 
The list of applicants for old age 
pensions was also discussed, although 
none were granted in the lkt of one 
hundred applications as the list 



Feature Valhall Program 



At Valhall on Sunday, July 15 



vet incomplete. Any person over 70 close to 500 Smiley , Silyerton, Rockf 
years of age who has lived in the bury. Hazel and Thief River Falls 
county for 15 years is eligible for the People witnessed some real expert 
pension, and will receive $5.00 a : kittenball playing. Four games were 
month if the pension is granted. Pay Played m the course of .the after- 
ments will begin January 1, 1935. I noon. . Rocksbury ano Hazel 4-H 
,, "• . - „,„ „ ol ' teams contested a thrilling game in 

No changes were mad jin .the : real , which Eoeklib emerged victorious- 
estate assessment in Thief River a The officia j j e 
Falls, St. L Hilaire, and Gooc*id ? e bj , * p Iayea b y Smiley and Silver: 



the commissioners sitting as a board 
of equalization, these all being accep- 
ted as submitted by the assessors. 

Dr. Lynde Is Injured 
In Ajuto Spill Monday 

Returning from a call near Wylie 
shortly after midnight on Monday 
morning, | Dr. O. G. Lynde sustained 
several injuries to the jaw, kness, 
and: teeth 1 , when totally fatigued, he 
fell asleep at the wheel of his car 
and : turned over in the ditch. The 
accident occured on the Black Rivei 
road where the Wylie road joins the 
St Hilaire road*. Dr. Lynde was 
knocked unconsciuos, but upon re- 
gaining consciousness, he' was able tc 
walk -to a nearby farm for assist- 
ance. Dr. Lynde resumed his duties 
again oh! Wednesday. 

Duck Hunters Must Have 
Migratory Bird Stamp o n 
Licenses Says P. 0. Dept. 

. It has; been announced by Post- 
master A. Anderson that migratory 
bird stamps or so-called "duck 
stamps" will be available August lsi 
at the postoffice at the price of one 
dollar each. All who hunt migrators 
birds, ducks, geese, etc., must secure 
one of these stamps. An amend- 
ment to the migratory bird law pro- 
vides for: this stamp, and all migra- 
tory bird hunters over sixteen years 
must have one whether they have a 
license or not. The stamp is good for 
one year, expiring June 1st of the 
following vear after which it is ob- 
tained 

Those having a state game license 
must take it to the postpthce an„* 
have the stamp affixed; while those 
who arei not required to have '■ a 
license must have the stamp afhxec 
to their certificate by the postmaster. 

Definite Information 
on Bakken Accident 



4-H CLUBS WILL 
SPONSORSTYLE 

AT AUDITORIUM 

Donna Brink is Winner in Cake 
.Baking and Will Compete 
' in District Meet 



Moro definite information can | be 
given this week regarding the auto- 
m.bile a.cident in whic i Mrj. O.j L. 



ton was hotly contested.' A thrill by Donna Brink of the St- Hilaire 4- 
the audience was manifested from: a H club' won firsts place in the cake 
thunderous '• side line support; The baking' contest On Wednesday, and 
game resulted in a 9-7 score in j will be given an opportunity to com- 
favor of Silverton. The Silverton ; pete with the winners of live other 
and Rocksbury girl3 teams played a counties in a contest at Crookaton in 



August, the winner of which will re- 
ceive a free trip to the Minnesota 
State Fair in September. Bernice 
Saugen of the Steiner club, placed 
second, and Esther Hetland of the 
Rocksbury club won third place.' 
Of the 123 girls in the county 4-H 



fine game ending in a victory for 
Rocksbury team 10-0 

No doubt the game played by the 
Bill's Eat Shop vs. the Pennington 
County All-jStars will stand out as 
a masterpiece of kittenball , history. 

Bill's Eat Shop with 6 imported . . _ . . - 

league players including Bill Groslie clubs enrolled in sewing approximate 
was crushed to an undisputed defeat ' ly 75 will appear in a style revue, at 
in a score of 13-3 in favor of the the Lincoln High School on Triday. 
All-Stars. The greatest thrill ex- July 20th, commencing at 1 o'clock in 
hibited,- resulted in the 6th inning the afternoon. Preliminary practice 
withHhe:- All-Stars at bat- 3 menvin-J flir-the^ stjde revue and„ classes on. 
bases and 2 men out. At this point pressinr clothes, table manners, and 
both teams were determined to hold making wooden buttons will be given 
their own. With a nice fly -into! in the morning. The winner of this 

* revue will be given a free trip to- the 
state fair to take part in -a- style 
revue conducted* there. 

The girl in the senior clothing div- 
ision having the best exhibit .will al- 
so recelya a. trip to the state fair 
The two winners of the junior div- 
ision of the clothing exhibit will be 
given "free trips to- the junior short 
course at the University farm next 
spring. The clothing" exhibits will 
also be displayed at the Pennington 
County Fair. 

On Tuesday,. July 24th, Bread 
Achievement imy will be held at Lin- 
coln High School starting promptly 
at 10 . o'clock.The two winners ir 
this demonstration will be awarded 
by free trips to the state fair. - f 



center field, Bill adjusted his hat 1 and 
made a graceful rush to meet-' the 
fiy, but alas, like a vanishing- bubble 
it rolled gracefully into the- stubble; 
and from that inning on the All- 
Stars had no more trouble. .",... 

Watch for the announcement of the 
return game. Be' present and give 
yourself a treat. 

TENNIS MATCH 
ENTERS FINAL 
SUN JULY C 29 

Vf. Benson and G. Aanstad aire 
Winners in the Qiiarter- 
Finals : 



4-H Club Leaders 
Meet With Douglas 



.he .last school year, ; ; 822 employed 
teachers were given employment at 
one time' or another during fine course 
jfe the program. They; provided ed- 
ucational and recreational opportuni- 
ties for more than 40,000 person! 
ranging from sixteen; ltd sixty-five 
years of age. V r!" 

General fields of educational work 
in; which unemployad ; ! and need} 
teachers may be employed are: gen- 
ei^kl acult education, -worker's educa- 
U<pii rural education,; nursery schools 

II parent education. Projects witH- 
flie above field are initiated local- 
„ Snder the adininistration hud sap- 
eryisory of local: school ^authorities. 
lljlr. Phillips urges that unemploy- 
ed? teachers wishing » be considered 
for reHef: employmen ; during the en- 
suing year write the Emergency Ed- 
neHtion -Division requesting applica- 
tion, and.- eligibility*-hlanks. Regis- 
tratfim is completitti . .when these 
firms have been nitad: put, signed, 
and returned to the Emergency Edu- 
cation Dnvsion. It will I not be nec- 
essary for teachers tb call personaUy 
at the State Deparrtmeilt in^nalang 
application.^ | : | 

NRS Of fice Wiri bi open 
| Satnrday Nights jto Take 
•- Gare of ^arrii P lacemeiitg 

&■ It haB been- announced that the 
' mi placement diviaiohi of the local 
tionatReeinplc^nient. Service office 
■be open -yih -"•'^HagJsr ct™™.8s 
u^^rfter from 7 tofSTWilock, begin- 
ning this coming SaturBay, and; con- 
tinvjng through the! harvest, season. 
Faimers who wif-U 'tr hire, addwjjnal | 



days?" might find the Question an 
swered in the three-fold project now 
being experimented with under the 
d'irection "of the Parents-Teachers 
Association: The leader of the pro- 
ject will be Miss Harriet Helquist. 

The activities consist of Dramatics. 
Arts and Crafts, and Sports. Thosi 
girls wishing '' to ' take advantage of 
this opportunity, should register on 
Saturday, July 21, between the hours 
of '2 and 4 o'clock on the first flooi 
of Lincoln High School.. 

Taxpayers' Suit to 
Stop Truck Purchase 
Goes to Dist. Court 

The case of H. A. Brummund vs. 
the city of Thief River Fails deal- 
ing witn the purchase of a motorized 
nre. truck will be* tried in the fall 
term of court. ' 
■ Notice for trial in the regular term 
of court w s served by Paul A. Lund- 
gren, atto.-aey for plaintiff following 
an adverse decision from the courtoi 
petition for an injunction restraining 
che city from entering into the pur 
chase. " - 



W00LH0USE AND 
BENNES ELECTED 
TO SCHOOL JOBS 



labor should, call at the NRS office A, E. MattSOD is Defeated for 



Re-election. Douville 
Gets 137. Votes. 



The Pennington County 4-H club 
leaders and presidents held a meet- 
Manager -Art aonnson annouxjewj ft ^ of Comit y Agent 

today that the city .tennis tournament D £ j on la3t ^e^y even rng. •. 
is coming along nicely with much ^ decided that ^ 4-H clubs 
public interest being evident. An up- of silverton Erie> S t. Hilaire, Bray; 
set occureo in the first round matches a anbury wou i d ^^ exhibit 
when JohnBiederman defeated lFbHi- boo ti 13 at the Pennington County 
er A. I. Merth, it-seeded played rad ., & j^^^ .-jHvaa also agreed 

favored to play, m the quarter finals, M dub members, will assist Mr. 



by 9-7, and 1 6-4. 



Douglass with the club exhibits at 



where their demands will receive im- 
mediate attention. | i | - ". I 

ERA Funds May Be 
Secured to Gather 
Co Historical Data 

• ; At a special meting of the Library 
Board of the Carnegie j Public Li- 
brary, it was decided that the board 
would try to sponsor a | collection o. 
historical information and "data 61 
this county, providing the project i 
paid for out of » Federal .Fund, it 
has been put up to the ERA with 
the object that the: material thus col- 
lected can later, be jturnecf over to a . , t — — . 

county historical society when one ii board, revealed m bis annual repor. 
orgahizecL The outcome of the pro- - preseding the opening of the electior. 
iect all depends oh) ah- appropriatiorj polls, that the balance on hand July 1 
being received by Federal Aid to 1933 was ?7,535.52. Revenue *™™ 



On Tuesday -evening, the residents 
of Thief River Falls School District 
18 elected £. M. Bennes and R. W ; 
Woolhouse as directors on the board 
of education for three-year terms 
Mr. Woolhouse was elected by 15C 
votes, and Mr. Bennes was re-electec 
to the board by 150 . votes. Thi 
other candidates, A. E. Mattson anc 
W. J. Douville, received 149 and 131 
votes respectively. The regular or- 
ganization meeting will be held 1 the 
tirst Saturday in August when tht 
two elected directors will take theii 
places on the school board'. 

Olaf Neset, clerk of the school 



C.W.A DECIDIS 
TO TAKE ACTION 
AGAINST COUNCIL 

Circularize tne City With Bills 
Stating They "Will Not , 
i Patronize." ■; ■ 

Following the eult refusal 6i ' ft'a : 
city oouncil to reconsider' their ao- 
•ion in regiu-d to the city em'ploye»il 
mscharged by the 6ity engineer > W. ' 
W. Viebahn, the GWA ProtectivB- a*. • 
sociation decided at th'eir meeting : 
-ast Weanesclay evenrng -to- take dras- 
tic action against the members of the , 
iity council to force them to " at 
least give the dismissed men a hear- 
ing. On motidVi which was passed un- 
animously they decided to withdvaw 
*heh- paironage from the business- 
men on the council and from the firms 
ivicli which thjy are cuiinecied. A 
committee was selected to distribute 
Handbills stating the "We Will Not 
fatronize" followed by. a list of "the 
members of the .council and the firms 
tliat they are connected with. 

The entire city and many of the 
neighooring towns were circularized 
on Saturday evening and on inonaay. 
. Some severe criticism of^ their ac- 
tion was voiced by several business 
men who stated that they tnought 
it wouid be. unfair to sume innocent 
parties. 

This phase of the matter was dis- 
cussed at the organization's meeting 
last evening ami a statement to the 
public was prepared and handed' to 
the newspapers in the city wherein 
they clarity their position. 

'l'he statement follows: 
Statement to the Public: 

The CWA Prote;tivfe Association 
wishes to take this means to inform 
the public why we have decided that 
we will not patronize the members of-<" 
die city council 01 Tmei Kiver Falls . 
nor. the firms with which they are 
connected'. 

The city -council has been very un- 
fair to local labor. Three men who 
nave served the city ior many year*- ' 
nave be-m discharged and their places 
nlled with men trom other places. In 
lie case of the last 'two the CWA 
iTotecuve Association has requested 
that the council reinstate them in 
their positions and that it dispense 
with uie services of the city engineer, 
who is himself -an imported man.and 
absolutely unnecessary in the set-up 
of the city's business.. There is ample '" 
evidence to show that he is unquali- 
fied to hold the position that he has. 
and is absolutely without experience^ - 
as^ an engineer in charge of a larg*-'-- 
utility,such as our water and' light* <te-- 
partment. 

This request was tossed aside with- 
out being given any . consideration. 
When we asked that a reason be giv- 
en for the discharge of these men 
we were told that "they refuse .to co- 
operate" and that "they 'are inenl- 
(Continued On Bade Page.) 

Churches Rev. Lerohl's 
Call Will Hold Fest 



carry it out. 
consented to 
endorsed. 



W. a 
do th 



Stephens, hai 
work, if it 



Cities Should Read 
Danger Signals, 

■- McUonell Says 

■ ■ , u_ ! 1 

res issued 



The other, winners in the first round t j, e fa jj, # Earl Engelstad will have 
of the raerfs singles tournament are charge of the 4-H dairy calves; 
K. Halldin,;M. Benson, G. Overland, Charles Joyce will have charge of the 
... rnrunsor.; E. Riehter, T. Rowan, poultry; Martin Hanson of the swine; 

J. Biedei-mann. D. Fabnaa., A. Ros- Harold Jorstad. of garden and potato: , -, . . - — 

uaKKcn of ihis city was . instantly i er> l. Arnold, W. G. Claffy, J. Av- exhibtfs: Dona Brink- of the home the Minnesota Taxpayers Associa- activities, $3,964.58; for fixed charges 
killed, together with three others, nol d f c. Lee, L. Aanstad, G. Aanstad, 3COa 6inic3 u* partment; and Severen tion, in a talk over] WCgO, that the ( $i,b41.74. The total for current ex 
and two ^of the car's occupants. aiu j \r. Jung. • Barstad of the open classes dapart- debt adjustment plan ' ior mumci- pease was ?8ti,731.b7. There was ai 
eveieiy I injured. k 1 j n the second round quarter finals men t ' I palities cannot be iiseu 1 by solvent unexpended balance of petty cash o 
" * " " - ' - ■ ' " ~"^- '- ^*— "*•»"*• — - -,._-__ .^ ^„, 1 — L.—* „* aum.. < §2003. 



A warning was issued today 
James P. McDonnell, ! president 



from 
current taxes amounted to ?41,2is9. 
Id.; trom delinquent taxes, $7,'Jbj.iU 
ii'om rural credits aid, $719.34; from* 
tax on rural credit lane, $665.62. 
from apportionment, $9,893.40; from 
state aiuj $3b,io3.4u; and 1'rpiu otnu. 
uources, $d,zzz.y<i. Xhe total revenuv 
was I?lu7,ab4.69. 

Mr. : Neset further quoted the. dis- 
bursements for the year as follows: 
for 'general control, $4,8ol.38; foi 
instruction, $61,822.06; for operation 
by ^±2,018.20; for maintenance, $2,533.02 
— auxiliary agencies and cordinate 



ior 



Tne tragedy occured between Men- ^ jj. Benson defeated K. Halldul In the Tne coun ty 4-H club picnic is plan- cities to postpone rjayment of debts, 
ahga and tiebeka, Minnesota, when first bracket by 6-0, 6-2, and In the ned f or . either A*ugust 19 or 25 at The primary purpose of the muhici- 
tn« ear was struck by a Great North-, fourths bracket G, Aanstad defeated - gj, hlanding further announcement pal adjustment act ia: to provide a 
em passenger train. Mrs. Bakken; v. Jung by 6-4, 6-4. • of 'which will fo ^vr n a :ater ed.tioh means by which inboWent commum- 



■, of the paper. 



HARRY; ROBINSON IS SERVING 
ON j PRESIDENTIAL ESCORT 

iWordihas been received that a local 



H.TvC; Fowler, -auditor of Penning- 



v.as mstantiy killed, as also was Mrs.i The final match, which will ckcide 
T. Ekelund anc her twelve-yearjold the city champion,, is planned to be < 
son 01 Menahga, and Miss Kececca played on Sunday,' July 29; except in' p H ; A Twfc 

iioreni^La missionary from China, j the condition of inclement weather. \i3V6*TB0r U-S U AppOlutS 
O. L. Ba_ken of this city, and Revl 'i'.- a cordial invitation is extended to -the ( A«4U,». C«»»livv. *.-. P'n^a 
Ekelund^ Lutheran pastor of cnurd..ti_ ' nab'.ic to attend these niatcaes wnic AUullCr rOwlcri 13 liUCc • 

in ndcnuhga and Sebeka, are report- 
ed as seriously injured. 

The report of the a.cident has 
that ciiel. .uriver ha-' stopped the 
at the railroad crossing to let 
ti-kin pass, but had fahed to put 
car iu neutral gear, only holding 
clutch down with his foot. He moved 
Lio iooc| from the clutch pedal with 
the result that the car sprang for- 
ward \n\o the path of the oncoming 
train and was cut in two. . [ 

. After i having been in a Wadena 
hospital! since the accident, {Mr. 
Bakken has now returned to his home 
in this Icity. ' • ~ I " 



public to attend these niatcaes wide 
l are held every 'night at. the' Lincoln 
I High School tennis courts. '•■-"-" 

SECONDt STOCKHOLDERS 
MEETiNG IS CALLED TO 



, ti2s couid work outj ofi their difficul- 
ties with the cooperation of / their 

! creditors^ he stated;-'"- - ; { 

"Our cities, and (government all 
along the line, aboild read the dan-, 
ger- aigi.als.' Emoarijassment_ that re- 



._!_««>:« ~„P»_ n l-.oinn quires such adjustments as these njw 

ontnteri m ax L oma ljsicn gSvid^aior bankrupt, I «« e ?. \ ^ 

'■"-V ' ~~^"^ NiMa avantriflllv to RTllH Unit of ! 1TOV- 



come eventually to;.{an} 
ernmentithat disref 



(unit of; gov- 
t\ tptinci- 



ton County, has accepted an "appo.nt- . bf ^. onomy . trouble is waiting 
menf'by Gov. Floyd B. Olson to an for c ^ e3 that C arrlr dh| an. extended 



Interim Commissioh on Tax Lawf 

ATT ON CRFAWFRY SAI V 'WhIch'Trill m ko lecomnvindations 
AUi u« un.tAmE,is.i palc t0 the goveTnm and t„ the next atat , 

'legislature. / "i ■ 

Auxlary WiJI Bsnrfit 
Froa Cit caj to bs Siowft 
Here en 



The stockholders of the Thief; RiT- , 
er Falls Creamery Association' will^ 
hold another meeting on Friday, Aug. 
3, in the Civic and Commerce rooms 
of the municipal auditorium, as the 
first meeting of July 6 is held uncon- 
stitutional because. the notice y cal- 
ling for the meeting of the stockhold- 
ers did* not state the purpose of the- 
meeting. '• 



program of shortptime borrowrig 
,na that continue -to create long-time 

bond isauea that are cbnwarianteJ. 
I No business, not e^en (public busi- 
tness^ can long . be -to>lv«pt, unless it 
! balances; its budget^ liVes within, its 
j income, and meets ■itsjlnonest obliga- 



The' amount spent ior capital- oui 
lay was $2,397.T(, and for debi ser 
vi\ie, $7,499.50, giving a grand to- 
tal for lAsbursemehts of $^6,648.87 
The total cash on hand July 17 wa 
*U0,716.72. ' 



JOHN BRANDT TO 
SPEAK AI ' GRYGU 
COOP PICNIC SUN. 



_.__ ftions. 1,300 unite <fi jlbcal ^govern- 

WJ a - oiX'meut mo now insolvent" he stated; 

f.d-, AUgUSC Otn «*lf W e continue tofg^i (on the theory 
— _ — _ * that the future gentarajimi will-ibene- 

The Seal Brothers circus will pre- fit by all our bond' ;fesu4s, and there- 
sent an afternoon and evening per- fore future' generations; should* bear 



l -rr ^ ^. i.-- i ; Mr - and Mrs « e m1 Smith, Mr. and 

boy, ^arry Robinson, son of Mi. ^nd Mrs. A. JL Jtobinson, and Misi 

:Mra..A.;F. Robinson;. is on the U. S. S. Andersoffv Attended the pagu 

*Newr- Orleans which is an esfcort Itaska St v fe Park last Sunday/ „ 

cruiser 1 to the U. S. S. Huston j on Mr.and Mrs. E. A. Stoughton and cents/and twenty cents for adults. 



which President Roosevelt is taking two daughters motored to Itaska 
his. vacation to the Hawaiian Island .State ParkV on Sunday and spent the 
and the Pacific Coast. . ! day there, 

! ; 1 . 









fbrmance in Thief River Falls oh part of the cost, Icjfc'UB see how our 
Wednesday, August 8, at .the vacant children will corae put; The money 

forma lota^n the corner of Sixth street \ that onr municipalities borrow.: at 4 
t at antijmnd State avenue^. T^e adra^; per cent today wiff^aHiiuble in Z 
sion^irice for children *fll te ten years. This means jkfiR every million 
" *' " ' dollars of 4 per cwPoonas that we 



The exhibition is being sponsored issue will cost ourl cfildren two mil- 
for.the benefit of the Auxiliary Drum > lion- dollars .' at - r4at#itr - oyer . 26 
Cforps. ■-:'„" yeara* time, .!■ " 



lii^i^f'vV^^^AA^^ait 



; . A misunderstanding of inform - 
.ion given us caused the paper ti 
print an erroneous report in las 
vveek's euCtioh that ^John Brandt 
Freiiident of the Land O' Lakes as 
sociation would be unable-' to be pre 
: ent at he Northwestern Group Co 
operative picnic which is to be helt 
Sunday, July 22, at Grygla. Tht 
article should have stated. that- Mr 
Brandb was/ unable to speak las 
time because -the picnic: was post 
poned, but he will be present, am 
will be the principal speaker at Sun 
day's picnic. ' 

Other addresses and musical selec 
tioiB ate|li8gfto be" given. A gooe 
tuJ|^5B|urjHFto all who attend. 



The five congregations served by- 
Rev. J. K. Lerom of Oklee will hold 
their fifteenth annual festivalon Sun- 
jay, juiy liz, with services in Salem 
Ohurch, Games, at 11 A. M. Dinner 
.vUl he served by the ladies' aida in 
.Valhoug's grove- at the old Games 
place, which is across the road .from 
opong's ■ This place, is' 8 miles eagt 04 
numraer, and 6 miles north and one 
.nile west of Oklee. Rev. R. M. Fjel- 
jtad will give tlie main address on the 
afternoon program which will ' be 
.teid in VVa^nougs grove 

Addresses will also, be given by 
Attorney j ens Grothe, Rev Flao- 
aiark and others, ana a number el 
musical selections and songs will 
complete the program. The public 
is cordially inviteu to attend! 



Mibs '.'Violette Jacobsbn left on 
Moncsayl to spend the second week of 
her vacation at 'Minneapolis. 



TWO DltlN WRECK 
AT MIDDLE RIVER 



A tragic automobile accident took 
lace otLween fcjLrathcona an Middle 
.tiver on Monday night when a, car 
.riven by Joe Vogel of Fergus Falls 
collided" with a car occupied by Fred 
omisun of uvbokston and another' 
..ccupant. ,Both cars were coming 
from Strathcona, with- Johnson's car 
a cue lead. Johnson stopped hTs car, 
.nd together with "the other occu- 
pant, was standing on the road with 
,*tenc en hailing Vogle to stop. 
/ogol was apparently going ■ at a 
ast speed, and hot aeemg .the other 
.ar or its occupants on the" road, 
rashed headway into them, killing 
ohnson immeu'.a.teiy. The- other "oc- 
;upant was saved by- his jumping into 
.ne nearby- ditch. Vogel's car then 
,werved around and went into the 
•cher side of the ditch." Vogel was 
.pparently all right before the oc- 
.upant 01 Johnson's car hiked back 
.0 Strallicona for aid, but was found 
lead on their: return. A coroner ' 
.vas sumnioneu' from" Warren arid the 
.odics were taken to Middle River. 

Mr. Johnson wos a salesman" for 
;he Nasli-iFinch Company^at Crooks- 
con, while. Mr. Vogel • was -salesman 
for the Diamond Match Company % 
Chicago. 



Mr. pnd Mri. .Otto. Skog, Mrs. Skog 
:nd Arthur Lamay^ of Wadena Sun- 
day to. visit at the~ home of Mr. and 
"Mrs; John : Skog.-Mrs. M. Skog ' is 
spending several weeks with her' son, 
while' the others returned to Wadena 
on Tuesday. 



ML 



CI 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURF 




■m 






T6B!gS!^RgiJ13 g6fet?M, "fetES SIVEB $Ali&_^r&86gA.|ftb&foAV, jtftff 16, 16& -« 



f^-7«rfe#l 



STRIKE TIES IIP 
SANiRANCISCO 

Guardsmen Pour Into City, Police 

Augmented as Mobs Loot 
I ; Grocery Stores. 

San Franclsco-j-The normal pro* 
. cessej of existence for 1,300,000 men, 
women and children were torn up by 
th* foots In the relentless clutch of 
a general strike In the San Francisco 
metropolitan district. National guards- 
men jby the thousand, with tanks. 
Held pleWs, machine guns and 'other 
formidable engines of death, surged 
into i befuddled San Francisco | and 
others Were on their way. Police 
force* /were swelled throughoui the 
area j by emergency additions] A 
great community had been knocked 
off 1U balance by the shock of i busi- 
ness ^stagnation and fearful conse- 
quences loomed in the face of Its 
shaUnesB.- 

Mobs looted a few grocery stores 
still running m the face of a; food 
shortage and a buying stampeded By 
the tens of thousands the populace 
began surging Into the streets. Most- 
ly they were th© curious. Others, 
perhaps, had less friendly motives. 
Virtually all were pedestrians. Every- 
where there Is tenseness and" uncer- 
tainty, i 

At | the request of the President's 
national longshoremen's board here, 
which failed to persuade opposing 
sides; to arbitrate the original strike, 
the new national labor relations board 
in "Washington^ detailed its chief ex- 
aminer, P. A. Donahue, to head for 
San Francisco by airplane to assist 
in "negotiations. City, state and fed- 
eral authorities as well as leaders of 
the general strike promised food for 
everybody but It was not In evidence. 
At Washington it was reported a fed- 
eral check-up on food. supplies In the 
San iFrancisco area revealed i that 
thera was no. shortage and that the 
government saw no need of using its 
agencies to supplant the usual! food 
supply channels. j 

Strikers were reported picketing 
against supply trucks waiting an op- 
portunity to enter the city, under na- 
tional guard or state police envoy. 

Khaki clad militiamen began mount- 
ing ^machine guns on the roofs of jcom- 
miaslbn houses in the produce district, 
and there are 6,100 guardsmen In the 
city to. keep order. i 



Second Trunk Murder In London. 
Brighton, England — Another trunk 
murder victim, the second since June 
18, Was disclosed in Brighton when 
the body of a woman was found cram- 
med ;In a trunk in an apartment 
house. With It were found the' head 
and- arms of the torso previously 
found at the Brighton railway station. 
This discovery, police said, definitely 
links ! the bodies and establshes j that 
both crimes were committed by| the 
eamejpersoi or persons. In addition 
to the trunk the police took possession 
of a quantity of blood-stained clothing 
belonging to a woman. \ 



Caterpillars Strips 40 Acres Dally 
Berlin, Wis. — A horde of millions of' 
tent caterpillars was advancing lover 
a strip about a mtle wide in a marsh 
In the town of Aurora, leaving be- 
hind thousands of -young willow trees 
stripped of all leaves. The caterpil- 
lars have destroyed trees on 600 acres 
- of the marsh at the rate of about 40 
acres j a day. Corn and other farm 
crops nearby do not appeal to the in- 
vaders who feed only on willow trees. 



N. D. Business Debt Holiday Extended 
Bismarck, N. D.— North Dakota's 
business debt holiday, scheduled to 
expire July 16, was extended to inext 
January 1 by proclamation of Governor 
William Langer. The first proclama- 
tion was issued March 19, making It 
unlawful to levy upon, attack, or sell 
any stock of merchandise, shoruetiuip- 
ment, furniture and fixtures usdd In 
and about tho operation of any busi- 
ness, i • 



Minneapolis Truck Drivers Strike. 

Minneapolis — Union truck drivers 
talked out on strike for the second 
time within two months, as an agree- 
ment between the employers and Idriv- 
ers failed to satisfy them. Mllkj Ice, 
bread,; gasoline and garbage trucks 
were not affected as yet Both i'sides 
are working towards a settlement of 
differences^ j 

Lumber Products Prices Are Reduced 
Washington— Reduction of from 8 to 
10 per:.cent In the price of all lumber 
products ordinarily used in house 1 con- 
struction was announced by NRA.I The 
reductions were made by the lumber 
and timber products code authority 
and approved by- Hugh S. Johnson. 

Baba Ruth Swats 700th Home iRun. 

Betrot — Babe Ruth got his 700th 
major league home run hit In Detroit. 
Ruth's! swat, one of the mightiest of 
his career, brought the "Yankees their 
only victory of the series with the 
Tigers; The Babe paid a youngster 
?20 to get the hair back. I 



Disarmament Called for Autumn. 
Geneva — The world powers were 

commuted to another serious fling at 

disarmament next September by the 
. official! convocaton cf the stearins 

committee of the disarmament j con- 
-ferenco. ; 



Church| Members Back Clean Movies 
Na York — Protestant church groups 
with an estimated mmebership of 22,- 
000,000! were joined with the Roman 
Oatholc Legion of Decency'ln theicam- 
v paign for more wholesome pictures* 
forpm advertising is bargain news 



AUTO FATALITIES CONTINUE ^ 

TO M PT IHKUOU IJAIION 

The Census Department has just 
released figures showing: the death 
rate froai automobile accidents in 
66 of the large eitie3 of the nation 
for the four weeks ending June . 9, 
1934. T.ie first striking feature ib 
the fact that during the four weeks 
ending June 9, 1934, after repeal, 
there were 108 more deaths than in 
the like period in 1933 when beer 
only wan legal. This shows an in-? 
crease of 19.8%. 

The National Council ^of Safety 
Reckon- that the average ,'cost per 
motor ctr deaths is $5O,U0O. There- 
fore, if repeal was responsible for 
this increase, the loss to the nation 
was ¥5,4.00,01)0 for the four week:, 
at which rate the total loss during 
a year would be $70,200,000. 

Figures from all parts of the n£> 
rion indicate that there has been a 1 
.alarming ; increase of drunkennes3 
\iince the return of beer which has 
oeen still further augmented by re- 
peal Only fragmentary figures for 
a934 are available, but 1933, nine 
months of which were beer months 
and one month of which was a repeal 
month, recorded a sliarp increase in 
jrunkenness in nearly every city re- 
porting. The rate of increase rang- 
ed from .8% to 36.2 per cent, wjth 
an average of 92.8%. That thi» 
would* be sharply reflected in the rate 
jf automobile accidents and fatal! 
ties is evident. 

Robbins E. Stoeckel, former state 
director of motor traffic in .Connecti- 
cut, now research executive in high- 
way transportation, recently stated 
that reckless driving and - similar 
generalities are apparently being 
widely used to camouflage alcohol as 
a factor in traffic accidents." 

These facts make it evident that in 
any honest system of bookkeeping 
there will have to be. a large de- 
duction from the revenue received' 
from the liquor traffic to cover the 
cost of the accidents and fatalities 
chat must be charged against it in 
connection with highway travel. 



TREATMENT MAY PREVENT 
SUDDENHEART DEATHS 

When the Minnesota State Medical 
Association held its 81st annual 
meeting in Duluth, July 16, 17 and 
18, Minnesota physicians consio^red 
an interesting new treatment for the 
prevention . of sudden deaths from 
neart disease. 

This new treatment, according to 
a bullethuon the subject, issueu by 
che Public ■ Health Education Com- 
mittee of the Minnesota State Medi- 
cal Association, has not had a tna. 
on a sufficient number of numai, 
cases to be accepted, yet, as part 01 
medicine's ever growing armament- 
arium against disease disaster. Iv 
does, indicate,, however, that .rea. 
progress is being made in the treat 
ment of the much dreaded heart con 
ditions, angina pectoris and disease o_ 
the cononary arteries, and what then 
is a read possibility, in the future, o 
preventing the sudden tragic heart- 
failures that take off so many. meri 
and women prematurely. 

The new theory and treatment tc 
be demonstrated in Duluth is the 
work of a single Minnesota reseai*ch- 
er with whom the University of Min- 
nesota has cooperated in .experi- 
mental work. . 

It is based on the fact^hown in 
a large number of postmortem stud- 
ies, that the actual -structural 
changes found in the heart are often 
not enough to account for death. In 
a large proportion, the heart fnusclt 
is practically normal. These find- 
ings indicated to the researcher that 
the trouble in many cases was with 
the physiological mechanisms of th- 
heart rather than with the heart 
structure itself. The only two that 
could cause sudden --cessation of the 
circulation are the standstill and the 
fibrillation of the- ventricles. In the 
first, the ventricles simply cease to 
contract. In the second, they go in- 
to a quivering which makes the con- 
traction ineffectual. 

In animals and in a few human 
cases, this Minnesota physician ap- 
pears to have been able to produce 
these phenomena and stop them at 
will by means of simple drugs. 

PART-TIME JOBS TO BE fihft 
COLLEGE STUDENTS THRU E.E.L 

Under authorization from Han 
L. Hopkins, Federal Relief Adminis 
trator, more than 2,600 young mei 
and women will be . given part-tim 
jobs which will enable " them to bi 
gin or continue their college educa 
tion in Minnesota through the con: 
ing year according to announcemen 
made by : Harold O. Soderquist, Al 
sociate Director of Emergency Ei 
ucation. 

Any person who has finished hig' 
school may anply for these, par. 
time jobs Applicants should writ 
to the Emergency Education Divisior 
of the State Department of ^Educa 
tion requesting the proper applicf 
tion form.s Mr. Soderquist state 
that apnlicants write for thes< 
forms. - U will not be necessary t 
call at the office personally. 

When the application form is pro- 
perly filled out and signed, it sliouh- 
be returned directly to the Emei 
gency Education . Office. There th 
reiief eligibility of the applicant wil 
be checked and the blanks approve 
will be sent to the college designated. 
The college administration selects. 01 
a basis of merit the quota of stu- 
dents which they are allowed. Those 
selected are given worth-while so 
cially useful tasks about the.-college. 
They are paid a minimum of 30c 
per hour, ; with *» maximum, monthl; 
earning of $20.00 per month. . 

Give Snake* the Lanjb -'.--.,'-- 
The mongimse, the rjeilgiiliiiy - nhtl 
the. pig are said to be Immune from 
the venom 1 of poisonous snakes. . 



Farmers Warned;" 
Of 'Chiselers' on 

Mortgage Debts 

j Mortgage burdened farmers are 
warned by the -Minnesota Farm Bur- 
eau Federation Protective service 
against a. scheme ' that • proposes to 
levy on them for "assistance" render- 
ed in obtaining, the scaling down of 
cheir debts. Under this scheme, if a 
former succeeded in having a debt 
scaled down from ¥5,000 to $3,000, he 
would.be forced to pay the promoters 
one percent of the scaled : down 
amount, or $20. 

During the past year and a half 
there has been a strong trend to- 
ward the scaling down of farm debts, 
and ■ creditors have . voluntarily sur- 
rendered claim to thousands upon 
thousands of dollars, thus relieving 
farmers of some of the debt load they 
have been carrying, says A. -J. Olson 
president of the Minnesota Farm 
Bureau. The scaling down process 
aas not gone nearly far enough, but 
■in the instances where it has been 
benefited. Mr. Olson says. 
, When creditors agree to scale down 
they do it with the intention of mak- 
ing it easier for the debtor to carry 
on, and if they learn that a third 
party is to enter the deal and levy 
cribute from the farmer on the 
amount the creditors have voluntar- 
ily agreed to strike off their boei'S, it 
is probable that the scaling down 
movement will be' seriously, impeded. 
On' the other hand, no debt-burdened 



farmer should be .expected jta 1 pay' 
from his sadly depleted resources for 
!ahy alleged services; jthat intermed- 
iaries may furnish, i:.: 

"This heartless [ attempt to; wring 
tribute from debt-stricken farmers 
should be nipped in the" bud, and all 
parties to a debt-conciliation agree- 
ment shoud be sure, before the agree- 
ment is completed, that the farmer, 
rather than outsiders,: get all the 



■JteMj 



iToMrwrirDHnis IK 

&M HIGH DESPITE Tfit 
WORK OF SAFETY COUNCILS 



Four traffic-deaths in Minnesota on 
the 4th of July,' (in addition to 



. . .. ... . ■_. - . ., numerous injured on the highways,) 

f°f*™» n *^M m ni«^™l^ m fa "P ite °f the intensive effort made 

awton i- . ttnn <■<"» a jjy newS p a p erSj th e raoio, organiza- 

tins and speakers co-operating with 
the city and county public safety 
committees to influence the holiday 



settlement," Mr.-. Olson/ asserts, 

The first debt-conciliation commit- 
tee in Minnesota- was ; formed : nearly 
three years ago in Co ttonwood- county 



under the auspices! of the Cottonwood motorists and pedestrians to exercise 
County Farm Bureau: Since that time! caution and giye heed to traffic re- 
s' number of other j County Farm Bur- gulations, indicates the heed for the 
eaus have organized; local debt con- public safety educational program to 
ciliation groups, and' splendid resuts go on in .Minnesota,' ' even' more 
in the scaling down |of debts have thoroughly, in the opinion of C. H. 
been made to the cfebt-stricken far- Zealand, director of the Safety Div- 
mer for services irehdered, the idea ' ision State Emergency Relief Ad- 
of wringing tribute from a debtor's ' ministration. 

misfortunes being- abhorrent to the NeW3 fi spa tches on July 5th 
organization, tor. Olson assorts. J ; | placed the death toll in this state at 

Farmers who wish I assistance in four, Duluth, Rochester, Triumph 
adjusting their debt; burden should and Fairbault being the scenes - of 
communicate with! their local county the fatalities. J 

debt adjustment committee or, if they| John P. Arnoldy, head of the state 
do not know its personnel, with the highway patrol, said that traffic was 
County Farm tiyrtaul office or w J li| unusually heavy this year on the 
the Minnesota Farm .Bureau Federa- j -Fourth of July, but it was not at all 
tion in St. Paul. : points where traffic congestion was 

It is not necessary tt> join the Farm ' greatest that the fatalities occurred. 
Bureau or any cfhei farm organiia- . That there was co-operation with the 
fc'on, or to pay any fees, or agree to rules for • traffic safety throughout 
pny any, for the services of debt con- j the state generally, was the obser- 
vation iKimmittejes, jFarm Bureau vation of highway patrolmen. On 
officers explain. ; - j | the strength of the observation of 



aafljMMjsaittfis 



■j—~™^\ 



behaviqr of motorists and pedest- 
rians .was that, it was in geher 1 in 
accord with tie requests of city and 
county safety committees, newspa." 
pers and . radio speakers for the ex- 
ercise of care for prevention -of ac- 
cidents. " . 

"I cannot help but feel that we 
got a response from tue public, as 
the result of ^ efforts made preceding 
the holiday for careful driving," Mr. 
Zealand said. • He cited that the au- 
tomobile death toll of 69 in the coun- 
try as a whole for the 4th of July, 
which was reported by the Associat- 
ed' Press as a lower figure than the 
drowning fatalities of the holiday 
was indicative that an impression 
had been made in the interests of 
safety upon motorists, as a whole. 
This was the first time, since 1931 
that there were fewer deaths in traf- 
fic, than the total of drowning fatal- 
ities for the day. 



Where Water Goe» Uphill ' 

Water flows uphill In plants through 
the many thousands of tiuy tubes that 
make up the woody parts of the stems, 
but it does not flow as water does Id 
the plumbing ' pipes of a house. Sci- 
ence Service says. It does not go 
up In solid streams, at least In times of 
water scarcity, but forms Aims that 
stick to the walls of the tubes and 
flow along them, with hollow spaces 
in the middle filled with water vapor. 
This hypothesis of sap ascent in 
plants, radically differs from all dnc- 



; ; , \ enforcement officers, the driving pub- P' an ts, radically differs from all dnc- 

Watch Forum Aavertasements lor n was credited with being careful, i trlnes accepted by botanists for maDy 



bargain news. 



(and the general impression of the (years. 




HEY KIDS! 



WIN 




Just Get Ten New 



FREE TRIP 

TO THE 

State Fair 

Subscriptions to the Forum 





Prize Winners 

will be provided 

-with escorts on trip 



Prizes for Every Contestant 

^'^AiJlREE ticket good at the gate and grandstand 
for every contestant who scores 100 points or more. 

JPPf ^^ ts entitles contestant to a round trip rail- 
way ticket; Minneapolis and return and a ticket to the 
fair, good for admission at the gate and at grandstand 
^For 



every 400 points the contestant scores in 



No limit; 



ex- 



cess of ;ip00_ points will get- $1 cash fpr spending money 



get all you can 

Here Are the Rules 



CONTEST^ open to any boy or girl from 10 to 15 years of aee ONE 
NEW YEARLY BUBSCRIP^ION Counts ^ 6 

100 points, one renewal for one year counts ™* 
50points. Bring in ojie renewal or one 
new subscription to make yo^r entry and 
get a receipt book and instructions. This 
will count on your total score j ust as well 
as the others you get; Start %iow. THE 
FAIR OPENS SEPTEMBER 1st 




Contestants Must Have Their 
; Parents Consent to Enter. 



^eryhody W^ Only $1 Per Year! 



■"^V 



— 'A^^jSiMm^Mh^^^^: ■■ :v;-m&^&:' : : 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



■fr-sts *.&frg& 



* k 




j;! §iBi^%Ji&&^^^^ 




^:;.j stvfiafAtta foam, fgrgg ftiVEg-fAttia, Mcates-atA. MPaaBifrrm? is.- ia& -^: 



Our Community Builders 



° L nf ™r^5™ E * T 3 LS f^tory In 1893. An excellent fan?- 



OF THE EARLY 
THIEF RIVER 



A pioneer, of this part of the coun- 
try for 54 years, M. C. Burn3 is the 
only living pioneer of (" 
who 




the four men 
were the 
first white 
settlers in this 
territory. He has 
watched- the 
grojwth of Thief 
River Falls since 
the I days when the 



over-ran the present LaBrae avenue 
Mr. Burns was horn! in eastern 
Canada at Campellford, Ontario on 
i September 25, 1848, and was one of 
a family of thirteen. He was raised 
on a farm and had no ! schooling to' 
speak of excepting in the school of 
experience, hard knocks, and hard 
:work. When sixteen. Burns went to 
the lumber woods in Canada where 
he worked until he came to this 



— ^■~~»«**. j "ail .AUtJtJa Ail *£JtCClJ 

DATS IN . ly resulted from this union: -Francis, 
FALLS 2 n P is in business at Hawley: 

Evangeline, (Mrs. G. L. Ardron) of 
Seattle, ^Washington; Lucille ' (Mrs 
John T.~Notan) of Gilbert, Minn. 
and Marguerite, (Mrs. A. Q. Janse) 
of Fargo, N. Dak. 

Patriotism for his country is but 
one of the few qualities of Mr. 
Burns' sterling character, and is evi- 
dent in his staunch and law-abiding 
attitude. He says: "The country I 
live in is good enough for me. I 
believe in my country and its govern- 
ment, and I believe that the only way 
occupants 'of"the'£? r °!} e & H^*!?" 6 * ? s to „ 1!ve up 
present city site i ^ u !5i- ^VH ' flWS °* * he,: 

were Indians and I °" ntI 7l , \/ 

whose tepees were {respite his 86 yejirs, Mr. Burns is 
cluttered along „', v , ery active, -H&iving his own 
the] river bank a- £ ord v ' 8 and heing> caretaker of the 
round the territo- ', Dobner-Meehan building. He and his 
ry !now occupiej I J'nuly wife are contented and' satis- 
b y J the Central . £ ed in their comfortable home, after 
Lumber Company, having weathered unflinchingly to- 
and! whose trail sether so many gales in life's voyage 
*™„ „.. of happiness and disappointments. 



timates of ?3,162,919. ! 

These figures in addition to being 
good news for all interested In tMe 
development of the nine-foot channel, 
serve to refute some wild and exag- 
gerated' guesses as to the total cost 
of this work. It now becomes ap- 
parent that the estimates were quite 
liberal and the engineer's figures 
also are significant because these- es- 
timates were made some time ago, 
most of; them before the N.R.A. and 
the SOrhpur week and minimum hour- 
ly wages. In only two instances would 
the actual cost exceed the estimates: 
These are at Lock No. 16 at Musca- 
tine, la., and Lock No. 18 at Burling- 
ton, la., and the total over-rim for 
these two projects was 1 " " 

$100,000. 



ID the RoStrUm ]' These are" important 



just 



IMAGE LIVESTOCK PRICES 
ARE BETTER JHAN LAST YEAR 

i The first half of 1934 has passed 



country. Beginning at tee age of ?,™u„ " 00k ' cons ! d enng future 
;22, he worked in the lumber woo& S H ^^W^TP" 1 ^ S 5 y ? the 
around the Georgian Bay for a num- ' rw£i ™? ? rket bulletin issued by the 
ber of years. | I Ce "'J aI „ c °?Perative Association of 

faoutn fat. Paul. 



He J entered this territory in May, 
1880, driving oxen overj the Indian 
Trail jto Crookston which was the 
only available trail at] that time. 
Burns; filed a claim south of town, 
:where. he "batched it" all alone on 
the farm with the possible exception 
of occasional Indian visitors. During 
this time , he had the distinction of 
raising the first wheat Igrown north 
of St., Hilaire, which was crudely 
cut with a cradle and threshed' with 
. a flail. After seven years of hard 
and unsuccessful farming, Mr. Burns 
sold his farm and personal property 
and for the ensuing several years, he 
was engaged as a farm hand, and 
worked on building elevators in 
North [Dakota. I 

. Burns aided' in erecting the first 
building ever built in the 1 town which 
was for Frank RussellJ and also 
worked on several of | the town's 
first buildings. In 1883 he helped to 
stack the first grain stacked in Thief 
Kixer Palls which was for John La- 
Bree. j Burns filed a. claim at Red 
Lake m 1888, which he I sold after 
three years. In March of 1888, hi 
assisted several other men in moving 
C. A. Robekke's hotel building from 
St. Hilaire to this city. | This build- 
ing later became the Hotel Ogamah. 
Burns also helped' grade the first 
streets i of the town which composed 
two blocks on the present Horace 
Avenue, and two blocks on LaBree 
Avenue. 

j In April, 1892, Burns, together 
with other men, buried the first man 
in Greenwood cemetery, j The saw- 
mill was established in 1891, and for 
some time, Mr. Burns was in the em- 
ploy of; the lumber company. Among 
other businesses he has Engaged in 
from that time, he has speculated in 
real estate, maintained aj farm im- 
plement business until 1907, and has 
been caretaker of several! city build- 
ings iri the Dobner-Meehan block 
since 1910. j 

Mr. Burns tells of the large prairie 
fire which swept this part of the 
country from Wylie to Holt around 

Sont amrinK 1DOO TT_ __>!_.. .. ' 



, As the second half of the current 
year started the average fat cattle 
market stood $2.00 per cwt above a 
year ago. Hogs averaged 40c above 
year ago and fat Iambs averaged 
?1.60 above a year ago. 

During the first six months of 1934 
cattle receipts at twenty leading mar- 
kets of the U. S. were 5,235,00 head 
or 921,000 more than during the 
same period' last year. Hog re- 
ceipts thus far this year at 13,434,- 
000 head at twenty markets were 
1,489,000 less than the corresponding 
total last year, and the sheep re- 
ceipts 6,864,000 head showed a fall- 
ing off of 2,864,000 head as compared 
with a year ago. 
• With the drought causing liquida- 
tion of many cattle, hogs and sheep 
and the government making vast 
purchases of livestock in drought 
areas, future supplies of livestock 
for markets undoubtedly will be 
smaller. The recent pig crop esti- 
mate of 2894 less this spring and 
38% less sows to farrow this fall, al- 
so indicates small supplies for fu- 
ture market. 

Fewer hogs for the future is bear- 
ish in the corn market since it 
points to reduced consumption of 
corn. If hog production has been 
cut as much as . reports indicate, it 
may prove to be too drastic. a reduc- 
tion. A bad run of cholera this sum- 
mer and fall might result in a pork 
famine. 



Dear Editor: '.;•"':£ 

.J * he Times and. .Forum of July 
12th I notice my friend Paul Engel- 
stacV invites speakers for. the three 

ir n."i, (, *"". es '" cu,a state to c °nie to 
Valhall and present the merits of 
their respective party platforms. 
±he only restriction he makes for 
the speakers is that no mud-slinging 
shall be allowed. 

I think that this is a very good 
plan to adopt in every community. 
■ -*• | *? the platform and principles of the 
than different political: parties' are explain- 
ed to the voters at' political hieetings 
they can form a more clear opinion 
and cast a more intelligent vote at 
the November election. 

The saying! is that "politics is 
rotten, and the reason for this is 
that politics has been left in the 
This is the season in which motor ? a ' n *° thos / l? h ° have made i£ their 
ists enjoy "razzing" the Engineers re SH??,;* ^ . a "°' °> ?lead the peo- 
sponsible for oiling the roads and es- ELmm™?" 8 S^'"?! ra "" !s of the old 
tablishing detours 8 arouse eonatrut *££? r 1 n ' a J ^V ' h< L P S st the 
tion projects, says a highway deuart ^??' pa £ of the , s Pef ches has con- 
raent bulletin a ' B . y depart - , ""ed in abuse and calling people of 

Some motorists probably think the ' ^^T' ° P ™° n bad "T^ 
engineers have deliberately plotted r, Most P e °P™ are agreed that this 

=--- *•-.. ~ . ..« r "=" Depression! is [caused by there being 

not. only "something rotten in Den- 
but right here in the United 
if nn ^«i A i- __,= 



. build it ourselves, and know 
■ I what we are getting. 

These are important questions. 
Give; the matter some thought and 
investigation. If we want to sell, 
then we certainly must see to it that 
we get a fair and just price for our 
Creamery property. 

Knute Solheim 
Gust Berggren 
Christian Steen 
N."!E. Johnson 
Frank Hardisty 
Ed. Grundhouse 
L. O. Stenseth 
Gdrden M. Olson 
Tobias Stene 



.ROAD OILING WANS MORE 
MOTORING ENJOYMENT 



Gervais-Emardville 



vu 611 .v. _i.o nave u-cjiuei'ttbts^y piottet 

against their Sunday afternoon en- 
joyment of some particular stretch of - ,° 
hiehwav. Rut:. if tho h.-^inuon- j„ mark 



highway. But -if the highway de- 
partment ;failed to apply the needed 
bituminous treatments, the motorist 
would- have poor diriving for the next 
twelve months, instead of some slight 
inconvenience for a few minutes or 
few hours with the freshly applied 
black surfacing. 

And if there were no detours, there 
would be no nice, modern roads to 
drive on. Construction activity brings 
temporary detours which make pos- 
sible years of driving comfort ovei 
improved highways. 

The state highway department, in 
applying ordinary retreatments to 
bituminous roads, treats only half 
the roadway at a time. It covers the 
fresh material with gravel or -sailed 
immediately after application. It 
keeps flagmen on the job while 
treatment is in progress, and these 
men warn drivers to go slowly ovijir 
the treated* stretch. If cars go slow- 
ly they do not spatter the bituminous 
material, but if they speed they will 
pick it. up off the road. Bituminous 
treatments must be- applied during 
summer months. 

If cars become spattered with bit- 
uminous road surfacing, highway de- 
partment chemists recommend the 
following cleaning method: Mix one 
quart lubricating oil with one gal 
Ion of gasoline. Do not use gaso- 
line containing lead compounds, - sucfi 
as ethyl gas. Spray or brush the 
mixture on the spots to be cleaned 
Let. the gasoline evaporate, then 
wash with soap and lukewarm water. 



CANALIZATION OF MISSISSIPPI 
COSTS RUNS UNDER ESTIMATE 



The actual cost of the 16 projects 
now under construction in the canal- 
ization of the Upper Mississippi river 
will be more than ?3,0O0,000 less 
than the government's estimates, ac- 
cording to official reports from div- 
ision engineers. 

„ ■-:- . — - j.~ w uuu m-uunu There are 8 locks and 2 dams be- 

beptember, 1883. He says 'that the ' "«g built in the northern division ex- 

lire was from three . to four miles tending from the Twin Cities to the 

wide, anc; cleaned everything in its mouth of the Wisconsin river. This 

course Burns was working ' out in division- is in charge of Major D. P 

the field, when Mrs. C. Al Robekke Johns, St. Paul. Estimated total 

Ca . m ? . r V nnln S' across the field with a cost of this work y/as ?16,987,608 

child in her arms. She cleared the The contract cost, which includes lib- 
held just ahead of the fire's path, as eral estimates for miscellaneous work 

it' passed the Robekke farm immed- and equipment charges, is $15,313,- 

lately after her, burning [everything , 898, which is $1,673,710 less than the 

except the house, which Mr. Burns estimated total. On the southern 

spent two hours in saving from being division, in charge of Major R. A 

burned to the ground. The course of i Wheeler, Rock Island, there are 9 

,!£,* l?Jt n - th '7 es J of the town i locks and' 2 dams either under con- sloVdow^' 

near the fairgrounds, the only ob- struction or finished. Total esti- , . 

siacie in its progress further east mated cost for the work at these 1 A report just issued by the Call 

being the old Incian Trail. " ' •■ — * — -'- — *--' -'--- ■ "" ■ *• • 



HIGH SPEED BOOSTS STATE'S ; 
AUTOMOBILE TRAGEDIES 

Excessive speed and "riding the 
center line" are among the prime 
factors in Minnesota's increasing toll 
of automobile fatalities, according to 
an analysis of traffic accident causes 
made ;by Chief John P. Arnoldy of 
the state highway patrol. 

"Excessive speed means any speed 
too high for prevailing conditions," 
Mr. Arnoldy said. ' l Twenty miles an 
hour might be excessive speed in 
some circumstances, although -much 
higher speeds are reasonable under 
other conditions. 
. "Too many drivers become ac- 
customed to high speeds on long, 
open stretches of highway and re r 
fuse to slow down sufficiently for 
traffic, for warning signs, townjs, 
schools and other driving hazards. ; v 
"Drivers have a marked tendency 
to take the middle of the road when 
going at high speeds. This is ex- 
ceedingly dangerous, and often forces 
other cars out into the ditch. Even 
in open country driving, motorists 
must realize th»t there is a. limit to 



States. If people can. come to poll 
tical rallies where patry principles 
are fairly .explained they may cast 
a more intelligent vote this fall and' 
eject men of a party that will work 
for the good ; of the commonpeople 
am. 1 not only for Big. Business as 
before. \ -i 

Paul Engelstad .and myself have 
often found ourselves, both -in the 
columns of; the papers am] in person- j 
al talk, on opposite sides of political 
questions, but ■ he has never in those 
instances u'sedj abusive - language nor . 
called bad ;names. : And it has al- : 
ways been! a. t -pleasure to discuss 
things with him even when we dis- ■ 
agreed'. But all too. many like a' 
certain farm-renter, in Kratka Town-| 
ship whose! name I will not sully the i 
columns of; this paper by mentioning: 
can present no arguments but use ' 
only mud-slinging, . abusive language j 
and the calling of bad. names. 

Well, I wish you, Paul Engelstad, ' 
good luck, at your political rally and 
nope other 'communities' may do like- 
wise. ! 

J. W. Erlandson. 



Dear Editor: 

A meeting is about to be called, 
and a move on foot to' sell or trade 
off the creamery building of the ' 
Thief River Falls Co-operative 
Creamery Association. The under- 
signec stockholders feel that before 
we dispose I of pur Creamery Build- 
ing we should • consider the matter 
very carefully anu/we would like a' 
little space in your "paper. 

There are at least two important 
questions t ■ consider in . this con- 
nection. First:' Do we want to dis- 
pose of pur. present crepmery build- 
ing under any conditions? Is it nec- 
essary or disirable to sell? 

Second: If we co sell the property, 
what price should we get? Wnat is 
the property fairly worth? 

.The Lana O' i Lakes wants to c buy 
our property. Mr. Brandt stated at 
the meeting -that the most they would 
pay is twenty thousand ($20,000.00) 
dollars. Are we willing to sell this 
property for that price '. The build- 
ing ana the site] cost us two or three 
times that amount. What ought we 
to get now if we do sell? 

Ii we sellr out, then we shall have 
to build another,' small creamery per- 
haps. The first; thing is to buy a 
new lot or site for the creamery, 
which will cost us fcbout $1750.00 or 
thereabouts. ] Then %e have to drill 
a well, a^ about $1200.00. Then we 
have to move and install the fixtures 
anc machinery, which - will cost us 
about $30U0.0u. 'We also have to pay 
up our bonus or indebtedness on tne 
creamery, whiqn' amounts to about 
¥4»uu.uu after deducting what Land 
<J' LaKes owes. | in otner words 1- 
ail we suaii have to pay out $iu,7b 



Groom spent" Sunday evening"" *fl| 
Thief River Falls. ■ ' '\ 

A large number of friends pleasant- 
ly surprised Mrs. John Greenw»ld at 
her home _ on Monday evening, tto 
occasion being her;birthday annivaz*- 
sary. Home .made ..ice cream "a&d 
cake was served at; midnight by tLa 
self-invited guests. 

George Craft, Edwin Langlie, Tony 
and' Ben Schiefert and Luciilt Hemly 
called Monday evening at the K. tL 
Groom home. ' u : 

Miss Lucille Hemly left Tuesday 
for Leonard, Minesota, , , where ahc 
will be employed. 

The Helping Hand club meets fo<rf 
Thursday, July, 19 at the home «tf 
Mrs. Jake Johnson. 

Miss Nora Craft returned to her 

— : — parental home here after having b«*a 

A large number of friends and re- employed in Fargo for the past twa 

latives enjoyed a barn party dance ! months. - 

at the home of Mr. and Mrs. And-' Eileen and Arne Haparahta viiited 

rew Hemly on Saturday evening. j at the E. R. Groom home on Monday 

Ludwig Halverson and Ervin Arltl afternoon. "mmmmj 

of Fargo, N, D. motored here on! Conrad Benieson called' at the H 

Farg^n ^on™' retUming *° ! g hj ° ffenbockw ho ™ Saturday . .„. 

Rev and Mrs. R. H. Selway and' Jir. and Mrs. Harry Thomssaa 

R„H T e V£ ,Y 1SS GIadys Eukel of and fomi 'y visited tonday aftiSeta 

at the^E e R rr„ n We l e SUPPer n gu I st3 at the Clarence Anderson hem? 

LA S..rr"^' u n Sunda y-' Mr - ""a Mrs. Jake Johnson visited 

Juanii RhS,12 e " V w ted her ftiend ' at the Bud Howard hom " Wedne.: 
Juamta Ripple in Plummer on Sat- : day evening. «•»»«» 

urday. evening. A lar nuraber of friendu aJtfW"" 

and^ We1no Ir 1? e and M f, r ?«<* Saum' latives fave s Tshower for M*?\5 
S.™^tf , Rasen | n "'""d a* the F Mrs. Gust Christopherson Saturday 
Haparonta home Saturday evening, evening. Many useful gifteWe 
. Misses Ruby LeMiuex and Shirley presented to them -T*" 



OPEN FOE BUSINESS 

SATURDAY ' JU LY ,21st 

A completely equipped and modern 

Shoe Repair Shop 

The best equipped shoe-Vepair shop in the • 

State - ; 

WHILE YOU WAIT SERVICE > 

REASONABLE PRICES : 

You will enjoy a visit to our shop 

Nick the Shoe Doctor t 

313 No. Main Opposite Chevrolet Garage 1 




the speed at which they can travel. I °V nearly ^li.uuU beiore we are 

When a fast driver fintia himcolf 'm^_ thTOUgU. 



When a fast driver finds himself 'rid 
ing the center line' instead of keep- 
ing to the right side, it is time to 



xnis will leave us about $9,000.00 
witn whicn to- biiiid a' smaller ouud- 
mg. it seems to us that anyone can 
see that we canhoc get an iiuequatt 
new creamery • nuildmg, even u w>. 



ai.eu cost ior tne worK at these' "»-!•>■»• j«»<- -==.l,,:u uj , mo ^au- new e ,. eame f v . m ,iirt,7.<r »«=« , 
dam sites was $21,907,384 while ?°™,^ Patrol says:' "Motor vehicle SuUd mucn smaller SS' N,„p ■£„,"' 
e construction cost is $20,428,175. fatalities in 'California can be re- £T u m ^?„ .-^" ,^' ^ ,ne .uT? ou . s : 



moli-iij * »f- ' i ?? <J '. Mr - Burns was -the construction cost is $20,428,175. """'"«» in ; uainornia can De re- anfl i, Q „ Kr , : .,.^„. ,„ oriJ \ k z;- 
camTfimS™vn| N8 M- e P ° W . erS ' W Jl° The difference is $1,479,209, making duced 10 to 25 per cent within a year o?der w « ^an aTeouaS^ew bui di n 'S 
came from Renvi lle, Minnesota to this a total saving under the orginal es- a ^ c s °™„ as e™« s ive speed can be _ wHhauf ?.a?e ?o g^ ^n Sebt *s™Z 

Frank C. Berry of the Minneapolis 
Automobile club, writing in the cur 




, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN; That a spacitl 
; meeting f t h e Stockholders of the Thief River Falls 
! Cooperative Creamery Association will be held in 
! Civic & Commerce room, at ih.> new Auditorium in 
ithecityof Thief River Falls, Minnesota, on. FRI- 
1 DAY, the 3rd day of August, at 1 o'clock P. M. .The 
ofiject and purpose of ihis special' meeting of the 
stockholders will be to consitfer a sale or trade cf 
j the creamery buile ing and lots of the association, 
land if so decided by the stockholders to authorize, 
empower and direct the officers and board of direc- 
'tors of the Thief River Falls Cooperative Cieamery 
:Ass'n. to sell and convey and transfer the said 
Creamery. Building. and lots, which property is de- 
scribed as lots one|"l", two "2", three "3" and four 
"i" of block thirty-three "33", of the original town- 
site of Thief Rivdr Falls, in Pennington County, 
Minnesota. . I . r 

\ All stockholders are urged to be present. 

By order and resolution of Board of Directors. 
J. M. THEIGK Secretary .^ ' 
^oard of Directors 



_..,... v _ uu vihwj niiliUlg III U1C. tUi". 

rent issue of Sparks on "What Price 
Speed?", declares:" -The remedy calls 
for drastic treatment. We must edu- 
cate and train both drivers and ped- 
ertrians — vigorously enforce the pen- 
alities incident to flagrant and dan- 
gerous traffic violations — hole' down 
driving speeds on city streets to a 
maximum of thirty miles an hour. 
Can we do tha^o things? Not until 
public opinion his been materially al- 
tered. Not until the moral verities 
as expressed in the Golden Rule have 
re-established themselves in our con- 
sciences." 




SURPRISE PARTY 

TuTd^y evening many friendB of 
Eric Anderson, of Sanders Township 
Rnrpriied him at his home. Anion- 
the self -Invited guests were Mr. p.n'" 
Mrs. A. C. Matheson and children 
Mar.ione »nc' Homer; Mrs. Rilpl 
Shetler and son Jackie; Mr. and Mrs 
LeRov Shetler and son Larry; Mr 
end Mrs. William Parbst and son 
Raymond;. Miss Ruth StorhauB; Mrs. 
H. H. Oerdirtjr of Coouille, Oregon: 
Mrs. Dean Hollinshead of Betid, Ore 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hoard and child- 
ren, Elaine, Betty, and Donna, Min- 
ton Hoard and daughters ' Lorraine 
Lois, Ardith, , and Vivian, Kenneth 
Shetler, and Sophus Ness. 

HAS THEATRE PARTY 

Miss . Bernice Berge entertained 
Mia» Vflrna Brandon, Miss Adeline 
LinBberf, and Miss ^eTen.WaSSgrfr | 
at a theatre party at the ^Valor I 
Theatre Friday evening, after which 
they returned to Miss Berge's home' 
for. alight luncheon and social time. I 



taking Mr. firaiiat's oivn ngures w. 
inail soli lie inl deot quite a large 
-am of money if we build. Do we 
•vaut such aiueai? . 

./inoliiur question is., whether wt 
^an. reany save on -overhead by hav- 
ing a smaller building '( Tbcy ted 
as we are going to save a lot, buc 
-an we leany.-save very much? Thuiii 
cliis over and figure- it out for your- 
self whether there will De' any ap- 
preciable saying'. We cannot a™ 
aiucn of a saving wnen we figure 1. 
all out?- Consider this carefully. 

Still another question: if we sell 
Jo we want the n,and O' Lakes to pui 
up the new building for us, or do 
we want to buiic.' it ourselves? i t 
ieems to us that i if we are going ti. 
nave a new -^building, we ought to 



INDEPENDENT 

GROCERY & FRUIT CO. 



Phone 

7» 



"TRADE TO BS AHD SAVE" Phone 

FREE DELIVERY 740 



CERTO 



Large 
Bottle 



SALT 

Iodized 
2 packages 



»»_• • Thompson's 

Raisins, seedless 4 lb. bag 



9c 



29c 



Nector, 



All Flavors, 8 OZ. btl. 



9c 



Tomatoes, P a C " - e d 3 No. 2 cans 29c 
Dill Pickles, qt. jar 



Fig Bars, 

Ga^tsup 

Snider's, 
2-14 oz. botls. 



Fresh from 
the oven 



15c II 
IOC 




Quality Meat 
Beef 



WEPAY 

SpQtjGash 

! For 

OLD GOLD 

Bring anything- ;ypu th ! nk 
that contains gold — we'll 
teat and estlmate:lt for you. 

EL0FI 

JEWELR1 

Thief. River! Fails,; 



Shoulder 
Roast, lb. 



Bacon Squares, 



s for Less 
Hams 



Picnic, Shank- 
less, lb. 



12c 



Veal Shoulder Roast, lb - 9c 



Pork Links 





lifl Freestone 
Slbertas, Crate 



$1104 



Bfifc, 



Thief River 

Official Paper of 



Pennington County 
THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA. 



, -_gMjlVER fr Ajfcs F^R-trtt, M ilk titM fALtl-jtl^NfasdTA. THttMlA?, Jtfc¥ liS, 1934 



Falls Forum 



Published Thursday Df each week by the 

FORUM PUBLISHING COMPANY 

R. M. Aalbu and H. li. Schuster, Proprietors 

;B. M. iAalbu, Editor. ■ | Bernice Berge, City Editor. 

Citizens State Bank Building, ; Thief River Falls, Minnesota, 



Subscription $1.00 per year in the United States. 



." "Entered as second-class matter, April 27, 1932, at the post office at Thief 
River Falls, j Minnesota, under Act of March. 3, 1897." 



THE ENIGMATIC MR. ROOSEVELT 



President Roosevelt presents quite a puzzle to the radicals of the coun- 
try. Home of his actions have given tuem reasons to believe that he is in- 
deed rauieal and. committed at least to a program of socialization of public 
utilities and key industries. His enth usia^m ior the Tennessee Valley deve- 
lopment, his sponsoring oi tne i\ii<A with "'its provisions tor shorter hours 
and longer wages, his \ signature on the Frazier-Lemke Farm Moratorium 
Act, ana above all, his outspoken support of some of the more radical mem- 
bers oi Congress, oi other than uemocratic party aunerence, even to tne 
extent oi nauntmg nis own party's candidates, has all been to his advan- 
tage witn the liberal-radical element. 
* ■ On the other side of the ledger, however, there is his opposition to, and 
• practicahy killing of tne r'razier r'arm Refinancing Dili, his let-down on 
kection r (a of the NRA, his opposition to inflation and his apparent kow- 
towing to the international BanKers in all and sundry monetary matters, 
; and I his toying with the tariff situation and world armament policies, in ^plains that whatemls ww2 K \with 
neither ot which he seems to have any conception of the problems involved. ' " ~ 

The left-wingers on the other hand unhessitatingly condemn the pre- 
those who believe socialization in a greater or lesser degree inevitable, are 
prone to hail Roosevelt as a super-politician, who is leading the industriai- 
uankirig crowd on and giving tnem rope enough to hang tnemselves, while 
at the same time he is advancing the cause of the Co-operative Common- 
woalth as last as the American people can assimilate this to them, new and 
untried doctrine. They .apparently Delieve that when the time nas come, 
that he has the unsuspicious and uemghted capitalists out on the end of tne 
limD he will suuUenly pull the denouement ana reveal himself as the master 
ox political strategy and the long awaited leader of the Common People. 

The elft-wingers, on the other hand, unhessitatingly condemn the pre- 
sident as a conniving Q-ascai who conspires to fasten upon the people ior- 
ever, a rotten capitalistic system by insidiously forging the cnains of a 
fascist dictatorship. They see in him the super-salesman who would re- 
tain and strengthen the industrial-financial oligarchy. 

Frankly, we see in Mr. Roosevelt, neither the great leader of the com- 
mon people nor the staunch defender of .Big Business. \Ve uo not see any <S 
particular greatness in him, unless it shouid.be his optimism, rie is un- 
doutealy a ciean-living, clean-hearted, person who earnestly desires to do ' 
the things that will Dt* of the greatest good to the greatest numDer with- - 
out knowing precisely where that course iays. But "his birth, his early train-! 
ing and environment, ana his subsequent experience is all against him. He 
cannot know the motives that move the people nor the passions that can 
rock a nation on : its foundations. The history of his life does not reveal 
that he has lived; Consequently he can not lead, and his tenure of omce 
must continue to be just what it has been so far, a goodnatured fumDling 
of the fundamentals and travel along the way of least resistance. Aristo- 
crats never become great leaders of tne Common People. 

It is easy for; Roosevelt to say that, noone shall starve in America, in 
the face of widespread misery and near-starvation, for he has never him- 

self known the pangs of hunger He cannot know the icy blasts that pierce . velt administration.- By a few bold 
the thmly clothed, and chill men's bones to the marrows freezing the soul. • str0Kes galantly exem ^ he changed 
He has always had a warm coat. He has not known the aches and the the attitu „. „/ the nation e from f ne 
grime ; of the mines and the shops. He has not known the heartbreak ot ... 
the farmer who sees the fruit of a whole season's grubbing in the soil; broil- 
ing in!' the hot sun; the hopes of paying the mortgage; or of sending the 
boy to college pounded into the earth by a hailstorm. He hasn't known the 
aching limbs and* burning feet of those who must pound the pavements 



| W. C.T. U. NOTES j 

* ' ' - ' : ■ ■ • 

MIGHT IT BE THE NEW FREE- 
DOM 

And- who should find himself agree- 
ing with Anti-s loonist, McBride but 
a New York "old-timer!" An old- 
timer, it seems, is anybody who was 
old enough to exercise a stand-up 
drinker's idea of personal liberty be- 
fore Prohibition. Dr. McBride has 
just launched an attack on America's 
'cocktail hour" and "Old-Timer" has 
written a letter, to the press admit- 
ting that the "Cocktails-for-Two fad 
is a "ruinous institution." 

But — and this is . important as an 
indication of the line that repeal de- 
fense may soon be obliged to take — 
-Old-Timer" says that before Prohi- 
bition very few young people indulg- 
ed in mixed drinkiftg. Girls and 
boys of the good old" days, got to- 
gether over nothing more stimulat- 
ing than an ice-cre°m soda, unless 
perhaps it was a banana split.. Pro- 
hibition, we are to believe, taught 
them to take spirits in a. coeduca- 
tional way. 

So today, one of the faults of re- 
peal that cannot be overlooked even 
oy an "old-timer" can at any rate be 
charged up by him to the noble ex- 
periment. We may expect ia see 
more of this kind of argument, \vhich 
explains that whatever is wcong\ 
I repeal is due to Prohibition. Bui 
peal was supposed to abolish the) ills 
of the arid era, not annex them/ 

And old'-timers are continually in- 
forming us that girls didn't drink as 

much in the old days as after ' the ' Jimmy Higginses throughout Wis 
Eighteenth Amendment was enacted.) consin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and 
Well, neither did they smoke so many other states that has made the pro- 
cigarets or plaster their faces with gressive- movement the power that 
so many cosmetics, or drive so many lit has today. There is, of course, no 
automobiles so fast. Are these discounting the importance of leader- 
lusty employments Prohibition-Bred' ship. The leaders of the movement 
or are they just negative' manifesta-j deserve due credit for their great ef- 
tions of the i^ew Freedom? And if forts, and yet without the aid of local 
repeal fails to curb them, will . that ' boosters, leadership of the most re- 
be Prohibition's fault? — Christian j markable sort would meet without 
Science Monitor. [ success. 



Farmer-lJaTbor 
Press Service 

1 " 
by Senator Henry G. Teigan 



Wisconsin Progressives have gotten 
their new party plans well under way. 
More than 120.0U0 signatures of vot- 
ers in that state have been affixed to 
petitions asking for the establishnient 
of the new progressive party. :.■ ■ 

"The gathering of these- thousands 
of names, viewed as a matter of mech- 
anics, was a tremendous task calling 
for hard and sacrificing! work on the 
part of* loyal progressives," says the 
party organ The Progressive. "There 
was no money for paid workers — 
those who' saw to it that petitions 
were made available to enthusiastic 
signers worked from devotion to pro- 
gressive principles and 1 progressive 
cause without recompense." 

The Progressive Party will havo the 
support of the old LaFollette organi- 
zation and of the newly_ organized 
"'Farmer-Labor and I 



■A second cdnsjention of the Pro- 
gressive Party /TOs held at Fond* du 
Lac a Sveek ago^.xhe delegates adopt- 
ed a fine platfbrnSjt on which the can- 
didates of the n]£iity will, wage their 
«anipaign. In substance it is much the 
same as the platform of the Farmer- 
Labor Party of Minnesota. 
' >; Fourteen Planks 

The platform consists of fourteen 
planks as follows: 

Government sale of arms, and muni- 
tions. 
Public ownership of public utilities. 
Complete ownership of country's 

banking system. 
A job for everyone who is capable of 

working. 
Financial and old age security thri 
state' and national legist' tion cre- 
ating unemployment insurance 
sickness, and accident insurance 
and old 1 age pensions. 
Legislation guaranteeing workers the 

right to organize as they choose. 
Opposition to sales taxes; oppositior 
to the exemption' of securities an«. 
governmental salaries from taxa- 
tion. 
Support of a tax on corporate divi- 
dends. 



The Liberal Digest 



...cA; THE ANTITHESIS OF AAA 

Condensed from the /'Rainbow 
0\ er the White House" by ' M. 
Farmer Murphy, in the Nation 
oi July 11, ly34 by ft. M. Aalbu. 

There is no denying the remark- 
able accomplishments of the Roose- 



of despair tto one of hopefulness. 
Among thesfe acts were.reforms which 
had been proved,' and others which 
i were in the nature of radical experi- 



uumut^ Jiinua u.uw uunung ieet ui luusk wiiu muao uuunu Mie pavements i „,„„-,. oil,, , j i _ *. 

in. vain search of work, he hasn't tasted the salt of his own blood and his : ™Z ih £ tv,,?^ ft dev g?P m f nt P™- 
sweat,, hugging a: moist and heaving earth while shot and shell screamed ]?*„l!?1 j£ ,. - m ; securitie3 law; the 
and whineu over his head like an inierno. He has not had to meet tangible "i"* 111 * Te£jl i m act; "Presented only 
physical crisis, so he can not be expected to meet intangible ones squarely ^ t«£ w IPVI- the , £ xslstmg 
ana- with decision. cond^ions But the National Recovery 

■-■ ■ f - wi' j 'j + *. £ tt j -n i • j.v ' Acc and the Agricultural Adjustment 

- - Great- leaders-do not emanate from Hyde Park mansions; they are not Act were new and their consequenses 
.-.-raised rwith silver spoons. They spring from the depths of the people. They -.-■>. v *««»*»■«"«» 

reach the top by meeting and conquering adversity They have known hun- 
ger, cold, sweat and harsh words. As Andrew Jackson the orphan boy; as 
Abraham Lincoln the railsplitter; as Floyd' Olson the newsboy. 



MINNESOTA'S GARDEN SPOT 



A person need only to travel to the Twin Cities and return to appreciate 
the wonderful section of the state that we have here in the Red Lake River 
Valley;- We have of course heard- a great deal about the drouth that has 
hit the state and the untold damage it has done to crops and to the fortunes 
of men. We supposed all .the time that we were hard hit here in this sec- 
tion, and this article is not intended to belittle nor to minimize the damage 
thiB part of the state has suffered. 

Nevertheless we can truthfully say that we had no idea of what a drouth 
Is until last week when we made a trip to the cities. From Glenwood and 
south it seemed to us that the crops were increasingly hard hit. The Eden 



Lift your eyes to the hills, but remem- 
ber the valleys. ' ] 



incalculable. 

What some believed that they saw 
then, and 1 what the sponsors did not 
see, was that the purposes of the two 
acts were mutually antogenistic. In 
the crumbling of the NRA its critics 
see justification for thier position. 
The broad purpose of 'the NRA was 

to increase purchasing power, by age of June 8, are asking 1 why the 
shortening hours and increasing things he holds out now asl promises 
wages. To attain this the industrial- j to be fulfilled by the next 1 congress 



....... -..„: Progressive _ ,. L , , if ... - , 

League." There are, of j course, other lnunedmte Payment of the soldiers 
independent groups that will throw . j 30 "" 3 - . . 

their suport to the Progressive Party Adequate legislation to secure tin 
and its slate of candidates both at the tenure of land for those who owt 
primary in September and -gain in ! - u thr ough moratorium laws, 
che November election..] j Opposition to the destruction o: 

T!M „ Tr TTJ„«,-« nQB ln«) t„u wealth while the people are in neeo 

Jimmy Higginses OnJ Job Support of co-operative marketing t< 

Wisconsin Progressives are just reduce the soread between price, 
like their brethren m other states of | received by the farmers and by th. 
the Northwest. It is the devotion of the consumers. 

Abolition of speculation and profit 

eering in food. 
Cost of production for farmers. 
LaFollette Candidate For Senator 
Senator Robert M. LaFollette, Jr 
will head the new party ticket. Can 
didates for other places on the ticke 
have not been selected. Phillip La Fol 
lette, brother of the senator and for 
mer governor, has been mentioned a: 
possible candidate for the governor 
si ip. Another prospective candidatt 
for governor is William T. Evjue, edi- 
tor of the Capitol Times. 
Fly In Ointment 
The only fly in the ointment is th< 
apparent disinclination of the social 
ists of Wisconsin to join hands witi 
the progressives in the fight, "social 
ists worship dogma rather than real 
ity*'* is the charge made by The Pro 
gressive in an editorial-, in its Jul; 
7th issue. "There is much common 
ground between Progressives anc 
Socialists. Both believe that the God* 
given resources which have been so 
lavishly conferred upon this country 
should be used to promote a fuller lift 
for the masses of people rather thar 
to be used in serving selfish greed anc 
power. Why then are not these group: 
standing shoulder to shoulder in mak 
ing the fight for a better ' state anc 
nation?" 

It will be most unfortunate indeed 
should the Socialists of the Badgei 
state see fit to go it elone when they 
might join hands with the Progres- 
sives and make victory for .a common 
cause all but certain in the November 
election. Let us hope that Wisconsin 
Socialists will 1 aid the Frogressiv. 
Party as the (Socialists of Minnesota 
have aided the Farmer-Labor Party 
of this state virtually since the found 
ing. of the. latter party in this state. , 



FIRESIDE 



PHILOSOPHER" 

By ALFRED BIGGS, 



Only the truth will survive. 



Bad thoughts are boomerangs; 



A little sympathy will do no harm. 



Learn to congratulate without envy. 



Ill-gotten gains are worse than losses. 



The whole art of selling Is the art of. 
closing sales. j j 



Would you have "Iove"?Spell it back- 
" wards and add V. E. || 



Why Not Beauty Too? 



Which is more important — to get 

--.-.—--- ,™ „.. iM cli „_, ,, llc , ICAt W uK«5is where we' want to go, or to have a 

:st who had exploited the people in could* not have been got I ready for the' pleasant time on the way? Usually 
the past would have to become Chris- . one that just expired. Bills covering we're severely practical, and say 
tians over night, and meet the in- ] some of them were already in commit- i we're not much interested in any- 
cieased costs of production out of tee. ! thing but arriving. We say so even 

their profits. To induce this the an- _, . > . 'j though, when we do get to our des- 

,, „ . . . , , , , - ., ..- - t . ,»• . • ti-trusc laws Wd-e suspended in ord'ar ' V 1 ^ ,tleas contained; in the sug- tination, we may just turn around 

Valley, country which l-.as been known as the paradise spot of Minnesota in t!lat t , ley eould " c00 „ erate " if the gested program are basic. ! They go an d rush back 
the past,' while it had not, so -far as we coulc- see from the car window, suf-' i;ldustries did not me e t the 'increased J° the «">*'. ? the trouble— sfecnrlty in! Little by little, though, we're not 
fired as much as some ot the sections further south, was tar from the gar-| UJLC ouc ot - their nts b t th , home in living, and im old; age. But' s0 sur J. There's something about a 
den it has been in the -past. Oat fields were being cut with the mower and _ hcr hand tried t J Ieca ^ tan it thru will the means to attain this end be good road except the pavin | an<J the 
They were dead white in color. Com was rang- mi „ th in £ rea3ed costs ! formulated with such care as to exclude ° rades and c nTves. Something that 

pastures in a_ great many places woUid come ^ ut of ^ pub , ic and the confusion that have; atten^d the . we enjoy as we pass , and- remember 

uiare woulu be no addition to the pur- V eaT -. Thls question is worrying thos» - wit h pleasure. Trees, shrubs, grass, 

, , u , , ■ . , ^ ,- • ' closing power of the people. , experiments inaugerated the pasr ■ and flowers , for instance .along the 

We spoke with a man who boardeu the train at one of the little stations ,, • • ov „„ H „ ,„v, oi +•„„,, „;,.,, ,.„ who have only good will, for the ad- roadside instead of bare dirt and 

*!S^>5!L^!£!?^^ do. iLfr.Xpimtlorwafonly for """totaitton and the reason for it is j ugiycutk We begin to suspect that 



stood only six inches high. 

ing in height from a loot to two feet. 

vvtre bare as a floor and brown. Within fifty miles of Minneapolis we saw 

corn fields that were wilted and* brown an though hit by a killing frost. 



provided by the special session of the legislature at the insistence of Gov- "£* s "'SI- coo P e i atlon "™ "J* J« 
ernor Olson, "men, women any children would have starved to death in Min- fjL'l °, W " i£ vantage and not for the 
neaota this spring and- summer." .general welfare. They combined to 

„ ■ . ... . , , .. . , . ., . . ,. . , , lux prices and manipulate wages so 

. paving viewed the desolation and knowing the st -..ggie thai has been that as many as possible were thrown 
the-Iot'Of our people here where the 'drouth was relieved in tune to save the. nlco Lne .minimum wage class. The 



found in the records. The acute prob- possibily beauty is as important 
lem to be solved is that ;of purchasing j speed . 0r at least haIf as imp( 
power to jbalance production, and. ' an t. 

So more and more the engineering 



import- 



ltue grains anu even bring about a bumper crop for iomc, we can well be- result has been no increase in total 

hive "him. ,lt makes us more than "ever impatient with men like Rockne and consuming power, complaints about 

~ „. ^„„ „„ ,„~™ „ ^^ prices and endless labor dis- 



others like him who oppose every elt'ort ttnat men and women with a heart 
li^ 4.l\eijc bosom put forth to .aid the stricken populaiton. i 



/ 



-* MORE PRUSSIANISM 
St. Paul Daily News.) 



I 



kHh' 



elf "cracked up." 

The problem of the AAA, as seen 

. by itj administrators, wqs to shorten 

...e span between the price of comod- 

,,.,,,, ,. „ .„ . A _ . iiiiss i.he farmer has to sell and the 

i|jUnited Press uispacch from San Francisco to Col.' lh:nSfl that he musi; huy . Thifl nafl be . 

v m*- f • * ■„■ i^ an . an !f r - , of *. e ^ l( S S? rd '°° rS ordered ? ufc :-...il. dsastrousty wide, and every In- 
tnday- to maintain order in the longshoremen's strike. j create in tariff rates on agricultural 

lc may be that the colonel was. giving a message ior public consumption, ..., uL ;ci.s v/er {matched by an increase 
warning; strikers what they could expect as the best way of ^voiding 3n Manufactured* goodB so that the 



yet no serious attention! has! been giv-j 
en to it. All the talk has been of stim- \ 
ulating industrial producion. Altho 
the banks are full of j money which 
they can't or won't lend, | Congress 
provided another $5,000^000 (for. loans 
, to industry — more is added to too 

cr.-,s P '= S > ° f J t o h hnso°n eS 'h I a n s eV no y t ^wl^T jKSfttt! bon^j 
™cte, G down' but° h has 0n r ather him- — e ave .stimulus to business. They 1 



■m+Oi* 



kfiiBa- 



Minute Sermons 

By Dr. Crawford Grays 

Service pays. - 

One way to gei somewhere 
is to do something. 

The alive person is never 
stuck wondering what to do 
next. 

Perhaps we're in a rut; 
things might be different if 
we were not. 

Profiteering ils Vhighway 
robbery" whether times are 
good or bad. 

Self-pity creates misery while 
self-forgetfullness eits from 
the storehouse of happiness. 

We condemn ' heartless 
squeezing by large bodies to get 
much profit at little cost and 
yet for what we do, we want 
"plenty" while when others do 
for us we give "little." 



.f new highways is supplemented 
/ith beautification plans. Some of 
he states are beginning to make re- 
;ular appropriations for this pur- 
pose. Why not?— Fairbault. Daily 
lews. 



JONTRIBUTION TO THE MINNE- 
APOLIS TRIBUNE EXPLAINS 
THE LANGER VOTE 
(From the Public Pulse) 

:o the Editor of The Tribune: 

In your issue of July 2, in an edi- 
orial under the caption, "Two Ver- 
.icts in North Dakota"' you find it 
ifficult to reconcile the overwhelm- 
ng indorsement given Governor Lan- 
der in a recent primary in the face of 
: is conviction and severe sentence. ' 

The indorsement is not difficult to 
analyze. The people of North Dakota 
.re educated in the prt of readHn_g 
Laily newspapers. The people had no 
/ay of knowing all the facts in the 
..anger case any more than they have 
-f knowing all the facts about politi- 
.al issues or candidates for office, but 
me thing all the voters did know 
bout Governor Langer and his trail 
,vas that every single daily news*' 
paper in and out of the astte were aft 
tgainst Governor Langer and the 
people of North Dakota all being wise 
,o the newspapers would naturally 
.upport the governor and why not'' 
iVhere is there a daily newspaper who 
.s not ashamed of its record during 
.he World War when they all joined 
.n a conspiracy of falsehood against 
Cerim-ny ani piopapandi;x*.l pecple 
.nto a fenzy of idiotic patriotism from 
.vhieh we all suffer today. Where were 
.he daily newspapers during the Tea 
Pot Dome scandal 1 

In the lace of the record? of the 
press, is it any wonder that intelli- 
gent readers everywhere should 
read the daily newspapers in reverse, 
that is, when the newspapers are for 
\ thing, the people of North Dakota 
aye sense enough to be against it 
.nd when the papers are against a 
hing ,the people are for it which is 
,ust right and as it should be. 

That is why I voted for Governor 
_*anger and his entire ticket and' that 
s the only manner of voting in which 
.he common ctiizen can defend his 
own interests as tile daily newspapers 
ire always lined up on* the side of the 
.•espectable, smart crooks and against 
the people in every issue and every 
campaign. S 

On the tremendous vote given Gov- 
ernor Olson of Minnesota it is very 
evident that Minnesota voters are 
■vise to the Twin City press and read 
them in reverse, the only way they 
can be read without injury to the in- 
*Vidual and without injury to the 
cause of good government. 

T. H. HAGEN 
Grand Forks, N. D. 



Crickets as Watchdcga 
Many Jupunese keep single crlckt'ts 
In cages about their homes. They 
stop singing, [f an intruder approaches 
and the unusual silence awakens the 
household. 



putes.- There has been no attempt on 
the part of the NRA to enforce the 



"Any man who fires a shot in the air will be court-martipled — shoot to 

This official order v$as proclaimed not in Russia, nor Germany nor even 
in Italy but in the United States of America. 

It is credited in th 
H. H. Mittelstaedt 



blood3hedi 



Unfortunately his order has not been oecepted that way. 



taken, as a bit of brutal militaristic arrogance and contempt for human life, 
li it were carried out, literally hundreds would be killed. 

Wnat inciub trial dispute is worth ""that sacrifice -of life? 
Surely there must be some point where sanity can enter into thi: 
matter. 
.- The first step should' be the recall of Col. Mittelstaedt, 

0— ■ 

i CANADA TRIES CURRENCY 

(Labor) 



; di: -.parity remained. The AAA, there- 
It bus been fdi-o set out to increase the price of 



•r.i commodities, of which there was 
a r.urplus, by a ■ series of plcns to re> 
sliiai production. Inducements to 



were antidotes for the ■ high prices 
Created by the" NRA arid the AAA 
crop rastriction plans. But : the CWA 
was abandoned and the fundamental 
task which it had been performing; 
that of providing more consuming 
power was thrown back upon d'lrect- 
i-elief agancies. ; . 

No thinking person would not want 
to go back to the old -order. All in 
that category acclain j President 
Roosevelt's recognition of [the need 
for security — tne removal of the 
deadly fear of want, and they desire 
o go forward' with him. They hope 







Canada has started a works program for unemployment relief without 
selling bonds. She is printing currency. The works program calls for 
about $40,000,000; and Canada is issuing about $75,00v>,000 of new notes.. 

: spokesmen of the Canadian government insist that this will not -impair the 
credit of the jjcmiidon, since Lhe gum reserves \\ili still be far above thoso 
agreed upon at the World Economic Conference. II Canada can do this, 

■ why not the United States ? We have the need', we have the basic wealth, 
and as for. gold reserves, we have about half the monetary gold in all the 
world.. 

Admittedly, inflation can go too far, and often has done so. But will 
Inflation, such as Canada proposes, do as much harm as the piling iip of 
interest charges through constant borrowing? 

^-o - * _ 

FARMER CAN'T SEE IT 
{ (New Ulm Journal) 



Everybody in the country is talking about the improvement ri&agxucul- 
tural ' conditions throughout the nation, but the farmer himself. lT takes 
pore ^than slight increases in the prices of farm commodities to convince 
him that prosperity is returning. What the farmer has to buy, costs much 
jnc-re than: a year ago, so he argues that he is far from "getting his" 



.-.urners to cooperate, in addition to ^ a * ] f e ™A P ut mto an orderly sys- 

tho premised higher prices, were \ em u V e j* ls J° mted . operations now .in 

made in the form of bonuses for re- lorce b( ;fore he is overwhelmed by 

slncted acreage. While the speaw has Ue confusion and cross-purpose. . 

been slightly lessened there has'boen It is hoped that his great objec- 

tIj gain because, just as' in the case tives; "security of the 1 home, secur- 

of the tariff, the farmers gain has ity of livelihood, and the security of 

been nullified by the higher prices the social insurance," ,T< ill be reached; by 

industrialists obtain thru the NRA. methods which take into account the 



Failure to see this may be excused 
?'.> in'c to the fact that they were ini- 
tritcd when the times were" critical 
.in i c 3 uiek action was necessary. And 
t'-.i'y could not reasonobly be ^ban- 
uonec* without a fair trial. But be- 
tween the Special seaion of Congress 
tvneii-.they were put -into effect and 
the regular session in January of this 
year six and a half months - elapsed 
which should have made it possible 
to work out a coordinated plan. 

Such a scheme was not presented. 
Various useful measures were passed 
by the session -just ended but none 
of .them went to the fundamentals of 
thi ----—■• 

ent; 

tion and'are in full sympathy with the 5 
broad humanitarian principles enun- 
ciated by thfj president in his mess^ 



whole social and* economic 



o t.iat tnfi plan my work and enuuro. 

"^ Ctiia'i Loi^s 'b War 

Front He\eiiifent.'i phu-e in th? jmpii 
luMcn rank or stutt-s In '.\mr.i t niu. ad 
■ nnccr.l to thirteenth hyj 1ST >. to flfth 
place In the next ten years, and t<» 
third In the succeeding itwe ity years, 
whl.-h. place She lost t» Ililn »is. With 
only nbituc 43,000 persons at, her birth 
in less than 60 years! the Buciieyi- 
sru'ie offered 340,<M>0 men In- the t-Ivil 
war. "J4,5(M of wlnini died on j the uatth*. 
.tields. *(hnre $t&n hnir tier population 

L*S>l.i... ntl. „,ri2 nl yit..V..fi.l..r1 OllH II 



structure, 



le-situation. Hence, people who ar^^»en sj^j wa^j given s^a'tehiMd. and it 
it:rely friendly to the administra^ *0 percent greater loss 1 rh&i that In" 

^t. nni)-A».'ia'A.I1 ..« _ it 111. .1. ■'. ^L: i '..' _. .. r. ■-• - ' . 'T . ..... 



"ciirreil "liy the British ttnil r j American 
soldiery, during the entire Kevolutlon 
ary wury 




^uvrence 

She welcomed me with trembling hands, 

And eyes that smiled through tears— 
I was the first old friend from home 

She'd seen in twenty years! 
"Someone from home," she said, and sighed; 

"Oh, you could never know 
How good it is to have you herel 

I miss my old friends sol" 

We talked about our yesterdays— 

About the folks via knew 
Long years ago; we talked about 

The things we Used to do. 
Her heart still cliiP.g to memories 

Of days when life was glad; 
But oh, how lonely she had grown, 

How deflate and sad! 

■'A 

The time fo? parting came too soon; I 
She plead with mo to stay; 3 

Someone from home gave her more joy 

Than word?, could ever say .. . 
And I shall cherish tlu'ough the years 

The brave and wistful smile 
With which she thanked me— just because /g?= 
>. I talked with her awhile. . *£S" 

H- 





V 



!'i 







ir.Ki- 



Thief ^River Falls Forum 

; Official Paper of Pennington County 

;"'.;' j. THpiF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA. 



I.- 



Published Thursday of each week by the 
•■•-- ■■; ■ f6)RUM PUBLISHING COMPANY 

R. M.; Aalbu and H. L. Schuster, Proprietors 
J B. 31. jAalbn, Editor. 'V , ' ; Bernice Berge, City Editor. 

Citizens State Bank Suilding, j 



Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 



Subscription $1.00 per year in the United States. 



.- "Entered as second-class matter, April 27, 1932, at the post office at Thief 
' River Falls, ; Minnesota, under Act of March 3, 1897." i 



THE ENIGMATIC MR. ROOSEVELT 



President Roosevelt presents quite a puzzle to the radicals of the coun. 
'h7- Some ot his actions have given ituem reasons to believe that he is in- 
deed rauica'. and. committee; at least to a program of socialization of public* 
utilities and key industries, rlis enthusiasm lor the Tennessee Valley deve 
lopment, his sponsoring of tne JMiiiA with' its provisions- lor shorter- hours 

• and longer wages, his signature on the iTrazier-Lemke .farm Moratorium 
Act, aha above an, his outspoken support of some of the more radical mem- 
bers oi uongress, of otner than Democratic party adnerence, even to tne 
extent; or uauntmg his own party's canaioates, has all been to his advan- 
tage witn the liberal-radical element. 
• On the other side of the ledger, however, there is his opposition to and 

• practically killing of the Crazier /arm Kerinan:ing bill, his let-down on 
taction ?a of the ImKA, his opposition to inflation and his apparent kow- 
towing to the .International Bankers: in all and sundry monetary matters, 
and his toying with the tariff situation and world armament policies, in 

' neither of which he seems to have any conception of the problems involved. 

The left-wingers on the other hand unhessitatingly condemn the pre- , „ 

those who believe socialization m a greater or lesser uegree inevitable, are of the arid era, hot annex them, 
prone to hail Roosevelt as a super-puiitician, who is leading the industrial- And old«-timers are continually in- 

. uanking crowd on and giving tnem rope enough to hang tnemselves, while " ' ~ 

•at the; same time he is advancing the cause of the Co-operative Common- 
wealth as last as the American people can assimilate this to 'them, new and 



. -IMS^t, Ui NOTES 



MIGHT IT BE THE NEW FREE- 
DOM. ■ . ;.V*,;.;,- :: ./ ; 

And* who should find himself agree- 
ing with Anti-s lbonist, McBride but 
a- New York •^'old-tuner!" . An. old- 
timer, it seems, is anybody who was 
old enough to exercise a stand-up 
drinker's idea of personal liberty be- 
fore Prohibition. Dr. McBride has 
just launched an attack on America's 
"cocktail hour" and "Gid-Timer" has 
written a letter to the press admit- 
ting that the "Cocktails-for-Two fad 
is a "ruinous institution." 

But — and this is . important as an 
indication of the line that repeal, de- 
fense; may soon be obliged to take — 
"Old-Timer" says that before Prohi- 
bition very few young people indulg- 
ed in mixed drinking. Girls and 
boys of the i good old 1 days. got. to- 
gether over nothing more stimulat- 
ing than an ice-cre n m' soda, unless 
perhaps it was a banana' split. Pro- 
hibition, we are to believe, taught 
them to take spirits in a. coeduca- 
tional way. . 

So today, one of the faults of re- 
peal that cannot be overlooked even 
Dy an "old-timer" can at any rate be 
charged up by him to the noble ex- 
periment. We may expect to see 
more of this kind of argument, which 
explains that whatever is wrung with 
repeal is due to Prohibition. But re-r 
peal was supposed to abolish the ills 



forming us that girls didn't drink as 



■ J^ri»er-Ij8(,]t)6r 
Press Service 

by Senator Henry & Teigan 

Wisconsin Progressives have gotten 
their hew party plans well' under way. 
More than 120.0U0 signatures of vo£ 
ers in that state have been| affixed to 
petitions asking for the; establishment 
of the new progressive party, 't ti ^ 
J.'The gathering of these {thousands 
of names, vie wed as a matter of mech- 
anics, was a tremendous! taisk calling 
for hard and sacrificing jwork on the 
part of* loyal progressives,'! j says the 
party organ The Progressive. "There 
was no money for. paid workers— 
those who' saw to' it that';]' petitions 
.were t made available to j enthusiastic 
signers worked from devotion to pro- 
gressive principles and*} progressive 
cause without recompense."!! 
. The Progressive Party jwill hava the 
support of the old LaFollette organi- 
zation and of the newly 'organized 
''Parme r-Labor and j Progressive 
League." There are,, of course, other 
independent groups that will throw 
their suport to the Progressive Party 
and its slate of candidates both at the 
primary in September and J rgain in 
che November election., j 

Jimmy Higginses On Job 
Wisconsin Progressives 
like their brethren in other 



sir 

.if A _'- second . 
grtessiye Party J^. 
'Lac a "week.ag^ 
ed a' : fine{platf6; 
djdates of . the" 
-campaign. In j 



ition of the ; Ero- 
[s held at Fond* du 
le delegates adopts 
iqn< which the can- 
ty Trill wage their 
ince it is much the 



iwinrirr»m^^^- a ' M ^ 



are . just 

states of 

the Northwest. It is the' devotion of 



much in the old days as after ' the ' Jimmy Higginses throughout Wis- 

^ __^ n m# n hmm Eighteenth Amendment was enacted. jconsin, Minnesota, North iDakota, and 

untried doctrine. They apparently 'believe that when the time nas come" | Well, neither did they smoke so many other states that has made; the pro- 



that he. has the unsuspicious and uenighted capitalists out on: the end of tno 
limn he will suddenly pull the denouement ana reveal himself as the master 
oi political strategy and the long awaited leader of the -.Common People. 

The elft-wingers, on the other hand, unhessitatingly condemn the pre- 
sident as a conniving rascal wfco conspires to fasten upon the people for- 
ever, a rotten capitalistic system by insidiously forging the cnains of a 
fascist dictatorship. They see in him the super-salesman who would re- 
tain and strengthen the industrial-financial oligarchy.' 

Frankly, we see in Mr. Roifeevelt, neither the great leader of the com- 
mon people nor the staunch defender- of Big Business. We uo not see any. 
particular greatness in him, unless it should be his /optimism, rie is-un-' 
doutealy a clean-living, clean-hearted person who earnestly desires to do ' 
tne things that will Oe of the greatest good to the greateoc number with- I 
out. knowing precisely where that course iays. But his birth, his early train-' 
ing arid environment, ana his subsequent experience is all against him. He 
cannot know the motives that move the people nor the passions that can 
rock a nation on its foundations. The history of his life does not reveal j 
that he has lived. Consequently he can not lead, and his tenure of omce 
must continue to be just what it has beefa so far, a gcodnatured fumbling 
of the fundamentals and . travel along the way of least resistance. Aristo- 
crats never become! great leaders of tne Common People. 

It is easy for Roosevelt to say that, noone shall starve in America, in 
the face of widespread misery and near-starvation, for he has never him- 
self known the pangs of hunger. He cannot know the, icy blasts that pierce 
the thinly clothed, and chill men's bones to the marrows, freezing the soul. 
He has always had a warm coatf He has not known the aches and the 
grime of the mines and the shops. He has not known the heartbreak of 
the farmer who sees the fruit of a whole season's grubbing in the soil; broil- 
ing hx the hot; sun;, the hopes of paying the mortgage; or of sending the 
boy to college pounded into the earth by a hailstorm. "He hasn't known the 
aching limbs and* burning feet of those who must pound the pavements 
in, vain search] of vfork. he hasn't tasted the salt of his own blood and his 
sweat, hugging a moist and heaving earth while shot and shell screamed 
and whined over his head like an inferno. He has hot'" had to meet tangible 
physical crisis; so he can not be expected to meet intangible ones squarely 
ahc* with decision. '. '■ ; 



cigarets or plaster their faces with 'gressive movement the power that 
so many cosmetics, or drive so many jit has today. There is, of course, no 
automobiles so fast. Are these discounting the importance ]pf. leader- 
lusty employments Prohibition-Bred' ship. The leaders of the movement 
or are they just negative" manifesta- [deserve due credit for their] great ef : 
tions of the dew Freedom? And if forts, and yet without the aid of local 
repeal fails to curb them, will, that' boosters, leadership of the; most re- 
be Prohibition's fault? — Christian markable sort would meet without 
Science Monitor. (success. it 



+ 



The Liberal Digest 



...CA; THE ANTITHESIS OF AAA 

Condensed from the % "Rainbow 

Ov er the White House" by M. 

Farmer Murphy, in the Nation 

of July 11, W34 by It. M. Aalbu. 

There is no denyim: the remark- 
able accomplishments of the Roose- 
velt administration. By a few bold 
stroices galantly executed he changed 
the attitucw of the nation from one 
of despair to one - of hopefulness. 
Among these acts were.reforms which 
had been proved; and others which 
Were in the nature of radical experi- 
ments. The power development pro- 
ject; the'' truth-in-securities law; the 
uanking reform act; represented only 
wholesome changes in the exsisting 
condicibns. but the National Recovery 



-■■■■ ' n ■ *. i ■ a a ■ ». •«.-.* rr a t, , • ■ -.«_ 'Act and the Agricultural Adjustment 

■- Great leaders do not emanate from Hyde Park mansions; they are not Act were new and their conseauenses 
raised -with silver spoons. They spring from the depths of the people. They incalculable. 
reach the top by meeting and conquering adversity They have known hun- 
ger, cold, sweat and harsh words. As, Andrew- Jackson the orphan boy; as 
Abraham Lincoln the railsplitter; as Floyd* Olson the newsboy. 



MINNESOTA'S GARDEN SPOT 



A person need only to travel to the Twin Cities and return to appreciate 
the wonderful section of the state that we have here in the Red Lake River 
Valley.- We! have of course heard- a great deal about the drouth that has 
^hit the state land the untold damage it has done to crops and to the fortunes 
■if men. We supposed all the time that we were hard hit here in this sec- 
- 'tiqn, and this article, is not intended to belittle nor to! minimize the damage 
this part of the state has suffered. : , ' 

Nevertheless we can truthfully say that we had noj idea of what a drouth 
ia until last week when we made a trip to the cities.' From Glenwood and 
Bouth it seemed to ^us that the crops were increasingly hard hit. The Eden 



- What" some believed that they saw 
then, andrwhat the sponsors' did not 
see, was that the purposes of the two 
acts were " mutually antogenistic, * In 
the crumbling of the NBA its critics 
see justification for fhier position. 
The broad purpose of 'the NKA was 
to increase, purchasing power, by 



C%e FIRESIDE 

philosopher" 

By ALFRED BIGGsl 



Only the truth will survive. 



Bad thoughts are boomerangs'. 



A little sympathy will do no harm. 

■-'•• • • M ■ 

Learn to congratulate without envy. 



Ill-gotten gains are worse 



The whole art of selling Is 
closing sales. 



than losses. 



Lift your, eyes to the hills, but remem* 
-ber the valleys. 



Would you have "love"? Spe 
* ward's and add V. E. ; 



be art of 



1 It back- 



age of June 8, are asking 



why the 



same as the platforA of the- Farmer- 
Labor Party of Minnesota. 
* ; * & '' Fourteen Planks 
-TJi$ platform consists of ' fourteen 
plaijjcs as follows: - : 
Government' sale of arms, and muni- 
; ( tions.. 

Public ownership of public utilities. 
Complete ownership of country's 
-.banking system. 
A/job for everyone who is capable of 

working. 
Financial and old age security thrt 
state and national legisl'tion cre- 
ating unemployment insurance 
sickness, andf^ccldent insurance* 
and old* age pensions. ; 

Legislation guaranteeing workers the 
- right to organise as they choose. 
Opposition to sales- taxes; oppositior 
to the exemption^ of securities am 
governmental salaries from taxa- 
tion. .r'- i / 
Support of a tax on corporate divi- 
dends. 
Immediate payment of the soldiers' 
bonus. .. 
Adequate legislation to secure tht 
tenure of land for those who owi 
it through moratorium laws. 
Opposition to the destruction o: 
wealth while the paople are in need 
Support of co-operative marketing t< 
reduce the spread between price. 
received by the farmers, and by th« 
the consumers. 
Abolition of speculation and profit 

eering in food. 
Cost of production for farmers. 
LaFollette Candidate For Senator 
Senator Robert M. LaFollette, Jr 
will head the new party ticket. Can- 
didates for other places oh the ticke 
have not been selected. Phillip La Fol- 
lette, brother of the senator and for 
mer governor, has been mentioned a; 
possible candidate for the governor 
slip. Another prospective candidate 
forgovernor is William T. Evjue, edi- 
tor of the Capitol Times. 
Fly In Ointment 
The only fly in the ointment is tin 
apparent disinclination of the social 
ists ..of Wisconsin to join hands witl 
the progressives in the fight, "social 
ists. worship dogma rather than real- 
ity?". is the charge made by The Pro 
gressive in an editorial in its Jul; 
7th issue. "There is much common 
ground between Progressives ant 
Socialists. Both believe that the God' 
given resources which have been so 
lavishly conferred upon this countrj 
.should be used to promote a fuller lift 
for the masses of people rather thar 
to be used in serving selfish greed anc 
po.wer. Why then are not these group: 
standing shoulder to shoulder in mak 
ing the fight for a better state ant 
nation?" 

It will be most unfortunate indeed 
should the Socialists of the Badgei 
state see fit to go it alone when they 
might join hands with the Progres 
sives and make victory for .a common 
cause all but certain in the November 
election. Let us hope that -Wisconsin 
Socialists will aid' the Progressiv- 
Party^ as the Socialists of Minnesota 
have aided the Farmer-Labor Party 
of this state virtually since the found 
ing. of the. latter party in this state. , 

Why Not Beauty Too? 



Which is more important — to get 
where we want to go, or to -have 



shortening hours and increasing "things he holds out now! as' promises 
wages. To attain this the industrial- 1 to- be fulfilled by the next! congress 

:st who had exploited the people in qoulo not have been got ready for the' pleasant time on the way? Usually 
the past would have to become Chris-.one that just expired. Bills covering- we're severely practical, and say 
dans over night, and meet the in- I some of them were already in commit- i we're not much interested in any- 
cieased costs of production out of tee. thing but arriving. We say so even 

their profits. To induce this the an- _,, ' ; -, ''. though,' when we do. get to our des- 

=;,,-- ., .... . , - .. .-- -. »,-,». . - ti-trust laws weL-e suspended in ord-ar" ' V 1 ^ ideas -contained in the aug-' ' {fa^fon we ' m a y just turn around 

Valley, country which has been known as the paradise spot of. Minnesota in t!lat tl could •• c00 „ emte » if the gested program are basic. They go -Vd ■ rush back 

the past, while it had not so- far as we cpulu see from the car window, -suf- iildustries did not me " t the increaaed to the root of the trouble— i ecurljy in ! Little by little, though, - we're not 
fered as much as spme ol the sections further south, was far from the gar-|,. JL j. oui of tHeir at3 | t Q the |l'ome in living, and in bid age. But' s0 snr |. There's something about a 
den it has been m the past Oat fields were being: cut with the mower and . h£r hand tried t J reca ^ tare it thru will the means to attain this end be good road except the pavin| and' the 
stood only six inches high They-were dead white m color. Corn was rang- r Dri a „ th ^^^ cos ^! formulated with such cartas to exclude l,: adea Indcu^es Something that 

ing in height trom a xoot to twojieet. pastures in _a_ great many places w J uid come ^ t of the puMic and the confusion that have lattlend'id the ■ ■ '- ur '" ;b - °™?" u " e 



v^ere bare as a floor and brown. Within fifty miles of Minneapolis we'saw ..„„_ „,„.,,.. i. -„ B jj ;ln - -.„ +t 

corn fields that were wilted and. brown an though hit by a . killing frost. | cn = r s !nl power of the people r 

We spoke with a man who boarded the train at one of the little stations' ..-.,,;„ ;„ Qv _-n„ m i, . +t, rt ' • j . 
down there and he stated that if it were not for the drouth aid. of 55,000,000 .,„ . ,1 VL' ^f™.™? ™ y w , led , tc 
prdvidod by the special session of the legislature at the insistence of Gov- ,? , 1 , 1 „?^- «o<>Peration - was only for 
ernor Qlson, "jnen,: women anc children would have starved to death in Min- "";" °, W l^^ ta ?? v , an ^ n0t ,,. fo L the 
l.esota this spring and, summer." .general welfare. They combined to 

„ i . . .. ' ■ -. . ... , , . ... ...... , lux pi-ices and .manipulate wages so 

. Having viewed the desolation, and knowing the st ^igg.e thai has been that as tasny as possible were thrown, 
the- IotiOf our people here where the drouth was relieved in time to save the mto lne minimum wage class The 
lute grains anu even bring about abumper crop for some, w.e can well be- r ^ su ]t has been no incre: 
licto-hini. It makes us more than ever impatient with men like Rockne and consuming power complaints about 



m , . .. - ■ . . .'we enjoy as we pass and' remember 

year? This question is worr;rmg thos.-mth pleasure. Trees, shrubs, grass, 
experiments rnaugerated :he pas 5 ; and flowers, for instance, along the 
who have only good will, fcr the ad- Voadside, instead of bare dirt and 
ministration and the reasor for it is ugly. cuts. We begfli to suspect that 
found in the records. The a :uteprob- possibily beauty is as irapoirtanf as 
lem to be solved is that of i urchasmg spe ed. Or at least half as import- 
power to (balance Jjroduc *on, amd ' a nt. 
yet no serious attention has been giv- ' 
en to it. All the talk has bee i of stim- 



othera like him who oppose every effort ttnat men and women with a heart 
in, xtieir. bosom put forth to .aid the stricken populaiton. 

. o ^ — '-~ ' 

i / : ^ MORE PKUSSIANISM V 
-r .,'. - ; ! St. Paul Daily News.) . 



„„ ,„ n ™n„. ;„ .„,~i ulating industrial produciin. Altho 
no increase in total the- banks are full of moiley which 



ingn prices and endless labor dis- 



they can'c or won't lend. Congress 1 

provided another $5,000,00 0j for loans 

"to.'- too 



putes. There has been no attempt on ^ 7'^^ w " „ *7" „S, 

the part of. the NRA ^enforce tte.S^KTK ^Sffi atiTthit I 

iiiuor provisions ot the codes. In every, n. .-** „Vi . - ,, " . . "r t t: . W1U ' , ' I 



crisis, General Johnson has 



"crocked 1 down" but has rather hims- 
elf "cracked up." " " 
The problem of the AAA, as seen 
by itii administrators, w^s to shorten 
w-.e sr^an between"; the price of comod- 
Uiss i,he farmer has to sell and the 
tliinga that he must buy. Thin had be- 
-■■'iue d'sastrously wide, arid every ih- 
i crease in tariff rates on agricultural 
1c may be that the colonel was.givaig a message ior public consumption,- ..v«uci.s was ftnatched by ah increase 
warning strikers what they could ; expect as the best W8£r of avoiding ~ Dn mdnulacMrsC! goods so that the 

{disparity remained. . The AAA, there- 
It hss heeii-foi-2 set out to increase the price of 



"Any man- who fires" a shot in the air will be court-martialed — shoot to 
khh" - : - i; —. ■ 

This official order vjas proclaimed not in Russia, nor Germany nor even 
In Italy butin the United States of America. ■ .* 

It is credited in thej United Press uispacch from, San Francisco to^ Col. 
H. H. Mittelstaedt, commander, of the national guard troops ordered out 
fSriday- to* maintain order in the longshoremen's strike, 



bloodshed! 

linfortunately his order has not been accepted that "way. . „ 

taken as a bit of brutal militaristic arrogance and contempt for human life.i fs:Vm commodities, of which there was 
li it were carried out, literally hundreds would be killed. j a surplus, by a series of plans to re- 
VAiat intiubtr"ial dispuce is wori;h that sacrifice of life? . | s-iiai^ production. Inducements to 
Surbly there must be come point where sanity can enter into this 1 i ?- rme * rs to . cooperate, in addition to 
matter. ' -V. 
*.': I'hc first Btep, should' be the recall of Col. Mittelstaedt, I 
o— — 



CANADA TRIES CURRENCY 
(Labor) 



- t Canada ; has started a works program for unemployment relief without 
selling bondB. She is printing currency. The works program calls for 
about $40,000,000; and Canada is issuing about $75i00u,OUO of new notes. 
spokesmen of the Canadian government insist that this will .not impair the 
credit of .the Dominion, since the gviti reserves .\\ill still be far above those 
agreed upon at the World Economic Conference. If Canada can do -this, 
why not the United States? We have the°need', we ;have the basic wealth, 
and as for gold reserves, we have about half the monetary gold in all the 
world. ■•-';■■ 

Admittedly, inflation can go too far,jmd often has done- so. (But will 
inflation, such as Canada proposes, do as much harm as the piling up' of 
. interest charges through constant -borrowing ? j [ 






FARMER CAN'T SEE IT 
(New Ulm Journal) 



Everybody in the country is talking about the improvement <&• agricul- 
tural conditions throughout the nation, but the farmer himself. "Intakes 
more than slight increases in the prices of farm cdmmooities to "convince 
him that prosperity is returning. What the farmer has to buy, costs much 
JJicre than a year ago, so he argues that he is far from "getting his." 



the premised higher prices, were 
made in the" form of bonuses for re- 
stricted- acreage. While, the spead* has 
been sightly lessened there has been 



^ the CWA and* the AAAithiu its bon-| 
noz uses gave stimulus to bush .ess. They : 
Were antidotes for the I hi] :h prices ' 
Created by the' NRA and he AAA 
crop restriction plans. But the CWA 
was abandoned and the' fu luamental 
task which it had been pfrformihg; 
that of providing more consuming 
power was thrown backi ui on d'irect- 
relief agancies. 

No thinking person woulc hot want 
to go back to the old order. All in 
that category acclain t^esident 
Roosevelfs recognition of the' need 
for" security-^-the removal of the 
deadly fear of want, and they desire 
to go forward* with him; They Hope 
that he will put into an orderly sys- 
tem the disjointed operations now ^in 
force before he is overwhelmed - by 
the confusion and cross^frrpose. . ' 
It is hoped that his "great objec- 



So more and more the engineering 



never 
to do 



Minute Sermons ' 

' 'By 1 Dt, Crawford Grays 

Service pays. ■? 

One. way to ge£ somewhere 
is to 'do something.. 

The alive person is 
: stuck wond>ering what 
next. 

Perhaps we're in a rut; 
things might be" different if 
we were not. ; 

Pfrofjteerjng ifc Vhighway 
robbery" whether times are 
good or bad. 

. Self-pity creates misery while 
self-forgetfullness eits from 
the storehouse of happiness. 

We condemn : heartless 
squeezing by large bodies to get 
much profit at little cost and 
yet for what we do, we want 
"plenty" while when others do 
for us we give "little." 



/f new highways is supplemented 
/ith beautification plans. Some of 
he states are beginning to make re- 
gular appropriations for "this pur- 
pose. Why not? — Fairbault -Daily 
lews. 




JONTRIBUTION TO THE MINNE- 
APOLIS TRIBUNE EXPLAINS 
THE LANGER VOTE 
(From the Public Pulse) 
Jo the Editor of The Tribune: 

In your issue of July 2, in an edi- 
orial under the caption, ''Two Var- 
.icts in North Dakota" you find it 
iflicult to reconcile the overwhelm- 
ng indorsement given Governor Lan- 
ier in a recent primary in the face of 
: is conviction and severe sentence? 

The in(*orstmtnt is not difficult to 
analyze. The people of North Dakota 
.re educated in the prt of reading 
mily newspapers. The peopie had no 
. r ay of knowing all the facts in the 
janger case any more than they have 
it knowing all the facts about politi- 
.al issues or candidates for office, but 
me thing all the voters did kn^w 
-bout Governor Langer and his trail 
Vas that every single . daily news- 
paper in and out of the astte were all 
igainst Governor Langer and the 
^eople of North Dakota all being wise 
.0 the newspapers would naturally 
,upport the governor and why not 7 
.Vhere is there a daily newspaper who 
.s not ashamed of its record during 
.he World War when they all joined 
.n a conspiracy of falsehood against 
Glermi-ny .and pi-opapandi;.t.d people 
.nto a fenzy of idiotic patriotism from 
*hich we all suffer today. Where were 
,he daily newspapers during the Tea 
Pot Dome scar.dal ? 

In the lace of the record* of the 
press, is it any wonder that intelli- 
gent readers everywhere should 
read the daily newspapers in reverse, 
that is, when the newspapers are for 
\ thing, the people of North Dakota 
aye sense enough to be against it 
.nd when the papers are against a 
hing ,the people are for it which*-is 
,ust right and as it should be. 

That is why I voted for Governor 
^anger arid his entire ticket and- that 
.s the only manner of voting in which 
-he comrhon ctiizen can defend his 
own iriterests as the daily newspapers 
ire always lined up on the side of the 
.■espectable, smart crooks and against 
the people in every issue and every 
campaign. 

On the tremendous vote given Gov- 
ernor Olson of Minnesota it is very 
evident that Minnesota voters are 
'wise to the Twin City press and read 
them in reverse, the only way they 
can be read without injury to the in- 
^Tvidual and without injury to the 
cause of good eovernment. 
\ T. H. HAGEN 

Grand Forks, N. D. 



Crickets as Watchdogs 
Many Japanese keep single crickets 
in eiiges abuut their homes. They 
stop singing. If an intruder approaches 
and the unusual silence awakens the 
household. 







%£ 



hu gain because, just as' in the case tives; "security of the home, secur- 
of the tariff, the, - farmers gain has ity of 'livelihood, and the Security of 
been nullifiedjiy the higher prices the social insurance* 1 .?, ill be reached: by 
industrialists obtain thru the NRA. ■ methods which take into ajcount the 
Failure to see this may be excused whole. social ana economic structure, 
twin-? to the fact that they were ini- so v.iattae plan my work and enuuru. 
tiito(l when .the time3 were' critical | ^ ■ - 

xv. i quick action was nocessary. And 
tht'.y could not reasonobly be aban- 
donee' without . a fair trial. But be- 



tween the Special sesion of Congress 
.viten they were put -into effect and 
the regular session in January of this 
year six and a half months : elapsed 
which should have made it possible 
to work out a coordinated plan. 

Such a scheme .was not presented. 
Various useful measures were passed 
by the session' just ended but none 
of;them went to the fundamentals of 
the-sitHation. He&ce, people wbo ars 
entirely- friendly Uo the administraS 
tion anerareui full sympathy with the> 
broad humanitarian principles enun- 
ciated by the president jn'his niess- 

''■'■'.• r-T./^. :'■ "";. :"*Z; ' ■ "• "'. . ■ . 



s<- 



CUis's ioiu'i th W: 
FrnnlVMeiilfentli plnce lii the pnpu 
latlcn rank oratates In \&YX, nw.n ad 
.nncrT.l to thirteenth by 1S1^». to arth 
place. : In the next ten years, and r<> 
.ihlnl in . the succeeding twniUy years, 
whti'h.pliice fihe lust u? - Illln lis. With 
only nbiMit 43,000 persons at; her blrtli 
In less than 60 yean* J the But* key*-, 
state offered -840.IHU) men hi the Civil 
war. '24$&i of wliiiiii died on the battle 
heldH. /Sjnre jhan hiflP h«r >i>|iu!atli>n 
jfelien OTe w» given s^iWht «>rt. and 
gfo perTcent, greater Inss thil h that In-' 
curred *by the British 4nil! AmHrl^n 
suldlefT^duiisg the entire lfevolutlOD 
ary wiwi" _^_ . , 
"' ■ * V- ij T" ' ". 



DEFECTIVE PAGE I I INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



gtwr&nce ricff*'morn& 

She welcomed iae with trembling hands, 

And eyes that smiled through tears— 
I was the first old Mend from home 

She'd seen in twenty years! 
"Someone from home," die said, and sighed; 

"Oh, you could never know ■ "-■- - — IsSi -. 
How good it is to have you herel ■$£ ; t:ift.^§\ 1 

.1 miss my old friends sol" ' 

We talked about cur yesterdays— 

About the folks' wa knew ^. 

Long years ago; we talked about ' ; 

The things We used to do. 
Her heart still clung to memories 

Of days when life was glad; 
But oh, how lonely she had grown, 

H<jw desolate and sadl 

The-time fo?.partingr came too soon; v -: 

She plead witli mo to stay; % 

Someone from home -gave her more joy ' «^j 

Than words could ever say . . . U 

And I shall cherish tlirough the years 

The brave and v/istfol smile 
With which she thanked me— just because /^? 

I talked with Ker awhile. . '-^ 




M 



-\' 



1 



_HBBg ferVgjfcfrAttS $6%\W, fttflia &m& gA!jAJBia«flfltA..gfttatfiDAg. jjtl¥ i4. 'iMi .: 



Tjn-n- 



ST. HILAIRE 



■ relatives. They returned Sunday. 

. t ; ***• and Mrs - E - N. Reiersgord and 

"77 T~^ — ~ — : ^-|- ' ; ; on ■ Tommy and Garmo Jenson re- 

Mr. and Mrs. TO. J. Janda accom-! turned Saturday after having spen* 
S?" 1 ! r,- y D ^-„ an<: ' Mr3 ' Haney " of | several days at a lake near Detroit 
Thief River 'Falls motored to Granc I Lakes. 



Forks last Sunday to attend the all- 
american turkey raisers picnic. 

Miss Hildah Gigstad, who teaches 
at Moorhead . arived Wednesday j tc 
visit at her home - during the sum- 
mer months. She , spent part of the 
summer visiting- relatives near tht 
Twin Cities.- | 

Mr. and* Mrs. Carl Nelson anc 
family left for their home at Minnea- 
polis the first of the week, pfter hav 
ing spent a week at the home of Mr& 
Nelson's mother, Mrs. Mary Sherv; 
and other relatives. j 

Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Ness, Mr. an 
Mrs. P. H. Evenson of Langdon IN 
D. spent a few days with Mr. Even 
sons mother Mrs. A. Odegaard am 
at the Iver Iverson and Tobias Stev. 
homes. They returned tl« first of th 
week to Langdon. j 

Charles Patterson, former maha 
ger of the Farmers Elector Co 
here visited Sunc*ay with frieniifc 
He is now located at Ogemah, Minn 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles McClellan 
and son of Arnegard N. D., Mis 
Mai Early of Detroit Lakes, and Mis 
Erma "Walker of Fargo, N. D. visite 
at the Wash Adams home. Mrs. Mc 
Clelland and Miss Early are nieces ;o 
Mr. Adams. j 

Clarence Swenson of Fargo visit 
ed briefly with relatives Monda.5 
while eroute on business to town 
north. 

Mrs. Thomas Harvey returned to- 
her home in Chicago last of the week 
after visiting for some time at the 
Rev. M. L. Uahle home, 

A large crowd atended the open air 
concert that was given by the local 
band on the grounds south of the 
old post office building. 

Birthday Party 

Mrs. Hans Wilson and Mrs. Nich 
Eskstein were honor guests at the 
birthday party at the Eskstein home 
at Wylie Sunday. An enjoyable af- 
ternoon was spent and lunch was 
served. Ine honor guests both received 
number of lovely gifts. Those present 
were: Mr. and Mrs. McAllister of 
Grand Forks. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Iia- 
Plante and family of Crookston, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Hanson of Thief Riv- 
er Falls, Mrs. Hans Wilson of St. 
Hilaire. Mr .and; Mrs. Joe Draeger of 
Badger, Mr.- and Mrs. Fred Eckstein 
and family of Wylie, Mr. and. Mrs. 
Otto Eckstein- and family of Red 
Lake Falls, Mr. and Mrs. Wm Eck- 
stein of Verndalei Miss Mary ?Gavin 
of Red Lake Faljs, Mrs. P. Smide- 
sang, Mrs. Dreelan, Mrs. Landman 
ana Mrs. Nick Eckstein all of . Wylie. 

Mr: and Mrs. J. Opphehn visited 
Tuesday evening" at the Clarence 
Pope home in Thief River Falls. ; 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Hanson, Mrs. 
Randolph, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest" Log- 
gins and son Harry, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ben Rosendahl, Herman Ortloff were [ 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Just 
bunday afternoon and evening. | j 

A large crowd' attended the Swed- 
ish 



Mrs. P. _ Smith t-nd son Peter of 
Chicago are here to visit at the. M. 
highland and Neil Dahl homes. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Corbet and eon, 
Mrs. Anna Ingvalson, and ArJene 
.McKercher of Thief River Falls were 
■upper guests at the R. McKerchei 
-lome. 

- Mr. and Mrs, Evert Johnson of 
.Varren visited Monday with Mrs 

• ohnson's parents Mr. and' Mrs. Jiir 

- unney. 

Mr. and- Mrs. Adolph Satterbergs, 

Ir. and Mrs. Gust Hedman and fam- 

-ly of Mcintosh visited at the Henry 

Jurstad home Sunday evening. 

The Norwegian Lutheran Luther 

* -eague was held at the Gunnard 

-indquist home Friday evening. A 

arge crowd attended. 



HAZEL 



Mr. and Mrs. H. Jepson and* family 

«. Ir. and Mrs. O. Johnson and Mr. and 

irs. Hans Hanson and family motor- 

d to Detroit Lakes Sunday where 

■ iey spent the fia-V visiting at the 

Jhristianson home. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Peterson were 

' »leasantly surprised at the Carl 

iwanson home 'last Saturday even- 

ng with a large crowd was present. 

junch was served and Mr. and Mrs. 

Peterson were presented with a num- 

oer of lovely and useful gifts. 

M. and Mrs. Hans Vake and family 
and- Mrs. Andrew Vake motored to 



Song Group of club girls. 

Talk on weeds Mr. Clark of Crooks- 
ton. 

-Piano Solo Miss Mickelson. - 

/The Rocksbury 4-H club held their 
annual -tour on Sunday July 15. 
Thirteen homes were visited 1 , alto- 
gether making a trip or 21 miles. At 
the*, end' of .the tour a picnic din- 
ners was served at Valhall. In the 
afternoon ball- games between the 



ar. n WTiiilfflrNTr^a 



and Mrs. E. B. Dshlstrbm of Grants- Mrs. P. E. Bjerklie and daughters ed at the Edward Bergh home near 
berg, Wis., Mr. and -Mrs. Albert An- Mrs. Pete Erickson of Issaquah,- Wanke, enjoyed last week at her 
derson Merriam and Raymond and Wash, and Miss Agnes Bjerklie visit- parental home. 



M.;J. Peterson. 



NORDEN 



MrB. Alfred Olson v and- her son 
Ralph spent Thursday afternoon vis- 
iting with friends and * * 



Rocksbury 4-H team and Hazel Thief River Falls * and ; St. Hilaire. 



Thief ECver 
Ed. Johnson 



team, with Rocksbury winning. J Gi^ace Grindland <tf, 

Silverton and Smiley played with Falls is a guest at the 
Silverton, winning. The Rocksbury . home. j 

girls pl&yed the Silverton. girls witr J Ralph Olson returned 
Rocksbury winning. The last game Fort Snelling and spent 
was' between Bill's Eat Shop and a " visiting with his parents, 
pick-up team with pick-up team win- ; Mrs. Alfred Olson. He left for Chic- 
ning. On next Sunday there are two ago, Thursday evening where he will 
ball games scheduled to be played- on ' be employed'. "^ . \ 

the Rocksbury field. I Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Comstock of 

The Ladies Aid of the St. Paul Thief River Falls are [visiting Mrs. 
church will have a picnic at the Ole Comstock's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Leon farm on Sunday, July 22. The Alfred Olson, 
program starts at 2 o'clock in the. Little Myrlin Gullingsrud returned 



I ed at the Olaf Nelson home on Hon- Mr. and Mrs. Bj. Bjornaraa tfhd son 
^y* _"'-*■ - ,., l , " , Einar accompanied- by 'Mr. and Mrs. 

Misses Irene, Annabelle and Helen Bjorn Tveitbakk of Gully motored- to 
Tasa visited with the Haugen girls at- Fisher on Sunday, where they attend- 
ee Halvor Haugen home on Sunday e d a surprise party in honor of Arne 



relatives at 



afternoon. 

S el ma and Henry Waale of Kratka 
were callers in this vicinity on Mon- 
day evening. 

Mr. and* Mrs. . Thore Skomedal and 

children Evelyn, Thelraa and Kenneth 

visited at the Christ Thompson home 

home from on Sunday. 



Grundyson at his home. 



a few days 

Mr. and 



afternoon. 

A canning demonstration of the 
south Rocksbury will be held at the 
Cheerville school Wednesday, July 2£ 
with Mrs. Lloyd Johnson and Mrs-. 
Martin Finstad as leaders. 



to Thief River Falls Wednesday after 

having been a guest at the S. Hovick 

home. " "■ j 

, Halvor Strand void : Thief Rivei 

. Falls visited with friends here Mon- 

l dav - _■ _ _ .... ! 



at the community club that evening. 

BLACK RIVER 



Observe . Anniversary 

The 20th wedding anniversary oi 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anderson was 

Hoople, N. Dak., on Saturday where l celebrated last Saturday evening 

they spent the weeje-end visiting with ' when about 100 invited relatives ana 



relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. -Olaf Bergland and 
family of Crookstafn motorpd hiire 
oh Saturday and spent the weekend 
at the August Swenson home and 
with etohr relatives . ~Jj 

Mrs. H. Jepson visited at the Am- 
anda Person home at St. Hilaire Sat- 
urday evening. 

Mrs.- A. P. Anderson and son Paul 
motored to the Fritz Ulrich home on 
Thursday pnd Mrs. Anderson remain- 
ed for a number of days to visit with 
her daughter, Mrs. Fritz Ulrich, 

Mrs. Wm. Gilbertson was honor 
guest Monday evening when a num.- ~ 



oer of her fronds ana- relatives gath- 
ered* at the Gust Erickson home to 
help her celebrate her birthday. 

Mrs. Aug. Erickson and family and 
Mrs. Oliver Nordquist and family 
of Wilmar, Minn, were Monday even- 
ing guests at tne A. .f. Anderson 
home. 



.The 4-H Club Sewing met at the 
D. Johnson home oh Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. ^Larson and fam- 
ily were Sunday visitors at the J. 
Fellman -home. 

■ Mrs - *"raut Johnson was honor 
guest Thusday axternoon when l 
iarge number of her friend's gather- 
ed at her Home to honor her at a sur- 
prise snower. Airs. Johnson receive.. 

._ , a number of gifts from her irienas 

Lutneran Ladies' Aid held at the and lun ^ was served at the close of 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry den motored ( The Good Cheer Club also known as 
to Warren on Saturday to visit atrthe the Sanc.vich club is serving lunch 
Anderson home On their, return trip July 29th at Soren Sorensons hoik. 
they were accompanied by IMiss Those serving will be Mrs. S. Soren- 
' Grace Anderson, who ■ demontrated son, Mrs. Charles Sorenson and Mrs. 

Harry Myrom. Everybody, is cordi- 
ally invited. ! I 

Mrs. S. Hovick, son Lloyd, daugh- 
ters, Gudren and Helen,} and Myrlin 
Gullingsrud spent Tuesday evening 
/isiting' the G. M. Olson and fam- 
Jy Ernest Grind land*; (returned to 
Thief River Falls Saturday after hav- 
ing been a guest for the ! past -week at 
the Ed. Johnson home, j 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Myrom became 
the proud parents of a 12-pound boy 
ruesday morning. -j 

Mr. and -Mrs. Albert Thorson were 
dinner guests at the Gerhard Hanson 
home on SatuaJay. \ j 

Lydia and Judith: Lockrem at- 
tended the Young Peoples' Conven- 
tion last weekend at iThief River 
Falls: i \ j 

Little Donald Johnson! [was a week- 
end guest at the home of his grand- 
mother, Mrs. Grindeland.1 

A. Stenseth and« . familjy of Smiley 
visited with (fordon i Olson on Mon 
d*ay afternoon. ■ j 

Glenn .Olson and Victor Nelson of 
St. Hilaire spent -Tuesday afternoon 
at the home of Gordon Olson. 
Nic Nelson of Norden township pas- 
sed away Tuesday afternoon at a 
Thief River Falls hoapitjal being 7t 
years old at the time of his death. 
He was lai<l to rest" in tlie Norden 
cemetery. 

Esther Soiney, Eldred and* Dahe 
Ayers spent Sunday visiting' Gordon 
Olson family. 

Lilas Olson spent Sunday afternoon 
visiting friends at the StL Lukes hos- 
pital in Thief River Falls. 



friends gathered at their home. The 
aiiair vas sponsored by MrV Mar- 
tin Peterson, Mis. Elmei Dahlstrom 
and Miss Hattie Dahlstrom. A very 
good and inspiring program was ren- 
dered, the following taking part: 
Wedding march Merriam Anderson 
I Love you Truly Mrs E. M. Dahl- 
strom 
Invocation Rev. E. B, Dahlstrom 

Duet Merriam Anderson and Alvin 

Dahlstrom 
Remarks. and Reading Mrs. E. B. 

Dahletroui 
Quartette ■ J. A' titi3on sia.tars 

Talk John Stiger 



J. Almquist home Friday afternoon, 
with Mrs. J. Almquist and Mrs. lJ. 
Fellman entertaining. j 

Mrs. Oris Rodahl and infant son 
r turned home Wednesday from the 
hospital. They will visit Mrs. Rb- 
dalii's parents for a few weeks. | 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Allen, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. A Corbet anc son Junid.i 
Freeman Allen Jr. and Rev. E. A. 
Cooke of Thief River Falls visited 
Friday evening at the Freeman 
Allen home at Hazel. . | 

A number of persons from the com- 
munity attended the Passion Play in 
Thief River Fslls at the Community 
church Sunday evening. It was J a 
moving picture of the Life of Christ 
it. was a rare treat, as few have been 
able to see the famous production. 
Parcel Shower. 

A parcel shower was given Thurs- 
day afternoon in honor oi Mrs. Frank 
Johnson at her home. About 25 per- 
sons attended. A purse of money wbl 
given to Mrs. Johnson and a delicious 
lunch was served j 

M. an.j Mrs. Gust Hedman and 
family of Mcintosh spent Sunday vis- 
iting at tha Adoiph Sa'.' erbcrg 
home. ' j 

Raymond Young, Carl Pearson and 
Hubert Huff' motored to Rugby and 
Minot N. D. Sunduy to visit foi 
several days with relatives. | 

Mr. and Mrs. Verner N elson and 
daughter Clarine of Warren are^ vis- 
iting several days at the M. Flicker 
home. 

St. Hilaire- Games Ball Game 

The Gariies and St. Hilaire baseball 
teams playeu the return game on tne 
local bail diamond Sunday afternoon 
with Uarness winning 17-11 

Mike Highland motored 
evening to Greenbush to attend 
Sandard Oil meeting . 

Mr. and Mrs. JNorm'an Olson __ 
Leonard spent Sunday with Mr. Ol- 
son's ^parents, Mr. anJ Mrs. Henry 
Olson. j 

The Red Cross will have their meet- 
ing Tuesday afternoon at the N E. 
E. Beebe 'home. 

Mis. VV\ L, Carlson and daughter 
of Minneapolis came Friday to visit 
tor some time at the Arne Vik hohie. 
Mrs. Carlson was formerly Agnes 
Vik. ; --" ■ 1 

. mr. and Mrs. Elmer Johnson and 
ton Stanley have been visiting Mrs. 



..I 



tne afternoon. 

Mrs. uennie Johnson was a Wed- 
nesday afternoon visitor at the Aug 
swenson home. 

Little Jimmy Gilbertson' returned 
Wednesday from a Thief" liiver hospi, 
tal where ne was a patient for a num- 
uer of days. Jimmy is now feeiing 
fine. 



SILVERTON 



Misses Desena and Anna Quinloji 
of Thief River Falls visited Sunday at 
■ihe J. Anderson home. 

Emil Burdick returned Tuesdai 
i'rom Malta, Mont., where he has beei. 
employed. j 

Vivian and Art Von Wold (spen 

.*. 1. _•_ p* ar g attending ^tlu 



.ast week 
State fair, 

Miss Theresa Olson visited Wed'.ies 
Jay evening at the Capt. Hoveiant. 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Nesland- an 
daughter Audry of Thief River Falls 
visited Sunciay at the G. Neslan^ 
nome. 

Mrs. Marit Hegrenes was a calle; 
J.t the J. Anderson home Sunday. 

Miss Geneva Anderson returnee 
nome Saturday after being -employs, 
a few weeks at the M. Hoverstad 
home. . ~ 

Knut Knutson transacted' busines. 
in Thief River Falls Wednesday. 

Ole Homme Jr. vislLed witli friend 
in Grand Forks Sunday. 



HICKORY 



Solo" Mrs. John Anderson 

Message , Rev. J. Anderson, Crooks- 
N- ton. 

'Solo Lucille. Anderson, Graatsberg, 
Wis. 
Remarks • Rev. E. . Dahlstrom 

Remarks and song Albert Anderson 
Music by Trio Meriam. and Raynionc 
Anderson and Alvin Dahlstrom. 
Rev. E. Dahlstrom served 1*s toast- 
master of the evening. 

The Wedding attendants of twenty 
years ago, Mr. and Mrs. Fred D. Lor- 
Sentson, Mrs. Martin Peterson were 
present and served in a similar capa- 
city again. The fourth member of the 
attendants, Edward Erickson, was not 
present so Martin Peterson served in 
ms stead. Mr. Erickson arrived from 
California the following day too late 
j to be present. 
. After the program a very- delicious 
2-course luncn was served, a further 
congratulation offered the honored 
couple. 

Mrs. M. J. Peterson and Alvin 
Dahlstrom called at the J. A. Ander- 
son home Tuesday. 

Rev. and Mrs. E. B. Dahlstrom of 
Grantsberg, Wis., here, Friday even- 
ing to visit with the former's father 
Aixred Dahlstrom and also with other 
relatives and friends in this vicinity. 

Visitors at the Albert Anderson 
nome Satuddy afterrnoon were, Rev. 
and Mrs. E. ii. Dahlstrom of Grants- 
oerg, Wis., and Felix . Anderson, 
Gladys, Marie and Ferdie. 

A Fourth of July picnic was held 
-he John Kruse farm. Dinner was 
served after which a program was 
.endereo. 1 of which Rev. Bloom of 
Jrand Forks N. D. and Rev. Fjel- 
itad of Thief River Falls were the 
.peakers. Tne St. Hilaire Baseball 
tiam also came out and took th- ***"-h 
.core in a game against the Black 
.:iver. team. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed .Erickson and 
daughter, Adeline and Mr. Nelson of 
-iOS Angeles California, arrived 1 here 



Mr. 



G. 



Johnson's parents at. Manville, N. 
Rose Whalen of Red Lake Falte 
\i a . nag with her grandparents, 
and Mrs. M. McAndrews. 

Norma Bucklin of Crookston catne 
Wednesday to visit at the V. " 
Brink home. 

f Canning Demonstration 

The vegetable and' fruit canning 
demonstration for this communjjj 
was given Wednesday afternoon ai 
the iNorwegien Lutheran church base- 
ment. Over -Jj women attended. The 
leaders were Mesdames John Hanspn 
Earl Jenson and W. A. Corbet as- 
sisted by Miss Beta Johnson, relief 
worker of Thief River Falls. 



Miss Lottie Mae McMahon who ha: 

Monday been employed at the Harold Sterna' 

home left last Sunday for the Venn. 

1 McMahon home where she will visi 

( of for some time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ole Rindahl and Mri. 
Charlie Thrulson visited at the Mr; 
Berggit Danielson home Sunday. 

Mr. end Mrs. Ericfc Johnspn an , 
Thora Bjornaraa visited . friends an 
also attended to business at Thie 
River Falls Friday and Saturday. 

Relatives of Martin Solsang fror 
North Dakota are visiting with H> 
and Mrs. Martin Solsang at the Cai 
Bakken home. 

Mrs. Olive Christianson . was hur 
quite badly in a car acci j-itt on Jul 
4th. .-■'-.. 

Miss Minnie Thrulson is employe 
at the Mrs. Bergit Danielson. home 

Mr .and Mrs. Ole Rindahl and sot 
Orlean Mr .and Mrs. Mike Rindah 
and children Dean - and Mildred 
Bjorn Tveitbakk of Gully and Rev. B 
per guests at the Bj. Bjornaraa home 
Monday evening. 
Hoff erening of Roseau were . - sup 

There will be services in the Lttik. 
Oak school house Sunday July 22nd at 
11 o'clock.- ■ 



Roy Sumpter and Cornel Aubol mo- 

tored to Red Lake Narrows on Sun- The Rocksbury Community Club 

£"J held their monthly meeting at Valhall 

/Miss Graeme ''Carlson' and' brother of on Saturday evening, July 14th. The 

/ Suluth came TFriday to spend ihe[ i " ™,? Program was given by. the 

summer with Mrs. Mary Sherva. f 

Mr. and Mrs. Melyin Norhe motor- 



EAST ROCKSBURY 



i 4-H club. 

Piano solo Miss Mickelson 
ed to tSrand,uist Saturday to visit ^^^in^emonatration 



Miss 



BRAY 



Mr. and Mrs. John O. Swansoc 
anc* daughter Gertrude visited at the 
Adolf Barstad home in Silverton 
and at the Herbert -Grinde home h 
Thief River Falls on Saturday. 

A large crowd attended the Luther 
League at the Black River church 
Friday evening. A fine program was 
given by the Luther; League from 
tne Clara church at Hazel and lunch 
was served. ; ' I 

Mr. and Mrs. David Rux accom- 
panied by their cuughter, Mrs. H 
Udstrand and daughter Darlene oi 
Holt, left Wednesday to visit rela- 
tives at Reynolds, N. Dj 

Miss . Mable Lindblom of Thie:* 
River Falls spent the weekend at hei 
home -here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Larsoa. anc 
son Raymond of Sti- Hilaire were 
Thursday evening visitors at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Larson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Kulseth are the 
happy. parents of a baby boy borr. 
Tnursday evening, July. 12th. 

Mrs. Reuben Kux was a Saturday 
evening supper guest at che home pf 
Mrs. Annie Linabloom. 

Miss Irene Schnieder returned 
home Saturday after visiting iriends 
at Fairmont for some time. 

A show was given in School Dis- 
trict No 180 Wednesday for the 



_ anday aicernoon to spend some time ' 4-H club. Coffee was served by ti*.. 
/isiting with the former's mother, Rea Owl Store and ; lunch was f ur- 
yfrs. Andrew Erickson and also .witn nished by the 4-H club j members, 
jcher relatives and friends. | Mr. and -Mrs. Thuro | Bloomberg 

Mr, and Mrs. M. J. Peterson visited le " Monday for their home in Port- 
"*t the Albert Anderson home Wed-. land / Oregon after spending severa. 
.esday evening. weeks here- attending -to. business 

Visitors at the Chris Kruse home ■ ^^ EU George, | Harold anc 
-Vfcanesday evening were, Mr. and j ohn nie Lindblom, ciRk Mosbeck and 
jdrs. Fred D. Lorentson, Adeline, Lon- (jlarence and" Donald Sevre were Sunl 
uesz, Donald and Adrian of Thief <tay afternoon visitors at the homt 
stiver Falls, Mr. and Mrs. Aiex ot - Mr3 _ Annie Lin^blomL 

..wanson, Lorraine . Kenneth ana \ — 

>oris, Mr. and Mrs. Gust fetersori : 

iu uaughter Murial, Felix Anderson |" SOUTH HICKORY 



Miss Olive Haugen, who is employ-. 



' rrjid . daughter Gladys 

Mr. "and Mrs. Edward* Erickson, 
aughter Adeline and Mr. Nelson all 



(Too Late For Last 



Mr. ana Mrs. Alfred Anderson and 
of Proctor, 



Week) 



L,os Angeles, Cauiornia, Hev. and daughter Angeline Ethel ._ 
irs. E. B. Dahlstrom of Grantberg, ni 33 Amanda Jepson, Gilmer and Jor- 
."Jls. Mrs. Alfred Dahlstrom, Hattie ffen Oftelie and Richard Jepson vis- 
.id Alvin and Mr. and Mrs, M. J. ltea - a t Erick Johnson's on Sunday 
eterson visited at the Albert Ander- afternoon, 

on home, Monday evening.. j Services were conducted by Rev. 

Ladies Aid was entertained by Sigurd Fladmark at ; the! Little Oak 

Irs. J. A. Anderson and Mrs. E. Per- schoolhouse on " Sunday ^afternoon. 

on at the former's home. A very Martin Edward* Jr^.the infant son 

irge crowd attended. of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Solsang was. 

Mr. ai.j Mrs. Carl A. Adolphson, ' christened in the presence of Mr. and 

nd son Raymond of Willmar arrived fi * rs « Alvin Bakken and Mr. and Mrs. 

iere Tuesday to visit at the Felix An- Ray Martinson. Mrs. Solsang was. for- 

.on homes and also with others for merly Miss Esther Bakken. Lunch 

jome time. ' was served by the Ladies Aid af tei 

Misses Hannah and Embek Erick- services. _ r A. «oW^ 

;on who are working at Minneapolis' Cla ? a < ***«* a »4;^gf d ■ ?£jSl~ 

irriveu- home Tuesday morning to son were callers at the: tBjornTveit- 

«Bit for some time with their moth- . ba ^ k home " ea J 9g®X. on t ? unday * B , 

-r, Mrs. Andrew Erickson «, Evepett Roed ' Erick Johnson ^ anc 

M^ ar ,A m«. n * n * t Thorwald Bjornaraa were business 

; ^ a r d ^!; Gl J 3t f Pe H rson , en ^- callers at Thief River Falls on Fri. 

.noH D - group of- friends- at their 



tained 

lome Thursday evening. An im- 
promptu program was given, con- 
sisting of singing, speeches, and 
music, At' a late hour a delicious lunch- 
eon was served. 

Mrs. M. J. Peterson, Mrs. Albert 
Anderson and Misses Hattie Dahl- 
strom and Merriam Anderson viBited 

witR-Mrs. G. M.: Erickson Satlrffiiy 
.Supper guests at the Alfred Dahl- 
strom Home Wednesday were Mr. and 
Mrs. Ed. Erickson, Adeline and Mr. 
Nelson of Los Angeles, Calif., Rev. 



day. 



••K. E It S.. 

Door .keys, Yale keys' and auto- 
mobile ignition keys of all kinds, 
for all kinds of locks, .made at short 
notice at -51*^ ~-.-.r 

Havel's Gun Repair Shop 

407 Arnold Ave. South; | 

Thief Siver! 'Falls, Minn. 



Larson Funeral Home 

CARL B. LARSON 
Licensed Funeral Director 

Ambulance Service^ — Calls Answere.i 

Day or Night 

Day Phone 61 Night Phone 148V 

118 La Bree Ave. N. 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 



Dr. H.J. Rice 
DENTIST ! 

X-RAY LABORATORY 

Phone— Office, 207 Besideaet, Ml 

First Nationt.1 Bank Balldiaf 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 




Announcement 1 

Mr. Clarence Lasseson, 
of Thief River Falls has 
been appointed as Local 
Representative for the 
State Farm Mutual Automo- 
bile Insurance Company 
and will look after all 
matters pertaining to in- 
suring and servicing auto- 
mobiles, formerly taken 
care of by M JR. Levorson 
who is no longer an author- 
ized agent of the State 
Farm Mutual Ins. Co. 

At the present time Mr. Lasse- 
son is our only authorized re- 
presentative in Pennington coun- 
ty. 

W. D. Stegner, State Director 
John A. Gronner, Dist. Agt. 



ree 



from your 

Watkins Dealer 

2 Bars, of Green Palm 

Soap FREE jWiih 1 lb. 

Double Action Baking 

Powder. 

That's just like cutting the 
price of Baking Powder in half 
I give 2 or 3 bars of soap FREE 
«with other necessities like spi- 
ces, Extracts, daily used Toi- 
let Articles, needed Medicines, 
etc. which ' means a savings to 
you of loc to 25c on an article. 

Wait for Watkins— It Pays 

I will start working in this 
locality with the well known 
Watkins . line of spices, ex- 
tracts food products, soaps, toi- 
let articles and stock and 
prfultry preparations. My stock 
is new and fresh. You'll enjoy 
using these highest quality 
products, which I will bring to 
your door at a savings to you, 

GEO. BERKHOLZ 

Central Hotel 
Thief River Falls 



NORTHERN CLINIC 

A. W. Swedenburg, M. D. 

O. G. I.ynde M. D. C. M. Adkins, M. D. 

Physicians and Surgeons 



Swedenbnrg Building 

Thief River Falls. 



Telephone 350 
Minnesota 



Dr. P. L. Vistaunet's Clinic 

Besides Medical and Surgical, also Electronical Digauii «f Afi 

Diseases. 

Fundamental Treatments Consisting of: Medietas*, B e t train, 

Baths, Massage, Manipulations, Diets, etc. are adabUstered. 

Aait—U raqaisaaV— Soswj. 

Room 6. Dobner-Meehan BIdg. Phones: Office 383 Residence 280. 

Thief River FaBa, HtaMasts. 



DON'T 




To Heed Otir 




suits s 



w^wamgcagKMirf'^iMit^*^.^. 



KUPPENHEIMER $35 $ 
Suits, now . . 



28 



75 



MICHAEL STERNS 

$25.oo SUITS NOW $20.75 
$22.50 SUITS NOW $18.75 



One Group of Suits 
at $9.95 








; 




: 




i 

i 




i 

j 




' • + 






X 















mSf> 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




afiaaaMfflftBaM 




thief ftlVER -f ALLS f 6bBm, $hi£f' RfVJR ^Alts, atft&ifofA.: tMbs&a¥, itii¥ i6,-i6Si" — 



■ ■.:-..L^:. 



*fi£i 



Mi', and Mrs. Thure Blomberg, 
latter who was formerly Rina Gihde, 
left Monday for Portland, Oregon, 
■where Mr. Blomberg is employed 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Comstock, and M' 
end Mrs. Ted' Chester motored to Bel- 



trami on Sunday and spent the day, 



Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson, 



Eeubin and Mabel Johnson returned 
Sunday from a ten-day trip to the 
Iron Range and various points in Wis. 

Miss Elaine Evehson left Mo iday 
evening for Washington, D. C, hav- 
ing accepted' a government position 
with the Agriculaural Administration 
Association there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Falk and two 
children of New Rockford, Minnesota, 
arrived .Sunday for. a visit with Mrs. 
Talk's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. P. 
Anderson and friends. Mr. Falk is 
manager of the J. C. Penny store at 
New Rockford. 

Ralph Olson left for Chicago Sat- 
urday after spending several days 
visiting with relatives here. He will 
be employed for some time in Ohic- 
ago. 

Miss Olive Olson, an employee of 
the J. C. Penny store, left Saturday 
with Mis Marion Oden for Minneapo- 
lis where they will spend a week vis- 
iting with relatives. 

Mrs.. Bertha Gibson returned Sat- 
urday from a two week's vacation 
during which time she visited with 
relatives at Neenah, Wis., and Minne- 
apolis. She resumed her duties at the 
J. C. Peny store on Monday. 

Miss Joyce Wold- arrived from (Min- 
neapolis where she is employed and 
visited several days with her friend 
Miss Elaine Evenson. i 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Ulrich and sor, 
returned Saturday from Stillwater 



and 



will attend the Lutheran Bible camp 
which is being held mere this week. 
Kev. Fjelstad' is in charge of the 
evening inspirational services. 

Mrs. Ole Ostby and daughter, Mrs. 
Andy Maghuson and Joyce Bennes 
left Sunday for Cross Lake where 
mey will spend the week. ' 

Miss Gladys Williamson left Tues- 
day evening for a two week's vaca- 
uion trip to Minneapolis and Chicago 
[ .vhich she will spend with friends and 
relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Williamson, 
llave Christianson and 1 Misses Olga 
»ad, Delia Dougherty, Ella Holden 
and Borghild Hoiden motored to Win- 
nipeg and spent Wednesday and 
Thursday of last week. 

Miss Maide L. Johnson arrived 
Sunday evening from Red Wing and 
-vill be a gjest for some time at the 
nome of Mrs. Nate Harris. Miss 
Johnson was formerly music super- 
visor of the city schools for a num- 
ber of years. 

Mrs. Jack Murphy and two sons ar- 
rived Thursday from their home at 
Jhattam, New Jersey. They will 
,-isit Mrs. Murphy's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Wilde, and also Mrs. 
ilarry Fry in this city. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Janse and son 
Tommy of Fargo, N. Dak., and Mr. 
jiid Mrs. Bum's son-in-law and 
Thursday after a trip to Gilbert, Min- 
nesota where they visited with Mr. 



weeks 



with 



, E. 



to run oyer $500. This job cost the ' 
city over $3,000. They called in a 
Minneapolis linn to do the work altbo 
there are cement workers and plaster- 
ers in the city of known ability who 
are out of work. 

.They have increased the payroll of 
the city without in any way giving 
the city any ad'Jed service. -They have 
two street commissioners where ont 
•vas sufficient before, but our stre^ 
are no better than before. They have 
two janitors ui the auditorium and 
only' one. was Never needed before. 
Tney are paying one of them as as- 
sistant a good salary but .it is s 
known fact that he does not put in 
one half of his time on the job. He 
is 'gone sometimes for days. 

We know that in the case of strikes, 
riots, lockouts and boycotts every- 
body in the community suffers. The 
innocent with the guilty. However, 
we also know that there is no othei 
recourse at our command than • ti 
withhold our patronage from thi 
members of the city council and the 
nrms they are connected with in this 
case. We have tried all other methods 
of persuasion. 

Therefore, -we wish to state that as 
lone as the members of the city 
council refuse to grant the men in 
question a fair and public 'hearing 
to the charges of inexperience and 
inefficiency which have been macTe 
against the city engineer, we shall 



SUNDAY 

-at the- 

CHURCHES 



T 



AUG. LUTHERAN; CHURCH 
H. L. Sjogren,; jPastor 

Morning worship; at; 11:00. 
Evening worship; a£ ;8:0Q1 



Morning worship at 11. 

"Evening service at 8. 

'prayer meeting on Thursday eve- 
ning" at 8. 

The Evangelists Oscar and Olaf 
Monson of Chicago will sing and 
speak Tuesday evening 1 and also Wed- 
nesday and Thursday evenings oi 
• next week. 



l| 



Mid-week service; at 8:00 /on Thurs- 
day. t • . j ■ I / 



The Ladies Aid«;wlil 
afternoon at 3:00 o'clock, 
Peterson and Miss I Hild' 



and Mrs. Burn's son-in-lay and continue to .withhold our patronage 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. John T. No- . f r orn the members of the city coun- 
Ian, and they also made stops at c ii and the firms with which they. arc 
Buel and Tower, Minn. | connected. 



Adopted at the meeting 6f the 
CWA Prfcective Association, on Wed' 
nesday July 18, 1934. 

K3WA Protective Association 
by Chas. L. Schultz 

Chairman 
Jack H. Van Pelt, 

Secretary 

• ' 

ITE1WS 



where they spent two 
friends rnd relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Neset and Mr 
and' Mrs. B. O. Norby motored to 
Twin Lakes on Sunday and attended 
the Land O' Lakes picnic which was 
held there. 

Miss Eleanor Kelly returned [Sun- 
day from Red Lake Falls where she 
has spent some time visiting her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Lawrence Fouvnier. 

Mr and Mrs. E. J. Richards| anc' 
daughter Ethel returned Monday 
from Detroit Lakes where they have 
spent several weeks. | 

Mrs. Aff Anderson of St. Paul is 
spending a ten-day vacation a^ t>" 
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs 
O. Gullingsrud. - | 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Adbljihson: 
and son of Willmar and Felix Ander- 
son and family of Wylie visited' at 
the F.' D. Lorentson home Sunday. 

W. N. Morell resigned Friday as/K ' 
receiver of closed state banks in this ' 
district, which resignation will | take 
effect immediately.He will continue 
in his present office until the j time 
his successor will arrive to relieve 
him. As yet Mr. Morell has -' made 
no definite plans for the future. 

Several boys are attending the 
Lutheran Bible camp which is being 
held this week at the Lake of the 
Woods near Baudette. Among the 
group are Erling Mellby, Ralph 
and' Alfred Nelson, Robert Frlssell 
James and Milton Nesse, YCe'nnetli 
Holmgren, and Lawrence Stadum 

Oreal Halland. and Arnie Bethkit 
left Saturday for Chicago where they 
will spend about three weeks. 

Mr- and Mrs. Carl Narveson and 
family of Erskine spent Tuesday 
evening at the B. O. Norby home. Mr. 
Narveson is superintendent of schools 
b'_ Erskine. , 

Dr. and Mrs. A. E. Jacobson and 
family spent last weekend vacation 
ir.g at Detroit Lakes. 



EDNA HOVIE IS BRIDE OF 
GEORGE BISKEY 



A number of local people attended 
the annual picnic of District No. 14 of 
the Land' O' Lakes at Twin Lakes 
last Sunday. J. $. Hay, former sup 
evintendent of the local schools was 
the principal speaker. 

Mrs. Ed. Hermanson -of Los An- 
geles, California, who has been visit- 
ing at the Mrs. K. Hermanson and 
Ole Granum homes for a week, de- 
parted for Ada Saturday where she 
will visit at the L. Hermanson home 
before leaving for her' home in the 
west. 

Miss Marion Oien is leaving Sat- 
urday for her home at Shelly after 
having spent a week with her brother 

Orvis, and her sister, Alice who are, In the presence of immediate «]. 
employed in this city. atives, Miss Edna E. Hovie, daughter 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Peterson ' f Mrs. G. K. Hovie of this city, was 
spent last weekend vacationing at ■ married to GSeorge W. Biskey,. Jr. 
Detroit Lakes. | son of Mr. and* .Mrs. George Biskey, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Kline of Radium Sr., of .St .'Hihiire, on Friday evening 
spent Tuesday in the city shopping at the Norwegian Lutheran parson- 
and attending to business matters. | age in St. - Hilaire with Rev. M. L. 

Mrs. Dean Hollinshead' of Bend. ' Dahle reading the service. The at- 
Oregon, and Mrs. H. H. Oerding of tendants were Miss Mary Biskey, sis- 
Coquille, Oregon, who have been * er of the «room, and Clarence Hovie, 
visiting friends and relatives for a br ° th .? r °. f the bride, 
few weeks, left Wednesday fo- Big ' Following the ceremony, a recep 
Sandy, Montana where they will visit "° n was. given for thirteen immediate 
with Mrs. Hollinshead's brother, J. relatives at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
E. Matheson. They were accom- * red Biskey of St. Hilaire. The young 
panied by Kenneth Shetler, and Lor- couple left Saturday for a weekenj 
raine and Ardith Hoard', the latter excursion trip to American Point, 
two- remaining the rest of the sum- Th , e brlde is well known to local 
mer with Mr. Matheson, .while popele, havmg graduated from Lin- 
Kenneth will go to the west coaVrt. , , coin High School in 1926, from the 

Misses Helen Wassgren, Adeline i°„^} '*<«<?««' training_&partment in 



Lindberg, and Verna Brandon ..left 
Saturday evening for Mineapohs 
where they are student nursee. They 
enjoyed three weeks vacation at 
their respective homes in this city. 
CARD OF THANKS 
I wish to thank the voters of Thief 
River Falls for their vote and sup- 
ort at the school election, July 17th. 
The vote was very gratifying. 

Wm. J. Douville 



CW.A. Circulates 
Dodgers Saturday 

. Continued from page one.) 

cient,' these reasons are not the real 

reasons and are only a smoke-screen 

to iu3c the fact that the cit> engin- 

^ at uetruit l U1 v«. -ecr- has pulled booners)and is trying 

Mi« Marine Halland left Saturday to place the blame jH^omeone else. 

•" . _. i •!! I i\r .. „:„.„i n fn>) -Tint*! 4- in tic; tiihinh -oro 



fur Gary, Minn, where she will spend 
several weeks visiting with relatives. 
Miss Ella Holden, who is employed 
iu tue ci.y, spent last weekend at her 
parental home in Viking. ' 

Mr. and' Mrs. M. C. Burns motored 
to Grand Forks with Mr. and Mrs. 
A.- G. Janse and son on Friddy, re- 1 
turning the same day. Mr. and Mrs. 
Janse remained to spend some time 
visiting Mrs. Janse's parents, "iter 
which they will return to Fargo 
vharo the formor is employee 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Taie and 
1-v T-anna. Dick Kaheal and Lorecm 
Ilud'- of Bemidji, and Melvin Jolin- 
i . of in-.ertiaiional Falls weie tnc 
Sunday guests at the H. Halland 
Koine. " 

HAVE YOU tried the gas r, 
at Bsger Oil Co, High test pas 
bare oiis at a low pricn. N 
,,. cracks on Highway 32 I 
Miss Ruth Mellby spent th 
una visiting: in Minneapolis. _ 

R"v. R. M. FjcMstad accompanied 

I •• Misses Sblveicr Pjdstad, Bar- 

- bai'a Keoi>, Mcl'itta YOiike, and Stella 

ttadum left Sunday for the Lake of 

t:i u Woods' near Baudette where they 



We 



:ld oil: 

100% 

c-or G 

lip 

week 



rculated petitions which were 
i.igncd by over four hundred citizem 
of Thief River Falls urging that the 
Liismisied men be reinstated ani" *hai 
Liiu engineer be uismissed. These pc-^. 
..ions were also tossed aside withou. 
consideration. I 

The council has shown an utter 
disregard for the interests of the tax 
payers, in ^roof of whiou we cite the 
aa that . uhey have accepted the 
nigher rather tl - l the lower bid'., in 
numerous inDtances where advertice- 
:n-!,c has bum rnaae lor equipment oi 
_or services. In buying p a firetruck 
^ii^y uoug.it at a price of over $>y,U0J 
..^ ; ; \.i quostionaDle value while 
_• u.p-.uiil gj. known qualify was of- 
fered at from ono to three thousand 
uol.arn less. They contracted to have 
jh cuy's olficial orintin^ done at 35 
ei-nt per folio a.uiough another j 
v.us «„oieu by a responsible biduer 
at 2d cents per folio. In the' case of 
! .he repair of the water reservoir they 
:ailed to call lor Li-*a on the 300 at a. 
aiuioU£!l the law provides that bijl 



LOCAL MARKETS 



Tnitir iu* 

•(Ji'JlfTt If.V 



■ill KALI,? 
:,.!f l:i»-r 

l!«MI.-f 



>n I tin'* I >.-sr, hi-i-K 
Rl». 1 I ivU "'*'" I" 

^'u.- iNoMi.L-tn ; i ii'ftf 

J^ll. I AinbL'^ .'uriim 
Nu. 1 Mil. '1 Ilurihtl 

ftti. i H|-!l iHMtiUt 

Uain 



It-.V 



Uiic'Krrliftti jJt-t- (iu;i*itif! 

i*oi;:/n:v ?Iai::c 
AndiinitMi i.j- l.-Ui\ *>' i-i; i 
Hcuv.v lii-iis *>i $> UMiv«r 
l.irfiil lit-n.-* : 
C11.1 
BtarfM 

Ul'l'HH ' * -' 
TtiirkH 

I)^.ck^lllKll■^"^ Dounds 
Lt'irliurn sui'lmrs 
Colored Springs 2 lb. "I> 
Lesborn Droll *;i-s l%Tb or ovi 

1'HODUCiS 
Casli Cream 
Egtfs. l-irsts 
Seccmda 



:IjJ1 l"i 


L'Ul 














■ 
















iWj 


f\ 


h 


i'l 


> 


Al 


D 


>S| 


, Forum 


Want 


Ads 


one 


cent 


a 


•^ 1 

wora 



HAVE THREE year old grad» 
Xiolsiein bull, weight about 1200 lb3 
t o trade for erood young Holsteir. 
co\. : ". — Aicerc Larson, Ha^el, Minn., 
lioute 1. nc-16-23 



1927, and from the Bemidji State 
Teachers-College J. 1929. She has 
taught-.for several years in the rural 
schools, .and for three years in the 
St. hilaire schools. For the past two 
years she has heen employed in the 
county agent's office, and will con- 
tinue her duties there for ■ the time 
being. The bride is also a candidati 
for the office of county superinten 
dent of schools in the fall election. 

The groom, is a graduate from tht 
St. Hilaire high school and is now em- 
ployee- as "a substitute mail carriei 
on the St. Hilaire route. Mr. and Mrs 
Biskey plan to reside at St. Hilaire. 

; ENTERTAIN FOR KIDDIES 

Mrs. H. H. Oerding of Coquille, 
Oregon, and Mrs. Dean Hollinshead of 
Bend, Oregon, entertained several o:' 
their little relatives at the home of 
Mrs. Minnie Shetler on Thursday af- 
ternoon. The feature of the after- 
liion was a treasure hunt for gifts, 
and games, were also played. A del- 
icious luncheon was served at the 
close of the afternoon by the hos- 
tesses. Those present were Elaine 
Betty, . and" Donna I 'oard; Lorraine 
Ardith, Lois, and Viv an Hoart>; Mar- 
jorie and Homer Jdatheson, Jack 
Shetler. 

-- HOLD FAMILY "REUNION 

A family reunion was held las! 
Sunday at the E. Anc.v2r.10n home in 
Sanders" T6\vhship with approximate 
ly 40 relatives present. Among those 
taking .part were Mr. anJ Mrs. Wil- 
liam l*arhst and son Raymond; Mr 
r>nd Mrs. "Henry Hoard and daughters 
Elaine,- ' Donna, and Betty; Mr. and 
Mrs. A. C. Matheson and* children 
Marjorfe "and Komer; Mrs. R. B 
Shetler; Miss Ruth Storhaug; Ken- 
neth Shetler; , Mrs. .Harrison . Oerding 
of Coquille, Oregon: Sophua Ness; 
Mrs. Laura Feragsn; Mr. and Mrs 
Jonkiin and 'con of Holt; Minton 
noard and daughters. Lorraine, Lois. 
Vivian and' jKrc.' i.h; Mr. and Mrs, Le- 
RDy Shetle^and son Larry; Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph Shetlex and son Jackie; 
Mr. and jars. " Iver Ottom of St 
Thomas, Ti. Dak.; and Mr. and Mm. 
...iugust Sortland. 

"HT ANDCTHTARMtR 75 YDJL 

ODPAvSES AWA\ JULY 12U 



I SCAND. EVAN. FREE CHURCH 
| J. O. Jacobson, ; Ppstor 

Sundoy school at 10 A. M. 

Legal iNctices' 

CALL FOR BIDS 
Sealed bids will be received by 
the undersigned until 7 P. M., July 
25th, for moving ! a store building 
from Neptune to Riven Valley 
Creamery, also for remodeling and 
other work. For particulars see the 
undersigned. The Board reserves the 
right to reject any or all bids. 

Nels Fore, Secretary 
: Oklee, Minnesota. 

CITATION FOR HEARING ON 
PETITION FOR PROBATE OF 
WILL. 

State of Minnesota, 
County of Pennington — ss. 
In Probate Court 

In the piatter of the Estate of 
Elizabeth Holland- * Bakken, formerly 
known as Elizabeth Holland, Dece- 
dent. 

THE STATE OF MINNESOTA TO 
Selmar R. Holland, Mamie Holland 
ScMander, Anita Elizabeth Halbach. 
Dorothy Mary Holland, Alfred Law- 
rence Holland, and Norwegian Luth- 
eran Church of America and Ole L. 
Bakken, and all persons interested 
in the allowance and probate of the 
will of said' decedent::' 

The petition of Selmar R. Holland 
being duly filed in this court, re- 
presenting that Elizabeth Holland 
Bakken, then a resident of the County 
of Pennington, State of Minnesota, 
died on the 11th day of July 1934. 
leaving a last will and testament 
which is presented to jthis court with 
said petition, and praying that said 
instrument be allowed'l as the last will 
and testament of said decedent, and 
that letters testamentary be issued 
thereon to Selmar R. I Holland, 

NOW THEREFORE, you and each 
of you, are hereby cited and required 
to show' cause, if! any you have, be- 
fore this court, at the Probate Court 
Rooms in the Court House, in Thief 
River Falls, County iof Pennington, 
State of Minnesota, on the 11th . day 
of August, 1934, at 10:00 o'clock A 
M., why the prayer of said petition 
should' not be granted. __ 

WITNESS THE : HONORABLE 
Andrew Bottelsori, Judge of said 
court, and the seal of said court, this 
17th day of July, 1934. 

ANDREW iBOTTELSON 
Judge. 
(COURT SEAL) 
H. O. Berve ■ / I 
Attorney for Petitioner 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
July 19-26 Aug. 2. 



I MAVIE LUTHERAN CHURCH I 

I E. O. Sabo, PaBtor \ 

♦ . *' 

Services in the'Silverton church at 

II A. M. Sunday, July 22nd. 
,=t wj,„ ' The Telemarken Ladies Aid will bt 
5L'n pi entertained by Mrs. Torjus Larson ai 

the Larson home Thursday, July 2(i 
Services in the Highlanding churcl 
at 2:30 P. M. Sunday, July 22nd 
An offering for the general church 
budget will be lifted* and the con- 
firmands will read after services. 



Mrs.'O. C. 

'Erickson. 



GOODRIDGE LUTH. PARISH I 
O. O. Bjorgan, Pastor | 

Bethania: 

Services in Engljsh at 10:30 A. M 



I TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH | 
I R. M. Fjelstad, Pastor | 

* ■ « 

Morning worship at 10 o'clock A. 
M. 

Circles will Meet Thursday, July 
26 as follows: 1'. Mrs. Hardy Bjerke, 
2. Mrs. O. I. Oien. 3. Mrs. L. J. Eric- 
son, 6. & 8. Picnic at Tindolph Park, 
9. Mrs. Ernest Yonke, No. 4 meets 
on Wednesday at the church parlors. 

Always a hearty welcome. 

.. ^z^zz^zzm - 

I COMMUNITY CHURCH I 

I E. A. Cooke, Pastor I 

* ■_, \ 

Services for Sunday, July 22 will 
be as follows: 

Thie church school will meet -at 
9:45. Miss Minnie Leavitt, superin- 
tendent. There will be classes for 
all ages. Visitors are welcome 
Morning worship will be in charge 
C Rev. J. B. Smith who will preach 
the sermon. A cordial invitation is 
xtended to all. 

Service at Steiner conducted by Mr. 
G. H. Mayer-Oakes at 2:30. Sunday 
school at 1:30. 



M 4!» 



t » < ,»»»»»»»»»»» < , « ,» < ^» < ^^».^. t j^<^<^'5^^'M^'>':-?'>*»*»^^<^ ; 




THIEF RIVER PHARMACY 

O. H. EKEREN & SONS 

"The Rexall Store" Phone 77 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



Erickson arid Lund 
FUNERAL HOME \ 

M. P. ERICKSON 

Funeral Director 

Prompt Ambulance Service 

321 N. Main 

Day and Night Phone 404-W 



DR. H. B. NEWELL.r^D., C.V.S 

Expert on all disease of poultry and 

other animals 

ADVICE AND COUNSEL FREE 

PHONE 1 158 




I Ai resident of Wyandotte Township 

fori At years, Andrew Nelson passe J 

■v^ay -at 4:58 P. M. Thursday, July 



IQM SALE — Piano in good condi- 

.ion, orginally cost ?400, will sacri- _^_ __^ 

f.i'o for quick sale. Call at Forum \2i, at a local hospital, being 75 year: 

ur.ice, 15-ltp oj£J at ti le time of his death. He 

'~"„~.V« ^ ^ / j i s -a s born December 24, 1858 in Verm- 

FOR SALE— Team of good work Jand> Swedenj , and came t0 Red Wing, 
horses, .5 and 7 yea" old.— C. O, Minnesota from the old country, lat- 
■ ...-hu^er, u-:^ St. Paul Ave. i». | tel . j,j v i ng at CrooKston, Minn., and 

.'i w.-ii-Ki'i •■■«'-•: lf~3^ iiant mP'mWi Washington. In 1892, he 

: i 1 t\V lm^Ko— H you want w| . moved t Q Wyandotte Tow{lsWp 
,;uy, sen ur u-^e typewriters— Wwhe wherQ h{ , has since made hja hom £ 
li.8, Hamilton s._ l£-rtc Mr _ Nelson . wa3 unma rriedi those 

FOR SALE:— 4 wheel trailer with wlio survive being two sisters, Mrs 

cox and stock rack. Nearly new. Over f- R - Larson and Mrs. J. O. Berg- 

t i,ed tires.-E. T. Burstad : 16-ltp l"nd, and one brother Julius Nelson, 

: —5 | who are all of Hazel. His parents 

Any Size Kodak Film .Developed one sister, and' one brother have pre- 
cluding 8 High Grade Glassy .KrioU ! "^e<J h'hj in death. Services were 
25c — SalvesofcsrawBo ™d on «dhday, July 16, at Jths 
. _j33_7. ClearwateS Lutheran Church wTHi 

FOR SALE — Horses and "Cattle, ' Kev. U.S. Dahle of St. Hilaire of- 
terms if desired. — Northern rjCrgdftj Delating, i Interment was made 
Co., B.J, Shaw, manager. -Ifctfc" |trie Clearwater cemetery, 



Fri., Sat., jfly 21-22 
"Strictly Dvnamite" 

Starring — Jimmy Durante, Lupe 

Velez & Four Mills Bros. 
Added Attraetioii-4-BAER CAR- 

NiiRA fighatj pictures. 
11 rounds of real thrills — knock 

downs in slow motion. 



TRADE IN 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 




Quality 



Economy 



Mat. Sat. 2:30. 
Lve. Adm. 



Adm. 6-15-25C 
]U-^u-zac 



t 



Sun-Mon. July 22-: 3 

"The Life of Vergin 

Winters" 


Starring — Ann Harding, 
John. Boles. 


.MiUinee Sunday at 2:30 



Tuesday, July 24 

TAKE A CHANCE NIGHT 

Children 10c, Adult. 15c . 

Wed. Thur. July 25-26 

Starr i,n g — Shirley Temple, 
Ad'olphfc Menjou, jgorothy Dell. 

. —ONE CENT SALE— 



HARTZ 

ampi©n 

?8ib. 
bag 
Every Bag Guaranteed 






California 
Elbcrtas 

Per Crate . 



K^SLYYOlSf large bur.chef , 2 for 

New Potatoes Far ^iL! c ' 



Green Onions 



Fer 
Bunch 



3c 



L. B, Hartz Stores 



Phonel3 



(Incorporated) . -^V 

Thief River Mis 



Minnesota 






UkZ 




^HJEFfl^BF^&B^^ 



-"*&"!■ 



ii^K 



toaitwyaiaitMa' 



will attend (the Lutheran Bible camp rto run over J500. This Job cost the . 
which is being held there this weet-l city over --$3,000.. They called to a 
Rev. Fjelstic.' is in charge of the |. Minneapolis firm to do the work altho 



evening inspirational services, 

Mrs. Ole-Osthy and daughter, Mrs. 
Andy Magnuson and Joyce Bennes 
left Sunday for Gross Lake where 
tney will spend the week.'. 

Miss Gladys Williamson left Tues- 
day evening for a two week's vaca- 
tion trip td Minneapolis and Chicago 



Mr. and Mrs. Thure Blomberg,; the 
latter who was formerly Rina Ginde, 
left Monday for Portland, Oregon, 

"*£* M £ M ""a? ktZi l Zi Mr »"<* **> *ill spend with friends and 
Mr. and Mrs. Al Comstock, and Mj-.i elatJTcg . 

and Mrs.! Ted' Chester motored to ■Be.- 1 M nd M ;CUll!11(!e Williamson, 
trami on: Sunday and. spent the day. 

Mr. aiid Mrs. M. M. Johnson, j and 
Eeubin and Mabel Johnson returned 
Sunday from, a ten-day trip to: the 
Iron Range and various points in [Wis. 

Miss Elaine Evenson left Monday 
evening for Washington, D. C, ihav- 
ing accepted' a government position 
with the; Agriculaural Administration 
Association -there. I 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Falk and two 
children of New Rockford, Minnesota, 
arrived Sunday for a visit with I Mrs, 
Falk's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. F. 
Anderson and friends. Mr. Falk . is 
manager! of the J. C. Penny store at 
New Rockford. 

Ralph | Olson left for Chicago! Sat- 



urday after spending several ;days 
visiting with relatives here. He will 
be employed for some time in Chic 
ago. j i 

Miss Olive Olson, an employee of 
the J. C. Penny store, left Saturday 
with Mis Marion Oden for Minneapo- 
lis where they will spend a week vis- 
iting with relatives. j 

Mrs. Bertha Gibson returned ! Sat- 
urday from a two week's vacation 
during which time she visited iwith 
relatives] at Neenah, Wis., and Minne- 
apolis. She resumed her duties at the 
J. C. Periy store on Monday. ! 

Miss Joyce Wold' arrived from ;Min- 
neapolis Iwhere she is employed and 
visited' several days with her friend 
Miss Elaine Evenson. 

Mr. arid Mrs. Allen Ulrich and son 
returnedj Saturday from Stillwater 
where they spent two weeks iwith 
friends pnd relatives. 

Mr.- arid Mrs. Olaf Neset and Mr. 
and' Mrs! B. O. Norby motored to 
Twin Lakes on Sunday and attended 
the Land O' Lakes picnic which was 
held there. ; 

Miss Eleanor Kelly returned Sun- 
day frorii Red Lake Falls where she 
has spent some time visiting her sis- 
ter, Mrsi Lawrence Fournier. 

Mi- . arid Mrs. E. J. Richards and 
daughter Ethel returned. Monday 
from Detroit Lakes where ,tfeey have 
spent several weeks. 

Mrs. Alf Anderson of St.- Paul is 
spending! a ten-day vacation at tbt 
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
O. Gullirigsrud. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Adolphson 
and son of Willmar and Felix Ander- 
son and ! family of Wylie visited' at 
the F. D. Lorentson home Sunday. 

W. NJ Morell resigned Friday as 
receiver !of closed state banks in this 
district, which resignation will i take 
effect immediately.He will continue 
in his present office, until the time' 
his successor will arrive to relieve 
him. As yet Mr. Morell has made 
no definite plans for the future. 

Several boys are attending the 
Lutheran Bible camp which is being 
held this week at the Lake of the 
Woods near Baudette. Among the 
group are Erling Mellby, Ralph 
ami Alfred Nelson, Robert Frissell. 
James and Milton Nesse, \\0nneth 
Holmgren, and Lawrence Stadum. 

Oreal jHalland and Arnie Bethku 
left Saturday for. Chicago where they 
will spend about three weeks. 

Mr- and Mrs. Carl Narveson and 
family of Erskine spent Tuesday 
evening at the B. O. Norby home. Mr. 
Narveson is superintendent of schools 
Erskine. 



ijave Christianson and' Misses Olga 
vad, Delia' Dougherty, Ella Holden 
and Borghild Holden motored to Win- 
nipeg and! spent Wednesday and 
Thursday of last week. ; 

Miss Maide L. Johnson arrived 
Sunday evening from Red Wing and 
A'HI be a gjest for some time at the 
home of Mrs. Nate Harris. Miss 
Johnson was formerly music super- 
visor of the city schools for a num- 
ber of years. 

Mrs. Jack Murphy and two sons ar. 
rived Thursday from their home at 
Jhattam, New Jersey. They will 
«sit Mrs. Murphy's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Wilde, and also Mrs. 
Harry Fry in this city. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Janse and son 
Tommy of Fargo, N.. Dak., and Mr. 
and Mrs.! Burn's son-in-law - and 
Thursday after a trip to Gilbert, Min- 
nesota where they visited with Mr. 
and Mrs. Burn's son-in-lay arid 



there. are cement workers arid plaster- 
ers in the city of known ability who 
are out of work. 

'.They have increased the payroll of 
the city without to any way giving 
che city any ad'Jed service. Tney have 
two street commissioners where one 
*as sufficient before, but our istre~ 
are no better. than before; They have 
two janitors -in' the auditorium and 
only one was'.* ever needed - before. 
Tney are paying one of [them &3 as- 
sistant a good salary but it is - a 
known fact that he does not put-in 
one half of his time on the job. He 
is "gone sometimes, for. days. 

We know, that in the case of strikes 
riots, lockouts and boycotts every- 
body to the- community suffers. The 
innocent with the guilty. However, 
we also know -that there is no othei. 
recourse at our command than ti 
withhold bur -patronage from thi 
members of the city council and the 
firms they' are 'connected with in this 
case. We-have tried all other methods 
of persuasion. 

Therefore, -.we. wish. to state that as 
lone as the members of the city 
council refuse to grant the' men in 
question a fair and public "hearing 
to the charges of inexperience and 
inefficiency which have been .' made 
against the city engineer, we shall 
continue to -withhold our patronage 



SUNDA? ; 

-at -Hie-j 

CHURCHES 



"Morntog worsnip. at 11. ",'~ 
' '■'Evening ' service .at 8. • . 

jye? meeting on Thursday eve- 



nifig<at 8. 
iThft E 



,e Evangelists Oscar and Olaf 
Monson of Chicago will sing and 
speak Tuesday evifiing-and also Wed- 
nesday and Thursday evenings of 
next week. " '-^ 



AUG. LUTHERAN" CHURCH 
H. L. Sjogren, Pastor 



Morning worship at! 11:00. 
• Evening : worship at! 8:00. ^ 

Mid-week service at 8:00 oil Thurs- 
day. 



MAVIE LUTHERAN CHURCH 
• ' - " . E. O. Sabo, Pastor 



Services in the^Sflverton church at 
11 A. M. Sunday; July 22nd. 
— fti t j- Aij „i!i ~o«t w.tJo« ; The Telemarken Ladies Aid will be 
The Ladies Aid- wlU . meet Friday. intertained by Mrs. Torjus Larson al 
afternoon at 3:00 o dock, Mrs. O. C. ;the Larson home Thursday, July 26 
Peterson an d Miss Hild-. Enckson. ^^ fa fte Hignlanding churcl 

: : a , lat 2:30 P. M. Sunday, July 22nd 

SCAND. EVAN. FREE CHURCH 'An offering for the genera} church 
JO Jacobson^i Pastor- ! | budget wifi be lifted' and the con- 

■ : ; i— — ■ flrmands will read after services. 

Sunday school at 10 A. M. 



TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 
R. M^.Fj.elstad, Pastor 



daughter, Mr. and Mrs. John -T. No-jfrop,: the members of the city coun 
Ian, and they also_ made stops at c ji and the firms with which they are 

connected.. 

Adopted at the meeting of the 
CWA Prteetive Association, on Wed- 
nesday July 18, 1934. 

' iCWAf Protective Association 
by Chas, L. Schultz 

Chairman 
Jack H. Van Pelt, 
•""* ; " Secretary 



Buel and Tower, Minn. 

A number of local people attended 
the annual picnic of District No. 14 of 
the Land'IO' Lakes at Twin, Lakes, 
last Sunday. J. H. Hay, former sup 
erintendent of the local schools was 
the' principal speaker. 

Mrs. Ed. Hermanson of Los An- 
geles, California, who has been visit- 
ing at the Mrs. K. Hermanson .and 
Ole Granum homes for a week, de- 
parted for Ada Saturday where she 
will visit at the L. Hermanson home 
before leaving for her home in the 
west. , v , . 

Miss Marion Oien is leaving Sat- 
urday for her home at Shelly after, 
having spent a week with her brother 
Orvis, and her sister, Alice who are 
employed in this -city. - - - - ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Peterson 
spent -last- weekend vacationing 
Detroit Lakes. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Kline of 



EDNA HOVIE IS BRIDE OF 
GEORGE BISKEY 



In. the presence of immediate rel- 
atives, Miss Edna E. Hovie, daughter 
, of Mrs. G. Ki Hovie of this city, was 
at ' married to George W, Biskey r Jr.; 
| son of Mr. arid'- Mrs. George Biskey. 

Radium Sr., of .St "Hilaire, on Friday evening 

spent Tuesday in . the city shopping at the iNorwegian Lutheran parson- 
and attending to business matters. | age 4n St: Hilaire with Rev. M. L. 

Mrs. Dean: Hollinshead' of Bend. 'Dahle reading: the service. The at- 
Oregon, and Mrs. H. H. Oerding of t e ? da ?'» -'were Mnw Mary Biskey, sis- 
Coquille, Oregon, who have been tor of the 'groom, .and Clarence Hovie, 
visiting friends and relatives for a bl ^ T 9? the bride, 
few weeks, left Wednesday fo- Big FpHowmg the ceremony, a recep- 
Sandy, Montana where they wffl visit tion^was'-giyen for thirteen immediate 
with Mrs. Hollinshead's brother, J. ^^t'Y^ 9 , at tB S £ <m Jl,°* Mr ^ nd M* 3 - 
E. Matheson. They were accom- « e d Biskey of St. Hilaire. The young 
panied by Kenneth Shetler, and' Lor- couple- left Saturday for a weekenj 
roine and. Ardith Hoard', the. latter e *SJ. ra, 9" ^'P *° American Point, 
two remaining the rest of the sum- ■ The bride is .well known to local 
mer with Mr. Matheson, whUe popele, having' graduated from Lin- 
Kenneth will go to the west coast i col b -High fachool m 1926, from the 

Misses Helen Wassgren, Adeline ^ -^ciers'^tramanE ^artment in 
Lindberg, and Verna Brandon Jeft x^^^JL*^ . 1 J ^ udj *ov. S, ?. t ! 
Saturday I evening for Mineapolis ^fSttolevfral ' 

„,i,„™ «,oi, -•» ohirtont rm«»e Thev {augnc,ior several 



She has 



en^^ttreT £ff =^ S^J^^^^ 
their respective homes in this, city." 
CARD OF THANKS 
I wish to thank the voters of Thief 
River Falls for their vote and sup- 
ort at the school election, July 17th. 
The vote was very, gratifying. 

' Wm. J. ' Douville 



C W. A. Circulates 
Dodgers Saturday 

Contjnued from page one.) 



Stvliilaire schools. For the past two 
yeava she has heen employed in the 
coanty; agent's: office, and will con- 
tinue her duties there for the time 
being. The; bride is also a candidate 
for the office of county superinten 
dent of schools in the fall election. 

The - groonv. is a graduate from th< 
St. -Hilaire High school and is now em-, 
ployed- ,as a substitute mail carriei 
on the Bt. Hilaire route, Mr. and Mrs 
Biskey. plan to reside at St. Hilaire. 

\ : ENTERTAIN FOR KIDDIES 

X, arid Mrs. A. E. JaeobW and ^^^^^S^^S^BSSi 
faSiy^nt last weekend vacstton- .oWae to**^*^.^- ^-iSS^UvSlT&TCS- of 

^.?S H^Sid left Saturday'to'pl^.&rrso^ t^oo^lhf lea^ o^t^tet 

^juisji ^ 1 *""" s w l„. s \. e will spend We Circulated petitions which were ternoon. ineiearare oi tne aiter- 

far Gary,. Minn, wntre snewui =V C " . • \Jt - Mra >*--fX»^ hnnA-mA r-iH^r... nion was a treasure hunt for gifts. 

several weeks visiting with relatives signec by over four hundred c.tizem aad ^ aIao ta fl A B de , : 

parental home ,n,Vik.„g_ ^^ ^»|^^ T2XS%£?fe ^J^*^^^ 

Ar-iith, LoiSj and Viv an. Hoard*;. Mar- - 
jori'e and .'Homer Matheson, Jack 
Shetler. ~X. 



Legal Nfctices 

CALL FOR BIDS 

[Sealed bids will be received by 
the undersigned until; 7 P. M., July 
25th, for moving a store building 
from Neptune to i. River Valley 
Cpeamery, also for remodeling and 
other work. For particulars see the 
undersigned. The Board reserves the 
right to reject any or! all bids.' 
| Nels Fore, Secretary 

. | Oklee, Minnesota, 

CITATION FOR HEARING / ON 
PETITION FOR IPROBATE OF 
.-WILL. ' ' II .. 

State of Minnesota, p 
County of Pennington— ss. 

In Probate Court . . 
In the matter of the Estate of 
Elizabeth Holland- Bakken, formerly 
known as Elizabeth Holland, Dece- 
dent. ! 

THE STATE OF. MINNESOTA TO 
Selmar R. Holland, Mamie Holland 
Schlander, Anita Elizabeth Halbach. 
Dorothy Mary Holland, Alfred Law- 
rence Holland, and Norwegian Luth- 
eran Church of America and Ole L. 
Bakken, and all persons interested 
in the allowance r and iiprobate of the 
will of said' decedent: C - 

The petition of Selifaar R. Holland 
being duly filed in this court, re- 
presenting ■ that Elizabeth Holland 
Bakken, then a resident of the County 
of Pennington, State jof Minnesota, 
died on the 11th day of July 1934, 
leaving a last . wiH and testament 
which is presented to !thi3 court with 
said^ petition, and praying that said 
instrument be allowed'ias the last will 
and testament of said decedent, and 
that letters testamentary be issued 
thereon to Selmar R. ! Holland, 

NOW THEREFORE,, you and each 
of you, are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any you have, be- 
fore this court, at the Probate Court 
Rooms in the Court House, to Thief 
River Falls, County of Pennington, 
State of Minnesota, on the 11th day 
of August, 1934, at 10:00 o'clock A. 
M., why the prayer bf said petition 
should' not be granted. . ' _ 

WITNESS THE ij HONORABLE 
Andrew Bottelson, Judge • of said 
court, and the seal of [ said court, this 

17th day of July, 1934. „__':■ 

-.- ANDREW BOTTELSON 
- . \ Judge. 

(COURT SEAL) ' . ij . ' 
H.- O. Berve ; l 

Attorney for Petitioner 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
July 19-26 Aug. 2. 

Erickson arid Lund 
FUNERAL HOME 

"M. P. ERIGKSON 

Funeral Director 

Prompt Ambulance Service 

321 N. Ma\n ! 

Day and Night Phone 404-W 



GOODRIDGE LUTH. PARISH 
O. 9. Bjorgan, Pastor 



Bethania: 

Services in English at 10:30 A. M' 



Morning: worship -at 10 o'clock A. 
M. '' I ■ t.-'.*- 

Circles will iirieet Thursday, July 
26 as follows: 1. Mrs. Hardy' Bjerke, 
2. Mrs. O. I. Oien. 3. Mrs. L. J. Eric- 
son, : 6. & 8. Picnic at Tindolph Park, 
9. Mrs; Ernest; Yonke, No. 4 meets 
on Wednesday at- the church parlors. 

Always a hearty welcome. 

• ^ ' .* 

•|- ! COMMUNITY CHURCH I 

I E. A. Cooke, Pastor I 

*_ , : ^ .- 

Services for ' Sunday, July 22 will 
be as follows: 

Thje church school will meet at 
9:45. Miss Minnie Leavitt, superin- 
tendent There will be classes for 
all ages. Visitors are welcome _ 

Morning worship will be in charge 
E Rev. J. B. Smith who will preach 
the' sermon. A cordial invitation is 
xtended to all. 

Service at Steiner conducted by Mr. 
G. H. Mayer-Oakes at 2:30. Sunday 
school at 1:30. 




THIEF RIVER PHARMACY 

O: H. EKEREN & SONS 

"The Rexall Store" Phone 77 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

^^■^»^l■ *■ ^'l i ■ ^ l | ^ ■ '> l ^ '>■^ l ^ l ' l ^^"' f ^ rt ^ t ^ ! ^^ , ^^ , ' ;vw '^ L "''"'' t ''''^ ta "'**' >t *** *l 



Mr. and' Mrs. M. C. Burns mo 



to Grarid Forks with Mr. and Mrs. consideration. 

A G Janse and son on Friday, re- 1 T ne council has shown an utter 
turning | the same day. Mr. and Mrs. disregard 1 for the interests of the tax- 
Janse remained to spend some time payers, in proof of whkfi we cite the 
visiting! Mrs. Janse's parents, . after iac „ that ; c hey have accepted the 
which lihey will return to ; Fargo . higher rather tl' : i the lower bH-'-. in 
where the former is employed. n-jiiierous instances where advertise- 

Mr and Mrs. Ca-rl Taie and daugh- MLuC l.as' L<-cn mane ior e^uipmenc oa 
(••■V Trahna. Dick Kaheal and Loreeti _ or sorv ices. in buying a firetruck 
P.ud" of Bemidji, and Melvin : John- oll ^y UO uk.it at a price of over $9,1)00 
b . "of international Falls were the _ .. uo i \.i questionable value while 
Eunday! guests at the H. Halland- .7 u: n;:-.jnl, oj. known quality v.as of. 
)-, ome . ! fered at from one to three, thousand 

HAVE YOU tried the gas and oilr doi.ars less. They contracted to. have 
at Sagei 01! Co. High test gas> 100% Ma city's olBcial .printing done at 36 
bore oils at a low prico. Near G ctn t p^r : folio aitiough another »_-_ 
t, tracks on Highway 32 lD-ltp ' XV us u ,.eiej ty a responsible biouer 

Miss! Ruth Mellby spent the week at 25 cents per folio. In the' case of 
una visiting in Minneapolis. , I .lie repair of the water reservoir thej 

■ Rev. I B- M. Fjelstad acconipamed la ii e d tojcail lor LU'j-on the jo.o at a, 



I y "Miis'=s Solveig . Fjelstad,! Bav 
tata Beep, Mcritta YOilke, and Stella 
fctcdum left Sunday for the Lake of 
t:iw W^oos' nilB1 " Baudette where the y 



.utiiGUSh' thu lav/ provides, that biJt 
uun i>e called when oxperidituies are 



f 



LOCAL MARKETS 



, $ TllIEfr IttVfcH KAL1.S. GIIA1N3 
^ it;i*t»( Ifii UA • .Ti.te-r l:iv.-r i'aiu ;!*ut( 

i juj'i Hiii-l Xir.'tifhi 
' Kiui l>ik «. Hi.1 in 

\Us Tn'om iti-tu -iJ-i'W 
- Pc<j, 1 Ambef iMirflrti' 

Nu. 1 Mlsril IiutUrfl 

Pin* 

U.v 

UtiOkWht'ttt ]h-f liuIUljit! 

L'OlJl-TUY ai.uiuicT 
Asiiiiuieil uy Lntiti fbiwi*' 
Hon*)' IIiMi-t 4H a> ur «> r « f 
\A*i\\ heiiit ' • 

. ' Otis . 
BtiffU 

Ueiu»». ^ * ! ' 
TlunUs r 

Di.ckiundtirJ uonnds 
Lealiorn sprlniTs 
Colored Springs 2 lb. »P 
Lushiim Broilers 13i& or over' 

I . ; PBODUCK 

Cash Gream 
Ebkb. lvlratB : ' 
Seconds 



- hold; Family reunion 

A' ffitnily;, reunion was held" iasi. 
Sunday 'at- tiie E. And-araon home: In 
Sanders "Tt^rtiship with approximate 
\y 40 reltftnres present, /.mong those 
taking part' were Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam £arl$at and son! Raymond; Mr r 
arid Mrs.rHenry Hoard and daughters 
ElaiheV' Donna,- and Betty; Mr. and 
Mrs. .X. ^ -.Matheson and' children 
MarjorfeT "and Eomer; Mrs. R. B 
Shetler; ,, Miss Ruth - Storhaug; Ken- 
neth Shetler;, Mrs. .Harrison. Oerding 
of CoquilJe, : Oregoht Sophus Ness; 
Mrs. Laura Feragen; Mr. and Mrs 
ooriklin and ,son of Holt; . Mintoii 
doarJ and- daughters. Lorraine, Lois. 
Vivian ahd'.Acd'th; Mr.' and Mrs. Le- 
Roy Shetle^and son Larry; Mr. and 
Mrs. RalpB Shetler and son Jackie; 
Mr. and jars. Iver Ottom of St 

_ .yhomas, Tl. pak.; and Mr. and Mrs. 

' Forum ] Want Ads, one cent a woru:|^P»t Sor tland. , 

^ i^^hfanou? 1 1*ini;:f rtiCItt FARMtR Will 
c° u ..^itert fZU"tU*%£Z. UMkMlMMX .1211: 

rtoute li ltc-lu-aa 



DR. H. B. NEWELL.MD., C.V.S 

Expert on all disease of poultry and 

other animals 

ADVICE AND COUNSEL FREE 

PHONE 1158 



-.— i-t rj'l- Asrdsi4ent of Wyandotte Township 

FOR SALE — Piano in good condi- f rj 4a! years, Andrew Nelson passe J 
.ion, orginaliy cost ?400, will'sacrtr s.v^y.o,t 4:68 P. M. Thursday, July 
f.co fori quick sale. Call at Fqrura iaf a t a local hospital, being 75 yean 

unice. j 15-ltp t^j.a^t tlie time of his .death. He 

"7Zr;zr~ „ : / * „ i. fras born December 24, 1858 in Verra- 

FOR ;SALE— Team of good work Ja nd> Sweden , ud ame to Red Wing. 

horses, 6 and. .7 years . old,-^, V- Minnesota from the old country, lat- 

htotef, 'uas bt. Paul Ave. S. Her living at Crdokjton, Minn,, and 



i'\ PiiwfruTiiKdi-T-H you want to 



i'acqrna. Washing 



In 



1892; he 

s . . . - i- .-»„_ ui, r. "moved - 1 6 'Wyandotte Towdship 

,;uy, Milor ira^e typewriters— tfwBe wherohe has since made his home 

l ** L Uajniltoiis. IS??* . Mp- , N/elSdn. was unmarried ( those 

FOR SALE:— 4 wheel trailer -with ^ho survive being two : sisters, Mrs 
box andistock rack. Nearly newt Over ?• J • .".W™ ■»» .■ •?«?•- i- °.-„ B , er 8- 
"ed tires.-E. 1. Burstad - 16,ltp lu ? d .. *"? one ^brother. Julius Nelson, 

■ : , . T 1 who aw'.-ajl pf Hazel. His parents 

Any Size Kodak Film .Deyeioea( !°? 8 suiter, and 1 One brother have pre. 



Including 8 High Grade Glassy: 
25c t — Salv'i "" 



FOR' 5SALE— Horses and ft 
terms' if desired.— Northern 3j 
Co.; B, J;. Shaw;-. manager, A] 





cede4 him in death. Services were 
hWd on Wdhda-y, July 16, at 
OlearwateR Lutheran Church 
Peyi K.rx Dahle of ..St.-Hilaire of?! 
Diciating. i.'Interment was ' made in 
VHe Clearwater cemetery,. ■'■'•■■""-- .— 



Children Are Safe At The 

AVALON 

Always Cool . & Comfortable. 



Fri., Sat, July 21-22 
"Stiictly Dynamite" 

Starring — Jimmy Durante, Lupe 

Velez & Four Mills Bros. 
Added Attractiort-J-BAER CAR- 

NERA fighat | pictures. , 
11 rounds-of real thrills — knock 

downs in slov^ motion. . 
Mat, Sat. 2:30. Adm. B-15-2BC . 

Lve. Adm. lu-ju-2ic 



TRADE IN 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 



Sun-Mon. July 22-: 3 
>The Life 61 Vergin 
Winters" ; 

Starring — ?. Ann Harding, 
T ' John- Boles. - 
.-Matinee Sunday at 2:80 



Tuesday, ijuly 24 

TAKE A CHANCE NIGHT 

Children 10c AdolU 16c 

WedThur. |uiy 25-26 

S.t>rri,n.g— ShiHey Temple, 
Aijjlpht/Slenjou, jjjijbrothy Dell. 

•" -. --ONfe,'CBN| SALE^- ..* 




£8 lb. 
bag 
"Every Bag Guaranteed 




Calif ornfa 
Blbertas 

Per Crate ..-..-. 




/^»»«e*t^k-l-£! Gretn tops ^ 

V>arrOl»j ]arK : e bur.chef, 2 for 



New Potatoes 



Farcy igc 
10 lbs. 



Green Onions 



Per 
Buneh 




1^ B; Hartz Stores 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 




! W^^!?$m 



OFFJPIAL A 

; PAPER' " 

OP 

PENNINGTON 

COUNTY 



VOLUME THKEi^* >-l6 



Ti^F KltEK FAIO FORU 



•THpiRETVERiFALLS,* PENNINGTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA. 




THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1934 



BORCHERT CHILD 
BURNSTODEATH 
flU FLAMING CAR 

Three Year Old Boy Thought 
To Have Been Playng - 
With Matches 



Citizens State Bank Pays 
A 3!Per Cent Dividend 



The Citizens -State Bank of this 
cityv in * process of liquidation paid 
another three per cent dividend this 
week. This! makes a total of 23, per 
cent realized by the depositors of this 
institution which was closed January 
5th, 1924. A total of $18,000 was 
ment. ■ ' 



Soo Cafe Basement 
Entered, Beer Stolen 

The Soo Cafe basement was burg- 
larized' about 1 A. M., Sunday morn- 
ing, entrance being gained by break- 
ing a lock on.. trie basement door. A 
case of beer was stolen. 

Bennie Dahl was taken into custody 
about fifteen minutes later by Chief 
Stenberg and Patrolman Knadle and 
charged with tr/e crime. He was ar- 
raigned before 'Municipal Judge Tar- 
rant Monday afternoon and* waived 
examination.' He was bound over to 
the district court on $500 bail. . 

K.K. SOLBERG HITS 
BOTH OLD PARTIES 
WITH SAME BRICK 



Fire took the life of little Dale 
Borchert, three year old son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis Borchert at about 6 o'clock 
on Tuesday evening while playing in 
the family car in front of. the Borchert 
home at 704 Knight Avenue North. 

The origin of the fire is unknown, 
but ti is supposed that Dale was play- 
ing with matches or that the fire was 
coused by a short circuit in the car. 
Mr; Borchert discovered the fire, and 
triec 1 to open the car door but couldn't 
get near it due to the intense heat and 
iiames. A .garden hose wa? turned on 
the car, putting out some of the blaze, 
after which the boy was removed by 
Earl Severson and Meis Von Schlosser. 
The little body was burned (beyond re- 
cognition and was lying on the flooi 
of the Jimndau with the feet on the 
seat ctighiohs. The fire department ar- 
rived* to extinguish the , remaining 
flames. The upholstering and interior 
of the car was burned . and„ the wind- 
shield had also melted from the intense 
heat. ' i ' • 

Dale Borchert was born May 8, 
1931 in this city, Services l were held 
this afternoon from the Larson Funer- 
al Home with Rev. E. A. Cooke officiat" 
ing. Interment was made in Green- 
wood cemetary. i 

Marguerite Dahle and 
Norma Anderson Win 
Breadbaking Honors 

The first two winners of the Bread 
Baking Achievement Day of the Pen- 
nigton County 4-H clubs which took 
place Tuesday, July 24 at the high 
school, were Marguerite Dahle of the 
St. Hilaire club, and Norma Anderson 
of Bray. Each of the girls will re- 
ceive trips to the State Fair in Sept- 
ember. The two alternates are 
Evelyn Nelson of Hazel, and' Martha 
Anderson ,of the Silverton club. Mrs. 
Martin Finstad judged j£he contest. 

The demonstration teams competed 
for trips Ito Crookston on: this day 

„i„„ £*■, j xt i j j t -it • i Kei« hcliuii uii burnt: uuis iuu<. vvumu 

Wo-" J"S£2i I land rf*S? H ha w A, " : otherwise have died on the d-esk, she 
berg of Hazel showed "How to Place, ^.-j . '- 

a, Pattern on the Material Most Eco-j 1, . ' ' ■„ ' 

nomicaHy;? Mary Jane Johnson and ' , Mr .' S? lber f? wno ?s. we11 known to 
Mayme' Anderson also of Hazel, d«e- ITluef Rlver Falls audiences, discuss- 

*_:__!._* „ m . ~ .. ~ . „ .. , e( j the present financial and- economic 

situation in his usual forceful manner. 
He scored the destruction __ of ■ food 
while people, have been crying for 
bread, and' asserted that the cry of 
communism ; directed against the 
Farmer-Labor party is false. Com- 
munism is being Jared and fostered 
by the present 'economic chaos,- he 
stated' and this chaos is the result of 
50 years of republican and democrat- 
tic misrule. 

The- old gang politicians are so anx- 
ious to keep control of the lawmak- 
ing bodies 1 of the state that they, are 
willing to : sacrifice their parties.and 
their candidates in order to do so, he 
stated. Therefore this talk of fusion. 
This isn't Harris,' nor Solberg*s, nor 
Floyd Olson's fight, he said, this is 
your fight. It is a fight by the com- 
mon people to regain control^ their 
government by lawful and peaceful 
means, at the ballot box. 

He lauded 1 ■ the railroad brother- 
hoods for their efforts in behalf of all 
progressive legislation. They -have 
always assisted the farmers in put- 
ting thru legislation to benefit the 
farmers, he said. As a member of 
the brotherhoods legislation board 
Mr. Harris the Farmer-Labor en- 
dorsed candidate for the senate from 
this district, has done invaluable 
work in behalf of the farmers and 
r ^ k ^. rs - . H e. urged. the election' of- 

m; r? *t, t> , ^ ^"s8l X P ar ^ s an , d P aid a nn( * tribute to 

Miss Esther Bennes and Harriet Sfenator Lauri E. Naplin and tS 
Morgan left Tuesday for Chicago. • splendid work she has done as a mem- 
ber of the uper house. 



Laud Senator L. Naplin and Urges 

Election of Paul A. Harris 

In! Saturday Talk. 

It was announced at, the meeting 
of. the Farmer-Labor club last Fri- 
day evening that Lieutenant -■' Gover- 
nor K. K. Solberg would be in the 
city on Saturday evening enroute to 
the Old' Mill Site where he spoke on 
Sunday. A short-notice meeting was 
therefore arranged and . advertised 
with handbills for a speech by the 
Lieutenant Governor at < the court 
house on Saturday evening. 
-' Mr. Solberg was introduced by 
Senator Naplin who paid her respects 
to Mr. Soblerg and his predecessor in 
the Lieutenant Governor's chair,' Mjr. 
Arens as being very capable. and fair- 
minded presiding • officers. Although 
they have no vote in the senate and 
were shorn of the committee ap- 
pointive powers- they .were able to 
give the liberal minority in the sen- 
ate a fair break when it came to 
getting their bills before that body on 
the closing night of the session and 
that consequently it was possible, to 
get , action oil some bills that would 



WATER&SEfER 
MAIN ^TENSION 

Appropriation of $100 and Free 
Current During the Fair 
Voted Ag. Ass'n ' 



monstrated "The Daily Care of Cloth- 
ing." Both of these teams .will go 
to Crookston. Avis Fellman and 
Marguerite Dahle gave an exhibition 
bread , demonstration while Ina -and 
Martha: Anderson of Silverton and 
Naomi Johnson and Edna Prestby of 
Hazel, competed for county honors 
The Hazel te-m will go to Crooks'tor 
ot compete in the subciistrict contest 
which will be held August 7th at the 
Northwest School. ! 



Close Contests Rules 
In Tennis Semifina ? s 

The only remaining matches in the 
semi-finals of the city tennis tourna- 
ment will be played this week between 
Marvin Benson and Tom Rowan in the 
first and second brackets, and between 
Lincoln Arnold and George Aanstad 
in the third and fourth brackets. Th( 
games in the semi-finals have all beer 
very closely contested, according tc 
Art Johnson, manager. He -has ' an- 
nounced that the final match to be 
played Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock 
at the Lincoln high school courts will 
be a close match and interesting to 
watch because the men are very eve: 
ly ranked in their tennis- playing abil- 
ity. 



Br Pan Bjorkman "Celebrates" 25 Years 
|^ jh Mojlel Laundry "Working as Usual" 



The Model Steam Laundry, owned 
and operated by B. 'Dan Bjork- 
man, passed the ouarter century of its 
establishment on Thursday, July 19th. 
When Mr. Bjorkman assumed the 
laundry business, two washmachines 
composed the entire equipment. From 
such a small beginning, Mr: Bjorkman 
has built up a large business, which 
proves the old adage, that "big oaks 
from little acorns grow.'V In 1930, an 
addition was built to the building 
, much improvement and remodeling 
was done, and various new devices and 
equipment was installed. None of the 
the original machinery remains. 

To quote Mr. Bjorkman, ' he cele- 
brated the occasion by " working las 
usual." His son, Lawrence, entered in- 
to business with him on June. 1st, 1924. 

Auxiliary Drum Corps to 
Appe ar at R oseau Fair 

The Thief Kiver Falls American 
Legion Auxiliary durm corps is to 
appear at the Eoseau County Fair 
at Roseau on, Friday, July. 27th, at 
7:30 P. M. The corps will also play 
at the State American Legion ' con- 



Irma Fredericks is Given 
Three More NRS Offices 

Miss Irma Fredericks, manager of 
the women's employment division of 
District No. 1. with offices in this city 
has been assigned three additional 
districts under the National Reem- 
ployment Service by Dreng Bjornaraa 
state director ■ of the NRS, which will 
melius thirty^three counties with dis- 
trict offices at Fergus Falls, Bemidji 
and Montevido, besides the office in 
this city. - Miss Fredericks will be- 
gin her new work next week begin- 
ning in Fergus Falls, continuing or 
to Mankato and Bemidji, and back to 
Thief River Falls. 

School Board Calls for Bids 
on New Boiler for Lincoln 

The board of education of Sohoo' 
District 18 has 1 announced that bids brj 
a steam heating, boiler of 100 to 12E 
horsepower capacity will be opened 
on August 6 at 7:30 P. M. Tins will 
replace one_of the old boilers in the 



Two resolutions providing for ex- 
tensions of the water and sewer ser- 
vice of the city were passed by the 
city council at its meeting Tuesday 
evening. The first provides for ex- 
tending the mains .on ' Second street 
from State avenue .west to the home 
of Albert S. Swanson and the second 
for construction of one block or 
Markley avenue between James and 
Nora Streets. 

An abatement in taxes was grant- 
ed to R. H. Foss reducing his pay- 
ment from $42.62 to $25.00. Two 
small building projects were approv- 
ed and Olson and Kolden were paid 
their contract price for sidewalk con- 
struction to the amount of $510, 

A resolution approving for pay- 
ment of the balance of $1,000.00 dm 
Bert Norby on contract for the con- 
struction of the new 'auditorium was 
held up on reeomendation of Alder- 
man Jung, until certain alterations o: 
adjustments on the building is made 
to the satisfaction of the building 
committee. 

An appropriation of $100 war 
made to: the 'county fair and it was 
agreed that all current bp furnished 
to the agricultureal society free dur- 
ing the exposition. ' 

10,000 PEOPLE 
HEAR OLSON AT 
OLD MILL SUN. 

Chief Executive Thrills. Throng 

With Oration on Economic 

Philosophy 

A crowd, estimated, at from ten to 
twelve thousand people, jammed the 
Old Mill Site 13 miles west of new- 
f olden Sunday to hear Governor Floyd 
B. Olson and other. Farmer-Labor 
speakers. The rally which was easily 
the largest ever held in Northwestern 
Minnesota was favored, with an ideal 
day and the great throng of people ap> 1 
parentyenjoyed'jthe outing. tbjie. ful- 
lest; Two aeroplanes, were at .the 
grounds and .did a fine business as HiH 
an athletic show^and several refresh- 
ment stands. Young folks were enjoy- 
ing bathing facilities provided by the 
river which winds thru the, site and 
hundreds of picnic parties occupied the 
groves which dot the eighty acre tract. 
The governor-was delayed by a tire 
blowout which occured near Warren, 
and which might easily have brought 
the occupants of .his car to a tragic 
end, as they were travelling' at between 
70 and 80 miles an hour -when it -hap- 
pened. However the governor's Chauf. 
feur was able to bring the car to a stor 
without upsetting' ■andVihe -*tjre ,wae 
changed. The governor 'proceeded' tc 
Hallock first where he addressed 
large gathering and arrived at the 
Old Mill Site at about 4:46. He was 
introduced by Richard Rice of Alvar- 
ado, Farmer-Labor candidate for state 
sentaor from the 67th district. . 

Following are some of the highlights 
of the governor's speech: 

Referring to the Declaration of In- 
dependence, wherein it states, "W< 
hold these truths to be self evident; 
that all men are created equal and are 
endowed by their Creator with cer- 
tain unalinenable rights: That among 
these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursui 
of happiness." he said: "I.tpke it thai 
this referrence to "Pursuit" does not 
only mean we should have a right to 
chase it but. also to enjoy happiness ir. 
some measure. And the first requisite 
if we are to enjoy happiness is to have 
some measure of security: security of 
home; security from want; and secur- 
ity of life and liberty." 

"It seems to me that the functions of 
government must Tie not only to act as 
a policeman who stands about swing- 
ing his club, but as an instrumenta- 
lity-thru which the<geoftle.may«hjov. 
the fullest extent life, liberty andpur- 
suit of happiness. ■ ' . - 

"If I were well enough versed in 
theology I believe that I should be able 
to preach a sermon wherein I could ex- 
pound the principles of the farmer- 



PTA Girls Projects 
Gets Big Response 

A large registration gives evidence 
to the wide-spresd interest (being 
shown among the -girls [of the city 
concerning the project j sponsored by 
the: Parents'-Teacnersj !■ association, 
which project includes]- 'such recrea- 
tional activities " as ■ dramatics; arts 
and crafts, and. sports. '].; 
' Miss Harriet Helquist, director of 
the activity has announced the fol- 
lowing group schedules! for the sport 
events: - .- ir 

Group One Schedule: H 

Monday; Kittenball I 3 P. M. 

Tuesday, Swimming | ;3 to 4 P. M. 

Thurs. Hiking 3 P. M.' and 7 P. M. 

for overnight-hikes, j i 

Friday, Bicycling from 2:30 P. M. 
Group Two Schedule:-'! ! <■ 

Mon. Kittenball ! I 3 P. M. 

-Tues. Swimming 4 P.lM. to 6 P. M. 
j Wed. Tennis 3:iJ0 P. Ml to 6:30 P. M 

Thurs. Hiking 3 P. M.j and 7 P. M. 
• .for overnight hikes. \ \ 
: Sat. Bicycling from 2:30 P. M.' 
.^Miss Helquist has; announced that 
if any- of the older girls, !who are per- 
haps employed during :the day, may 
wish to take advantage of this oppor- 
tunity, they should calll 664, or gel 
in touch with her immediately. 

Roy Ericson is Delegate 
to Am. Legion Convention 

Roy L. Ericson, Post{ .Commander 
of the Elmer J. .fcickluncf Post of the 
American Legion, will 'represent the 
local post at the state American 
Legion convention to; be! held in Du- 
lutn the early part of iAugust. The' 
next regular meeting! of the post. will 
be Friday, evening in the club rooms 
in the auditorium basement. 



Pennington County Fair 
Opens Tuesday, July 31 



I HAS CHAEGE OF NEW GIRLS' 
I RECREATIONAL PROJECT 



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MISS HARRIET HELQUIST 



F-L PAPERS FORM 
NEWPRESSGROUP 



Splendid Agricultural Exhibits 

Will Feature 33rd Annual 

Exposition 

EXCELLENT FREE ACTS 



Wednesday is Designated Thief 

River Falls Day. Business 

Houses Will. Close 



Joint Postal Convention to 
Be Held Here Next Year 

; The 1935 annual state joint 
postal convention of the Minne- 
sota Federation of Ijost Office 
(Jlerks; Minnesota! Association 
of Letter .Carriers land! the Min- 
nesota Federation of 'Rural -Let- 
ter Carriers will be held. In this 
'•■' city August 9th and ! iOth 19B6, 
according to annouhcement'made 
by focal members bfjthe union's 
this week. f: ; ! 

This year 'the convention was" 
held ot Mankato on j July 20th and 
21st, Christine Gief er, 1 . Clarence 
Knudson and Fred'Protz being 

' delegates from this: city. Approx- 
jimatelT; '300 delegates 1 from all 

- Tparta. -o£ ;: tl£e-' state] attended, -re- 
presenting almost' every first and 
second class 'post j office in the 
stated 



Date Set for Rocksbury 
Political Rally m August 

The political . rally -junder the aus- 
pices of the Rocksbury i Community 
Olub is set for August 26, at Valhall 
hall, when speakers .'from the. three 
major political parties will be given 
from 4u to 45 minutes- each to defend 
their party candidates and. political 
Platform as it wilUeflfec't the 'aver- 
age citizen . of our country. Further 
announcement as to speakers and ar- 
rangements will be given in a later 
issue of the paper. j : ! 



Smiley Community Club 
Will Meet |at I Valhalla 



On Friday, July 27, ;the regular 
meeting of tie Smiley j ! Community 
Club will be held it ; Vallhall in 
Rocksbury. The articles of incorpora- 
tion of - the Smiley Community Club 
will be read, at this meeting, and it h 
of utmost importance that all club 
memoers attend. \ l\ ■ 



Writers Dedicate Selves 
'Disseminating Truth,' 
Leaders State 



To 



Twenty Farmer-Labor newspaper 
editors from all parts of Minnesota 
gathered. at. St. Paul last Friday, 
where they. perfected organization of 
a new press group, the North Star 
Press association. ' 

Dedicating its .organization to the 
purpose of : enlightening voters on 
Minnesota* regarding the principals of 
Farmer-Labor government, the group 
elected as president John H. Woebke, 
editor of the New Ulm . JReview. 
Other officers named were Frank 
Muii-head, editor of ' the Hastings 
Gazette,, vice . president; E. E. Far- 
ham,, editor of the Independent Press, 
Madison Minn., secretary; and' C. E. 
-Mills .v of the Montevideo American, 
treasurer. ■ ■' v - " 

In an effort to knit the organization 
*:iuj>eiy- -togmner, It was decided to 
name an executive committee of nine 
editors, one from each congressional 
uiscrict. Kegular supervisee editori- 
al material will be prepared by as- 
sociation members, it was stated. 
"in a. fight -for -the common people 
against the -special interests." 
^ Ohiqial . tabuia.tioji at the organiza- 
tion meeting showed a total, of 34 
papers in the- .state at the' present 
tiine which' are esopusing the Farmer- 
Labor cause. ' In acxlition? officers es- 
timated, more 1 than 30 other papers 
are classified .as -"favorable" publica- 
tions, dQihg£iouch ; . "to bring the 
truth before- tiiei-'p^ople, but who are 
of other. political, beliefs as well." 

"There .is- a grooving realization," 
association spokesmen stated, "that 
the burden of disseminating truth 
rests with the newspaper- fraternity." 

Fred C. Proehl Takes Over 
Work in Citizens State Bank 



labor party and take as my text .. 
Am My Brother's Keeper." 

"The functions of- government must 
be to protect the weak against the 
strong and against the greedy. 

. The results of these studies con- 
vinces me that we have no overproduc- 
tion of things that we need altho there 
is an overproduction of things that we 
are able to buy with the puithasing 
power that we have. The only com- 
modity of which there is more then 
we^need in the United States is wheat, 
and cotton, m other commodities, altho 
there is more than we, can buy, there 
is nofrasniuch as we need^if each per 
son should eat an egg a day we would 



Sale of Creamery Building 
to be Discussed at Another 
Meeting to be Held Aug. 3 

Action taken on the sale of the 
Farmer's Cooperative 'Creamery 
at a meeting on July 6; has been 
held to-be j unconstitutional be- 
cause the notice galling for the rf 
meeting of the sjo'ckholders did , 

.not state the purpose of, the meet- - 
.ing, and so another | meeting bAg " 
been set August 3rd".] ' ' 

A group of stockholders in the - 

■ creamery, who opposed. the sale of 
the creamery building, offer a 
statement of their position^ and 
reasons for their opposition to the 
sale in thePublic Rostrum column 
in this ' issue of the iForum. 



Fred C. Proehl succeded W. N. 
Morell, Jr. as receiver for the Citizens 
State Dank and Farmers and Mer- 
chants bank iri this city and banks in 
Newfolden, Viking, Grygla, and Plum- 1 M. Howalt, 
mer on Monday of this week, | also spoke. 



The 33rd annual Pennington Coun- 
ty Fair will open in Thief River Falls 
enxt Tuesday, July 31, to continue for 
four days. The agricultural exhibits 
are expected to be the best in recent 
years, dme to the favorable crop con- 
ditions in this vicinity. Large en- 
tries are also expected in the vari- 
ous other departments. An outstand- 
ing grandstand program will feature 
Al and Cleora Miller's "All Ameri- 
can Frolics of 1934," various vaude- 
ville acts, and horse racing. The 
United Shows of America will pre^- 
sent the midway attractions. 

Wednesday has been designated as 
Thief River Falls day, and most of 
the business places will be closed 
during the fternoon. A special event 
on the afternoon program vill be 
the appearance of the Thief River 
Falls American Legion Auxiliary 
drum corps which will p-rform. 
There will be grandstand en,£rtain- 
ment and the 2:24 stake pace will be 
run with a prize of ?200 offered. 

On Thursaay afternoon there will 
be a parade of fancy livestcck in 
front of the grandstand, showing the 
possibilities of livestock production 
in the Northwest. Races on Thurs- 
day include the 2:24 stake trot with a 
prize of $200; and the 2:16 or 2:18 
pace with ?175 in prize mone<r. 

There will be a ' free-for-aU race 
with a purse of ?175 on Friday. Ap- 
proximately 24' of the fastest race 
horses in this section of the country 
will run in these races. 

Al and Cleora Miller's All Ameri- 
can Frolics of 1934" will be featured 
on the grandstand programs all four 
days of the fair, and will present a 
ladies' band and' a ballet of beauti- 
ful girls. Vaudeville acts will fea- 
ture Tarzan, the human ape; the four 
lantanos in a high aerial act; Miss 
Alice Raleigh, girl whistler; iUtinge 
and Vernon in an acrobatic adagio 

SJctSS. many other featoe •*-. 

. In charge of the various exhibition- 
departments are: S. E. Hunt, live- 
stock department; Hans Antom ag- 
ricultural department; Olaf Nesefc. 
poultry department; women's" d<£ 
Partment, headed by Mrs. Herbert 
fuller and Mrs. Mary Shaw; culin- 
| ry '« M K- J" R ^derson and' Mrs. 
»; O-Myhrum; fancy needle work, 
Mrs. Mary Shaw; practical depart- 
ment, Mrs. O. H. Bessler; flower de- 
partment, Mrs. J. A. Wassgren and 
Mrs. J. B. Robinson, art, Mrs. John 
Cronkhite; educational exhibits; Supt. 
Morris' Bye, and County Superinten- 
dent A. C. Matheson- — J • " ' ' 



. and 4-H club 
County Agent R. 1^ 



department, 
Douglass. 

Admission fees for adults will be 
low, and children under 12 will be ad- 
mitted free. Prizes will be awarded 
m front of the grandstand each after- 
noon beginning Wednesday. 

John Brandt Addresses 
Co-op. Picnic at Grygla 

A large gathering of people attend- 
ed the Northwestern Group Coopera- 
tive picnic at Grygla last ■ Sunday. 
John Brandt, president of the Land 
O. Lakes creameries, gave .an impres- 
sive and well-received address, and A. 
tt ,. co-operative specialist. 



Distritt Court Holds St. Lukes Hospital 
Tax-Exempt in Decision Handed Down Wed. 



Dillinger is Shot to 
Death' in Chicago 



"Public Enemy One", i John Dillinger, 
■was. shot and killed by three bullets 
from federal guns on Sunday evening 
upon leaving a small Chicago theater^ 

t ^ + -. -66 » ««? we wouia in the company of two women. Instru- 

E™ i,» l" ™ 5836 our poultry produc- mental in the death of the Indiana 
iL? y 1 R1S £K?V. outlaw was a "girl in red", Mrs. An- 

Sm Mill Site the governor I n* Sage. Supposedly one of his sweet- 



vention at Duluth the first part of Lincoln high ■ school' building The 
August. I . board is also readvertising for bids 

on the winter's coal supply to be 
opened' at the, regular meeting . on 
August 13, aaj the O'Hara Fuel and 
Ice Company Jhas withdrawn its bid' 
due to an error in figures,- 



: Miss Margaret Wiener is 'visiting 
with her brother »nd> isister-in-law, 
Mr. and Mrs. William Wiener at 
Crookston, 



went to. Tabor where he addressed a 
dedication of the new Community Hall. 
Other- speakers on the program 
were,. Lieutenant Governor K. K 
Solberg, Judges of the District Court 
M ^ A t. Bl S ttland and James E.Monte- 
SS&* i - ETan ^' f armer-labor can- 
■SS? 6 ^fB"»Mrta«ve from Mar- 

M? (M 1 ^! V f2 e ^ Ne,son of Roseau 
Mr. Ohlquist of Badger, Richard Rice 

cfty^ ' and E - M- Aalbu of this 



"Sais 



hearts who torn between the. conflicting 



emotions of loyalty to 
had supported her on' 
iand lust. for money- on 



the man. who 
the one band, 
the other, led 



him into a trap that cost his life. 

Other public enemies such as In^ull,- 
Mitchell, and' E. W. Decker are still 
at 'arge atcordin^.to the last repo»t3^ 



Miss Charlotte Mcannany and Chas. 
Dablow mottored to "'Bfei'f Lake Nar- 
rows on Sunday and spintfthe day. 



Judge M. A. Brattland handed 
dbwn a d'eci3 ; .')-i tl'is iveek, in the case 
of the County of Pennington vs the 
S-'- ff*l^* Hp#it^l Association, rela- 
tivelto^ersiJrnil^Jnroperty taxes claim- 
ed to be- due? the county. 

Covmty attorney Paul A. Lundgren. 
appearing for, the county asserted 
that the hospital was to be exempted 
from taxation in return for the main- 
tainance of a charity ward, or in lieu 
of a special ward for charity cases . 
would accept charity cases without 
discrimination. In his brief filed with 
the court he state: "It is the conten- 
tion of the plaintiff that if the cor- 
porate set-up of the St. Lukes Hospi- 
tal association is stripped of all fads 
and frills, the -situation exposes itself^ 
as one 'whereby the Bratrud Clinic' 
controls th e u^tra l ions of the hospital 
and. receives a. real pecuniary advant- 
age -therefrom, leaving however, the 
legal tielt in- an institution which 
claims to be. a. tax-exempt institu- 
tion."! Further plaintiff states " — Al! 
patients who have been received at 
the hospital have been charged the 
regular rates of the hospital except- 
ing .those who were public charge: 
upon the city, county, or townships 
who have, by contract with the muni- 
cipal subdivisions received a special 
ratei" ... . . , 

In conclusion plaintiff states that 
theiSt. Luke^ Hospital Association is 
not owning and using the property in 
a' manner contemplated by the consti- 
tutional exemption provision." ' 

In holding that the property is in- 
deed include I uldcr the coiutitntion&i 
exemption provision the court states; 






"The personal property of the assoc- 
iation upon which the taxes for 1981 
and 1932 were levied, were acquired 
by direct purchase and by donation 
from the Bratrud Clinic. "The court 
further states that the membership in 
Jne hospital association consists of 
ninety-five persons none of whom en- 
joy special advantages nor preference. 
"The medical staff of the hospital," 
the court stay," consists of all doc- 
tors who take care of patients in the 
hospital and who have on. application 
been admitted to practice in the hospi) 
tal; such admission being subject to " 
the control of the Chief of Staff, Dr. 
Edward Bratrud. The facilities of tha 
hospital has beenr-at the service of 
outside doctors who bring their pat- 
ients to the hospital upon the same 
terms and conditions. There is no evi- 
dence that discrimination has- been 
ttons f^ ? passing- updn appS 
no,n;i-M admissl ons to practice in the 
would Lv d an y. 3 howing of that kind 
Si 1 ™ an important bearine 

a£ ^a"*? tion . of the p uWi <= <*«> 

SS™'i. f - e hos P ita l and whetherthe 
hospital is operated for thq exclusive 
Print .of the -Bratrud Clinic!" '™ 

.m? ^ on . clu3 .'°n "the, court states- 
"The court cannot find that th? mI 
rangements between the HoVpitol I£ 
sociation and, the Bratrud atiteJte, 
EE£ r the Purec5e of assSgttl 
m. t° T pe a tex Justly dueT" 



; an appeal 



■faq;J& 



mi 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 










THIEP SIVSR FAU3 gOatn^.taiEP mVBft-gAIJfl. ;MQWfi30'TA. raWRgbAY, JULV 66, ISM ~~ 



JOHN DItLINOER 



J 



Outlaw j.Is Killed as He Leaves 
Small Chicago Movie ; 
I House. ; 



the 
reached 
for the 
Dilllnger 
Not a v 
law. ran 
Dilllnger 
gave 
into his 
The end 



Chicago — John Dillinger, 32, ! arch 
criminal,) was shot dead by a group 
of department of justice operatives as 
he walked out of a Chicago movie 
treater. He whipped an automatic re- 
volver out of his pocket and had it 
half raised when the operatives loosed 
a withering Mast of revolver fire that 
dropped !him. He died a few minutes 
after. 

Fifteen operatives had surrounded 
theater, after information had 
M. H. Purvis, Chicago; agent 
department of jastice, that 
would .attend the theater, 
ord was spoken a? the out- 
into the cordon c" officers, 
knew what was ccming. He 
mnted look, reached quickly 
pocket, and the gurc roared 
of the greatest manhunt In 
contemporary crimnal annals came in 
the swift tempo in which tne notori- 
ous 'outliw had lived ! 

The federal men.watcheo him buy 
his ticket, and then for more than two 
hours, the longest two hours ever 
spent, according to Purvis, they kept 
the theater surrounded. 

It was late Saturday when under- 
cover Information was received that 
Dillingef would attend the movie, 
"Manhattan Melodrama", at the Bio- 
graphy theater Purvis hurriedly made 
arrangements to surround the theater 
with picked men from among investt- 
They were armed only with 
No shotguns, or machine guns 
were Issued, for he wished no general 
firing that might endanger passers- 
by ; 

Dilllnger was shot through the back 
of the neck, the bullet coming out un- 
right eye, and another bullet 
through his left breast The 
ould not have killed aim. The 
bullet through the neck being fatal. 
At the pook county morgue, attempts 
were made to identify Dillinger by his 
fingerprint, but the ends of his [fingers 
were scarred apparently having been 
treated with acid. Purvis had defin- 
itely identified him before the body 
was! taken to the morgue. Dillinger's 
hair was dyed coal black and cut 
very shcrt. His eyebrows appeared 
to have been plucked to a 3ne line. 
He. had! a small black moustache, and 
the j scar on 'he left side, of his face 
had' been removed without a trace by 
a clever bit of plastic surgery. 



FAT CATTLE PRICES 
DESPITE REDORD SLAUGHTER 

In face of record- bovine slaughter- 
ing', fat cattle prices are holding. -up 
unusually well the weekly .-market 
bulletin, issued by the Central .= - Col- 
operative Association of South' St. 
Paul. Fed steers are selling- at prices 
from $1.50 to $2.00 per cwti above a 
year ago: Yet an unparalldcV slaugh- 
tering of . cattle has taken place,, dur- 
ing the last six months and ." "paritr 
cularly during the past month." 

June slaughter of cattle in the 
United States was the largest on .re- 
cord, totaling 931,970, or 180^855 head 
more than a year ago, according to 
reports from all federally-inspected 
packing plants of the country.- : " 

For the first six months, this year, 
4,880,463 cattle were slaughtered in 
the United States, this being the 
largest slaughter on record for that 
period except in 1918. The corres- 
ponding total for 1918 was 4,991,287 
head. Last year the six-month total 
slaughter was 3,882,770 and- the-' five- 
year average slaughter for the per- 
iod was 3,868,015. 

Calf slaughter in June also estab- 
lished' new all time record at 601,- 
332 head, dr 160,151 head-more than 
slaughtered in June last year." Like- 
wise, the six month calf slaughter at 
3,169,620 head set a new record for 
the period. """■' 

Heavy slaughter is attributed " in 
part to government purchases .. in 
drouth areas, but it must' "be - re- 
membered that the cattle population 
of the country has been at its peak, 
during the past year and" that conse- 
quently slaughtering naturally has 
i been large. 







ITALIAN GIRL£ HUNT- ; 



gators, 
pistols. 



derjthe 
crashed 
latter w 



U. S. Pushes Plan in Tree planting 
Washington — Government forest 
service | officials are pushing ahead 
with plans to carry out President 
Roosevelt's program for bisecting 
thej. country with a lOO-aiile-wlde 
swath of trees from Canada :to the 
gulf! ln| an effort to modify climatic 
and other agricultural conditions In 
thejdroutlh area. The first step, they 
said, now that the President has au- 
thorize^ the Immediate expendture 
of 310,000,000 to: get the work under 
v/ajj, will be to perfect an organiza- 
tion. {Necessary land then will be 

obtained. — . 

26 [Governors Invited to Rochester 
Rochester; Slinn. — Preparing to 
greet President Roosevelt on his visit 
here August 8 to honor Dr. William 
J. andj Dr. -Charles H. Mayo, world 
famous surgeons, the William T. Mc- 
Coy post c_f the American Legion has 
obtained a fund ef §4.000 from the 
Rochester city council to finance the. 
program. Invitatons have been sent 
to governors and senators of; 26 Mis- 
sissippi valley states, and officials of 
American Medical association. 



Mbre : of '^Minnesota's last allotment' 
ot'r. "federal highway funds went for 
concrete ;paying than any other pur- 
pose except grading, according to an 
announcement by the state highway 
department. A revised check-up of 
the ^distribution of the $10,656,000 
gjveii Minnesota for the 1938-34 season 
shows" 47 miles paved' with concrete 
at a : cbst'of$l,594 l 000. Of this, about 
7. miles-was .40 feet wide instead of 
having -the : " standard 20-foot width. 

The department laid 13 miles of as 
phalt paving' in the Twin Cities at 
a cost of $731,000. All of this was 
40 feet or more in width. Bitumin- 
ous"/- treatment of various types was 
placed on 132 miles of roads at 
cost- of. $450,000. 

IDEAL TIME TO DIP»P 
IS W HEN WOOL iS^HORT 

.Dip the sheep right now, white the 
wool. is short and the weather warm 
urges. P. A. Anderson, sheep special- 
ist -of the University Farm divis: 
of animal, husbandry. Dipping is 
especially; important in flocks where 
tfckS were found at shearing time. 
EYeh if no ticks can be seen now on 
the shorn sheep, they are undoubted- 
ly present on the lambs from which 
they will spread to the entire flock 
before winter. Furthermore, if bad- 
ly' infested', the lambs will not make 
proper gains. 

The dipping of sheep to avoid un- 
thriftiness ond the loss of wool by 
the constant irritation of the sheep 
tick -and louse should be an annual 
event, and would be if the loss of 

wool and feed were considered 

dollars and'- cents. There are many 
types of sheep dips on the market. 
Only the. best should be purchased. 
Unless one "of the standard dips is 
used, a trial solution should be made 
up .to show the strength of the dip 
needed-. - )( 

Important points to consider about 
dipping sheep include: (1) Keep sheep 
in yard the night befoiu; (Z) Select 
a bright dav and" start dipping early 
so sheep will dry off before evening; 
(3) ; Use soft water or a water soft- 
ener, with hard water as the dip dis- 
solves more": completely in soft water; 
(4) Heat the water to take off the 
chill. Many losses hav e resulted' from 
cold, water^ (5). Keep the dipping so- 
lution well stirred and leave sheep in 
long enpughto destroy the ticks and 
lice; (6) Give the sheep a few hours' 
rest before- driving them to pasture; 
\ij riandle _all sneep careluity when 
dipping,- avoiding all rough rjndling. 
Sheep known to be heavily infested 
should- be dipped again in 12 days, un- 
less a sheep dip of high quality is 
used and the manufacturer maintains 
a second dipping is not necessary, 
says Mr. Anderson. 



MATES IN GO NDOLA^ 

Twelve weddings will be the result 
of a score of girls,: bent on finding 
husbands, riding tjielcannls of Venice 
In heavily befiowered jgondolaa. reviv- 
ing a traditional Venetian marriage 
custom. 

In days of old, the' doges of the city 
believed In matrimony and "more ba- 
bies," Just as Mussolini does today.. Tp 
encourage marriages, the doges used to 
aBSlgn a dowry to 12;glrlB chosen from 
among many candidates. The fortunate 
young women were then paraded 'In a 
richly decorated boat ^through the city 
canals to attract the ■ attention of all 
eligible young men. i The ceremony 
unfailingly occurred on the feast of 
the Purification of the' Virgin. . ± 

The marriage hunt was commem- 
orated every year uninterruptedly from 
944 A. D. until the: Fourteenth century,, 
when Venetian girls became self-con^ 
scions and shy and refused' to- sub-' 
-mlt to the "humiliating" public search 
for a husband; It was then thought to 
replace the girls by •dummies, but the 
attempt proved a failure. 



\% 



Mmi 



\ Beyond Figures 

fNo mathematician," said Hi Rev. the 
aage of ^Chinatown, "has heen ahlv in 
make computations' on the schi'itie of 
things to' show how main ilisu|ipui;it- 
meuta are required to compensate for 
one hope gratlfipd " 



Forum Advertising is bargain news, 



Chinese Stick Together 
The old t.'hfnese custom uf married 
Chinese sons living with rlieir parents 
Is still so general that frequently Ave 
or six irenerutlons and from 150 to 
:iiX) relatives are found living under 
one roof. 




Forum One Dollar Per Year. 



the 



DISILLUSIONED VOTERS 
RE GRET NEW WET LAW 

The repeal wave swept over the 
nation in' 1933 like a king tide. It 
carried dominantly dry states like 
Michigan, Ohio and' Oregon with al 
most the same certainity as welter- 
wet Wisconsin, New York and Con- 
necticut. Prominent personages, who 
had been outstanding dry champions 
were washed from their morrings like 
skiffs in a typhoon. The nation went. 
, wet — soaking, sopping* swimming 
"wet. 

.but, before repeal was six -weeks, 
old oustanding wet leaders "who had 
honestly hoped that repeal would re- 
duce,, if not eliminate, the evils .of. 
drinking and drunkenness publicly 
denounces the measure as. - hopeless 
and* intolerable failure. - - - 

Local option elections- followed in 
April. " Villages and small cities 
which had voted overwhelmingly for 
repeal only a few months before had, 
by that time been so disillusioned and 
disgusted by the results of repea'i 
that they reversed themselves and 
voted- two, four,-, and in some -cases, 
ten to one for local prohibition. 

And now two state-wide votes have 
been taken. The" first was in North 
Dakota. On June 27, six months and 
22 days after repeal, the Flickertail 

state- gave prohibition more' than 25,- Experiments are being conducted 
UU0 majority—^ signal victory in a by. the Minnesota Highway depart- 
primary election with a small total ment and', similar agencies in other 
vote. On July 10 Mississippi gave states which may bring about the 
John Barleycorn a two-to-one knock- widespread use of a new type of low- 
ou t- * 1 cost surface for secondary roads. 

Soil stabilization is what the 



Flowers Bloom in Cold on Coast 

During the height j of the winter's 
cold waves, temperatures on the North 
Sea Island of Foeh'r fell only a few de- 
greea below the freezing point, and 
broom (genista) bloomed. Wild pan- 
sles and other plants also betray no 
effects of cold weather. The Influence 
of the Gulf Stream; Is so strong that 
temperatures on the coast are regu- 
larly two or three! degrees higher than 
even a few hundred; yards farther In- 
land. It' shows itself also on the Is- 
lands ..of Norderney and Heligoland, 
where, roses frequently bloom In win- 
ter. 



Let the Forum advertisements be 
your mail-orcsr catalogue. 



3TICE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN; That a special 
meeting of the Stockholders of the Thief River Falls 
Cooperative Creamery Association will be held in 
Civic & Commerce room, at the new Auditorium in 
the city- of Thief River Falls, Minnesota, on FRI- 
DAY, the 3rd day of August, at 1 o'clock P. M. The 
object and purpose of this special meeting of the 
stockholders will be to consider a sale or trade of 
the creamery building and lots of the association, 
and if so "decided by the stockholders to authorize, 
empower and direct the officers and board of direc- 
tors of the Thief River Falls Cooperative' Creamery 
Ass'n. to sell and convey and transfer the said 
Creamery Building and lots, which property is de- 
scribed as lots one "1", two "2", three "3" and four 
"4" of block thirty-three "33", of the original town- 
site of Thief- River Falls, in Pennington County, 
Minnesota. . 

All stockholders are urged to be present. 

By order and resolution of Board of Directors. 
J. M. THEIGE, Secretary 

Board of Directors 
\ 



STATE TESTS NEW TYPE 
ROAD SURFACE PRODUCT 




Great BMGAINS ln'« 



Though there may be nothing in 
these" rather startling facts upon _?_„-■ -„„it ■ +i.j„ _„ *. ~ «. j i 

which to base a valid conclusion, tfiat ^T?/™J h,,Tn° reC £ nt deVel ? P 
che people of . the United States de- "JSJ \r ~»^»1 ^ % 7 ? f c ' en " nc 
nrnnd a return of the 18th Amend- | ""»"£ "f.flf™ 1 ? r B , and wlt h.-%y, 
ment, there is sound basis for the be- I and the <">**"»» of calcium 
iief that the tide of public sentiment 



chloride 
similar chemical agent, the en- 

swin B in S sharply, rapieiy and pre-. «*£«• ^sTstlnardTuISI 



ponderantly back to the support of >=!»«". ™™. ^mi-nara sunaces 
V* n-.c,Jure to outlaw the^ liquox | ££HVj[£, ™£™*\±*^ J^ 



traffic. 1* 

If the wets ignore that conclusion 
it will ' be to their sorrow. If . the 
Urys fail to act immediately upon 
.heir advantage, it will be . to their 
loss. ' 



Repeal Nets U. S. Quarter Billion 
Washington — With repes.: in effect 
but] sx months, taxes on liquors and 
beer brought the treasury S25S.911,- 
332: In; the fiscal yesr ended June 30. 
This was disclosed with publication 
of figures on internal revenue collec- 
tions, jshowing increases in j all gen- 
eral tax. eatogcries. For the fiscal 
year 1931, income tax collections 
wore | SS1T,02J,339, or $70,233,935 
greatci than the year preceedlng. 

Woridj Wheat Drops 4C0 Million Bu. 
i Y.^asMrgtcn — Reduction j of 400,- 
000^000 bushels in the iworld wheat 
crop for- 1934 as the result of drouth 
"was predicted by the federal bureau 
of. : agricultural economics, j Pfoduc- 
tonkin the. northern hemisphere out- 
side of Russia and China' was expect- 



f\ Though it is true that fish .may 
transmit tapeworms to human beingg, 
;.here is no connection" whatever be* - - - 
„we.en this risk and the ringed, rib- highway No. 



to! be,ab3ut 300.C-20.000 | bushels 
than last year, with the remain- 
100,000,000 bushels deduction be- 
accounted for in -the south 



Month. 



ed 
les: 
ing 
ing 



Corn ILoan Notes Extendsd 

Washington — The agricultural ad- 
justment administration jextended 
from. Aug. 1 to Sept. 1 jthe [maturity 
date_of outstanding notes ot govern- 
ment corn loan borrowers. J Prompt 
settlement will be. asked after Aug. 1,' 
however, ■ on loans secured ; by corn 
which! is in poor condition, or which 
Is stored in inferior cribs. ; 



UBLIC MUCtt CONTUSED 
ABOUT FISH TAPlWORMS 



proved gravel surfaces have also been 
obtained without the use of chemicals. 
■The cost .of stablization being com- 
parative^ low, it may open a new 
era. : of improved* country roads here 
if thep process works out at success- 
fully in Minnesota as it has in some 
oi|ier states, highway engineers as- 
serted. Stabilization work' has been 
retarded this summer by the drouth, 
which resulted in unfavorable condi- 



PURE SILK HOSE 


^^"~\ Full fashioned 


^rv 


49 c 


-^ 


Chiffons and ser- 
vice - weights in 
smart new sum- 
mer shades! S\z~ 
es8%-10%! 


i 





White with Colorful Jackets! Prints! 



Men's Woijk Smpenders 

Policeback. Strongly TLTLc 
inch web. Adjustable. J^ 



tions. 

"The 'first experimental soil stab- 
ilization project of the Minnesota 
Highway department is on- trunk 
22 between Wells and 



bon-like tapeworms so commonly Minnesota Lake in Pairbault county," 
found in the intestines of bass, crap- I saia 'Commissioner N. W. Elsberg. 
_ tes. anJ other game fish, says Dr. .."This .project is nearly eight miles 
\V. A. .Riley, chief of the division : of ! long and is now nearing completion, 
tntomoiogy and economis zoology at Its performance und'ar traffic" will be 
Jruversity farm. The kincof Tape- carefully .studied and its maintenance 
vorms. that infest - humans appear cost will .be checked closely. Other 
jniy in the flesh of fish and are "so stabilization experiments in various 
mall that most people never notice parts of the state are ' under consid- 
them. eration."' ';• " 

he fact that fish harbor .the im- - Engineers have long known that a 
mature stages of the tapeworm which gravel , surf ace is enicient in wet 
develops in man has received much waether, while clay surfaces compacv 



publicity, in Minnesota in recent 
years," says ur. Kiley. : "As a" re- 
sult many inquiries come to the -ex- 




Primed, plain! 



Complete range 
of beautiful col- 
ors—many love- 
ly prints, too. 38 
inches widel 



Gauntlet Work Gloves 

Leather palms with a «a>^»« 
heavycanyasb'ackiBuys! 3Pz& 




Specially Selected — enly 



Here's where you can get all 
the smartly styled summer 
dresses you want! i.larvi_l- 
ous values! Many while 
crepes with bright cotton, 
linen, or contrasting self 
material jackets ! Gay, sum- 
mery prints, loo — trimmed 
with crisp organdy or linen ! 
Sizes for Misses, Women 1 



BOYS' 



into hard, smooth roads when there 
not too much water. By combin- 
ing the. gravel with the clay and aad'- 



periment station. Almost .invariably ' ing calcium chloride to help maintain 
suspicion has been aroused by finding . tne proper moisture content under all 
t liw ribbon-hke tapeworm. Such forms conditions, a road surface is obtained 
are found eveyrwhere in fish and are which should remain smooth and firm 



Crash! Kills Five on' Way tojthe Fair 
Bloomington;. 111. — Five persons on 
their jway to the Worlds fair at Chi- 
cago were killed when the automobile 
In which they were riding; crashed 
Into a truck near Gridley, and turned 
over peveral times. 



Mute Makes Self at Heme In Bed. 
Newberry. S. C— Tom ^Ellison miss- 
ed a nule colt on his farm and start- 
ed a search. The last place le looked 
"^as In the house^ — and there was the 
mule asleep in Ellison's? bed. 

Patronize Forum advertisers 



ways liarmf ul - to man. : • The 
dangerous species is f ound . in . J the 
flesh of fish, in a stage which is ett- 
Lirely different in appearance -from 
-«-'#£=,* tax «£••»• fl -fl«fi^ :•£«:■•« 
cum of an inch in length. It is quite 
dkely to b e overlooked entirely and is 
ltd when the fish is properly cook- 
e d. 

"The ringed, ribbon-like tapeWorms 
so commonly found in the intestine 
of fish are species which have: under- 
went, their young, or larval stage' --in 
;ome other animal, that - has . been 
;aten_by_.the fish. Unlike man,' the 
.ish cannot cook its food "and hence 
.s subject to frequent .infections, 
ihere is no excuse for human cases 
jx tapeworm infection, for they al- 
.vays arise from careless use of raw 
or imperfectly cooked meats or fish." 

Ireland's Two Governments 

Ireland is divided into two separate 
govern in en ts, Northern Ireland and the 
Irish Free State in the south. The 
gateway to southern Ireland IsCohh, 
formerly- known as Queenstowh, a 
busy, bright and cheerfu] 
with a line bay.' —• .)*. 



. both wet and fcy weather. This 
would eliminate from gravel roads 
the -dust nuisance and the heavy loss 
■of material thrown out by cars and 
blown or washed away. It would 
also tend- to decrease maintenance 
expense, as the frequent blading c i 
smoothing required by gravel roads 
■would . not ; be necessary. 

A Robot :. . ■ 
Any mechanical device which dnp*> : 
the"- work; of a tiuinub being may hV 
;s.tyled a robot although it Is niort- 
often' applied to autonJatous" or tne " 
irhanical men, says ""Pathfinder "Mujra 
zlne. This.. word cutue' Into- use aft'ei" 
tlie publication In the United States In, 
1923 of a . piny entitled "UussumV 
|UnI versa! ■ R^lhots. ,, The 1 characters 6t [ 
this play 'were mechanical men and 
women. It 1b pronounced, according, 
to:.. most dietle>narle3." as "ro-hut" — aci ; 
rent" on; the first syllable and first vr 
long although; the New York Theater 
gullet which produced the play, pro- 
nounced it as "rob-Ut" with flrjat o 
shor than d accent also oh the first 




PLAY SUSTS 

Heary denims! 

Famous "Ox- 
hide" brand! 

Bar'-tackt'd 
against strain. 
Drop scat! 2-8. 



Men's Cotton socRs- 



Medium weight. Plain 
colors. Sizes 10 to 12 — 



10* 



BEACH SANDALS 

Women's 

98° 




Air-cooled duck 
uppers. Crepe 
rubber soles; 
heels. Misses', 
child'* niw.jL.ftiw*. 




Tested Quality! "Oxhide' 



Full cut — not skimpedl 



Stronger — because they*re triple- 
stitched! Bar-tacked and reinforced! 
Highest standard 2:20 deniml Built 
to wear and wearl 8 deep pockets 1 
Parva buckles! Boys' sizes, too — 59c. 




Good styles, workmanship in 

Rayon Undies 

that say value in every stitch! 

c 



Vests with picot trim, arm shields, 
non-stretch straps! Bloomers, pan- 
ties, step-in, briefs of light-weight, 
plain-knit rayon! Small to large! 
Children's sizes at I9c! 



C. Penney Co 



PA R I MEN T 



S T 




3 



; 



';-'!-:'>'-;5 ;; 






romp RiyERrFAit& 




SLAIN BY AGENTS 



Outlaw Is Killed as He Leaves 
'* Spiall Chicago; Movie 
House, 



Chicago— John DIUinger, 32, 
criminal,' was shot- dead by a 



of department ol justice operatives as 
he walked out of a Chicago movie 
treater. He whipped an ! automa :Ic re- 
volver out of his pocket and had it 
half raised when the operatives loosed 
a withering blast of revolver fire that 
dropped jhim. He died a few minutes 



, arch 
group 



: after. 

Fifteen operatives had surrounded 
the theater, after information had 

: reached ill. H. Purvis, Chicago argent 
for the i department of jnstice. that 
Dilllnger would attend the theater. 
Not a: word was spoken as the out- 
law ran' into the cordon of ol fleers. 
DIUinger knew what was coining. He 
gave a hunted look, reached quickly 
into his j pocket, and the guns reared. 
The end of the greatest manhunt in 
contemporary cfimnal annals came in 
the swift tempo In which the notori- 
ous outlaw had lived 

The federal men watched him buy 
his ticket, and then. for more th^n two 
hours,, the longest two hours ever 
spent,j according to Purvis, thsy kept 
the theater surrounded. 

It was late Saturday when junder- 

. coyer Information was received that 
Dilllnger would attend the 'movie, 
"Manhattan Melodrama", at the Bio- 
graphy theater Purvis hurriedly made 
arrangements to surround the theater 
with picked men from Among investi- 
gators. | They were armed only with 
pistols. jNb shotguns or machine guns 
were Issued, for he wished no general 
firings that might endanger passers- 

by : j | 

Dilllnger was shot through the back 
of the heck,; the bullet coming out un- 
der the! right eye, and another bullet 
crashed through his^Jeft breast The 
latter would not ha\\ej killed him. The 
bullet through the~nScR being fatal. 
At the Cook county morgue, attempts 
were made to Identify Dilllnger] by his 
fingerprint, but the ends of his 'fingers 
were scarred apparently having been 
treated with acid. Purvis had defin- 
itely identified him before the body 
was taken to the morgue. DilUnger's 
hair was dyed coal black and - cut 
very short. His eyebrows appeared 
to have been plucked to a fine line. 
He had a small black. moustacte, and 
the scar on 'he left side, of Ms face 
had been removed without a trace by 
a clever bit of plastic surgery. 

U. S. Pushes Plan In Tree Planting 
Washington — Government forest 
service! officials are pushing ahead 
with plans to carry out President 
Roosevelt's .program for bisecting 
the h country .with a 100-nr le-wlde 
swath of trees from Canada to the 
gulf inj an effort to modify dlmatlc 
and other : agricultural condit ons in 
the droutlh area. The first st< p, they 
said, now that the President las au- 
thorized the immediate exp jndture 
of 510,000,000 to get the work under 
way, will be to perfect an organiza- 
tion. -Necessary land then will be 
obtained. ■ 



FAT CAnLEPRICES HWP 
DESPITt REOORD SLAUGHTER 

In face of record* bovine' alatfghter- 
ing, fat cattle prices are holding^ Cap 
unusually well the weekly^ ^™-**£*- 
bulletin issued by the Cexri 
operative Association .of ~;Spui 
Paul. Fed steers are selling at-Tprices 
from $1.50 to $2.0_0_ per cwtTjabove a 
year ago. Yet an unparaHeiT3faug6- t 
tering o£ cattle has taken place,., du^r 
ing the last six months andf^pi " 
cutarly during the ', past m'orith^. 

June slaughter of ' cattle : in the 
United States was the largest',birjEe>; 
cord, .totaling 931,970, or 18D;855,. head 
more than a year ago, accaf^nhg, to 
reports from all federaUy^iMpected 
packing plants of the couritryr-^---V- 

For the first six months,, this year; 
4,880,463 cattle were : slaughtered ip 
the United States, this >being th& 
largest slaughter on record for that 
period except in 1918. The: corres- 
ponding 'total for 1918 was" 4,991,287. 
head. Last year the six-month total 
slaughter was 3,882,770 andVithe-'.five- 
year average slaughter for <£he per- 
iod was ;3,868,015. '"' Y-ty^ZZ 

Calf slaughter in June also'.estabW 
lishetf ;new all time record! at- 60t»» 
332 head, or 160,151 head-na<a» : than. 
slaughtered in June last y^ax^La^ 1 
wise, the six month calf slaughter at 
3,169,620 head set a new. record. ior 
the period. :^\ l -"V'-!f:- :r T:' 

Heavy slaughter is attributed" in 
part to ; government purcbasea.-iri 
drouth areas, but it must-'^be;! re- 
membered that the cattle".- population 
of the country has been -at fits pfeak 
during the past year and that conse- 
quently ; slaughtering naturally, has 
been large. ->' 




BjVBft -fi 



ID DISTRIBimOl 




_ .^jr^SC&innesota'a lastvaUotmt^. 
ofefMemE^Iiighway funds -went; -for 
cohcrefigpaying than any' other pufe 
pose "ex^tf grading, according to an 






„=., ;: .j*e 



Chester 
ng to 



28 Governors Invited to Re 

Rochester; Minn.— Prepar; 
greet President Roosevelt on his visit 
here August 8 to honor Dr. William 
J. and j Dr. Charles H. Mayo', world 
famqr.s' surgeons, the William' T. Mc- 
Coy post of the American Legion has 
obtained a fund cf $4,000 from the 
Rochester city council to finance the 
program. Invitatons have been sent 
to governors and senators of 26 Mis- 
sissippi valley states, and officials ol 
the .American Medical association. 



gjyep 'Minnesota for the 1933-84 season 
shows' 47 miles paved with concrete 
afca^Btfo*^l,694,000. Of this; about 
7, miles,-,wasi40 feet wide instead 61 
hjrein^i^; standard 20-foot width.; 
' The department laid 13 miles of as- 
phalt paving in the Twin 1 Cities at 
avebsfcof^ $731,000. All of this was 
40^e"et ibrTvmore; in; width. Bitumin- 
ouBctreatnient of -various types was' 
placed : :on~132 miles of roads at 
cpst;.'of.\?460,<M)0. 

lilL TIMtTO DIR SHEEP 5 
%!Sj « WOQL IS SHORT, 

JJ)ip> theV sheep right, now, while the 
woo^is short and the weather warm 
urgeff;P.:-A, Anderson, sheep special- 
ist;*^* the University Farm division 
of V animal; husbandry. Dipping "is 
peciallyi. important in flocks where 
!kV>were/ found at shearing tinie. 
Eyto if Sticks can be seen now' on 
the : ahorn-Bheep, they are undoubted- 
ly present on the lambs from which 
thejf will .spread to the entire flock 
before winter. Furthermore, if bad- 
ly' infested^ the lambs will not make 
proper gains. 

' The dipping of sheep to. avoid un- 
thriftmess : ond the loss of 'wool by 
the constant irritation of the sheep 
tick -and louse should be an annual 
event, and would be if the loss of 
wool and feed were considered in 
dollars and -cents. There are many 
types^ of sheep dips on the , market. 
Only the -bast should be purchased. 
Unless bhe/"of the standard dips' Vis 
used, a trial'. solution should be made 
uputo ' snow the strength of the dip 
needed'. 

Important points to consider about 
dipping sheep include: (1) Keep sheep 
in yard the night befoxe; (Z) Select 
a .bright, day and v start dipping -early 
so. sheep .will' dry off before evening; 
.(3)-;Vse.soft water or a water soft- 
ener, with, hard water as the dip dis- 
solves, more: completely in soft water; 
(4) Heat, the water to take off the 
chill: Many losses hav e resulted from 
cold, water: .(B) . Keep the dipping so- 
lution: well stirred and leave sheep in 
long enough -to destroy the ticks and 
lice; (6) ; Give the sheep a few hours' 
rest ■befpre-;driving them to pasture; 
vv) jiandle _sll sheep carcfuuy when 
dippmg,- avoiding all rough rjndling. 
Sheep known to be heavily infested 
should' be dipped again in 12 days, un- 
less a sheep dip of high quality. is 
used and the manufacturer maintains 
a second dipping is not necessary, 
says Mr. Anderson. 

STATE TESTS NEW TYPE 
tl SURFACE PRODUCT 

Experiments are being conducted 
by.the Minnesota Highway depart- 
ment r ari(£ similar agencies in other 
„ , - , -- , save States which may bring about the 

John, Barleycorn a two-to-one knock- widespread use of a new type of low- 
0U J;, , , I ,. . i cost surface for secondary roads. 

1 hS°^e* eI s \aS g be fac^ Un upo-S^ S ^ -^™°» is A, the en- 
which to base, a valid Conclusion Xt fe ^^^.^V^ .^ • ?" 
the people of. the United State*. <fe- SSSli «?22i£S ^T* ^J??"?™ 
mand a return of the 18tK Amdnd- I T^L ^J^" 1 ? T* Wlt ^,° 1 ?J' 
ment. there is sound basis for the : be- C »^ltt X™L^='^ ^ " de 
iief that the tide of public sentiment ^„fj^^ °^™'?L 8 - 8en ^ *5 e - e? " 
.s swinging sharply, rapid'iy arid pre- K mce ™ ^%* ««eeded in Producmg 
P ondera B nt.| tacj/to tL support of g^ ^^J^^i^^t 

ome measure to .outlaw the hquor 
traffic. - .■-£.■" 

^f the wets ignore that conclusion. 
i L will be to their sorrow. .' If ; 'the 
drys fail to act immediately "upon 
.heir advantage, it will be .to. their. 
loss. .-':-." .'.- . 






^^^^f^p^^pg^p^ 









aaasgaa 



j-fj-Ar :-*giw^a'» 



■:.%■'■■■ 



DISILLUSIONED VOTERS 
1 R EGRET NEW W ETLflff 

The repeal wave swept oyer the 
nation in' 1933 like a king tide. ' It 
carried dominantly dry states like 
Michigan, Ohio and Oregon 1 with al- 
most the same certainity as welter- 
wet Wisconsin, l^ew .York and- Con- 
necticut. Prominent personages . who 
had been outstanding dry champions 
were washed from their morrings like 
skiffs in a typhoon. The nation went 
wet — soaking, sopping* . swimming 
wet. 

i5ut, before repeal was six woeks 
old oustanding wet leaders "who had 
honestly hoped that repeal would re- 
duce, if not eliminate, the evils .ctf 
drinking- " and drunkenness publicly 
denounces the measure as. - hopeless 
and' intolerable failure. -' : ■■■_! ■ : ;••". 

Local 1 option elections followed in 
April. ; Villages and small cities 
which had voted overwhelmingly for 
repeal only a few months 'before- had, 
by that, time been so disillusioned and 
disgusted by the results of repeu'i 
that they- reversed thjemselves and 
voted' two, four, -and in some cases, 
ten to one for local prohibition.: 7\ 

And now two state-wide Votes have 
been taken. The first was; in North 
Dakota.- . On.Jurie27, six months. and 
22 days after repeal, the Flickertail 
state gave prohibitdon-mofeVthah'25,- 
000 majority — a signal victory in/a 
primary election with a small total 
vote. ' On July 10 Mississippi 



Flowers Bloornlitaj "old on Coast 

During the height of the winter's 
cold waves, temperati res on the North 
Sea island of Foetir Ml only ajfew de- 
grees below the freezing point, and 
broom (genista) bloomed. WUd pan 
sles and other plant [ also betray no 
effects of cold weather. The influence 
of the Gulf Stream il s so strong that 
temperatures on the coast are regu- 
larly! two or three 1 decrees higher than 
even a few hundred! pards farther In- 
land. It* shows itself also on the 
lands .: of Norderneyi and Heligoland, 
where, roses frequentjy bloom in win- 
ter^ -■■ " - ; 



Let the Forum advertisements be 
your mail-order catal ogue. 



Forum One Dollir Per Year, 



Twelve weddings, w ill be the result' 
of a (iacore of girfs,| bent oin ahdln^ 
husbands, riding tie icanals of Venice 
Id heavily beflowered gondolas. reviVr 
tng a traditional jve letian marriage 
custom. •-- . 'j'"l '■-'■' 

In days of old, the j doges of the dty. 
believed in toatrlnionj : and "roore^ba 1 
bies."ijast as Mussoltil does tqday^cT 
encourage i marHages,|the dogea^nsed tp 
assign a dowryto 12 girls chosffrffroin 
among many candidates. The fortunate 
young women were then paraded'toa 
richly decorated boat through thelclty- 
canals to attract the attention of all 
eligible young men.' The ceremony. .; 
unfailingly occurrf d : on the feast of : : 
the purification of the Virgin. ?-: 

The marriage buni was ,commem-' 
orated every year unit terruptedly from 
944 A-. D. until the;Fourteenth century,-, 
when .Venetian girisj became self-conj 
scions and shy andj refused to sub*, 
mlt to. the "humlllatlig" public Bearch' 
for a husband: It was then thought to 
replace the girls 1 by ^ummtes, but the; 
attempt proved a fall ire. . 



^ tNb math^atlci«ii." suld HI Ho-/ the 
VMge of Ghlhatown, "has liwr|"«hle io 
;make" computations* on thp sWit*ine of 
things to show, how numv illsiipimliit- 
inebts are reqiiir.ed to uomiienaate for 
one hope gifittfWi " 



Forum Advertising is bargain news. 



Chinese; Stick Together 
' The old L'liliiese custom urnntrrled. 
t?hltiese son;). living with their pnr'ents ' 
Is still so gpheral that Tre^uehtly five 
or six jienerat Ions and from lf>0 to 
.300 relatKes. are found living under 
one roof. ■ 



Forum One Dollar Per Year. 



9TICES 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN; That a special 
meeting of the Stockholders of the Thief River Falls 
Cooperative Creamery Association will be held in 
Civic &;Gommerce room, at the new Auditorium in 
the city^bf Thief River Falls, Minnesota, on- FRI- 
DAY, ^3rd day of August, at 1 o'clock P. M. The 
object and purpose of this special meeting of the 
stockholders will be to consider a sale or trade of 
the creamery building and lots of the association, 
and if sS^decided by the stockholders to authorize, 
empower and direct the officers and board of direc- 
tors of- the Thief River Falls Cooperative Creamery 
Ass'n. to sell and convey and transfer the said 
Creamery Building and lots, which property is de- 
scribed as lots one "1", two "2", three "3" and four 
"4" of block thirty-three "33", of the original town- 
site of Thief- River Falls, in Pennington County, 
Minnesota. , 

.All-stockholders are urged to be present. 

Byj.order and resolution of Board of Directors. 
J. M. THEIGE, Secretary 
y:--'- - - - Board of Directors - 






Repeal; Nets U. S. Quarter Billion 
Washington — With repeal in effect 
but sxj months, taxes on liquors and 
bee^ brought the treasury $258,911,- 
332 in [the -fiscal year ended June 30. 
This was disclosed with publication 
of figures" on Internal rsvenuB collec- 
tions, showing Increases in all gen- 
eral; tux. categories. For the fiscal 



year 
were 



L03-J, income 
$817,025,330, 



tax 



collections 
?70,233,935 



greatei than the year preceedlng. 

World Wheat Drops 4C0 Million Bu. 
;W"ashiiistcn — Reduction ;o£ 400, 
OOO.OOd bushels In the world wheat 
crop for 1934 as the result oiC drouth 
was! predicted by. the federal bureau 
of. 'asricult'-iral economics, i Produc- 
ton : in[ the northern hemisphere ont- 
siie; of Russia and China was expect- 
ed to | be about 3&0,000,000 | bushels 
less: than last year; with -the remain- 
ing * 100,000,000 bushels reduction be- 
ing I accounted for in the 



Corn -Loan Notes Extended 



Washington— The agricultural ad- 
■Justtn^nt administration extended 
from Aug. 1 to Sept. 1 the [maturity 
date of outstanding "notes of gOTern- 
•ment' [corn -lofliy borrowers. Prompt 
.settlement will, be asked afte- Aug, 1, 
however, on -loans t secured by . corn 
whichj Is In -poor condition, or which 
"is stored in inferior cribs. 



Crash! Kills Five on Way. to 



Bloomington, IH.— Five persons oh 



their way to the 'World's iai 



cagp were killed when the automobile 



In jwlJlch they were, ridlsfc 
into a truck near Gridley, 
■ over 1 several times. 



Month. 



/OBLIC MUCH WiNf USED; > ; 
ABU UI PISH TA PtllS 

Thoug-h it is true that fish :: -; : may 
transmit tapeworms to Human beings, 
there is no connection whatever be- 
tween this risk and the ringed,, rib- 



suitahle for moderate traffic. Im- 
proved gravel surfaces have also been 
obtained' \vlthout the use of chemicals. 
'-'r£he cost .of atabllzation being com- 
paratively "low; it may open a hew 
era; of improved 1 , country roads •. here 
if the prdc&ss works out . at, success- 
fully in" Minnesota as it has in some 
other states, highway engineers as- 
serted. -Stabilization work has been 
retarded titiis summer by the drouth,, 
which -resulted in unfavorable condi- 
tions. 

' 'T'he 'first experimental soil stab- 
ilislatidn project of the Minnesota 
Hfghway ; department is oh* . trunk 

highway' No r 22 between Wells and 

bon-like tapeworms so ^m"mpnTy Minnesota Xikke in Fairbault county," 
found in the intestines of bass, crap- I ***** <^mmisaioner N. W. Elsberg.; .; 
, ies ' ana other game fish, says Dr, ; '"•fhia^roj.ect is nearly eight miles 
W. A. Riley, chief. of the division "of Mpng and jb. now nearing completion 1 . 
entomology and eco'nomis zoology at Its, performance linear traffic will be 
Jniversity farm. The kiyc of xape- carefully studied and its maintenance 
vormsi that infest > nun-fins appear "costj;Will -be checked closely. Other 
jnly in the flesh of fish and are so stabili^yon: experiments in various 
mail that most people never notice parte of 'ttie state are under consid- 
them. ; .:■...".;:;._ eration.*^' : '","V '■■}'. 

"ine fact that fish harbor .the im- 
mature stages. of the tapeworm which 
develops in man has received much 
publicity in 1 Minnesota in recent 
years,'f says L>r. Riley. "As a* re- 







Great BARGAINS In Thin 



PURE SULK HOSE 

Full fashioned 

49- 




Policeback. Strongl% 
Inch •web. Ad| 



Value! 



iult. many inquiries come to the : ei- 



Engifieera have long known that a 
gravei surface is efficient . in wet 
waether, -while clay surfaces compacr 
into hard, ; smooth . roads when there 
is not too much water. By combin- 
ing the graver with the clay and aa&- 





Chiffons and ser- 
vice-weights in 
smart new sum- 
mer shades! Siz- 
es 8%-10%! : 



White with Colorful Jackets! Prints! 



M«n'« W-Wk Sn»p«nd«»« 



jstable. 



33« 



Printed, plaint 



Complete rar|ge 
of beautiful col- 
orsr— many, love- 
ly prints, too. 38 
inches wide! ■ 




Specially Selected- 



itdy 



Here's where you can get all 
the smartly styled summer 
dresses you want! Maivt.1- 
ous values I Many white 
crepes with bright cotton, 
linen, or contrasting self 
material jackets 1 Ga3\ sum- 
mery prints, too— trimmed 
with crisp org-andy or linen ! 
Sizes for Misses, Vv'cmcn! 



the Fair 



at Chi- 



crashed 
d turned 



MulelMakes Self at Home In . Bed. 
Newberry, S.-C— Tom Ellison miss- 
ed a mule colt on his farm and -start* 
-ed a search. The last place lie looked 
--"•as In the hoU3e-r-and there was the 
mule 'asleep In Ellison's bed 
Patronize Forjun advertisers 



periment station. Almost .invariably ' ing calcium chloride to hielp maintain 
-usp f c(on has been aroused, by finding . tne ^proper moisture content under all 
„:i<- ribbon-like tapeworm. Such, forms conditions; -a ^ road surface is obtained 
are found eveyrwhere in fish and Sie which should remain smooth and firm 
in no ways harmful to mahi'"3yse '-'-—■'- •—•-■■■■• •• - 

dangerous species is found; *&.-.- the 
flesh 6f fish, in a stage wyehe is3 en- 
i.irely idifferent in appearanBB' T.from 

uon of an inch in length. It is quite 
ilkely ,to be overlooked entirely and is 

ltd : when the fish is properly cook- 
ed. ■ ; -:•::.- 

"The ringed, ribbon-like tapeworms 
so commonly found in the Jnttsttn,. 
of fish are species which have: uiio*er- 
jone their young, or larval stttge-iih 
jome ;other animal, that his :'. been 
.-■atenfby the fish. Unlike man, the 
fish cannot cook its food/and_lmnce 
f, s-ibj ec t to frequent . ahfections. 
Iheieusno excuse for human cases 
ji tapeworm infection, for they al- 
ways ;arise from careless use. of raw 
or imperfectly cooked meats or fish,;" 

Ireland'. Two Governm-ults . : 

Irelhnd-ls divided Into two lepAratt. 
governments, Northern Ireland and the 
Irish jKree, State Id the south.. The 
gateway to southern- Ireland IsiCohpi- 
rormefly known as Queebstbwn, :a 
busy, jbrlGh't ahd cheerfuj 
tvith a fine hay. ^;fe- 

Forttm adver^fig' is b*rgaln news'. 



in ;both wet and ci-y weather. This 
would eliminate from gravel roads 
; {B«-dust nuisance and the heavy loss 
-of -material thrown out by, cars and 
blown or washed away. It would 
also tend to decrease maintenance 
expense,' as the frequent blading (.1 
smoothing required by gravel roads 
would not be necessary, 

".^" : - ; . A Robot - 

- -Any tnechanlcal .device which d»»i-i.- 
^he~ J : worli. of a humub being ma.v hV 
Tityjed a robot although It Is Ninre- 
; oflen* applied to autonJatoiis' or lite"' 
c'hanlcal -men, says ;'Phthllnder""^luihi". 
: zine. Thls.word vaiue'lDto-use aft'ei, 
jhe publication in the United States )ii t 
1928. of ji'/.plaj entitled "Itiissum'v 
iinlversal- ttoliota." Tlie-churHcfHrs iij\ 
thl»' play r'were mechanical men -and .-: 
wchnen. < -;"U la proDouuced, accordiati 
toi:hi6st dictionaries, as **ro-hut"— al&r 
cent^-un;'the first syllable and itrsrVVr 
Icmg althoilgh the New York Theater, 
guild; .-.which produced the play, pri>': 
nounued it as "rob-Ut" Wltb nrot'o . 
shorthand accent "also oh the first*. 



Gauntlet ^ork Gloves 



Leather palnis with a 
heavycanyasbhckiBuys 



BOYS' P 


LAY BUSTS 


W§ ] 


Heavy denims! 


ZiTwG^n ! 


rb&Y 


©Sljli/gjll ; 


Famous "O.xi 
hide" brand! 
B a r- tark ed 
against strain^ 
Drop scat! 2^8; 




'One Dollar Per Tear, 



_•• 1 • . . .ut- : 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



??^;i^^fe|^^S:<p^^fea9 



TBIEP MVER FAIAS POBOH, mtWP. /RIVER FAUS, 



Harrjy H. Peterson 



Attorney General of Minnesota 



This remarkably clear and 
able' address on the Fraziier- 
Lemke amendment to the U. S. 
Bankruptcy law, was given by 
Harry H. Peterson, attorney 
general of Minnesota, over radio 
Station WCCO, July 5 1934, from 
7:45 until 8:00 p. m. 1 

The : Attorney "General Said: 
"The Frazier-Lemke amendment, 
to tne bankruptcy law which was 
passed by Congress . on JJune 16ttt 
last, and approved by the President, 
has been hailed throughout 1 the na- 
tion as a measure designed to deal 
with the problem of farm mortgage 
indebtedness in such a manner as to 
give real and substantial relief to 
the American farmer. Trie purpose of 
this law is to grant und'er the Bank- 
ruptcy power of Congress extensions 
of time to distressed farmers, for 
payment of their debts and mort- 
gages and to permit them to remain 
in possession of their property dur- 
ing the period of such extension while 
payments are being made under the 
terms and conditions of the law. It 
attempts to deal with the problem of 
farm mortgage indebtedness in such 
a way as to save for the American 
farmer his home and his property, 
and in such a way as to give to his 
creditors the full and unfair value of 
his indebtedness and the benefit of 
any security given to secure; the pay-- 
ment thereof. 

The last Congress was compelled 
by the force of facts and circumstan- 
ces to realize that the indebtedness 
of the nation is so. large in amount 
that a very large part thereof will 
never ' be paid. We have been labor- 
ing under a staggering indebtedness. 
It. has been found necessary to make 
the provisions of the bankrhpcy law 
available to many to whom it has 
heretofore been denied. It jhas been 
found necessary to make this law 
available to railroads, vhen ;to muni- 
cipalities, and then to private cor- 
porations to effect reorganizations 
and< re-arrangements of their finan- 
cial structures and finally ; it was 
found that it was imperative that the 
law be extended to the American 
farmer so as to meet his needs and 
deal with his problems. , 

The problem of the American 
farmer is not a new one. It: has been 
witli us since 1921. . Since that time 
the American farmer has been en- 
gaged in a life and c^ath; struggle 
for his very existence. He has fought 
on many fronts. He fought if or farm 
relief measures like the McNary- 
Haugen bill and" other similar bills 
to protect agriculture. He has fought 
for mortgage refinancing bills, like 
the Frazier-Lemke Farm I Mortage 
Refinancing bill, to lift part of the 
f*irm mortgage indebtedness from the 
back of the American farmer. In all 
these fights he has been unsuccess- 
ful because Congress end the Presi- 
dent have turned a Jeaf ear to his 
pleas. In line with the idea of ex- 
tending the provisions of the bank- 
ruptcy law to 'thosei who are now 
in special need thereof, the : Congress 
■ at' its last session passed the Frazier- 
Lemke amendment to the bankrupt- 
cy law. It marks a distinct depart- 
ure from the traditional manner oi 
dealing '.with this question as to the 
other laws extending the provisions 
of the bankruptcy law to railroads, 
municipalities, and private corpora- 
tions. 

The amendment in effect pro- 
vides that any farmer who is un- 
able to pay its. debts and who 
has failed to obtain a composi- 
tion or extension of his debts 
under the exsisting law. provid- 
ing for such composition and 
extension of debts, or if he feels 
aggrieved by any composition or 
extension, may apply to the 
Bankrupcy court to be ad- 
judged a bankrupt and obtain 
the benefits of the Frazier-Lem- 
ke amendment. 

The first step in the proceedings 
is the appraisal of the property of 
the farmer. In order to secure such 
a.pV4aisal {the jippliqatftbn must be 
made at the time of the first hear- 
ing. It is important to bear in mind 
that the appKcation must be made at 
the time of the first hearing. The 
statute provides that appraisers shall 
be appointed to appraise all the pro- 
perty of the debtor. One of the fea- 
tures of the law is the provisions 
that such appraisal need not .neces- 
sarily be the market value of - the 
property which, heretofore has been 
regarded as the only crittrion for 
determining value. The language of 
the statute is: 

"Such appraisers shall ap- 
- praise all the property of the - 
debtor at its then fair and rea- 
sonable value, not necessarily 
the market value at the time of 
such appraisal." 
Provision is made for objections, ex- 
ceptions and» appeals from the ap 
piaisals under the jurisdiction of the 
court. . 

Aiter the appraisal has been madt 
in the manner as indicated, the nexi 
step is the disposition of the proper- 
ty. The act provides first for p vol- 
untary agreement between the farm- 
er and his creditors by which the 
farmer can repurchase his property 
from the trustee for the appraised 
value thereof, arid secand-ly, if such 
voluntary agreement is not entered 
into, the farmer shall have ; a five- 
year moratorium during which the 
creditors' remedies are staying upon 
conditions that the farmer pay a rea- 
sonable rental to the trustee, pay the 
taxes and comply with other reason- 
able conditions to be imposed by the 
court for the continued use and' oc 
cupation of his property during the 
period of the five year moratorium 
thV farmer shall ,.have the privilegt 
5f ifiayt&ig. infes^ie pourt the appraised 
faltfe of the propery and that there- 
upon the court shall award him full 
title andpossessibn. thereto. 



The law provides not only for 
a moratorium, but also for the 
abolition of deficieny judgments 
as a. practical proposition. Preai- • 
dent Roosevelt referred to this 
f."^-ire of the law when he sign- 
ed it. 

I wifl refer to the language which 
he used a little later. 

After the appraisal has been made 
the referee shall, pursufint to the pe- 
tition of the farmer made, at the 
first hearing, set aside to him the 
exemptions to which he is entitled 
under' tire state law, "subject to "ny 
exsisting mortgages or liens upon 
such exempt property to an amount 
equal to the value as fixed by the 
appraisal." 

In Minnesota a farmer has $0 
acres exempt as his homestead;. This 
would be the amount so set aside in 
Minnesota. In North Dakota,. I am 
informed that the exemption is IbU 
acres. It varies in different states. 
A further order la made at the same 
time that the possession, under the 
control of the court, of- any part or 
all of the debtor's property Bhall re 
main in the debtor subject to the 
general lien of the trustee for the 
benefit of the creditors and' subject to 
all prior liensj. pledges and encum- 
brances up "to the "actual vlue of 
such property as fixed by the ap- 
praisal. In other words, the proper- 
ty is held subject to prior liens, 
pledges and encumbrances up to the 
appraised value thereof. Such liens, 
pledges and encumbrances are scaled 
down : to the appraised value of the 
property. 

Then the law provides thut the 
farmer, with the consent of the lien- 
holder or holders may enter into an 
Agreement with the trustee to re- 
purchase the non-exempt property 
upon : the terms and conditions fol- 
lowing: * 
a. Payment of 1 per cent interest up- 
,year from the date of said* agree- 
on the appraised price within 1 
ment. 

year from .the date of said agree- 
ment - - . "" , 
Payment of 2% per. cent of the 
appraised price within 2 years 
from the date of said agreement. 
Payment of an additional 2% pei/ 
cent of the appraised price within 

3 years from the date of said? 
agreement. 

Payment of an additional 5 per 
cent of the appraised price within. 

4 years -from the days of said 
agreement 

e. Payment of an additional 5 per 
cent of the appraised price within 

5 years from the date of said 
agreement. 

f. Payment of the remaining unpaid 
balance of the appraised price 
within 6 years from the date of 
said agreement. 

If the debtor will not enter into 
such' agreement or consent thereto,, 
then the law gives the farmer ° five 
year : moratorium. The provision of 
the law applicable reads as follows: 
"If any secured creditor of the 
debtor,.. affected thereby, shall 
file written objections . to t the 
manner of payments and distri- 
bution of debtor's property as 
herein provided for, then the 
court, after having set aside the 
debtor's exemptions as pre- 
scribed by the State law, shall 
stay all proceedings for a period 
of 6 years, during which 5 years 
the debtor shall retain possess- ■ 
ion of all orjany of his property, 
under the control of the * court, 
provided he pays a reasonable 
■ rental annually for" that part of , 
1 the. property of which' he retains 
possession; the first payment of 
such rental to be maue within 6 
months of the date of the order 
staying proceedings, such rental 
to be distributed among the se- 
cured and unsecured creditors, 
as their interests may appear, 
und'ar the provisions of- this act. 
"At the end of 5 years, or pri- 
or thereto, the debtor may pay 
into court the appraised price of 
Liie pioperty of which he retains 
possession: .Provided, That upon 
request of any lien holder on 
real estate the court, shall cause 
a reappraisal of such real estate- 
' and tne debtor may then pay tue 
reappraised, price, if acceptable 
to the ilen holder, into the court, 
and thereupon the court shall, 
by : an order, turn over full pns- 
sessioii and .iilc .of said property 
to the dfl-ttv and he may appiy 
for his discharge as provided for 
by ^his act. 

"If the debtor fails to comply 
with the provisions of this, sub- 
section the court may order the _ 
trustee to sell the property as 
provided in this act." 
'j.'he Act affects the coritractural 
rights of a farmer's mortgage in. 
-wo important aspects. It substi- 
tutes for the original amount of the 
jecured debt the present value of the 
x&th2 as appraised; and postpones for 
a period of eix years in the event of 
the purchase of the land by the farm- 
er from the trustee, or for a period 
of five years m the event of the 
farmer's retention of possession on 
payment of reasonable rental, the 



Secretary of that organization, Mr. 
John Erp, the Prcsidentrof the State 
Branch of that - organization, the 
Minnesota Farm Holiday association, 
and Mr. John Bosch; its President, 
and- many others. -to numerous - tt 
mention. The judiciary committee of 
the' House of Representatives in Con- 
gress held protracted hearings and 
gave a great deal of time and con- 
sideration to this bill. I was invited 
to attend* those hearings,- as the At- 
torney General of Minnesota, and .-_ I 
did attend them and . gave such as- 
sistance as I could. . ( 

A- bitter ^cinflict developed be- 
tween opposing groups. Certain large 
investors in farm mortgagee, consist 
ing principally of certain investment 
companies, insurance companies, and 
other corporations opposed the bill 
upon the ground' that it would take 
their property without due process of 
law and impair the obligations of 
their contracts -by reason of the pro- 
visions of the law for the selling 
down of ethir indebtedness. They 
claimed that the law would result in 
large losses of capital which they 
would be compelled to sustain. Pres- 
ident Roosevelt discussed this fea- 
ture of the law when he approved it 
and said: 

"In the actual operation of the 

^ law, I do not believe that losses- 

of capital will greatly exceed, if 

they exceed at- all, the losses 

that would be sustained if this 

- measure were not' signed. 

"On the other sid«e of the pic- 
ture, it is worth' remembering ' 
that this act will stop foreclos- 
ures and prevent occasional in- 
stances of injustice to worthy 
borrows. 

. "The mere threat of a use of 
this machinery will speed " volun- 
tary conciliation of debts and 
the refinancing program "of the 
farm credit adrainistration.' It 
will prevent deficiency judg- 
ments—^ form of liability which, 
" in the judgement of many think-. 
:utf iui-.i, ought to be abolished 
entirely." 

The Frazier-Lemke amendment, on 
the whole is a good step forward on 
the road which we must travel to 
give relief to the American farmer. 
It is but partial relief at the very 
best; other legislation is needed and 
some measures must be provided for 
the refinancing of farm mortgages. 
I believe that there will be a very 
determined effort matte during' the 
next Congress to enact such legisla- 
tion and the same probably will cen- 
ter about the Frazier-Lemke Farm 
Mortgage Refinancing BUI. The far- 
mers must have full relief. Until that 
relief has been given and given in 
full measure,- until full justice has 
been done to our farming population, 
the rest of us cannot have normal 
prosperity. 

During the past years the far- 
mers, as a group, have suffered ~t 
greater injustice than any other por- 
tion of our population. 

Take away from the farmer his 
purchasing power, and* the" factories 
which produce the goods he buys 
must close- their doors and discharge 
their men; the merchants - who sen 
goods to the farmers and the city 
. working men must look in vain for 
] payment and face bankruptcy; the 
: professional men who provide theii 
respective services to the farmers 
and the city laborers- and the mer- 
chants cannot collect their bills. 
Every class of our' vast population U 
dependent on every other class. But 
more than all and most fundamental- 
ly are we dependent on our farming 
population. 

Let me point "out in closing that 
while the Frazier-Lemke bill ris a 
step forward it is but one step. Not 
more thon half of our farm pop- 
ulation can take advantage oif it. 
This, to be sure, is the group that ie 
carrying the heaviest burden of debt 
and therefore, most needs assistance. 
But until all of our farmers can be 
given a fair price . for wheat they 
produce other sources of relief, can 
give them temporary assistance, but 
never afford a final and complete re- 
lief. Therefore, I say, the Frazier- 
Lemke Amendment is a good step 
forward, but it is only one step. 

.WCCO has kindly given this per- 
iod' so that the farmers in the north- 
west may hear the Frazier- Lemke 
amendment discussed and so that 
they may have such information as 
can be given concerning it during 
this brief- discourse. 

r thank "WCCO for the courtesy of 
discussing this law. 



Petroleum Jelly From Mine 
One may perhaps he pardoned for 
accepting with some reservation, the 
Rtory of an 611 well that produces 
pure petroleum Jelly^ it sounds too 
much like a brass mine. However, 
Edward a. Roble. In Mining -and 
MetnllurKy, recently, reported that 
tl»>rt» la at least one such well, at 
Liim.-ir, okla. It was drilled In on 
Januai.v 2B, 1823, at a depth of 3.710 
feet, and hns heen producing about 
350 barrels of alumst pure pfitroleum 



Mi^3(>rl;3ppR3DAy,rJtn.v aa, isu 



■ - --rr~: ■.;•; --.-T^r^.. -.-.=: -,. r" ■;_ 7^ 



: .;'tiS?: , {r i ^R4:- 



W 



Wv^Mn 




Mrs. John GhriBiiesj son Floyd, and 
daughter " Mariah: arrived 'Sunday 
from International Falls and will 
visit this week at the L. L. Furan 
home. ' I ' . j ■"_ . - 

Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Bingham and 
sons Clark, and jStewart of Buxton, 
NiiDak. visited on. Sunday with Mr. 
Bingham's aunt, j54rs. O. E. "Berge. 

Mr, and Mrs. jBpy' Chamber : and 
four daughters of jSprague, Manitoba, 
Canada, werej Sunday guests at the 
home of Mr. and* Mrs. Helmer Ostrom. 

Mrs. Tony Carlson of Holt was a 
Friday visitor; ml. the city. 

Mr. and Mjk. . fijarry ±*rugh, and 
Mr. and Mrs.l John Norby of Plum- 
mer motored jto I Virginia, Minn, on 
Friday to attend the funeral ^of Fred 
Fuller. 1 iT" * ' 

Miss .Myrtle Stromberg of Rose- 
wood shopped! in: this city on Satur- 

^y- ■ i '|' 

Miss Linnea Backlund* arrived last 
week, from Madeline Island in Lake 
Superior where she-has been employ, 
eu this summer, ; and will spena a 
short vacation with her mother, Mrs 
S. BrandvoldJ ! | 

Oreal Haiiand ; and Arnie Bethke 
returned Monday ■ morning after 
spending a peeks' vacation at Min- 
neapolis, Chicago and Parkers Prairie 

Miss Myrtle - Mdnson of Goodridge 
was" a Saturday shopper in this city 

Among the local! people who attend- 
vSA t iM, J?armer " Laiior Picnic -at the 
Uld Mill site on Sunday were Dr. and 
Mrs. P. L. Vistaunet, JVIiss Sarah 
Hoglum, Mrs. E. J. Overland, Mr. ana 



;Mrs. Alf Anderson -left Soturday 
fqr'St. Paul after spending -a two 
weeks vacation with her parents, -Mr. 
and Mrs. E. O. 'Gullingsrud. -Mrs. 
Anderson is employed at the Empor- 
ium in St. Paul. 

. Mrs. George Erickson and children 
Mrs. S. Salveson and 1 children and 
Mrs. Leonard Hanson and children 
spent las.t week at the Salveson 
cottage at Red Lake Narrows. 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Lane and daugh- 
ter Patsy left 'last Friday for Camp 
Kabetogama where they will enjoy a 
week'-s -vacation. 

Miss vGudren Tveit spent Sunday 
at her parental home in SUverton. 

■ Mrs: E. Kliner of Radium was a 
Saturday shopper-in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. O. Norby, and 
daughter Tone, Mrs. R. M. Fjelstad, 
Miss Ruth Fjelstad, and Joan Dahl- 
quist motored to the Lutheran Bible 
Camp at -the Lake of the Woods last 
Friday, and also visited' in Baudette. 
They returned .on Saturday. 

Rev. and Mrs.' R. M. Fjelstad apd 
family are leaving on Saturday "for 
Kolden's resort at, Black Duck where 
they will spend Beveral weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs*. G. Schilbred of Lan- 



caster, Miss Sheila Angellrof Min-' 
neapolis, and Miss Angeline Nettland 
of. Oklee were guests at the hpme of 
Mr. and Mrs. Nels A. Nelsoh.las week 
end. sK«tfd 

Mrs. John Collins, daughter Fern, 
and son Lowell returned Monday 
morning after a seven week's trip to 
Centralia, Shelton, and Tacoma, 
Washington; Eugene, Oregon; and 
Minneapolis during which time" they 
visited with relatives and friends. 

Miss Alice Anderson arrived Fri- 
day from Alexandria, Minn, and is" 
a guest at the home of her friend, 
Miss Hilver Johnson. She will re- 
turn to her home at Middle River 
in a few days. 

Misses Doris and' Ha Moe, Miss 
lone .Halldin, Harvey Moe, Bobby 
Anderson, and Joe Keil returned to 
their 'homes on Sunday after spend- 
ing a week at. the Parbst ; cottage at 
Red Lake Narrows. / 



Diamonds 'in Industry =j~-~ 

Half of all the diamonds' produced 
are used In the Industries. .The chief 
demand Is In mining, motor, marina 
and flying trades. 



Mrs. B. J. Hoium 



and* daugnter Lor- 



Miss Lillian; Steenerson visited with 
friends at Gully : on Monday. . .. 

ifciss Etfie komry. returned Sat- 
urday )after (spending, several days 
visiting with (friends in Minneapolis. 

Mrs. J. H. Sannes and son Ghfred 
Mrs. Thora H. Nelson and daughter 
Penrhyn- attended j the church picnic 
held at Games last Sunday. Among 
others who attended the picnic were 
Rev. andi Mrs. R. M. i?'jeistad, JUrs. 
E. A. Mostue,janu iur. ana mrs. joun 
Gullingsrud and family. 
- Miss Marjorie'Ose is spending this 
weeic at tiie home 1 of ner parents in 
Siiiverton township. 

Mrs. Harry! Limd spent last week 
week visiting! with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. iElhrigson at Highianu- 
lng. . I : p 

Mrs. -Roy Oen, accompanied by Miss 
Myrtle Oen motoreu to Uamp yer- 
miiiion'near Cook^ Minnesota on Sat- 
urday to get Utoy; Oen-who has been 
at tne camp \ cms ; summer; Jtle re- 
turnee with themi on Sundayy and 
win ' De employeilj ^ ttus Cllv until 
the fall, wnen he: will resume - nis 
duties as atnletie ! coacn at ±iiDDing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Wnson are sp c nu- 
ing this week visiting with relatives 
at Virginia, Minn. 1 

'• Aivira u-mngsori of Highlanding ar- 
rived Monday ahji will spend the 
,weeK visiting! with her sister, Mrs.- 
Harry Lund. ! I 

Mr. ancr Mrs. Adel Ander and fami- 
ly returned Sunday for a weens trij. 
to Devils Lake ind . other . points, 
where they .visited, with relatives. 

Mr. and l^rs. Oiaf Neset and 
Arthur and Soren JfcJerglund attenucd 
the picnic at j the Old Mill site near 
wewiolodn on Sunuay. 

Miss isernice liustad, who is em 
ployed at the!- loc^l Woolworth store, 
ieit- Mbiiday" evening lor uargo wucre 
she will enjoy a greek's vacation with 
relatives. - 1 

Miss Eleanor Glynn, who is em.- 
ployed in this city, returned Monuay 
aiter spending the, weekend wuii hei 
parents at -tiemiaji. 

.Miss Liatnryn *|t_;osgrove is spend- 
ing the week [with her cousin, Kuvrue. 
snipiy at Wauena. They win .aiso 
speiiu! part of the 1 time ac a cabin at 
tetter ijake. J j. . % . 
■ Mrs. M. J. Morgan and daughter 
Laura 01. Clemeni, in. d&k;; 1U.1&. w. 
iem, N. DaK.: arid Miss Aita Puffet 
ofv Carrington, JSt. DaK. left Sunday 
after spending seyerai days at the 
~ " ium and Thora ±1. JNelson 
homes. '1'heyjplan to motor to Itasfea 
state Park, jdemidji and other points 
to- their respective 



c ^ v __ r Jelly every day since. The almost solid 

mortgagee's right to enforce , pay- j fue ' Is dark green when It leaves the 
mentfof the amount of the mortgage' " ■-- ■ 



well, hut clutnges to a brilliant gold- 
en yellow on contnrt with the air. 
An equally surprising phenomenon was 
reported a short time ago by Indus* 
trial and Engineering Cheuilstry- 



iebt' as changed by the appraisal. 

-This law is the result of one of the 
most spirited contests carried on dur- 
ing/ the, last Congress . A nation-wide 

mws for the relief of tHe American 
farmer. The entire farming popula- 
tion 6f America has demanded the 
enactment of such.'laws, and have 
rallied ot .their organizations and to 
.their .'leaders in demanding such laws. 
Outstanding in this fight have ; been 
such Imp' as Congressman .IsenVke of 
North' Dakota, Mr. Iversorii the Na- 
tional President, of the Farmers' "Un- 
ion, and Mr. Keiraedy, the . National 



which earboo - dioxide gas lssiieB at 
great pressure, shouts high in the alf, 
solidifies, and foils to the ground In 
the form of enrhon dioxide snow. Iden- 
tical with ' commercial "dry Ice."— Lit- 
erary Digest 

- v ' ■: ~ ~ * ~ ,v 

. Germany'* Coal- Mine. Old 

In Germany, state' coal mjhes-have 
been worked for more 'than a century. 



before returning: 
homes. - : ' 

Miss Marion Holzkneeht_ returned 
Suh^y after! spending a week with 
relatives in Duiuth.. 

Lloyd Kustad left Monday for Mc- 
Intosn where he will be employed 
during the summer. 

Miss Gwendolyn- Holter returnee 
Monday after having visited with her 
parents at Oslo since last Wednes- 
day. 

Misses Olga, Kaia, and' Laura Lund 
left Sunuay lor ; Twin Lakes where 
they will spend their vacations. 

Miss Olive Olson, who is employed 
with the J. C. Penney store, returned 
Tuesday 'in i company with Miss 
Marion Oden, after spending a vaca- 
tion at Minneapolis and Medicine 
Lake. t w . 

Mr. and Mrs. Tilford Keierson and 
family returned : Saturday evening 
from a month's vacation with rela- 
tives at Seattle,! Everett, Arlington, 
and Silvana Washington, at Portland, 
and other points in Oregon. On the 
way to the coast they went through 
Glacier National Park, and on the re- 
turn trip they visited Mt. Ranier Na- 
tional Park, and National Park, and 
drove through the Columbia scenic 
highway in Oregon. They were ac- 
companied on] their trip by Mr. and 
Mrs. B. D. "Hendry of Lewis, Wise. 

John Dahlsihg ;and daughter, Mar- 
ine of Radium were business callers 
in the city on Monday. They also 
visited at the . G. i Aaklius home. 
~ Mr. and Mrs. Carl Christofferson, 
and daughters Florence and' Mabel 
motored to -Grand Forks on Sunday 
and visited with; Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
man Wang. Mrs. Wang is a. sister 
of Mrs. -Christoffdrson. On their re- 
turn they were accompanied by Miss 
Cora Wang who; will visit for some 
time at the Christofferson home in 
this city. It, - 

; Mr. and Mrs. Jgfcr«:Fink and Mrs. 
Joe Bushaw and'iinfaht son of -Mah- 
ville, N. Dak -visf&d' last weefc'.'end 
at the home of Mrs. Bushaw's" sister, 
Mrs. Ida. Urdahli "-■";., > ; 



Patronize Your Co-Operatives 
And Save! 



Household 
FLY SPRAY 

Pint Quart 

6OC 



Cattle 
FLY SPRAY 

Gallon OUC 



A Carload of Salt 

Special Price QAr 

Per 100 pound bag 7Ut 



We give FREE tickets on prizes to be award- 
ed at the Pennington County Fair with' mer- 
chandice sales. 

LAND O' LAKES 
CREAMERIES INC. 



Save With Safety on 

Drug Store Needs 



Inuslen, U-20-10cc 98c 

'" U-40-lOcc $1.77 

" U-80-lOcc $3.49 

Benedict's so ^ ox $1.00 

Special D £El¥ c ZSc 

Gluten Flour. Needles 

Syringes, Alcohol Lamps, 

Test Tubes, Test Tube 

Holders. 



Rubbing Alchol, pt. 15c 

Fly Oil, g a p i1on 29c 

Leave your Films with 
us for Developing. 

Camera Special 
1 Univex Camera 
1 Univex Film, Both - / 4Sc 



Medicine Specials 
Kuriko, genuine, 89c 



Mineral Oil, 1-2 gal. 88c 



Milk of Magnesia, pt. 29c 



Halibut Oil C £?S L £ S 89c 



Castoria, Fletchers, 33c 



Moth Balls, lb.. 



I9c 



Vick's Vapo rub ||5 e 



29c 



Menthol atum, |g 



25c 



Cashmere Bouquett Soap 
3 regular 
25c bars 



27c 



Cara. Nome, Max Factor 

Shari, Harriet Habbard 

Ayer, Jonteel, Toilet 

Goods Lines. 



Dr. West Tooth 
Paste, 2 for 



25c 



Ipana, Pepsodent, Pebeco, 
Tooth Paste, 2 for 7S« 

Shower Bath at IJome 
Bath Spray Complete 57c 
50c Klenzo 

Tooth Haste 25c 
50c Klenzo 

Shaving Cream 25c 
Mescals Hand Lotion 

Cream of Almond, pint 39C 

Wonder Soft Kotex 19c 
Kleenex 3 for 500 

$50,000.00 Chocolate 
served on your favorite 
dish— The Little Dick 5c 

Fountain Specials _ 

Fresh Lime Freeze lOc 
All Ice Cream Sodas, lOc 
Lemon Mint Freeze lOc 
Dixie Cups, Cold Snaps»V. 
Popsickles — Our Malted 
Milk with Wafers is hard 
to beat. 



Thief River Pharmacy 

• O. H. EKEREN & SONS . ', 
'iileiS^all Store" " "_ ; : :; Phone 77 

/; ^;.;r Thief River Falls, Minnesota^ ' 



o 









li» 



sp 



.,-,-,-'1- ., ,, 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




C23S 



R. M. 



Thief River Falls Forum 

Official Paper of Pennington County 
THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA. ' \'] 

Published Thursday of each week by the '■■'■' ' 

FORUM PUBLISHING COMPANY. : .' 

R. M. Aalbu and H. L. Schuster, Proprietors. "... '•"-"'-' 

Aalbu, Editor. Bernice Berge, City Editor. 



waft sMfijAtti ■fe&s&iBm- $mti §Ait§:mmmL 'tomm s-ias mm 

^a^fa- 1 ^ ' " — : — 



Citizens State Bank Building:, 



Thief Eiver Falls, 'Minnesota. 



Subscription ?1.00 per year in the United States;-.\ 



"Entered as second-class matter, April 27, 1932, at the post office. a>.Thief 
Eiver FaUs, Minnesota, under Act pf March 3, 1897." •'.."-'■ 



THE ASS IN TRAVAIL BROUGHT FORTH A GNAT . 



The Minnesota Democrats held a convention at St. Cloud July 17th\and 
besides viewing- the Farmer-Labor platform "with alarm" and dweliing-loh 
the accomplishments of the national administration with all the lbvV'arid 
devotion of a young mother on her first-born, adopted a state . democratic 
platform.; And what a platform! Concern for the overburdened taxpayers 
.and the down-trodden farmers stick out all over it like the . quills of a 
porcupine. It fairly oozes with rtatesmanship. We marvel that such., an: 
oustanding instrument could be brought into the. world by a mere handf ull 
of two oi- three thousand democrats. (The St. ' Cloud Daily Times/states 
that is all that were expected to attend.) v .■:■-'- -. ■*-. 

After having stated that they will demand strict economy in govern- 
ment andi abolition of unnecessary commissions and bureaus, they advocate 
a new conservation program which would necessitate three or four, new 
bureaus, some tax revisions which would need one or two more, and unem- 
ployment ; and old age pension systems requiring some more study" by sun- 
dry commissions. , ~ - - . 

Getting down to real fundamentals they declare that the "old/Capitol" 
building should "be suitably remodeled and used for, state purposes." To ! Arrests for 
house some of the commissions £(nd bureaus which they want to abolish we ' Dunkehness 
would surmise. m 



| i^¥. C^T. U. NOTES j 

• -IC ■ . 

PRUNKENESS ON THE INCREASE 
" STATISTICS SHOW 



For sonie years prior to the adop- 
tion, ."of, : the national prohibition 
amendment; the city of Washington 
had - -ldcaly. prohibition under congres- 
sional : statute. Dunkenness * and t he 
evils -inseparable from drinking de- 
clined, sharply immediatly upon the 
adoption of. the measure. 

After the repeal of the prohibition 
amendment -the wet members of the 
congress almost franticly urged the 
repeal _-' : of ; the old p r o h i bition 
statute in the interest of "true 
temperance." Great concern about 
and abhorrence of the drinking and 
drunkenness that prevailed in the 
city" at'- that time was expressed by 
the'-.opponents of prohibition in con- 
gr'ess^-The CrusacVers, which wa^ the 
youth- division of the Association 
Against .the Prohibition Amendment, 
sponsored a law for the city which, it 
claimed," would reduce these evils to 
a" minimum. So congress repealed the 
old prohibition law. 

The results were appalling. Even 
the ; wet- papers expressed amazement 
and alarm'. The new high records of 
arests'-fpr drunkenness and tis as- 
sociated evils were disquieting. The 
arrests for drunkenness and its as- 
four months of 1934 show an increase 
of nearly 67 per cent over the same 
months in 1933, after the return of 
beer, and more than 80 per cent over 
dry 1982. • JttMaU 

The tabulation is revealing: 







~7&~ 



=S«g= 



Minute Sermons .! 

By Dr. Crawford Grays •/ 

— Laws are written for every» 
one but not ; enforced for. 
everyone. 

. ■ — How . people ; spend their 
: money reflects their idea of 
values. ! 

— Chain newspapers are a 
blight on the ; progress of 
fair public opinion. 

— There's bound : to be cor- 
ruption in a : community 
whfen certain lawless ones 
get excused by| "fixing." 

— In this speed age it is well 
to remember that wisdom, 
usefullness and' character 
are not secured by fast 
ones. 

— A man is not necessarily for 
one side or against another 
side because he has an opin- 
ion on a controversial subject. 



j .v „i The fact that tV i e pubIic bu 'l din es committees of the House! t„.„„™ 

and the Senate at the last session of the Legislature ihve 3 ti<mterf «,. ™„c_ 1 iXiSli. 



1932 
Dry 



1933 1934 
Beer Repeal 



1142 
1204 
1144 
1424 



1340 
1147 
1371 
1629 



1934 
1646 
2194 
2307 



. . . i . the Legislature investigated the mat- 1 February 

tor and found' that all interior walls in the old building are "bearings'. walls": March ' 
■which makes remodeling impossible and infeasable' since it ' would require A P ril 
the complete wrecking of the dome, the tower and the roof, bringhwrthe 
C °'l l r ^ y ° nd the Va ' Ue 0f the i P ro P e rty, does not enter into the question 

Z ' stakM ™° CratS - f What »»*« su <* bagatelle was there-are "principles" „_ „ „„., „„ „».„„. „„,. 

at stake. | We might suggest that there is another "burning issue" ■ which ! thev were a ctln e '•» the interest of 
*.!_ "if T C f ats , should . have e ive l> attention and declaration *" *"" nn ""' ~ ~'"~ "' 



Totals. 



4914 5387, 8981 
The .congressmen who repealed the 
'principles" local prohibitory law insisted that 



..in their Dlat i temperance. They were seeming to 

«, T t W 5 refer t0 tl,e ffire need of « footbridge over Mud Creek between r - ed ' a - ethe e ~ S ° f d . ril * in e <">* 
the John Jones and Ole Johnson farms. 



form. 



But it lis on the question of public ownership that the Minnesota demo- 
Z L? 3 J ',° ' he, . r .* reBt . est hef S ht - Spurred on by the accomplishments of 
tte St. vT, °, '" the B ° Ulder Dam ' the "i-taiwi canalization, 
cow-fhXnH \i y . deVel ,° Pment a " d ° ther large P r °J ects they grasp the 
^lt aXidl TT appenda ^ s »»» -th one mighty heave declare 
till h, ■? *,, hel ' crossin ^ of water ways and rivers, such as 

toll bridges and ferries should belong to and be owned by the public thm 
the instrumentality of either the federal government or of the state " 

M v»I h „ e rf\ Cl0Ud n TimeS rep ° rts Mn Regan ' the democratic candidate for 
governor to be well satisfied with the platform. We would expect -hTm to 
be However, the elections returns will probably show that Mr Regan ° 
■ much more easily satisfied than the voters. i 



CAN'T SCARE THE FARMERS 
(Mille Lac County Times) 



to sell stock in 

way without a permit and established 



It is going, to be difficult for the old. reactionaries to frighten the "farm- 
ers and workers by shouting "Cooperative Commonwealth." The farmers 

" mL'T nC ''i'-!' Ve f ° Und , " ,at the ° nly means with whicn they, could. at all' 
meet the conditions ,„ tins country is through cooperation. Their! coopera'" 
toe enterprises are the only things that have given them a decent "chance 
to gam a competence or livelihood on the farm. The time is not" so long 
past when- attempts were made to discourage their cooperative enterprises 
We can remember, of state offlcials»refusing to issue a permit formers 
cooperative and the farmers went ahead and sold' it'any- 

_. i a successful cooperative enterprise'. 

We can remember when warrants were issued for the arrest of iaSeS 
"ad nTh f B T m ?,. t0 °^ ni " * cooperative enterprise, just becau^ They 
bad not been familiar with -the law and had not observed all of the neces 

£Lt^ BUt th6y diSC0Vtled thB Plan to »P"' t«e ent rpril irfSe 
i°nd m reL t fi h t e |i„g q rm enlS ° f the l0W ^ d thCir «*' * -'« Wing 

are go.ng to be scared over the idea of a cooperative cc. monteahh? espS 
, json a co «ageous and intelligent leader as Governor 



drunkeness. The record shows that 
they- -applied -the wrong remedy, and 
that conditions were greatly ■ aggrava- 
ted.-'- Their sincerity must, of neces- 
sity, be judged jlargely by the prompt- 
ness- with which they retrace their 
steps and rectify their error by re- 
storing rigid prohibition in the dis- 
trict.-' 



iSi 1 ;^:^? t&sSS. 




ialiy when they have such 
Floyd IS. els 



""S. 



THE "MODERN" G. O: P. 
(Farmer-Labor Leader) 



The best evidence of moral decay of the Republican party of Minnesota 
shows in a comparison of the ideals of present-day Republicans with' those 
of the Republican State legislature of 1878. Among outstanding acts 'of 
that body were passing of the Corporate Excess Tax law, and a : bill for 
textbooks to be printed on contract for the state and furnished'.free-tb 
pupils. 

The gaunt, martyred Rail Splitter had been 
The Republican party of 1878 was; still* the 



That was 5G years ago, 

in his grave but 13 years. __ t 

party of Lincoln, warmed by his honesty, inspired "by "his" Weak. 

In 1934 Republicans of Minnesota -try to block enforcement of the'Cor- 
poorate Excess Tax measure. It ' " 
throats. 



"A lazy boy and a warm bed are extremely 
difficult to part" 

JULY 

■ 23— Steve Brodie jumps from 
theBrooklynbrtdge,1886. 

"24 — Waterspout in Nevada 
kills thirty people, 1874. 



23 — Bleriot first to fly over - 
English channel, 1909. 




■■"'.2«"» 

;-.iEv. 

£7r?^§& .27— Fir£t trans- Atlantic cable 
.fc'Sbj^L line isccmrjlcted. 1866. 



26— Ceoree Bernard Shew; 
great dramatist, bom 

■■: isse. 



■ Greatest Bowmen '-'.; 

Undoubtedly the ; world's greatest 
masters of archery are the Tarascans. ; 
.a tribe of Mexican Indians, says Col- 
liers Weekly. With, their bows and : 
arrows, many of them can split a 
grain of wheat at a distance of 30 
feet 



Irrigation in India 

Tank Irrigation Is common In cen- 
tral and southern India, Large quan- 
tities of rain are stored In tanks and 
distributed Uurlng the drier seasons of 
the year. : 



jCANTT BE DONE? - B y tMw 



OH OEABl-THESC THINGS ACE 
COHSTT^HTW FALLtHSOur* 



Tube 
Cabinet 

ApJUSWBtS SUELWS IN TttS 
COLLAPSIBLE TUBE CABINET 
TO FIT USUAL MEDICINE CHESTS 
PERMIT GREATER OR USS NUMBER' 
OF TOOTHPASTE AND OTHER TUBES 
TO BS CONVENIEKTL.V PLACED 
CAN IT BEDONB? 




Do you think lhi» Idea l» praoHcalt Write Bay Gross In care of this newspaper 



London's 1666 Fir* 
In 166B London tooS Are, and 13,000 
bondings were destroyed. 



The Liberal Digest 

& — — : ^r^— — ^— — _— _^___ . 

UNCLE SAM BEHIND /THE PJLOW special agriculture program. It ii 

true that these processing taxes are 
ultimately paid by the consumer (the 
farmer, for instance, paying 8c more 
a p^ir fpr overalls than he otherwise 
would), but at least the agricultural 
work of the Government is paying its 
way anc> not immeasurably increasing 
the public debt. Moreover, reports 
from tax collectors, merchants and* 

banks show that the farmer is not. 

You have probably wondered why/ ^ oa «ling his newly found money buj/ 
the\ Government shows farmers how 1S UB "is: it to pay debts and buy 
to breed better hogs|.and grow more re cessities. 

wheat and at the same time asks them As a concrete result of the pro 
to kill the hogs and; plow the wheal j gram the farmers found themselves 
under because we have a surplus y^J-k a 24% higher gross income in 

of both. Henry A. 'Wjallace, Secretary " nn " '" 

of Agriculture, clears up this mystery 
among others in The 'American Maga- 
zine for July, Mr. Wallace takes the 
stand as a witness for the Government 



The following digest is printed 
to give our readers [art. opportunity 
to read the arguments advanced 
by the Secretary of -Agriculture 
in behalf of the crop' curtailment 
program of the administration. 
It does not necessarily imply that 
we agree with the arguments 
advanced: 



Fair Relic 



1933 than they had in 1932— an in 
crease from $5,143,000,000 to ?6,383,- 
000,000. In stark contrast with this 
notable increase are the conditions 

which would have prevailed without 

and is quizzee' by henry F. Pringle. ■ regulation of production: we should 



counsel for a bewildered public. 

It is not as odd asiybii might think 
for agriculture to curtail its output 
by reducing" acreage.' "Whenever 



have had 17,000,000 bales of cotton 
which, added to the holdover from the 
previous year, would probably have 
brought the price as low as Be 




23— Austria starts the greatr ' 
- World war. 1914. 



-Mussolini, Italy's Black 
Sliirt leader, born. 1S83. 



industry cuts production it does the P ound - Wheat, rice, and tobacco 
exact equivalent." Mr.- Wallace de- ' p ower3 » and other farmers would 
Clares. "Industry started cutting pro- I * suffered likewise, 
auction when the depression started! Obviously the plight of the farmei 
throwing people out of work, making 5 as Dee n much more serious in this 
them unable to buy; and making"-it depression than in former ones. This 
more necesssary for the. farmer to cut * a not on ^y because he is more c-e- 
production." : pendent than ever upon remote citi- 

By the same token efficiency has zen ? wh ° must be able to buy his 
as legitimate a place ! in agriculture is ' S uc ,2? he ls to sur vive, but also 
in industry. Herein ihes the wisdom Jf9 ause . he is much less self-suf- 
of destroying crops i while teaching ? ] 5' ent 1 ?„ th S 1 , old Pioneer sense of 
farmers improved methods of scienti- u word - i . The Secretary denies, 
fie agriculture. "It is common sense oS W< ; Ve f' . farmers ar e shiftless 
lor us to work as efficiently as pos- ~l"t ""* enterprise. They have risen 
sible," the Secretary ^says. "To srfend £„ y to th f P"? en t gesture of the 
more hours than necessary, to get a ££ v ernment. Critics -said it would 
result is silly. We need to eon- S? f hundreds of.. thousands of 



trol the total but we: nJed To produce ?f'" tor f. '? . k !? p t"? 3 , on 10,000,000 
it tne department oi".agricu.Tturi"- : to ,1°°"„ 4 ?i l ?„„ a „ n i_ bu L a ^w "of" these 



each crop, as efficiently as we c^n7-"lt " ITO I r - s; y et .the actual number 'en- 
is the aim oi tne experimental uancn fS^? 1 ?„ a ^' mm i 3t e rl ne the act is only 



THiil 



In 



Natural 

jou, hiMr m.v speech on the ■ iie~job"of" tne" aI".nThistra t ive''b'ranc> 
ii.o?". itskt!(l.tlie (.-ollea^ue. — " "" 

'i-fihl." answ'ereil Senator Sorchum. 
'Hciwctllil It snunil?" 
'N'ntnrat-as^llfe. . It put me to sleep 
: nve >rolnutes." -"' 



make farm production efficient;:" it -U. of - an5r ins P ec ting. The whole scheme 

the job of tne ae.ninistrative branch ln0 

91' the Department to hold production - thvonoh i««;i i ^> 

*n-n, n ♦„ io„„io „„*„ i.i -jit Iv . cm ough local pmduiSTj l control 



crop control is carried out for the 
iiioat part by the farmeti themselves 



: '"V".T°° True 
SheV-I. dou't-'tlitiik that women haVe 
alw^uys-heeii "V'aln. You know, women 
wi're'iiimle before mirrors. 
• He- -Yes.; and they've heen before 
rhemltnost ^of .the time since. 



A Beginner 

Marjorle- -How Hre you 



getting 



. . . 'he law of the state but commercial cut- oiury-nne i 

newsnane^H^ ^""'i 1 ? liP S8rViC - e *° LinC ° In ' defy thttt law - an <i their, tne thing. today. 
newspapers I defame and denounce it. j v - ^- -■■■■•■■ 

ih^lrV- 3 !'^""^ ° f Minneso ? a repudiate and brand as vicious- the 1 
£r^f2i * V ;°? t 5 e l Ch ° 01 B ° Dk Trust ^ their Republican fathers and ■ 
grandfather^ of !878. Said the Minnesota Younger Republicans 



down to levels consonant with the S oei n ti« no a„^ -mr -nr w — 

welfare of the farmer and the Wi- out that JSl ? WaIlace points 
try at large. :j v.- * I ^JL;?® i T 1 " 16 * !l * r f are govern- 

The citizen may understand this ' SSteht dlSfn S fe la ? ces *° J " sure 
and still' be puzzled ti- know why : iSiSL Sd fhL t " g u has 5 een 
farmers shoulo cut short the prod'uc ?ag lieibIe and the far mers have been 

tion of food Qt the very time when i 1 _: 

Americans are going hungry. The ah- " " 

swer to this: simply is that people are 
not going hungry because farmers 
failed to prouuee enough food. "As a 
matter of fact," Mr. .]. Wallace ob- 
serves, "the pigs that were killed last 
year and the cotton that "was plowed 
nnder— much as these things go' 
against the grain — have made it pos- 




The M:ssissippi, ancient locomotive 
which helped to build the South 100 
years agoxand Is now in Wings of a 
Century at the Chlcngo Wor!r"s Fair, 
provides a resting place fcr Mrs. M. 
O. Peterson, of Des IV"..;.;-.2s, iowa, as 
Opie Read, famed author, tells some- 
thing of its history. 



philosopher" 

By ALFRED BIGGS 



Facts dispel fauclus. 

You can't win If you're afraid to try. 



Science, music . 
ality. 



.iid ;t. t kuo\v l;: nation^ 



You may play a j 
a poor sport. 



The vices of today 
of tomorrow. 



uften are th.? virtues 



You can't separate 
from modesty. 



true knowledge 



Only ignorance measures . values by 
money standards. 



2, 1934: 



on April 



The provisions of tlio Farmer-Labor platform, or anv other plat- 
form for) .state publication of textbooks, is a most serious menace to 
the freedom of ; both public and private education. It predicts curtail- 
ment of freedom of thought, cf speech and of press. :r /: 
(Compare that statement with Tory editorials of 101 
nouncing the proposal for public schools.) And 



- : ;"*M«ybe Not 

"The girls are gulu*; In for archery.* 
**1 fenow. But I don't think Cupid 
'ieed>: any help." 



years .ago .de- 
the regular Republican. 



nrInH^L M U ne3 ° ta I?-* 5 platfoPm ad ° pted Frida y- A P^ 13, f 1934"Sa' 
practically the same thing. -; *" 

When the G. O. P. of Minnesota was clean, wholesome and reflected 
the will of the people its sturdy pioneers passed the very laws that are de- 
nounced byjso-called Republicans |of today. 

Nor is the wrecking of the pirtv cm fined to this state. On Juiy^'and 
7 at Jackson, Mich., was held a celebration of the birth of the organization 
years ago. As the high spot in that celebration, Henry P. Fiettcher; 
tilled Democrats of state and nation wi*h 
dministration and upon the President -of 



"■ An Important Choice 
Smith — There are two sides to every 
question. ' 

Brown— Yes. and there are two sides 
to a sheet of fly paper, but It makes 
a J)Ig difference to the fly which side 
he chooses. — Kansas City Times. 



80 

Republican National chairman, a: 



this attack 
the United 



on the 'Democratic i 
States: 



Clothed with unprecedented ait*hority the President has delegated- 
control of the livelihood, business ar.d property of the individual Ameri- : 
can citizen to a vast maze of theorizing, meddling, directing, spending, 
lending and borrowing agencies lettered on the Russian model. 

Bankrupt in morals, without a program, and reduced to a few thread- 
bare "names'* to call those it cannot corrupt, the Republican party of Min- 
nesota and of the United States is a warning spectacle to honest men an. 
women. It | shows what happens, to an organization scB^t^an^Kfee^Ea 
by self-appointed leaders and by (them sold body and sfcUfa t£a^£n^ 
Special Privilege. It is truer today than ever before thaiVrogresT^tbe 
people of this state must be made in spite of and over the remains of what 
was once a great political party. ' 




■Hlinig with your autouinhlle lesson?' .- Ll , - , - - - 

Mflftr'-.-KIrie. I learned how to tint ' f ft 1 .? JXT^^H* 1° eat . in * h « 
■ - - united States that if those pigs had 

not been! killed and that cotton and 
not that cotton had not been plowed 
under. We are still producing more 
than enough food, not only for those 
who can afford to buy it; but for those 
1 on the relief rolls." Even at the height 
of prosperity in 1929 we lacked 200,- 
: 000,000 bushels of consuming oui 
wheat crop. Actually the more money 
people have the less they care for 
. wheat. Recovery would mean that wc 
would turn to more expensive foods, 
r Apart from drastie crop reduction 
' the only way to avoid- a perilous sur- 
. plus of foodstuffs is to ship our farm 
I products abroad. This, in the judg- 
ment of the Secretary, would be in- 
finitely preferable to the present arti- 
ficial ^ method of restriction. But to 
ship our goods abroad we should have 
first to lower tariffs and' admit for- 
eign goods so that foreign countries 
might in turn buy our "surplus farm 
commodities. This is obiviously the 
path of intelligence, but tariffs can- 
hot be lowered too quickly, and until 
the adjustment between export and 
import, is better we must continue to 
hold down farm production. Mr. 
Wallace-; believes that unless we c°n 
reduce Qur tariffs and ship surplus 
products* abroad*, we may have to re- 
tire permanently 40,000,000 to 60,- 
000,000 -acres of productive land. ". 
: : Sharp;' inquiry into the finances of 
the AAA reveals that about $2'7S,000,- 
000 has-been paid farmers 

icreage rentift and bi 

ients\ >Of this ajjjounV $: 

,606 has|already been returneus— s. 

CJftve'rnnient— andj. more will £e ' 

received — Ijirough the "processing tak"-' 

es levied by Congress to carry on t&ej 



Appropriate 

Husband — What possessed you to 
choose - lemon color for your new 
gown?. . 

Wiite-^It was hecause 1 had such a 
lob. squeezing It out of you. *" 



. -Anatomical Problem 

*!BohhIe, 1 am golnR -to spank yon 
as sure-aa -anything," said Bobble's 
mother. 

"You. can't Pm slttln' on It," said 
Hobble,— Chicago News, 



Fed Up 

Mrs.* Knngg- We were married twen 
v. years aero- today. Just fancy I 
Knncrc* I rt, .'' v «*lsh It was. 



ggsgjglftfrilJii Human Body ^^. 

Tlie^^ew^ normal human boAj^_ 

contains from one gallon to one ana 

j a fourth or one and a half gallons of 

j blood. , 






vCf CfjujJKence ■Mrru/r^fonn-e 






There's inpre to Mother's crazy-quilt 
Than careless eyes can see; 

Nobody else could understand 

The charm it holds for me! y 

When she points out the blocks that came 
From suits I used to wear, 

It brings back joyful memories 
■' That we alone can sharel 

There's tenderness and sentiment, 

There's beauty and romance 
In every scrap of coat she used, 

And every patch of pants; 
And eveiy thread is intertwined 

Witfc- happiness and cheer— 
Because, tons, these.memories/ 

Are very, very dear} 



V 



^fftofr?" 



7 mmi0^jiM wm; ^m : ^^mm;mmm: 



'T'm 



Thief Riv®r Falls Farurtt 



ii 



Official Paper ! of Pennington County 

thief river falls, Minnesota. 



B. M. 



Published Thursday of each week by the"- ■ -- ' ' .-- " -j 

FORUM PUBLISHING COMPANY.: ->rV.^.-'Sfc 

R. M. Aalbu and H. L. Schuster, Proprietors, . ; .'.- 'i : i->^' 

Aalb'u, Editor. - , ! Bernice Berge,;City lEditqK 



Citizens State Bank Building, 



Thief Eiver FaJU^liuinesot*. 



I ;Subscription $1.00 per year in the United States';.;?: ?"■ 



"Entered as second-class matter, April 27, -1932, at the post offide- SjKTblef 
Biver Falls,' Minnesota, under Act pf March 3, 1897." '";;' i-^-ft*-.-' 



THE ASS IN TRAVAIL BROUGHT FORTH A GNAT-:*'*'-. ' ' 



\ The Minnesota Democrats held a convention at St. Cloud July. 17tn>ind 
besides vievHng the Farmer-Labor platform "with alarm" and dwefiujgSoii 
the accomplishments of the national administration with all tile" loVS^akoV 
devotion of] a young mother on :her first-born, adopted a state -democratic 
platform.' iAnd what a platform! Concern for the overburdened 'ta^rpay£re 
land the down-trodden farmers stick out all over it like the> qujUj's ot a 
porcupine. ; lit fairly oozes with statesmanship. We. marvel tbatj'sucii! an! 
oustanding] instrument could be brought into thcworld by a mer^hariafull 
of two or jlhree thousand democrats. (The St. Cloud Daily Tirie§tat|s 

that is all jthat were expected to attend.) ~ ~^" 

After having stated that they will demand strict economy \in-gov«rn-' 
ment and abolition of unnecessary commissions and bureaus, they advocate; 
a new conservation program which would necessitate three or Sfouivnisf 
bureaus, some tax revisions which would need one or two more, -and unem- 
ployment arid old age pension systems requiring some more study'by soil- 
dry commissions. -*"--.--' -.- 

Gettingdown to real fundamentals they declare that the."olduGapitol" 
building should "be suitably remodeled and used for state purposes.'?- To J Arrests for 
house some of the commissions and bureaus which they want to abolish we Dunkenness 



C^LU. NOTES 



PBUNKENESS ON THE INCREASE 
^ > STATISTICS SHOW 



- # Fbf. "son^e -years prior to the adbp- 
tion^of^ Lth£ national prohibition 
amendment;^ the city of Washington 
had;-ld<^Wprohibition under congres- 
sional: statute. Dunkenness " ana the 
cvuV'toseparable from drinking de- 
c)in«d -sharply •immed'iatly upon the 
adoption' of! the measure. .. 

-After the. repeal of the prohibition 
amendment ; :the wet members of the 
congress almost franticly urged the 
repejil^.pf f the old prohibition 
statute ; in the interest of "true 
temperarice.'' Great . concern about 
and-.itbhorrence of the drinking and 
drunkenness that prevailed .in the 
city~*t'- JBat : time was expressed by 
the-opponents of prohibition in con- 
gres^The-Crusaders, which was the 
youthi-divisiqri of the .- Association 
Against .the Prohibition Amendment, 
sponsored alawfor the city which,' it 
claimed/;; would reduce these evils to 
a" nunlmum. So congress repealed the 
old -prohibition law. ' ' 

The results were appalling. Even 
the= : wetTpapers expressed amazement 
and: alarm". The new high records -of. 
arests* for drunkenness and tis as- 






Minute Seinufhs 

By Dr. Crawionl Grays ."; 



—Laws are writteiiifor every^- 



enforced for! 



spend their 
their idea of 



one but not 
everyone. 

.- — How ..peopfce 
: ; - money reflects 
values. 



— Chain newspapers are 

blight on the j progress of 
' fair public opinion. 

— There's bound j to! be cor- 
ruption in a | community 
when certain, lawless ones 
get "excused by "fixing." 

— In this speed age! it is well 
to remember that wisdom, 
usefullness and; j character 
are not secured j by fast 
ones. . ■ ! = .j 

. — A man is not necessarily for 
one side or agairikt another 
side because he has fan opin- 
ion on a controversial subject. 



Greatest Bowmen '.; '•'-; 

sociated 'evils were disquieting: The: w d ° u ^ dl, h the ^j^'L «««»«*" 
ii^; t. r™ j™-i,™_..^ ._j ? 4 . __ -..masters of archery are the Tarascans.! 



j.: 



arrests for drunkenness and its as- 
four months of 1934 show an increase 
of nearly. 67 ;per cent over the same 
months in 1933, after the return of 
beer, and more than 80 per cent over 
dry? 1982. , 

" The -tabulation is revealing: 



"a tribe of Mexican Indjans, says Cq> 
.;llers Weekly. With- their bows and; 
arrows, many of them can split a- 
graln of wheat at a distance of SO 
feet ■: - '•.; 



would surmise. The fact that the public buildings committees of the House! janu^ 
and the Senate at the last session of the Legislature investigated the mat-' February 
ter and found' that all interior walls in the old building are "bearings' waHs"! March > ■ 
which makes remodeling impossible and infeasable since it would Require AD1!il 
the complete wrecking of the dome, the tower and the roof, brtaginFtle 
coat far beyond the value of the property, does not enter into the-.questioh 
with the democrats. What matter such bagatelle was there. are 
at stake? jWe might suggest that there is another 



1932 
Dry 



1933 1934 
BeerRepeal 



1142 
1204 
1144 
1424 



1340 
1147 
1371 
1529 



1934 
1646 
2194 
2307 



Irrigation la India 

Tank Irrigation ia| common In can-:- 
;tral and southern India. Large quan- 
;tlUei of rain are stored In tanks and 
distributed during the drier seasons of 
the year. j ' ' 



the democrats should have given attention and declaration in their plat- 

fh" 1 !'.. ? ™ t0 the d ' !re need of a f °°«"*iB"e' over Mud Creek : between 
the John Jones and Ole Johnson farms. 

But it is on the question of public ownership that the Minnesota demo- 
crats rise b? their greatest height. Spurred on by the accomplishments of 

-the nafaoiial.administration in the Boulder Dam, the Mississippi canalization, 
the Tennessee Valley development and other large projects they grasp- the 

'^Ttat M-H* rr' aW,end "S« ™* ™ th one mighty heav7a£lare 
Zl br^l " ^* "'her crossings of water ways and rivers, such as 

toUbndgesj and femes should belong to and be owned by.thepublic thru 
the instrumentality of either the federal government or of the state' 

The St. — - -- ! 

governor to 
be. However, 



Totals;. .._.. _ .4914 5387. 8981 

The": ^congressmen who repealed the 

'principles" local prohibitory law insisted" that 

burning issue";whieh i *h e y Were acting in the interest of 



Cloud Times reports Mr, Regan, the, democratic candidate for 
be well satisfied with the nlatformr W» ™„„m „ .. ,.._ i " 



1 



be well satisfied with the platform^ We would expeot-Jiim- to 
r, the elections returns will prnhnhi*, «i.«". *i.-*. »#- «-- "":- 
the ..voters. 



„„„, ,. ., ^tions returns will probably show that Mr Reean 
much more easily satisfied than ^- «egan 



CAN'T SCARE THE FARMERS 
(Mille Lac County\Times) 



temperance, -They -were seeming to 
redniee^the" evila of drinking -and 
drunkeness; ---The . record shows that 
the'y->applied \the wrong remedy, and 
that conditions were greatly- aggrava- 
ted.'"- Their "sincerity .must, of neces- 
sity, be judged largely by the prompt- 
ness'"; with "which they retrace their 
steps. and rectify their error by re- 
storing rigid"' prohibition in the dis- 
trict.- 




It is going to be difficult for the old reactionaries to frighten the farm- 
ers and workers by shouting "Cooperative Commonwealth." The farmers : 
for instance, have found that the only means with ^m\h theyVcoulfl at all" 
meet the conditions in this country is through cooperatiix Their- cbopera-' 
toe enterprises are the only things that have given themVdecent/cmffiie 
to gain a competence orjivelihood on the farm. The time is^oi so' long 
wfj. a f tem J >ts 7' ef;Pmade tD *scourage their cooperative enterprises 
We can remember of state officials»reiusing to issue a permit f or f Irmers t ' l^r^' 
a cooperative and the farmers went ahead and sbid'it' any? """ 

permit and established a successful cooperative enterprise'.' 



"A Uzfbey and a warm bed ere extremely 
*■"*"'" to port" 



to sell stock 
way without 



sary details. 
' to meet the 



We can remember when warrants were issued for the arrest offarmers 

htlnTL^r^-' ° r ?rr * ^°^-^ enterprise,' just because they 
had not been familiar with the law and had not observed all of the neces 
But they discovered the plan to upset the enterprise m^fime 
requirements of the law and their cooperative is still derating 



■ and benefitting them. 

ttv.^r 6 a . 1 A fe V a r iners wh0 have anything to do ,with farmers .'caopera-' 

todav tf th?" " h ° °l n6t kn ° W th " t they W ° Uld not ' ha ^ ^ch'enteUfes 
wL k, ! mS reactl0 '> a 'J' opposition that is opposing state cooperation 

Le ^w t' e h St ° P , theM - S ° " ? d ° " 0t bdieve lhat '»™«- andf Sfiel 

Mv whfn th P v T °T the idea ° f a ' c °°P-ative cc.n,onwealtn; ; esiS 

^oyd B Olt„ SUCH * COUlass o us and -telligent leader as; Governor 



THE "MODERN* 
(Farmer-Labor 



g. o: p. 

Leader) 



v Sbe^T-tI : don't ; ihiiik that women haye 
alft^ysj:heHiVxv«ln. You know, womeb 
wijre'iiiarie .heftire mirrors. 

Be— Yes,; ^nd they've been before 
rhemJjriGst 't^.the time since <i 



The best evidence of moral decay of the Republican -p'arty of MmnWota 
shows in a Comparison of the ideals of present-day Republicans with"' those 
of the Republican State legislature of 1878. Among outstanding^ : acts v: of 
that body wfere passing of the Corporate Excess Tax law, -atid" a : bill for 
textbooks to be printed on contract for the state and furnisbed^fTeB-to 
pupils. w , •; ^ . .:.'.■':■ ...i 

That wis 5G years ago. The gaunt, martyred Rail Splitte^^fiad been 

in his grave, but ,13 years. The Republican party of 1878 w"a3= still" the ■ 

/.— . '^^ . A Beginner 

--•5Iai^QrIe^-^low Hre you getting 

-jiiiirig^rt'lth ymir autoumhtle lesson?" 

tbmnfa m V ;«o. t,™ •*- i i- "."" — "* "'" *"** re " ufc wumwreiai cut- ; ■ oloVVr- -KlnV I teamed how to aim 

Si™ 8 , hypocritical hp service to LincoIn>t drf tha( . ^ g r ^ , %( j a "«» 

newspapers defame and denounce it. . ■-..■. . | - '-^ -' t -> , 

In 1934 Republicans of Minnesota repudiate and brand as vicious- :ihe '.' ■ " "^ v ;* ? *f" ? rM»yI» Not "s 

upon the School Book Trust by their Republican father's : and •'■' "TKe girls are uolnc In for archery.* 

of 1878. Said the Minnesota Younger Republicans on April.' "I, know. But I dop't think Cupid 



— e-— j, ""- ,i" jroarsi. ine r.epuDiican party of 1878 was' 
party of Liriboln, warmed by his honesty, inspired by his ideals/- ■ 

In 1934 Republicans of Minnesota .try to block enforcement rinhe'Cor- 
.porate Excess Tax measure. It is the law of the state but commerbiaf eut- i 



check placed 
grandfathe; 
2, 1934: 



The n 
form, for 




JULY 

"23 — Steve Brodie jumps from 
theQrooklynbridse,18S6. ■'- 

"24 — Waterspout in Nevada' 
.-;- * lolls thirty people, 1874. ' * 

25 — Bleriot first to fly over; 
" ' English channel, 1909. -i" 

.26— Georee Bernard Shaw," ' 

- great dramatist, boin' : 
-••-: J8S6. :: 




UNCLE SAM BEHIND 



i The following dlgesl is printed 
to give, our readers an! Opportunity '•'-' 
to read the arguments advanced ; 

-by the Secretary 'of r^Agriculture'""; 

.in behalf of the crop' cort^ilmenti 

■; program pf the administration. : 
It does not .necessarily imply that ; 
we agree with the ; arguments 
advanced.'. 



£AN IT BE DONE? - 




Do ypg think OSm Idem U practical T Write Bay Gross In care of this newspaper 



London'* 1666 Fira 

In 1666 London took fire, and 13,000 
buildings were destroyed. 



era! Digest 



THE PJLOW 



spehial agriculture program. It is 
true; that these processing taxes are 
ultimately paid by the consumer (the 
farmer, for instance, paying 8c more 
a pair for overalls than he otherwise 
would), but at least the agricultural 
work of the Government is paying its 
way and' not immeasurably increasing 
the. public debt. Moreover, reports 
from tax collectors, merchants and' 

banks show that the farmer is not 

You have probably Wondered why/ hoa rding his newly found money but 
-the Government shows .farmers how "• "sing it to pay debts and buy 
to breed better hogs and grow more. reeessities. , 

wheat and at the same time asks them A 5 a concrete, result of the pro- 
to kill the hogs and plow the wheat | gram the farmers found themselves 
.._.!„- i ,. — . _ surplus with a 24% higher gross income in 



under because we have 
9'f -both, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary 
of Agriculture, clears up this mystery 
among others 'in The American Maga- 
zine for July, Mr. Wallice takes the 
stand as a witness for the Government 
and is quizzed' by henry F. Pringle, 
counsel for a bewildered I public.- ■ 
---It is not as odd as 1 you might think 
for agriculture to curtail its output 
by reducing 1 acreage.? "Whenever 



Fair Relic 



1933 than they had in 1932— an in- 
crease from $5,143,000,000 to $6,383,- 
000,000. • In stark contrast with this 
notable increase are the conditions 
which would have prevailed without 
regulation of production: we should 
have had 17,000,000 bales of cotton 
which, added to the holdover from the 
previous year, would probably have 
brought the price as low;as 6c 



industry cuts production if does the : p und - "bea t.^rice,^ and tobacco 
exact equivalent." Mr; [Wallace ide- "™""""~ 
Clares. "Industry started; cutting pro- 
duction when the depression started: 



powers, and other farmers would 
have suffered likewise. 
..Obviously, the plight of the farmei 



Sf^^& .27— First trans- Atlantic cab1«; 
.^'Sa^T-. .'_;■-'.-. line is completed. 1866. J. 



28'— Austria starts the great; ' 
■" "^ World war, 1914. 



. 29— Mussolini, Italy's Black: 
_. Shirt leader, born. 1883. 




the 



'■"'-;£' " '''Natural 
"Did yuu^ Jieur mv speech 
.ratliitV'- H^kurt^tjip colleague. 
-. .''i^!iiU;;VHiisw"ered Senator Sorghum. 

."HinOHil It. sound?" 
^•'■Niitural'iis^ife .'It put me to sleep 
■hf^flye>aithutes.*' -'" 



-ovisions of tJi-: 



Farmer-Labor platform, or anv other jilat- 

ptate publication of textbooks, is a most serious meiiace to" 

.he freedom of both public and private education.' It predicts fcarMiU 

ment of freedom of thought, of speech and of press. ■■.:„><.-•?.■.;.■ 

(Compare that statement 

nounclng th; proposal for nubl 

partyW Miiuiesota in its platform adopted Friday, April 
practically the same thing. 



swer-td-' this "simply is th»t people are 
not going : hungry ] because farmers 
failed to-'pr'ouuee enough food. "As a 
matter of ' fact," Mr. .".[Wallace ob- 
serves, "the pigs that were killed last 
year and the cotton thaij "was plowed 
under— much as these things go 
a'jjainst the grain — have made it pos- 

.sible ofr" more people t> eat in the 
United States that if those pigs had 
riot been" killed and that cotton and 
not that cotton had' not been plowed 
under. ' We : are still producing more 
than enough food, riot only, for those 
who can alford to buy -it, hut for those 
on the relief rolls.** Even; at the height 

I of prosperity in 1929 we lacked 200,- 
s» " . . . . _, . ;000,000 bushels of j consuming oui 

, Anlmportwit Choic. wneat cn>p _ ActuaUy the more money 

Snrith— There are two sides to every- p e0 pie have the less they care for 
question.-' wheat. Recovery would 'i lean that we 

Hrow.n— Yes. and there' are two sides 11 would turn' to .more expensive foods, 
sheet of fly paper, bnt It makes : ; Apart from drastic eijop reduction 



throwing people outiof ; ^vork, making ' h as been much more serious in this 
them unable to buy, and ihakingTit depression than in former ones. This 
more necesssary for the farmer to cut " nbt on 'y because he is more ae- 
productidn.V '-'I >; pendent than .ever upon remote citi- 

fy thtf same token efficiency has : zen 5 ^ ho . J , , ?? s t le » Me **» buy. his 
as legitimate a place in! agriculture is ' P I P ducta ,?J h? la to survive, but also 
in industry. Herein litjsl the wisdoni &'? 80 ? 6 . *L :1S ™ ucn . Ie3s self-suf- 
of destroying crops whUe- teachinfe fif m „ Snl- pioneer sense of 

farmers improved methods of scierib- t„t, wor < 1 - , J*S Secretary denies, 
fie agriculture. "It is common sense „°?1 ve f' tha * farmers are shiftless 
lor us to work as efficiently as pos- "?°2, » e " te »*??se. They have risen 
sible," the Secretary says. : "To srfend ??»i y *° "l e P^?? 1 : 11 ' eesture of the 
moie hours than necessary; to get a t»2 TT^ C " tlcs • said " "would 
given result is silly. Wei need to con- !Sn f „ ! , s **" ' h ? nsand3 of ™- 
trol the total but we need "to produce Si~ . ?? p tabs , on iO.OOO.OOO 

each criatas efficiently 'as we can.Tlt ™™1™ : 3 ^ et . t P e a . ctua ' number en- 
li the arm oi tne"- expeanenwi oancu S|?t ' f„ti' m ™'? t ? 1 '? e * e "'j 8 ?"'? 
of the department of^aWriculture-'tb 2„ Ut 4 ? 00 and bu *, a few of these 
ih'ake farm production efficient;: ifr:is,„?.^ ny "^P^V 06 ' The . whoIe Scheme 
die job of me acnlnistifative branch ,LS°L* n £?L 1S $* med "f fol ', the 
SfHhe Department to Kojd production : iC n ih fj?fi ^ a ™ e: - themselves 
down to levels consonant 'with the Stfons A n ? m"^' >, Contl ' 0, - as - 
welfare 6f the farmer arid the-ioun- out tW wl^l! Mr ' WalIa<:e P '"* 8 
try at large. i. •;•;•-- I ^± t that : T 1 " 16 J tl V er ? are S»vern- 

The citizen may understand this ' Krt^S,,!^ \^^ es *° ™?»re 
and still: be puzzled to know why : nSSSble ™rf?S* 5. hlsehn 'J has been 
farmers shoulu cut phort the produj- n „ e ? 1, e> ble ^ the farmers have been 
tibri of food:a.t the very time when j 
Americans are going hungry. The ari- 



iieerb": .any help." 



fair. 




The Mississippi, ancient locomotive 
which helped to build the South 100 
years- ago, and Is now in Wings of a 
Century at the Chicago World's Fair, 
provides a resting piacc fcr Mrs. M. 
O. Peterson, of Deo ^;i;^3s, iowa, as 
Opie Read, famed author, tells some- 
thing I of its history. 



'cJL FIP'SSiDE 

PHI^OSOlPHER. ,, 

By ALFRED BIGGS 



Pacts dispel faucics. 

• • • 

You can't win If you're afraid to try. 



Science, music i.ud ii. I kuow uo nation- 
ality. 



You may play a good g^r.ie : 
a poor sport. - 



The vices of today often are tin? 
of tomorrow." 



Tou can't separate 
from modesty. 



true knowledge 



Only ignorance measures ^values 
money standards. 



by 



with Tory editorials of 101 years"ago de- ■ ■ 'P 

blic schools.) -And. the regular RepiTbiicari I * * lE difference to the fly which side ' the only way to_ avoid- a [perilous siir- 
13, ? i?S4, said 



he chooses. — Kansas City Times. 



When the G. O. P. of Minnesota was clean, wholesome and rtflected 
the will of the people its sturdy pioneers passed the very laws that are'de- 
nounced by so-called Republicans of today. ■..■-•..•», 

Nor is the wrecking of the partv cenfined to this state. On JufyifcCand 
7 at Jacksoijj Mich., was held a celebration of the birth of ^he organization 
80 years ago. As the high spot in that celebration, Henry P. Flettcher 
Republican National chairman, assaulted Democrats of state and nation- with 
this attack on the Democratic administration and upon the President of 
the United States: ..:•,:-..-... 

Clothe! with unprecedented authority the President has -delegiied"-' 
control of 'he livelihood, business and property of the individual Am6ri- r; 
can citizen to a vast maze of theorizing, meddling, directing, spending,." 
lending and borrowing agencies,! lettered on the Russian model. 

Bankrupt in morals, without a program, and reduced to a few thread- 
bare "namesj' to call those it cannot .corrupt, the Republican party of Min- 
nesota and of the United States is a warning spectacle to honestmen an. 
women. It shows what happens, to an organization scb^bU* ' 

*.by self-appointed leaders and by them sold body and s&ttfej 
Special Privijege. It is truer today than ever before that'progr^sToy 
people of this state must be made 'in spite of and over the remains of whit 
was once a great political party. ! 



Appropriate. 

Husband— What possessed .you to 
choose - lemon color for your new 
gown.?.; ;-i. - ■ 

W*!ie-=jt was because 1 had such a 
lob.^queezlng It out of you. " ; 



;.-' Anatomical Problam 
■ *:Bobhle, I am going -to spank you' 
as "Vurejas anything," said Bobble's 
.mother..; 

?Ydii. cah't rm slttln' on It," said 
KobMe.^<?liIcago News. 



Fed Up 

Mrs.- Knogg--\Ve were married twen 
v years aeq-today: Just fancy I 
;. l&h'ee-' . 1,-rtylv. wish It was. 




._ r 



ja / Human Body 

TifisSiSfejS^i normal human >~u 3 u 1 i 
contains' from-'one gallon to one a|fir 

i a fourth or one and a half gallons of 
blood. , 



plus of foodstuffs isito : s]hip our farin 
I products abroad. This, in the judg- 
ment of the Secretary, would be in- 
finitely" prefer"ble to the | present arti- 
ficial -method of restriction. But to 
ship iur goods abroad \^e should have 
first to lower tariffs ant' admit for- 
eign goods so that [foreign countries 
might in turn buy puri"surplus farm 
commodities. This is obiviously the 
path of. intelligence; but! tariffs can- 
not be lowered too quickly, and until 
the adjustment between I export and 
rmportiis better we [must continue to 
hold down farm' {production. -Mr. 
WallaceWbelieves that unless, we c«n 
reduce ojur tariffs and; iship surplus 
productsVabroad', wej niay have to 're- 
tire pertttanently 40l000,000 to ' 60,- 
800,000 '-^cres of productive land. ": ; 
•'l Sharp^ihqniry into the finances" of 
the AAA reveals that about $278^000; 
000 haalbeen paid - fanaers . inii'tfi 
ige reitaftl and b« 
. jOf this Sount^. %'. 

J06 has|already beep, returne. 

»(f^Jverngient— aml^friore will . 
received— trough the professing tai-- 
es levied by'CongTess to carry on tie 






Ibij Gzusj^ence 



j-f&u/T+forzn-e 



Olheie's iridfe to Mother's crazy-quilt 

Thwi careless eyes can see;- 
Nobody else could understand 
-The charm it holds for mel y 

- When she points out the blocks that came 

Prom suits I used to wear, 
It brings back joyful memories 
That-\ye alone can share! 

Here's tenderness and sentiment, 

There's beauty and romance 
In every scrap of cost she use4 

And every patch of pants; 
And every thread is intertwined 

Wijfrnappmess and cheer— 
Because,. toils, these memories/ 

AwWSy.veryilearJ 



"^s: 




_u 




gyfeiyi^^Hj: 



jj&sfe, :*■=»;&:<;. 



i 

l 

t 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



j^,-i 



sa - 





fffifriramff"-™"—— ~- 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS 

Pennington County Board 




ffflSP SiVS& JAiffi gpBtiM, mm Slvia pALLi, MftftflfoS ^AX^Sa&iy,?lul^,26,.i^ 



July flth, 19S4. 



Pursuant to law the board of County 
Commissioners met at the Office of Coun- 
ty Auditor,, i Monday, July 9th, 1934 at 
10:00 o'clock A.- M. 

Members Present: Lee Kinghorn, Roy 
Ness and Mandt. ' 

Members Absent: None. 

The minutes ofuthe meeting- of Junt 
12th. 1934 were approved as read. 

A delegation "from the Pennlngtor 
County Fair, Board appeared before thi 
board requesting an appropriation ot 
$400.00 to the Fair Board for conduct- 
ing the 1934 County Fair. ^"«"« 

Commissioner Ness' offered the' follow 
ing resolution and moved its adontion- 

'•BE IT RESOLVED that the sum o 
% 00 -°? % be £ by ^Propriated ou? of the 
County Revalue Fund to the PenninKto- 
County Agricultural Society to defray 
expense of ;the County Fair for v«r 
1934, and auditor Is hereb^ aShorS 
srme.» reCte 1 t0 ' dlUW arrant covSfn ( 

Motion for. adoption of the foreeoine 
resolution .was seconded by ComnSm* 
er KIn&horn and -carried. *-""■""""""" 

Commissioner Lee moved tfeat J. A 
Erickson be, .appointed County Hlghw. 
Engineer for, term expiring- Dec 31st 193 
at same salary as now in force. Motion 
■seconded by Comissioner Ness and car- 
ried. ; 

County Highway Engineer J.; A 
fc.r!ckson presented surety bond In' th 
sum of $3,000.00 with National Surety 
Company as surety. Commissioner Roa 
moved that ! the bond be approved am 
placed on record. Motion seconded by 
Commissioner Mandt and carried 

Application of Carl Elg of Star Town- 
ship for On-sale Beer License was read 
Commissioner Ness moved that applica 
tlon be approved and License granted 
Motion seconded by Commissioner Let 
and carried.;' 

Commissioner Ness moved that Chair- 
man of County Board and County Audi 
tor be authorized and instructed to exe 
cute Lease in name of County to Beah 
and Enger for part of Caunty Shed foi 
storage purposes. Motion seconded b; 
Commissioner Roy and carried. , 

Tre matter of repairing roof of Coun- 
ty Machinery Shed -which was damages- 
by hail storm was discussed. Commis- 
sioner Ness and Roy were appointed a 
committee to arrange for the necessary 
repairs to roof. \ 

Application for admittance to Univer- 
sity Hospital of Mrs. O. S. Bakke was 
approved. Commissioner Ness moved that 
Transportation be allowed to Mrs. 
Bakke to University Hospital at Minnea- 
polis and Auditor be authorized to Issue 
his warrant: for Railroad Fare to Min- 
neapolis in favor of Mrs. Bakke when 
admitted to Hospltf*. Motion seconded 
by Commissioner .Lee and carried. i 

The following applications for abate- 
ment and settlement of accumulated 
taxes were approved and' recommended 
to Tax Commission for allowance: 

Hugho Pearson Black River 

R. J. Bohlen Thief River Falls 

John Morgan Thief River Falls . 

Ada Johnson Thief River Falls 

Physicians Hospital Thief River Falls 

Claude Engelstad Thief River Falls 

Johanna Nelson Thief River Falls 

Louise Korupp Thief River Falls 

The. following bills were read, audited 
and allowed: 

REVENUE | 

Thief River Falls Times 

Printing and Supplies S 36.25 

Poucuer Ptg. & l^iuio Co. 

Filing CaDinet, Clerk of Court .. 87.00 
Poucuer Ptg. &. Litho Co. j 

Office Supplies ; 2.74 

Free Press Co. i 

Legal Blanks & Supplies 15.15 

Hamilton's 

Supplies for Poor Relief Office .. 21.20 
Security Blank Book- Co. . i 

, Blanks and Supplies 47.09 

Japs Olson Co. 

Legal Blanks Probate Judge .... j 9.34 
Miller Davis Co. 

Precinct Election Supplies 221.65 

Fritz Cross Co. - j 

Office Supplies ; 2.84 

L C. Smith and Corona Co. 

Rental Typewriter 8.00 

A. C. Matheson. 

Mileage Supt. of Schools 12.90 

Paul Roy, Per Diem & Mileage i 

County Canvassing Board ,9.20 

Tobias Stone, Per Diem & Mileage ; 

County Canvasing Board \i 

A. G. Hallstrom, Per Diem & Mile- 
age County Canvassing Board . . 13.20 
Mary Prestuo, Per Diem Se Mileage : 

County Canvassing Board \ 6.00 

The Missouri Kansas Chemical Co. I 

Supp.te? Janitw 21.25 

,Mtrti:a.-3ri.atlipaon ! 

1 Expense Co. School Play Day ... '■ < 
1 Nortnwestern Sanitary Supply Co. j 

Supp. 1 . Janitor : : 5.50 

Thief R./er Falls Times, Printing \ 

& Supplies Poor Relief Office ... 22.75 
Thief River Falls Times 

Tax advertisement 17- 

Thief River Falls Times 

State Ballots & Legal Notice 193.10 

Ed. Lee - ■ j 

Plumbing repairs - — >l 

Forum Publishing Co. 

County Ballots, etc 180.03 

Geo. Werstlein 

Insurance Premium 20.80 

St. Hllaire Spectator 

Supplies Treasurer i . . 36.6P 

F. D. Lorentson . 

Recording Pees | . . 26.25 

W. O. Long, | Hauling Grasshopper ; 

Bait from Gand Forks 95 85 

R. M. Douglass; Cash advanced fori 

unloading Grasshopper Bait 3 00 

O. L. Ihle | / 

Expense Sheriff 65 97 

Paul Roy, Mileage to meeting and : 

signing Warrants 3 20 

O. M. Mandt 

Mileage to| meeting . 5.20 



5.20 

ZLK 

15.70 
LS.7U 
19.00 

78.65 



O. G. Lee 

Mileage to. meeting 

COUNTY AID ROAD 

.'aul Roy, Committee Work 

j. M. Mandt, Committee Work .... 

J. G. l^ee, Committee WorK 

-uidrew Ness, Committee Work . . . 

.. A. Erickson, Mileage County 

Engineer 

COUNTY BONDS & INTEREST 

-ity of Thief River Falls. 1934 '". 
raving} Assessment 217.26 

KOAD £ BRIDGE 

-iffany Grease Co. - c 
Grease for Traxtors 25.52 

-. A. foUS Oil CO. 

Ous ior rau-Ois 1.5G 

Electric Welding Co. 

t A\ciju.ii's Lor iratrois 3.50 

• ue Daiden Agency 

Mental., of ouiiaing ;,. 30.00 

.v-m. H. Zlegler Co. 

Tires for Patrols ' -, . 52.96 

iVm. H. Ziegler Co. 

j.huci liiaaes 89.2S 

• *"ne Texas Co. 

uaa ior Pairols 94J.6 

JItles Service Oil Co. 

lius ior' .ratrois ^ 43.92 

.mite Eagle Oil Corp. 

Gas tor Patrols 57.35 

standard Oil Co'. 

_Gas for Patrols 124.07 

,»Ues Service Oil Co. 

Gas for Patrols 3.20 

Sanson's Garage 

. Repairs on Patrols 13.10 

.^ortnern Woodworks Co. 

StaKes for Engineer 27.1 

/. A. Erickson 

■ Mileage County Engineer' ... 2L35 

POOR. FUND 
3. K. Sevro, Transportation Tillle 

Slmonson from Fergus 6.00 

■Physicians Hospital, 

Hospital' care Poor 47.50 

Thief River Co-op Creamery stor- 

, age surplus products 10.00 

vVaahburn Memorial Orphan. Asy- , 

mm, Care Ralph Thews 10.00 

Jnlverslty Hospital i '■ 

- RR Fare Hagen & Roose ' 13.21 

,. K. Dahle 

Lodging Bueregard family 2.00 

H. N. Rhddegaard Co. 

Supplies Poor House ...< 48.63 

City of Thief River Falls 

Electric Lights Poor house 18.53 

Alfred M. Johnson 

Care Perry Voldness May 10.00 

Adolph Solberg, rent K. K. jNaper . 15.00 
St. Lukes Hospital 

Hospital care poor ^ 29.00 

St. Lukes Hospital 

Hospital care poor >. 154.0F 

Dr. A. W. Swedenberg, 

Glasses for Alice Newell 12.00 

Bernt Johnson, Care Erlck Kline . . 10.00 
Bratrud Clinic 

Professional Service Ptuar ■ 66.50 

Bratrud Clinic ' 

Professional Service Poor 118.20 

J. C. Penny Co. Clothirig for I nm ate 

Poor House .: 3.99 

Floyd Confield, Unloading & .hand- 
ling Surplus Four 15.00 

T. R. Falls Seed House 

Supplies For Hcuue 9-20 

Hartz Stores 

Supplies Jno. HjeMe ■ 2.00 

O'Hara Fuel and Ice Co. 

Coal for poor House - — . 3.38 

Dr. O. G. Lynde 

Professional service Mrs. Hjelle. 40-00 
Cities Service Oil Co. 

Gas for plowing gardens - — 2.04 

Palmer Efteland 

Rent Mrs. Cavansaugh .+. . -80- 

Arthur Stru'cy, \ 

Hay for Christ N lessen -•.- 7.50 

Nels Syverson 

Sawing Wood for Poor ■ 2.25 

J. C. Penny Co. „„, 

Clothing for Math Slmonson 2.74 

Minn. School for Feeble Minded 

Care of County Wards 320.00 

Minn. Colony Epileptics 

Care County Wards 63.17 

J. S. Kinney 

Core of Mary Kinney (blind) ... 7.50 
Alfred M. Johnson 

Care " Perry Voldness„ June ■. 10.00 

Strand Transfer Co. 

Moving Hornseth & Noel 10,00 

Mike. Welch 

Repairing . Dahlquist EUdg 6.00 

Mrs. Walter Rosen 

Care Florence Fountains . 15.00 

The following list of Qualified voters 
In the county were selected for ri'etit 
Jury service to replace yurors used at the 
Spring Term of District Court: 

Name Township 

Hans Fjeld, -..•-.-■ Stfar 

James Ramsey Hlghlandl &g 

E. K. Rime .- fc HIghlandUtg 

Mrs. B. Hruby •......-.■ SttVr 

Olaf Kcmpellen _, Nort.i 

Pete Fabrick * Thief River Falki 

Algot Johnson _- ThLef River Falls' 

Mrs. O. F. Halldln ...i. Thief River Falls 

Charley Evenson .. Thief River Falls 

Helmer Ostrom v . Thief River Falls 

Arthur Lufkin , . . Thief River" Fails 

Jesse LaBree ......... ThleC River Falls 

Mrs. Clarence Roose - River Falls 

S. N. Olson ..-*., Bray 

Ed. Rosette i : .'. River Falls 

Bill Knight Thief River Falls 

Mrs. Louis Chef ney . . Thief Elver Falls 
Albert Poppeniaagen . . Thief River Falls 

Oscar Brekke Thief River Falls 

Nils Erlcksou Thief BJver Falls 

John Olson /...■ Thief River Falls 

Mrs. John J'aranson . . ' Thief River . Falls 

Mrs. Clair O* Sara Thief River Falls 

Mrs. Nils Severson Thief IRiver Falls 

Mrs. Joe Zavrold ...... Thief 3Uver Falls 

Ole S. Brieland Kratka 

J. H. Hardlrty Smile; 

Knute Ystes.und * Rocksbury 

David Hauijen "Wyandotte 

O. B. GunQerson Rocksbury 

The Auditor-Treasurer's report In 
funds was presented to the Board and 
read: 



ces remaining teethe credit ot each fund are as ioUowh: 

^ '%-. - 1 ; > : ^ ;.,. •£ .«■"■ 

F-M-N Dt-S -■. ,-***■< -• * -r. tV 
PootfiFuiad .j. -4. -V '■'• .'; ■;.- ■?' 
County Seven ue Eund.:7»i ' , ^ ;' c 
Road .arS Bridge : W.-" jti '~- ■ '• 
Ditch^Ftad " *- ^j .; 
Incidental.: Fund - -.** » } 
Sanitoriuxa Fund ' ■ ' •£ '*, 
County Bonds and Interest 
Slttk£ng Vund ; ? -4. 
ISgw- Enforcement' •'■'■ 
Coiihty *A,id Road: "' --• --■ > — »- 

"■TiieXoHowing^is a : -Maltraent of accounts remaining unpaid dt 



**0 

Amount a fe^ U 
Debit " Credl 
30,783.60 U.632.SH' 
16.61B.16 17^66.S8L_... 
112370.46 19,743.WJ8*,826.47 
30^74.16 40426.825!?;* 
1,077.64 1400.00' iK; 
1317.67 3,6O4J0i?':: 
2,678.93 6,848.7BT<i) 
1,682.62 
96.00 172.45., 
36^63.77 14.4U.79; 2til51.3S 

contracts, al- 



I 



iM jtuaeaageasam 



Balancwi; 



740.22 

9,761.67 
22.36 
1,786.5b 
4,169.82 
1,682.62 
' 76.46 



Atn't of >Am*t. 
CoDtractB''^Patd 



3303^6!.t:'Mone .1,257.50 
l,257.50.i5}^"> ne 1,267^0 



rea"dyjen&fced lnto~by the; Board: 
0)OflJT'BA.PT' -- ?* i 

Haagetoon &l:Tramley^tGradlRg); "'■- , ; " 
Ose^Brbthsr ^Grading)* -<:•'■- . u %•.. y 
Clifford jHedeen tGravelllng)? ' : - 

-.. £ t* . l!= ^. • Respectively submitted, 

v J - -s'% *;.*= - --'- -H. L- Fowler, 

- 1 - j?-*.. '■-•- ;•»'.' : County Auditor. ^'T- ;r 

Cammissioner Lee ifwed that-.the auditor's Statement to Soar« be approved 
and^fileo^ Motion seconded by. Commissioner Roy and carried. ^i^f, k - t J ^ : 

.'Commissioner Mandt moved that consideration of the Budget&ind Taat Levi 
for' year f 1934 be postponeu until aster board of EquolizaUon iSw jaet, and' tha. 
County Board adjourn funtU VVednesaay, July, 18th, l«34 at lUiC^g'clock AM. Mo- 
tion aecoided by Commissioner and carried. . ^■.■~ i 
"-t '* H. W. Kinghorn, \ -.- -."-. •■ I 

:. Chairman Coun,ty^ Board. 
Attest:^ : ■'■'*':: '. -''■^i-i'- : 

H. L.' Fowler. -v v - r£ -:■$ j 
-jCounty Auditor. "- !^" T '_M , ..' 

Pursuant to adjournment the Board 
of County Commissioners met at the 
office' of County Auditor Wednesday, 
July 18th, 1934 at 10:00- A. M-, with all 
members present. 

•The. Board proceeded' to consider ap- 
plications for old age 'Pensions and con- 
sidered all applications filed to date. 

Commissioner Roy offered the follow- 
ing resolution and moved its adoption: 

"WHEREAS the Legislature has en- 
actedTa* Jaw making It mandatory for 
all counties to establish, an ..Old Age 
Pension*. System and pay .pensions to re- 
sidents, of the County ior 16. yearn who 
are seventy years of -age ox older, 

"BE "IT RESOLVED that, the pen- 
sions to be paid by Pennington County 
be set at the sum of *6.00 per month 
to each person eligible, ■ - 

"BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that 
the -pensions are not to be considered as 
poor relief or will not exclude needy 
persons ' from securing poor relief from 
public funds, but that rec Plents oa 
pension shall be required to give 'County 
Trust deed on real property held by 

"'"BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that 
payments of pensions shall begin wltn 
month of"' January. 1935." 

Motion for adoption of the foregoing 
resolution was seconded by Commission- 
er Lee and. upon roll call the following 
Commissioners Voted Aye: Lee, King- 
horn, Rov -and Mandt. Those voting 
Nay were: Ness. *»„„„ 

Commissioner Ness offered the follow- 
ing resolution and moved its adoption: 

"BE IT RESOLVED that the sum of 
£500 00 is heresy appropriated out of the 
County Revenue Fund to the Incidental 
Fund and the Auditor is authorized to 
make the . transfer on Books." 

Motion for adoption of the foregoing 
resolution was seconded by Commission- 
er Roy and carried. 




Commissioner Kinghorn offered' ' the 
following resolution andvmoved itsfaddp- 
tion: ■".',-! A . t .^. 

WHEREAS Bridge Street In the 'City 
of Thief River' Falls lampw being used 
as Trunk Highway No. *33 . through the 
City to connect with v Trunk Highway 
No. 32 until new Bridge i over Red Lake 
River Is completed, and'- IT 

"WHEREAS traffic over this street 
has become very heavy due to the fact 
that It Is used for Trunk) Highway pur- 
poses and the Tarvia Treatment given 
this street in the City last year Is "getr 
ting In bad condition,'. >i ■'..»■'■' 

"BE IT RESOLVED' tiat this County 
Board respectfully (request the /-State 
Highway Department : to give this'. por- 
tion of the road on Bridge Street in 
Thief River Falls extending from end of 
paving to City Limits', anbther treatment 
of tarvia while their crew Is- repairing 
the bituminous treatment on Trunk High- 
way No. 32 from Thief jRiver Falls to 
Holt." ! " ' 

Motion for adoption of the foregoing 
resolution was' seconded by Commission- 
er Mandt and carried: ; j 

Commissioner Lee ; offered the follow- 
ing resolution and moved its adoption: 
"BE IT RESOLVED that the follow- 
ing special question jbe submitted to the 
voters of Pennington County at the next 
General Election to be held in November 
1934: "SHALL PENNINGTON COUN- 
TY ADOPT THE ' TOWNSHIP SYS- 
TEM OF CARING FORj POOR." 

Motion fgr adoption of the foregoing 
resolution was seconded by Commission- 
er Mandt and carried. \ 

Commissioner Ness moved that the 
Board meet as" a committee on roads on 
Friday, July 13th, to inspect C. A. Roads 
Nos. 13, 2 hnd 24. ; j 

Motion seconded by Commissioner Lee 
and carried. 



TO THE HONORABLE COUNTY BOARD . ; 

| Pennington County Minnesota' I «i / 

GENTLEMEN: ' _J, ' 

in the T1 Treisu?y Wi o D f tfe h > SS^ U i£^^ X ^^S U ^ t A 0t W *«U^ 
the amount belonging to each particular fund- * 1St *** ** July ™H l > wltn 

Cash in Office ! - 

Deposited in Banks i * JiVk 27 _ 

i 37,649.91 ?10*^,62L78 



Taxes & Penalties .. 
Mortgage Registry Tax ' 

County Revenue Fund ' 

Incidental Funds ,' ; 

Law Enforcement Fund " 

Poor Fund ...... 

Road & ; Bridge Fund " " ' 

County Aid Road Fund ' ''■ 
Current | School Fund 

Wolf Bounty .""*■* 

County Bond & Interest Fund 

Sinking i fund ■■ i 

State Revenue & School Fund 
State Lands & Interests Fund I 

State Loans 

Teachers Insurance 
School Districts 



• - .$ .24,382.37 

84.15 

• *. 1,276.14 

28.12 
76.45 
.... 8,634.16 OD 

2,018.73 

2,507.67 OD 

2,912.47 

. 316.00 OD 

4A69.82 

1,682.62 

■ . . . 12,749.20 

620.46 

... 12,677.86 

540.30 



Retirement Fund ..'.'.'.';".".' 

Town, City & Villages' " '. '.""* " •" H'253.97 

Sanltorium Fund .. ' - ''- 20,582.08 

Ditch Fund ".'.".*.'.'.' ' " .* • *- 1.780.63 

Refunding Account ... . '* -' 9,7 5 L 5Z 

I ?.. 93.33 OD 

Total ;,. 



r 



We certify that the above statement Is 
Dated this 1st day of July AD 1934. 



true &'correci: 



5?i02,62L78 



Commissioner Ness : 
filed. Motion [seconded b 



S'ohn Gulllngflriii, 
-. ' County " - 'XTeasurer, 

1 . .- H. L. Fowler, 

M^o^S-?™. -P- - ™ Zl* an, 



AUDITOR'S STATEMENT To COONTV BOABn 

TO THE HONORABLE COUNTY i BOARD ' """" 

Pennington County, Minnesota. ' ' 

GENTLEMEN: j , , . 



i 



amounrt «of Taxes 



onnty PurpoJS' llr^cSr^gg t^o'^ ^"•'W T 
portioned to date, and the balances uncollected; toKeth?r"£w., C ?l !e<:, ' ,a .i a ? d a t 
balance remalnlne to the credit of each countv Ai„ S™, ?E wi . th tb 5 »<"! ,al <!ash 
on the 30th day of June 1934. 



FUNDS 

County Revenue Fund 
, Poor Fund 
■■: Road- & Bridge fi v 
- ^DlfW Fund «** 
».iSailiorlma„,Fund 
-+iJ0«nty -^in^Sfi& Interest 



Amonnt Levied 

| for 
Current Year 
* 32,2«.02 
i 30,002.39 
■ 35.994.89 
i 23.S21.14 
j 4,394.60 
; 12.024.94 



county euuaat the'eiose „? &.\bS.taS. 



Amount CoUected 

' and 

Apportioned ' 

9 U.696.10 

- 11,441.66 

,13,763.27 

■ 6.15L22 

1<712.U 

. ' , 4*697.48 



. 'Cna'oUected 

.land 
^ ftaaippotrtioned. 

4 201647.92 

18V660.84 

221231.62 . 

"■ 17W69.9? * 

2JS82.SM 

, r 7,427.40 



-BUDGET YEAR 1S34. 
TO THE HONORABLE COUNTY BOARD: 

Pennington County, Minnesota, 
Gentlemen: p . r 

I herewith submit statement of expenditures from County Funds for the 1933 
together with estimate of the antlcip^teu expenditures tor year -1934 ior your m " 
"formation and guidance in adoption ouaget and makin g Tax Levy j^or year 1S34. 

COUNTY REVENUE: " " ■ \ _ M t" 

Expenditures 
1933 | 

Salaries and Clerk Hire • ¥14,o63.86 

Travelling Expenses ^'SS 

District Court — Grand Jury Jt- SS 

District Court — Petit Jury L800.20 

District Court — Witnesses L^l'it 

District Court — Miscellaneous 37Q.6SJ 

Municipal Court Expense Pu"?3 

Pranate Court Expense ™ .13 

JuvenUle Court Expense rf? , '„ 

Coroners Court Expense .' - oilJTi 

Fees 436,05 



Meeting 



Assessor's 
- Fuel 

Maintenance Court House and ' Jail 
Repairs Court. House and Jail - l .... 
Books, Stationery and ' Supplies ..'.'. 

Printing and Publishing 

Repairs to Equipment 

Appropriations 

Reporting Births and Deaths 

Board of Prisoners 

Insurance • • • 

Agriculture Extension Service * 

Incidental Expense 

Election Expense 

Miscellaneous 



128.40 

LH37 .86. 

-113:91 

Z15.92 . 

2,y23.12 

2,169.86 

73.20 

90O.OO 

129.00 

351.70 

3&8.08 

1,318.6* 

1,133.47 

976.40 

^01.36 



Anticipated 

Sl5,0w0.00 

C00.U0 

126.UO 

2,000.00 

aoo.uo 

600.00 
l*b.uQ 
400.00 
175.01) 
2OU.0O 
4o0.U0 
lio.uO 
800.00 
125.00 
175.00 

1.800.0U 

- 100.00 

LiOU.OJ 

125.00 

3o0.00 

j 45U.00 

1,300.00 

■ 1.750.U0 

1,0U0.UU 

aou.oo 



Total 

POOR FUND: 

Mothers Pension 

Old Age Pension 

Car.e oc Poor and Indigent 

Aid to Tcwnsnips 

Interest ou Bonus 

Total 

iROAD AND BRIDGE: 



. .? sJsSO.OO 
iNone 
.. 22,316.78 
.. 8,017.99. 
. . liliS.OO 



$31,675.00 

$ 4,000.00 
S.oOiJ.OO 

. 10,000.00 
None 
l.Lio.00 



. . $35,409.72 $23025.00 



Current Expense '. $29,892.49 " 

Bonds and Interest Payable 1934 19,648.64 

Ketli-e Oustanulng Warrants ■ 10,v0u.ub 



$30,000.00 
18,500.00 
L:,0OU.UU 



EdJfArvesoh, Hickory . . ; 

Kn,ut' Hanson .Hickory 

Henry' Hanson, Hickory 

Gilbert -jHtanson, Hickoi-y . . . 
Haiydr^Haugen, Hickory . . . 
Henry Hulyorson, HicKory . . 

John Jasduzk, HicKory 

John : Mcstrom, Hickory . . . 

Vrank Savage, Htc.cu*y 

Harold atenvlck, Hickory ... 

Thap. Torgerson, Hickory 

Sadie Bennett, Kratka 

Frank Pueips,' Kratiia ....... 

Fred E. Brown. Mayfield . . . 

Martin Hoas, Mayfield 

Win. Jesperson, Maytlcld . . . 
Arthur Skallet, Mayfield ... 
Adolph Solberg, Mayfield ... 

Ero.il Singer,- Mayheid 

Louis Singer, Mayfield 

T. -H. BJevke, North . .' 

Courtice r'Escflelby. North . . . 

- RV M. Jorde,: North ■. .- 

Julius MpasestadVT Norden . . . 

.'A. " D. Sandry,.^ Norden 

Geo. Slmonson t 'Norden . . . 

Ross Cronkhlte,' Numedal 4.79 

M; H. Herron, Polk Centre 8.47 

Grace LaCoursiers, Polk Centre 4.83 

F.L: St; John, Polk Centre 2.83 

Arthur St- :%Tohn, Polk Centre 2.70 

Gurider Erickson, Rocksbury 4.34 

H. -W. Mehrkins, Rocksbury 14.46 

Rupert Swanson, Rocksbury 5.19 

Jim Tobln,'- Rocksbury 1.27 

Martin M. Anderson, Reiner 3.08 

Verner McMahon, Reiner 81 

Carl Alberg. ; River Fa(ls 5.43 

Robert Stephens, River Falls v 8.68 

Floyd Sumpter, River Falls 3.18 

T.VJ-. Sumpter, River Falls 10.60 

Will. K3appenbflck, Sanders 7.68 

Fred Meyers, Sanders . - 11.30 

Aug. Swenson, Sanders 4.60 

C. -S. Swenson, Sanders 1.84 

O. K. Sevre, Sanders 19.18 ' 

Berger '-Anton'soh, Smiley 4ji6^ 

Martin Carlson, Smiley L5T 

Harry Cousins, Smiley ; 11.18 

Bert Roisland, Smiley 11.39 

B. J. Baker, Silverton 14.51 

Nick Baker. Silverton 5.17 

Frank Burdlck, Silverton 5.21 

Fred Burdick, Silverton 9.53 

H. A. Heggesteun, Silverton 3.20 

P. A. Van Wold, Silverton U.16 

Slg Void, Silverton 4.94 

Pete Kolstrand, Stai - G.An 

Ole K. Lien, Star 1.68 

Glennle . Lien, Star l-"^ 

Wm. Myers, Star 10.65 

Harry Brennen, Wyandotte ix.-±t( 

Frank Bruggerman, Wyandotte 3.26 

Alfred Helgeson, Wyandotte 1.80 

Math Rausch, Wyandotte' ; 8.55 t 

Alfred Anderson, vll. Goodridge 23.50 

J. A. Johnson, Vil. Goodridge 17.94 

Leonard Johnson, vll. Goodridge 1-92 

C. Nyhus, vll. Goodridge :'. 3.84 

M. J. Stephenson, vil. Goodridge 18.37 

M. G. Thorson, vil. Goodridge 10.25 

Mrs. Agnes Tollefson, Vil. Goodridge 14.10 

Mrs. Amu. Olson, St. Hllaire - 2.49 

Z. C. Plcard, St. Hllaire 3.40 

Mrs. H. Bergstrom, Thief River Falls 3.37 

Mrs. E. O. Boe Estate, Thief River Falls 7.07 

Alfred Bredeson, Thief River Falls 9017 

C .J. Bugge, Thief River Falls 74 

City Dairy Co. Inc., Thief River Falls 63.6o 

Geo. E. Commons, Thief River Falls 3.06 

Mrs. G. F. Dalton, Thief River Falls G-23 

Frank Dudley, Thief River Falls 1G.<7 

Mrs. Thresa B. Fuller, Thief River Falls 4.11 

L. L. Fuan, Thief River Falls 4.23 

General Electric- Co. Thief River Falls 8.12 

F F Haynes Estate, Thief River Falls 4.8o 

Mrs. O. C. Hanson, Thief River Falls 0.SG 

Hanah Halmgren,. Thief River Falls o-38 

Tonie Hornseth, Thief River Falls 6.8t> 

Emmett Israelson, Thief River Falls loo 

Mrs Alfred M. Johnson, Thief River Falls 4.7o 

W. K. Knight, Thief River Falls 3.38 

Mrs. Ed. Larson, Thief River Falls 3.o9 

Mrs. Mathilda Majores, Thief River Falls a.27 

H. O. Melby, Thief River Falls 24.00 

Mrs. Joe Novak, Thief River Falls 9a 

Knute Nelson Estate, Thief River Falls 10.34 

Mrs. Christina Ohm, Thief River Falls 10.87 

Mrs. Carl Olson, Thief River Falls ..: 1-48 

I. Pederson,' Thief River Falls 4.33 

J. A. Ralston, Thief River Ralls 10.13 

Red Lake Ice & Fuel Co. Thief River Falls 41.70 

W. S. RIsberg, Thief River Fails 2.6-1 

St. Lukes Hosoltal Assn., Thief River Falls ...211.00 

Thief River Motor Co., Thief River Falls 14.30 

The Burg Co., Thief River Falls 153.19 

That the following Is a correct list of the personal" property taxes 
County for said- year which said Board are Satisfied cannot be Collected, and so 
cancelleoOby said board, towlt: v 

Peter F\ Meyers, _ Bray 5.9G 

Said' KaVrle, Deer Park 2.02 

A. O. Aubol, Hlghlandlng 10.99 

Bennle Hanson, Hlghlandlng l.Oo 

Andrew O. Johnson, Hlghlandlng 19 

Warren' Lewis, Hlghlandlng v 1-83 

Emil Zavoral. Hickory 4.7o 

Ole Thompson, Kratka 2.S0 

H. W. Beurgard, Polk Centre 1-02 

John Engelbart, Rocksbury 1.03 

Olaf Loyland, Star 1.33 

Lawrence Wells, S f .«r ">- 

Mrs. Agnes ' Evenson, Wyandotte 1 2.35 

Carl Johnson, Goodridge Village 80 

N. R. Hage, St. Hllaire GS 

Ole Nash, St. Hllaire- ' 2.60 

Ole R. Brooten, Thief River Falls 2.11 

Joe Dostal, Thief River Falls 74 

Oscar Williams. Thief River Falls 1.16 

Commissioner Ness moved that the board adjourn until Tuesday, August 14th 
1934 at 10:00 O'clock A M. Motion seconded by Commissioner Lee and carried. 

H.W. Kinghorn, 

Chairman County Board. . 

Attest: 

H, L. Fowler 

County Auditor. 



.70 


6.58 


1.86 


21.95 


.69 


6.17 


4.07 


51.87 


.93 


9.48 


1.33 


' 14.86 


1.15 


12.36 ' 


.97 


9.93 


.59 


4.82 


.57 


4.58 


.61 


5.06 


.59 


4.82 


.89 


8.91 


.50 


3.63 


.68 


6.02 


.67 


4.53 


.43 


2.73 


.34 


8.17 


.64 


6.56 


1.12 


12.03 .. 


.62 


5.23 


.60 


3.67 


.88 


8.74 


.53 


4.01 


.62 


6.41 


.93 


9.40 


.64 


6.47 


.48 


3.31 


.47 


3.17 


.60 


4.94 


1.41 


15.87 


.67 


6.86 


.35 


1.62 


.50 


8.58 


.32 


1.13 


.68 


6.11 


.90 


9.58 


.50 


3.68 


1.09 


1L69 


.So 


8.54 


1.15 


12.45 


.62 


6.22 


.40 


2.24 


1.78 


20.96 


.62 


5.28 


.37 


1.88 


1.14 


12.32 


1.16 


12.55 


1.41 


15.92 


.66 


5.83 


.67 . 


5.88 


1.01 


10.54 


.71 


3.91 


1.14 


12.30 


.65 


6.59 


.80 


7.66 


.38 


2.06 


33 


1.36 


1.10 


11.75 


1.17 


12.65 


.51 


3.77 


.39 


2.19 


.93 


9.48 


2.13 


25.63 


1.68 


19.62 


.40 


•232 


.56 


4.40 


1.72 


20.09 




11.32 


1.38 


15.43 


..45 


2.94 


.52 


3.92 


.52 


3.89 


.82 


7.89 




97.68 




1.05 


4.54 


\.\ 68.19 


.49 


\ 3.56 


.75 


-■ ) 6.98 


1.59 


" 18.36 


.58 


4.69 




4.82 


.90 


9.02 


.li4 


o.49 


.80 


7.66 


,08 


6 06 


.80 


7.66 


.38 


1.96 


.63 


5.38 


.52 


3.90 


.54 


4.13 


.67 


6.94 


2.57 


26.57 


.33 


1.28 


1.08 


11.42 


1.12 


11.99 


.37 


1.85 


.60 


4.93 


1.14 


11.17 


3.59 


45.29 


.46 


3.10 


17.13 


228.13 


1.39 


16.69 


12.51 


165.70 



Total - $5y,541.03 

BO.NDS AND INTEREST: ■ . I "| ■ 

(Interest on Oustandiug Warrants $ 7,302.95 

llBack Apportionment Due Scnoois , 8,uu0.00 



\ Total $1&,302.95 

SANITORIUM FUND: . .j 

: Maintenance of Sanltorium ...% 2,263.-32 



GRAND TOTAL * $144,557.23 



134,700.00 

The foregoing buaget contemplates an expenditure of §134,700.00 (for this year a* 
compared', wltn §l*4,uuf^a expeuueu-uuring me pre/ious ysur, a ruuuctioh of 
$9,Sb7.23. -It proviues xor reaucing tue old rouu and bridge debt Dy retiring 
¥L:,UOO.OO Roaa ana Urluge Houus anu retiring $L:,0OuXM> In oustanulng Road' anu 
Uridge'.Warrants. Aiso ior payment ot »8,00u.00 to Uchool Dtstribt" ior back: ap- 
portionment due them hy reason o£ the penalities on Delinquent: Taxes for'yeur 
1922 \ to 1928 being dlstrluuieu to County Revenue tuml Instead |of 60 percent'to 
School Districts. Of the loregolng budget- $13,500.00 is to oe; uHed .in payment, of 
Interest-- on oid debts. ' ' i . | . 

If ahe foregoing budget Is adopted it would require the following tax levy to 
meet, same: ' i - : . I --■■ 

County Revenue ; J.'.V .'.'. .... % 32,000^)0 

Road and Bridge ■.: -. .- J. ,U'- r 37,000.00 

: Poor Fund ;, '. .v.;>.i 23,000.00 

Bonds and Interest j . ;Ci:.~. .... 14,000.00 

Sanltorium Fund .......... ' ..; i :.;i 4,400.00 



Total. .Levy .;...; 



, .> . . S:H.\\ . . $110,400.00 

I Respuctfully-.'Bubmitted, ' 
! 3 ; T7H. L. Fowler, 

^■■'•jjebunty AndUpr. 



Commlsstoner Ness moved that the Statement ; of Anticipate* 
year 1934- as submited by County Auditor be adopted as the Bun 
Motion seconued by CommissioherTKlnghor and carried. /*:'■- 

Commissioner Roy offered the following resolution and movefl itST adoption:. ; 

"WHEREAS after due. consideration this board has estimated, 'Che 4 expenditures 
<or the year 1934 and- adopted a budget covering same, 

"BE. IT RESOLVED" to meet such expense the following sulfas!. be levied on all 
theTeal and personal. property of Pennington County, for the y£ar- 1934: :' 

County Revenue Fund ....: .' :.n.„±'... $ 32,000.00 

Road' J and Bridge Fund " .....;-.-.. ^, .. 37,000.00 

Poor - Fund ."'.-'. : .-^ 23,000.00 

Bond and Interest Fund ." J i.-.l: 14,000;0Q 

Sanltorium Fund . . '.'.,.;,'. - '..'^.".u-.--.. 4.400.00 

.." Totalt Levy '........ „. '. , '."K ^-". , . $ 110,400.00 

Motion for adoption -of the" foregoing resolution w*s seconded hy" Commissioner 
Mandt and carried. . " ? ...; ; : - 

The Treasurer prsented list of uncollected^ Personal Proprty -Taxes for- Year 
■1934 together with his certificate thereon as requii.*ed by lu-vr. The County B'pard 



auiy "cuusiuered said list'. 61 uncollected taxes anoi caiiuoliaa subii taxes "as tuey 
are satisne.l cannot be collected. _ 

The- following is a correct list of such uncollected nersonal property Taxes In 
said County for year 1934. as so revised by said Board " 
NAME 



DISTRICT TAX 

Glen Mansfield, Bray 29.63 

J. V. Sheep and Wools Co., Bray 6 04 

James Dreeland, Black River 7i26 

Emil Harbot, Black River 212- 

Juno Swanson.- Black River 1 7.72 

John Ells, Clover Leaf .. 2792. 

Steve Skiblckl, CIove^Leaf 14.28' 

OBcar Stageberg, Clover Leaf ?-. ... 10^2 

^red N. Urdahl, Clover Leaf 2L77 

^atie Aiken, Goodridge "■ 6.24 

John O. Bergen, .Goodridge 3.42 

Frank Kusmak, Goodridge 942 

Stephenson and Tiegland, Goodridge 28 98 

Osmund Urdahl, Goodridge '40.33 

Nicolay Urdahi. Goodridge ." 27 94 

Knute Dahle, Hlghlandlng 2514 

Gunder Nestebo, Highlanding 6 65 



PENALTY, ETC. 

"" 2,26 



685b J*?"' H te. h "^?? 



, Overvdia, HQlhlabdlng; .. 
KUjah^el, Sundsdob], -His-blandlng 
Bjorn -Treltback, Hlgnlandlng- .. 



4.70 
8.63 
13.44 JB 




TOTAL, 
32.25 
6.77 
8.09 
2.64 
8.59 
30.40 
15.67 
11.94 
23.76 
6.91 
3.94 
10.43 
31.56 
43.81 
30.43 
27.40 
7.S2 



■***■■ 



1.13 



.34 



.46 
.42 
.31 



said 



2.43 

13.12, 

1.39! 

.46 
2.23 
5.33 
3.27 
1.35 
1-42 
1.61 

.81 
2.79 
1.17 

.93 
3.06 
2.63 
1.05 
1.50 



Summer Ice Skating at Fair 




Winter weather all summer long (s 
trio, novelty that la ^attracting thou- 
tanjfs {(ally to the Germark Black For- 
est' village' in the new World's Fair 

J. ' ' "";' -. r 



at Chicago. Gigantic crowds are flock- 
ing to the new Street of Villages, for 
a "tour of the world" In * alnglt 
day. 



■Qlve us a '<tay once Id a blue moon 
when wVdon\ have to make good, 

"Most pAJns' are nut deadly; they are 
Just pnrt^pf the phenomeuu of grow- 
ing old. :&■,.- 

You m'tA be sure no ancestors of 
yours leftfeu.tXH) In a bunk 100 years 
ago, uncinl^NpL 

Most Jme4 who. discover how to en- 
tertain. themselves, do It because ttbe- 
comes *n ecesaary. 

ng enough to be ex- 
y after you have 




Beefsteak and onions are still good 
for a man as well as health fooda, If 
he doesn't eat too much. 

Once lemonade was so rare that It 
was seldom seen except on circus day 
and the Fourth of July. 

It Is the second spring after a Pres- 
idential election that candidates tor 
the next one begin to bud. 

Remorse Is one of the teachers on 
the faculty of the school run by ex- 
perience. Discretion is another. 

In ^merlca people .thlnlr enougn of 
their nice new traveling bags not to 

.want tnem . plaatMefl vltb.' labels* ( 






DEFECTIVE PAGE 




ess: 



k ■-■T^F\M^i.|M§^t?fi/'t^gSiVBSgiiJii;MiHS^6gA i 



SUNDAY I 

-at the- 

CHURCHES 



COMMUNITY CHURCH 
E. A. Cooke, Pastor 

* ..,,,; 

Sunday, July 2S, Church school at 
9:46 with a good spirit keeping up 
all through ; the summer. Miss Minnie 
Leavitt, superintendent. 

The morning worship will be con- 
ducted at 11 o'clock by Mr. G. H. 
Mayer-Oakes' who will bring the 
message for the day. Let all gather 
and worship together and receive the 
inspiration of this hour. 



| Christian Science Chui'ds] 

m , ; ; I 

Sunday service at 11:00 A. M. Sub- 
ject "Truth." 
. Sunday school at 10:00 A. M. 

Wednesday evening meeting at 
.7:45. _ AVC1 

Reading room open 
from 3 to 5:00 P. M. 

A cordial invitation is extended to 
all. 



GOODRIDGE LUTH. PARISH 
O. U. .b] organ, Pastor 



Oak Park: - 

■services, at 10:30 A. M. ' 

Uonhrmation class on Tuesday at 
9 A.M. , 

uetutihia: 

Une ^uther League meets at the A ; 
Newton home bunaay auernoon. 
,Jt«osenuahl, 'i'orgerson: 

Une .Luther league meets Sunday 
afternoon at the u Tangen home, 



9 A. M, 
Ekelund 



r^W^T?**!*****!* . 



i 



son 'Friday, July 27th at the Slgh-^Q. . 1J < • n? ■•!•■." » » 
rlandlngr«hurbh. : - The confinhents wil] r 01316 Fair 11*10$ Are 

.'read a£tHe ^saine time. :-■'.:. c' ' -' ' ■ ■ 

>■; The \Silvertori Ladies' Aid will . be 

entertained' Friday evening, July 27 

by Mrs.. Adolph Barstad at the Bar- 
'stad home. " 






J SCAND. EVAN. FREE CHURCH 
;|. '* ~ J. O. Jaeobson, Pastor 



M. 



.Sunday school at 10 A. 
Morning worship at 11. 

__^___ Evening service -at 8. 

Gonhrmauon class on"aaturday -at* "->.• ilvangelists Oscar Monsbn arid Olaf 



Erie: 



Services in English at 8 P. M. 
Connrmtaion class on Friday at 9 
A. M. 

The Ladies' Aid will be entertain- 
ed by Mrs. S. Omlid at the church] 
Wednesday, August 1. . •! 



The G9spel Tabernacle- li 

Edw. Ualey, Pastor , 



LO OK LO OK 

Shorty Davidson 

and His Band 



Angle Road Inn : 

Sat. July 28th 



Special meetings will be conducted". 

over the week end by Evangelist B" 

I U Heinze ox Vermillion, S. Dak., as- 

I sisted by his wife and Evangelist H 7 

Wednesday I ^^, ra -, '^ere will be special mai 

' c a " d s ™g™e at all meetings. Meet- 

mg hours lollow: v. .."*"'■: 

.t'riday night. 7:45 P. M. 

faunday morning, 11- A. M '" 

Sunday night, 7:4 5 P. M. -i 

I* TRInFy LUTHERAN CHURCH T 
l r R. M. Fj elstad, Pastor -• | 

There will not be services in our 
church this Sunday.: Services will be 
held the following Sunday, August 
oth, m the Norwegian language at 
10 o'clock A. M. by Pastor 
Sabo. 



' jMorison who have held- meetings here 
curing this week will have their last 
meeting this evening, which will be 
in the Scandinavian- language. 
-" Miss' Esther Lufkin will entertain 
the sewing circle at the church oh 
Friday evening. 

A" daily vacation Bible school wil! 
commence -next Monday morning iri ; 
union - with the Swedish Mission 
Church. Mrs. Nellie Brodin and Miss 
Ruth Turnwall. will teach. 
• Union Young,. People's meeting next 
Tuesday earning-, in the Swedish Mis- 
sion Church;4t,8 o'clock- led by Miss 
Ruby iSolnionsbii. 



Wedding 
Dance 

Highlanding Pavilion 

Friday, July 27 
Good Music 



E. - O. 



AUG. LUTHERAN CHURCH 
H. L. Sjogren, Pastor 



Morning worship at 11:00. 

Evening service at 8:00. 

Mid-week service, Thursday at 8. 

Mrs. O. G. Peterson and Miss Hilda 
i-riekson will entertain the Ladies' 
3^00 ° n day aftern °°u, July 27, at 

I MAVIE LUTHERAN CHURCH *l 
I E. O. Sabo, Pastor 



In the Rostrum i 

Dear Editor::,"*. ' 

- The following is a copy of. the 
Notice, that was sent to the LandO" 
Lakes arid to. the secretary of the 
Local. Creamery right after the- first 
meeting, to sell the creamery had- been 
held. We would' like to have you 
publish this notice, to show what was 
said -in-our notice, and also to show 
how the signers of the notice feel 
about it. 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

r j, ~, '-r • Ju 'y 10 ' 193i 
l^nd O Lakes Creameries, 'Inc. 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, and 
J. M. Theige, . Secy;, 

mS e MH , ' er -' FaUa Creamery. Ass'n., 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Gentlemen: : 

We understand an attempt is.hehi'c 
made to sell and dispose of the 
Creamery builffingl and property of 
the Thief River Falls • Co-operative 
Creamery to the J Land 0' Lakes 



Creameries, 

The undersigned 1 are 
of the Thief. River 



stockholders 
Co-operative 



TeSr|en Jl chuSf h at S fri? S M n an'd ^^,^^« S^S 



Germantown at 



tfie Zion church, 
2:30 P. M. 

The Telemarken Y. P. Society will 
bo entertained by Mrs. O. Hoftdah] 
and Miss Emma Hanson at the J 
Hanson home Sunday, July 29th 

The Highlanding Ladies' Aid 'will 
be entertained by Mrs. Andrew John- 




0p 



emng Special..... 

For Friday and Saturday 



notify you that we 
posed sale of the 
Land O' Lakes. 



object to the pro 
Creamery to .the 



There is no valid and legal Special 
Meeting ^"Sd, for this purpose, as 
required, by law, arid the sale has not 
been properly -authorized. Most of 
the stockholders of the Thief River 
.,Jfi ■ P ea, " er y Association did not 
understand the proposed deal, 
♦w WI i' .* e , forma ' notice to you 
that we shall object to the sale, and 
if necessary shall take legal action 
to stop the proposed sale at this time 
and' shall take such legal 



Awarded Two in \Co. 
Sewing Contest Tues. 

- . ; __j 

. Over a hundred girls attended the 
Pennington County ;] 4-H Sewing 
Achievement Day held; in the Lincoln 
high'schol economics jrooms on Fri- 
day, Julf 20. . ' j ; ■ 
. In the sewing contest, .Elna Scholin 
of the Bray and Sanders 4-H club 
won a trip to the State Fair on her 
sewing exhibit, with. Iris Ayers of the 
.Nordeu club as" alternate. Ina And- 
erson of Siiverton, won first in third 
year sewing and Florence Hansen of 
Rocksbury was second. 1 Florence Huff 
of St. Hilaire won fir^t in first year 
sewirig and Anna Hanson came sec- 
ond. In the thrift exhibits, Mayme 
Hanson of Hazel canie first, with 
Joyce Roese also of Hazel, as alter- 
nate, The three girls winning first 
awards will receive trips to the Junior 
Short Course in St. Paul next June. 
'Thelma'Skaar of: the Norden club 
was awarded the title 'of style queen 
of the style revue,; which is an an- 
nual event in connection with the 
Sewing ; Achievement Day, and was 
awarded a trip to the' State Fair. 
Helen Johnson of River Falls, and 
Eldora Hagenson of RoaSsbury were 
alternates in the revue; The stage 
was decorated as a' garden scene with 
garden furniture, furnished by Oen's 
Mercantile Company, and the back- 
ground panels were furnished by the 
J. C. Penney Company. Mrs. John 
Hanson of St. Hilaire and Miss Bena 
Johnson of Thief River Falls, were 
the judges. .j 

Three classes were held in con- 
nection with Achievement Day, which 
were on clothes pressing, table mari- 
ners, and making wooden buttons. 

Elna Scholin and Thelma Skaat 
will both attend the State Fair ii 
September where they will again en- 
ter state-wide contest:). The other 
winners 'will go to St. Paul riext June 
in recognition if theiri work. H^ 

Ihese Little Pigs {Went to 
Market, And Net 3c Each 



pFPieiAL PROCEEDINGS 

'Pennington Co. Board of Equalization 



M Mtfl ft , 'fttMtti[BS , WK~ A^ ^ I M^ -uf^ jftfli y 




LADIE'S 




BEfcS3EK£3E53SS3S 



I |1 P 



313 No. JNLiin Opposite Chevrolet Garage 



^HSBBBBBERft 





IS CGNTINUEJNGL 

ss op for the 6ig 
County Fair 



at Clearance Prices 



^e may find necessary in order to 
safeguard ihe. rights, of the stock- 
holders pf the Thief River Falls Co- 
operative. Association. 

...:: Yours very truly, ' 
*L. .0 Stenseth 
: ■ Gordon M". Olson'; 
. Frank J. Hardisty 
■-■-■■ E.Grundhaus' . 

- - -Tobias Stene 

— -J . . . F: T. Satre ■ .; 
.- . CarlBeiswinger 

Thanking you, I am, ' ■ " i 

Truly yours 
L. O. Stenseth ' 



Cortland, 111.,— Mrs. j A. Mosback, 
struggling to make a living from the 
farm her husband left 'her, wondered- 
today if it wouldn't have been just 
as well if her 20 little pigs had stay- 
ed at home. j j 
• The little pigs went to market and 
she receive a, check for 68 cents; 
about 3 cents apiece, -j 

The pigs sold at the | height of the 
drouth when the hog - market was 
being flooded, actually. sold for $12.22 
at the. rate of 75 eentsj a hundred- 
weight. . . . ': ! . 

The packing company had to pay 

the government ¥2.25 a hundred 

Steps as pounds, three times ; what it allowed 



Mrs'. Mosback. 

The stockyards in • Chicago took 
$2.80 for use of its pens, scales and 
runways and .55 cents [for .the corn 
the pigs ate. 

-- ; An insurance company collected 
IJV45 to insure them against injury, 
and fire, insurance and [truckers got 

;The commission house claimed ?3 
for the sale and the meat board got 
7 cents. 

The rest^-68 cents- 
Mosback. • 



JVlAt leth, 19S4 

Shirsuant to law the County Board of 

Equalization met at the office of Coun'y 

Auditor Monday, July. 16th, 1934 at 10:00 

o'clock A- M; 

Members Present: Commissioners I^ee, 
King-horn, Hoy, .Ness and Mandt and 
County Auditor Fowler. 

-The Assessments of Moneys and Cre- 
dits as returned by the Local Boards 
of Review were gone over.- Commissioner 
Ness moved that the assessment of Mo- 
neys and Credits as returned by the Lo- 
cal Board of Review over the County be 
approved. Motion seconded by Commis- 
sioner Roy and carried. 

.... UNPLATTED REAL ESTATE 

Commissioner. Roy moved that the Pull 
and true valuation of unplatted real es- 
tate (exclusive of building and improve- 
ment) as returned by the Board of Re- 
view In .the various assessment Districts 
be equalized on the following basis: 

Bray Township 100 per cent Increase 

Black River Town'p 120 per cent Increase 
Clover Leaf Town'p; 20 per cent Increase 
Deer Fark twp. 66 and two-thirds Increase 
GooJrldge Tcwnship. No Change 

Hickory Township 40 per cent Increase 
Highlanding Twp. 75 per cent Incrase 
Kratka Township 125 per cent Increase 
Mayfield Township - 33 1|3 Increase 

Norden Township - 55 per cent Increase 
North Township. . .30 per cent Increase. 
Numedal Township 600 per cent Increase 
Polk Centre Town'p 50 per cent Increase 
Reiner Township 100 per cent , Increase. 
River. Falls Town'p. 60. per cent Increase 
Rocksbury Town'p 10 per cent Increase 
Sanders Township 75 per cent Increase 
Siiverton ^Township 40 per cent Increase 
Smiley* Township 40 per cent Increase 
Star Township 85 per cent Increase 

Wyandotte Twp. 40 per cent Increase 
St. Hilaire Village No change 

City of Thief River Falls No change 
Motion was seconded by Commissioner 
Mandt and carried. 

Commissioner Roy moved that the full 
and ' true valuation -of buildings as 
returned by the Local Board of Review 
In the various assessment districts 
equalized on. the following basis: 
Polk Centre Twp. 20 -per cent Decrease 
North Township • - 20 per cent Increase 
Siiverton Township 20 per cent Increase 
Kratka - Township 20 per cent increase. 
Mayfield Township 20 per cent decrease. 
All other districts. No change. 

-Motion was seconded by Commissioner 
Mandt and carried. 

PLATTED REAL ESTATE 

Commissioner Klnghorn moved ithatj 
the Full and True Valuation of Platted 
Lands (Including all buildings and im- 
provements) In the -village .of Goodrldge 
De Increased 50 per cent. Motion seconded 
by Commissioner -Mandt and Carried. 

Commissioner Roy moved that the as- 
sessment of Platted Real Estate (Includ- 
ing buildings and- Improvements) as re- 
turned by. the' Local Board of Review in 
the Village of St. Htlajre and City of 
Thief River Falls be approved as return- 
ed. Motion seconded by Commissioner 
Ness and carried. " 

PERSONAL PROPERTY 
Commissioner Roy moved that Class C 
(Household goods etc.) as returned by 
the Local Board of Review be approved. 
Motion seconded by Commissioner Lee 
and carried. 



- Commissioner Ness moved that Class 3 
Item 9 Cattle, be equalized over the 
County at the foldwing "average assessed 
valuations: 

.A-Pure bred cattle under 1 .year ? '4.00 

B-Grade cattle under 1 year 2.50 

C-Pure bred cattle 1-year and under 

2 years '. 7.00 

D-Grade cattle 1-year and under 

2 years 5.00 

E-Pure Bred cattle 2-years and 

under 3 years 10.00 

X -Grade cattle 2-years and under 

3 years 7 qq 

°-Pure Bred Cows ....""!!"';■'. 13^00 

M-Grade Cows ... 9 on 

I-Pure Bred Bulls ...■"."";:".";.".* lo.'oo 
J-Grade Bulls ....... JoM 

K-Other Cattle gOO 

Tr££h£?„ „ Sf U conde o; by 'commissioner 
Klngborn and carried. 

Commissioner KInghorn moved that 
?i?%% " em ( 10 . Sheep De equalized over 
the County at the following average as- 
sessed valuation: ■ 

A-Sheep under three months s 50 

B-Sheep Over three months ' 2 00 

Motion was seconded by Commissioner 
Ness and carried. 

Commissioner Ness moved that Class 
3, Item 11 Hogs, be equalized over the 
county at the following average assessed 
valuation: 

A-Hogs under three months ? 1.00 

B-Hogs over three-months 3.00 

Motion was seconded by Commissioner 
KInghorn and carried. 

Commissioner Mandt moved that Class 
3-A-, Item 44 Horses and Mules for agri- 
cultural purposes, be equalized over the ' 
County at the following average assessed 
valuations: 

A-Under 1 year p 3.00 

B-One Tear and under two years 8.00 

C-Two Years and under three years 15.00 
D-Three years and under Sixteen 

years 20.00 

E-Over 16 years ;,.. 8.00 

Motion seconded by Commissioner Roy 
and carried. 

Commissioner Roy moved that the fol- 
lowing ommltted property be added to the 
Personal Property Tax list of Rocksbury: 
J. W. Black, 1 pure bred Stallion, as- 
sessed valuation $100.00.. and Joe King, 
Rocksbury, 1 stallion, assessed valuation 
$50.00. 

Motion seconded by Commissioner Lee ■ 
and carrled- 

Commissioner Roy moved that follow- 
ing ommltted property be added to per- 
sonal property tax list of the Town of 
Black River: 

R. J. McKercher, 1 stallion, assesed val- 
uation §50.00. 

Motion seconded "by Commissioner Lee 
and carried. 

Commissioner Lee moved that all other 
Items of Personal Property be approved 
as returned by the Local Board of Re- 
view In the various -districts. Motion 
seconded ehy Commissioner Mandt and 
carried- / 

Commissioner Ness moved that the 
Board of Equalization adjourn. Motion 
seconded by Commissioner Lee and car- 
ried. \ 

H. "W. KInghorn, 
Chairman. | 
Attest: 

H. L. Fowler, 
County Auditor. 



Legal Notices 



-went to Mrs. 



i WANT: ADS' 

( Forum Want Ads, one c ent a word 

L *%Of SA^p^s Chevrolet co'tch*** 
grood condition. 319 Duluth Ave. No 

- _■ . _ ._'_ It 1 !? 

?± y S? U W4G$ for sale or on 
and timothy. 



"hare: "■'• Mixed wild 



New Shoe Repair^ Stop 
is Opens to Public: Saturday 

Nick Dispensa opened]his new shoe 
repair shop. on. Main avenue on' Satur- 
uay. A great many I pe'ople availed 
^emseWes-'pf "the invitatibmio, inspeta* 
his new and. moderaly equipped shof-'^ 
and were apparently much interested 
in his- demonstration ofj the machin- 
ery; : Mr. Dispensa, announced some 



all or write^Mrs'^SusTe "km W-'jK' s P eei ais on services in his line for Fri- 
'. T.-'R Falls Kidder,- fit., day and .Saturday and wishes to 

.-..■ ' t r°"~'P thank the people of the community 

FOR SALE: 7 acre tract V- mile l 0T the iriendl y reception extende. 
iom'city limit. Improved, residence "